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View Full Version : Pet peeves and misconceptions -- I want to know!



veebug22
May. 11, 2007, 05:58 PM
Okay, so as a jumper rider, there are a few things that sometimes happen when persons normally showing in the hunter/eq ring decide to come over to jumpers (not always, and I understand that's usually the learning curve for jumpers -- did it that way myself). Sometimes they're just dabbling, sometimes they're making the transition into jumpers, and I'm all for that! We're all on a learning curve and make mistakes. But it really frustrates me when I see people enter the jumper ring thinking it's all about going as fast as you can, and if you don't have any rails down, you're golden! Watching rounds that make you hold your breath and hope the rider will be okay, the horse is flat, strung-out, and running, and the turnout looks like the rider has entered jumpers as an excuse to slack off... all of these things add to the misconceptions that many non-jumpers have! I did my time in the hunter and eq ring, but I was lucky to have a trainer that introduced me to jumpers within the framework of precision, power, and good choices. She told me to lay down the course that would increase my horse's confidence, as well as my own, and perhaps most importantly my horse's confidence in me -- height, inside turns, and speed were challenges that came once we could lay down a consistently solid ride we felt good about, ribbons or not.

So my current trainer thinks it will be great for us to get some low-level cross-country/eventing experience under our belt (I agree and am so excited about the learning opportunities involved). What are the things that get YOU about non-eventers coming into the sport? I think my frustration with the riders described above is because they are not putting their horse and his confidence first, nor are they addressing the questions which are great about the jumper ring in a way which is useful and positive. It also makes you a liability for the spectators/ring crew, and for the reputation of jumpers in general (which is why it sucks when riders are able to win at the lower levels because by the grace of God their horse went clean and they were mighty speedy, not because they had a good round). So what do you wish you could tell non-eventers/new eventers? What aggravates you about them? What do they do which contributes to misconceptions about eventing?

The more detail, the better! I don't mean this as a b****-fest, I bring it up because I think it's about getting or missing the point of a discipline and the challenges/choices it presents. Thanks! I can't wait to hear everyone's thoughts.

Spark
May. 11, 2007, 09:00 PM
1) People that overface their horses. Just because you can jump three feet over stadium fences, does NOT mean you're ready for novice cross country. There is a BIG DIFFERENCE, in safety mostly, between fences that come down if you tap them too hard and big ol' logs that ain't gonna move no matter how hard they're hit.

2) People that, like you mentioned in jumpers, think of cross country as the speed phase. Yes, you do HAND gallop between jumps, but you have to collect, raise, and get your horse's attention before each jump, or else you will be in trouble heading to a solid jump dangerously.

3) People who underestimate dressage. Eventing is not just a need for speed. Dressage is vital and wonderful, and especially important for the other two phases of eventing. I love to see people who take it just as seriously as the jumping phases because it IS just as serious.

I'm sure there are more that I'll think of later :)

eqsiu
May. 11, 2007, 10:24 PM
1) People who don't bother to learn the rules and then throw a hissy fit when they're eliminated/DQed on some technicality.

2) People who don't take care of their horses/tack themselves. It's fine to have help, but the ones that sit there and have there parents or groom do everything...Argh!

3) People who can't win graciously.

4) People who can't lose graciously and throw tantrums and blame everything on their horse.

BarbB
May. 11, 2007, 11:01 PM
Generally, except for some silly conversations about colors, I find that most eventers are pretty non-judgemental.
Read the rules. Enter an appropriate level. Present yourself and your horse neat and clean. Ride as well as you can. Don't be afraid to ask if you don't know something. Have fun.
Beer is optional.

Jealoushe
May. 12, 2007, 12:32 PM
Kids who don't appreciate the parents who do so much for them at these shows.

Anyone who ever yanks their horses face off.

bovon
May. 12, 2007, 01:15 PM
1) People that overface their horses. Just because you can jump three feet over stadium fences, does NOT mean you're ready for novice cross country. There is a BIG DIFFERENCE, in safety mostly, between fences that come down if you tap them too hard and big ol' logs that ain't gonna move no matter how hard they're hit.

2) People that, like you mentioned in jumpers, think of cross country as the speed phase. Yes, you do HAND gallop between jumps, but you have to collect, raise, and get your horse's attention before each jump, or else you will be in trouble heading to a solid jump dangerously.

3) People who underestimate dressage. Eventing is not just a need for speed. Dressage is vital and wonderful, and especially important for the other two phases of eventing. I love to see people who take it just as seriously as the jumping phases because it IS just as serious.

I'm sure there are more that I'll think of later :)

I second all of the above and add railbirds from other disciplines who denounce eventers as folks whose horses and riding aren't good enough to excell in just one discipline so they think eventers are wannabees from other disciplines. Those railbirds can kiss my eventing horse's big beautiful brown butt:D when he goes double clean and nails his dressage test..well still working on that dressage stuff but you know what I mean anyway:winkgrin:

deltawave
May. 12, 2007, 01:52 PM
Not reading the rule book. Well, actually that's FINE, but not reading the rule book and then throwing a high-and-mighty whine fest when some stupid mistake you make that's CLEARLY in the rulebook gets you eliminated...that ticks me off, or amuses me highly, depending on whether or not I'm a volunteer having to grit my teeth or just watching you make a fool of yourself.

(I mean the general "you", of course, not referring to anyone here!) :)

Hearing people say they're more than ready for Training or even Prelim because they do the 3'6" equitation or the level 4 jumpers. :rolleyes: Yeah, well, it's DIFFERENT out here among the fields and trees. :lol: You might not think the jumps are big, but I promise you that unless your horse has some eventing or REAL hunting mileage, he's going to be taken aback. Please be safe and humble and SCHOOL XC A FEW TIMES before you declare yourself ready.

If your horse isn't broke to gallop and jump, please train it before you come to an event. More bit and hardware hanging off his face is NOT the answer. :no:

While there are no points for the nicest braid job or the cleanest tack, please don't bring a scroungy, dirty, skinny, hairy, unfit horse to the show! He may be perfectly fit and ready to do his job, but it looks pitiful. And clean your tack, for pity's sake. (this is getting to be a more common gripe every year as I see people bringing skinny, dirty horses to shows, especially local ones)

Mostly my "peeves" are based on the feeling that eventing should be SAFE and FUN for both partners. Much as I joke about not liking bling or neon, I'd MUCH rather see that than any of the above. Keep your ears open, volunteer if you can (and be nice to the volunteers, please!) and make sure you remember that (invited gripe-fest here notwithstanding) eventers are a welcoming, helpful bunch all in all. :yes:

retreadeventer
May. 12, 2007, 02:10 PM
I would like to say that I can usually spot the hunter/jumper person from their position while schooling XC. Their legs are stuck in one immovable place on the horses side while they perch a bit too far up on the pommel in a half seat to be safe. When they are not in a driving position, or in a position to support their horses when they jump down or up in terrain, or across ditches or into water, etc. Then the horse gets a yank, or a spank, or a spurring, for not committing. The horses must be taught and have to be ridden. The primarily h/j rider doesn't ride effectively enough, the position never changes, the horse is expected to clock about as he does in a ring. I'm not being specific, and don't mean to generalize TOTALLY, as many h/j riders myself included learn better more flexible positions on horses that jump XC. That's just the thing I see that sets them apart from the event kids out there schooling. Most of them know how to keep their seats in the saddle to stay on!

GotSpots
May. 12, 2007, 02:23 PM
On the other hand, I think many eventers could learn a thing or two about having a solid leg from the HJ crowd. Swinging legs XC make me batty.

Pet peeves? Petal boots. Matching EVERYTHING. Not petting your horse after he tries for you. People who gripe about the "unfairness" of X, Y, and Z. Snipey comments by the side of the ring or watching someone else go XC (unless, of course, the comment is particularly funny - coughPolo3Daycough - in which case, just come on down and set by me for awhile).

retreadeventer
May. 12, 2007, 02:31 PM
Good point, Gotspots. In fact I think there are things that the eventers could certainly emulate in the h/j world. Leg is one. I think another would be to work on a smooth, quality round with nice turns, and the art of keeping the horse round to the fences, and in between the fences, while staying in position to help the horse. Primarily thinking of stadium phase. Also the horses seem to understand the fly change better coming out of that discipline and that again is something eventers could better work on too. Even at the low levels our horses could ALWAYS be rounder and jump better!

CookiePony
May. 12, 2007, 08:44 PM
Not giving the horse enough credit/ not praising the horse for doing a good job/ blaming the horse for your bad ride.

Being b!#%y to volunteers.

GreyTrakehner92
May. 12, 2007, 09:10 PM
1)Haveing a freak attack on a jump judge when your horse is elminated. Especially at ditches, where each step back is a refusal. Three steps and TECHNICALLY, your out. Its not the jump judges fault, really, they are only putting their butts on a course by a jump all day to watch other people ride FOR FREE. Give them some freaking credit. If it werent for volunteers, we would be SOL. It just REALLY gets to me when people yell at the volunteers.

2) Getting mad at your horse for one reason or another. Your lucky that a 1200 pound animal is even trying for you. Especially the younger girls that smack their horses around. Yanking, spurring, smacking, yelling, spinning. ACK. Last weekend when i was with my mom jump judging, a girl was mad at her horse and took a crop to its face. 0.0. lets just say onlooks let it go on her.

3)When your horse may be having a tiny fit in the warm-up, and you can hear people from the side saying "arent you glad you dont have a horse like THAT" oKAY, WOOAA there buddy. My horse is a head tosser, pretty much is horrible in dressage (gettin MUCH better though!!), but will jump anything you put infront or her, and jump it well. Even though she may have a little fit, i'd like to see some of these girls with their made show horses, take my fiesty mare into a dressage arena, and then get her clear XC and stadium. Its leg leg leg leg leg leg, but she'll do it, she'll do anything, but i'd still love to see some of those girls try to ride a horse like mine, who has her own opinion.

4)Really loud trainers. Sure. its REALLY hard to hear sometimes in the warm up, but MAN some of these trainers get out there and YELL directions. Its like.. if i can hear you from 3 arena's over, your a little too loud.

5) not loving on your horse after it puts its heart and soul out for you. give your horse some lovvvveee!! they do a LOT for us.

(((not using "you" as anyone here just a general "you" as in.. people)))

eqsiu
May. 12, 2007, 10:15 PM
When a beginner or rider that only rides in their lessons once or twice a week buys a horse from a BNR that's going P, I, or A, and then complains when they can't win Novice on their high dollar horse. Ladies, the horse can't do it alone. Perhaps you should *gasp* ride more.

Jazzy Lady
May. 12, 2007, 10:27 PM
Hahha... here's one... THANK the volunteers!!

The barn I ride at is hosting an event this weekend, today was entry and pre-training (bn and novice) and tomorrow is training thru intermediate and a CIC**. A volunteer lunch was announced today and a man and a woman were walking beside me and this was their conversation:

Man: "What? They are already done?"

Woman: "No, they judges need a break every once in a while."

Man: "Break? I'm sure they get paid pretty hefty for their jobs, they don't need a break."

WHAT??????????

I almost turned around and set the man straight, but luckily the woman did it for me! :D

So yes, be kind to the volunteers. If something doesn't go your way or they don't know an answer, please don't freak out on them. A lot of them really don't know eventing and are helping out of the goodness of their hearts. :)

Meredith Clark
May. 12, 2007, 11:04 PM
* Not being respectful in the warm-up area!!!
- I usually don't have a trainer out there with me and I can't stand it when people don't call jumps, or go against the direction of the other people (not on the inside) or if a horse is having a problem in the warm up area they don't give him space. ALL HORSES HAVE BAD DAYS... if he's having a bucking fit just move out of the way, bring your horse to a walk, and let the other horse get over it! Also I hate when bossy trainers get into the middle and scream, or change the heights of the warm up jumps (which ISN"T ALLOWED!).

* Being respectful when x-country schooling
- There's a group of people that always come to a local schooling that SCREAM at their horse's to get them over the fenses.. i'm talking 5 strides out "GET UP GET UP GET OVER THAT JUMP" its so annoying, and spooks all the horses around them.
- Don't crowd popular jumps like the water jump, if people are already schooling there don't stand around putting pressure on them to hurry, they get their fair share to practice.
- At the same time if other people are waiting don't take all day if there's no way in hell your horse is getting over a ditch today!


*This is really random but I HATE when people say their horse is an eventer, or for sale as an eventer just b/c "he was too hot for the hunter ring" just because a horse is hot or fiesty doesn't mean he has the talent to be an eventer*

Xctrygirl
May. 14, 2007, 02:11 PM
Just a couple off the top of my rusty head,

1.) (and most have said this) Is it too hard to say "Thank you" to the dressage judge, bit check person, xc starter and stadium judge? I try to always say something positive so these folks know that we as a whole appreciate their work.

2.) Tell those around you that they're doing great. Maybe tell a quick joke. I mean the kid thats stressed on the headstrong horse, the woman who is clearly a competent rider but is talking her nerves down. And the guy who's trying to ignore the fact that he's surrounded by women and his breeches are a bit tight. Smile, share a laugh or a compliment. Everyone's had a bad day and everyone has had that million dollar ride that comes with the beaming smile. Remember the human element to this game.

3.) If your day is going really badly and Karma doesn't seem to be there, its ok to say when. Now I don't mean quit after one stop, but if you're terrified and your horse knows it and you are not able to get around the fences that were "easy" when you walked the course. Don't put undue pressure on yourself. When you're at the Olympics, yes THEN you are carrying the weight of the world. Until then, do whats best for you and your horse. No one and nothing should ever supercede this. No matter how much time, effort, money has been spent to get there, its never worth your neck or your horses.

4.) Agree big time with "PAT the pony!!" If anyone is fool enough to think that they made their horse go clean, stand back, Lightning is a coming!! :D Its a team effort and as they told us in dog obedience,

"Would you work for your boss if you were never paid? Hmm No praise is like never being paid for your work. You gotta put in what you want to get out of it."

5.) (This one has boundaries to it but..) If you see someone who needs help, offer it. Now don't approach like you're the omnipotent God of eventing, but if they seem lost or stressed or pressed for time, would it hurt to ask if you could help?

6.) Come home and let the problems of today go. They're done. Maybe write down in a journal exactly what went wrong and right and learn from it. Move away from the repetitive thoughts of "Oh well he stopped at water at Flora Lea, so he'll probably try to at Fair Hill as well." Ok well there's 2 ways to approach this, a.) School more water in between and have yourself ready to support him through his worries. or b.) Freak out worrying yourself and transmit it to him so he is almost guaranteed to stop again.

Ok thats what I have for now.

~Emily

RAyers
May. 14, 2007, 02:29 PM
1)Haveing a freak attack on a jump judge when your horse is elminated. Especially at ditches, where each step back is a refusal. Three steps and TECHNICALLY, your out. Its not the jump judges fault, really, they are only putting their butts on a course by a jump all day to watch other people ride FOR FREE. Give them some freaking credit. If it werent for volunteers, we would be SOL. It just REALLY gets to me when people yell at the volunteers.





Not quite! Read the rulebook (EV142). A set back is only a refusal after the initial stop (section 2 here). Now, if the rider continues to drive the horse forward and the horse backs that is another stop (section 3 here). If a rider backs thier horse in order to reorganize and represent and is successful, steps backward are not individual refusals.

There is no rule about a single step backward being a refusal.


EV142
2. DISOBEDIENCES (REFUSALS and RUN-OUTS)
a. Refusals.
(1) At obstacles or elements with height (exceeding 30 cm), a horse is considered
to have refused if it stops in front of the obstacle to be jumped.
(2) At all other obstacles (i.e., 30 cm or less in height) a stop followed immediately
by a standing jump is not penalized, but if the halt is sustained or in any way prolonged,
this constitutes a refusal. The horse may step sideways but if it steps back,
even with one foot, this is a refusal.
(3) After a refusal, if a competitor redoubles or changes his efforts without success,
or if the horse is represented at the obstacle after stepping back and stops or
backs again, this is a second refusal, and so on.
b. Runouts. A horse is considered to be disobedient if it runs-out, avoids the obstacle or
element to be jumped in such a way that it has to be represented. A rider is permitted
to change his mind as to where he jumps an obstacle or element at any time without
penalty for a run-out, including as a result of a mistake at a previous obstacle or element.
c. At an obstacle composed of several elements (A B obstacle), a horse may be disobedient
and refuse or run-out only twice in all without incurring elimination.

LisaB
May. 14, 2007, 02:35 PM
1. Don't blame the horse
2. Don't blame the volunteers
3. Don't blame the officials

While a matter of preference and taste, I still can't stand the glitter and bling if you're over 12 (or under 60)

Don't ever think that a big name rider is unapproachable for lessons. Or that they are too expensive

Don't ever be too shy to ask someone at an event questions or if you need help.

Fence2Fence
May. 15, 2007, 07:50 AM
Here are some more--and not just limited to new folks.

Put the horse's number on this bridle, not the breastplate. So hard for the volunteers to see!

Know what your number is when you check in with the bit check and ring steward. If they send you to the wrong ring because you gave them your number from last month, it's not their fault.

For your dressage test, trot around the ring and past the judge. Smile and say "Hello, I'm number such and such." It helps both the scribe from trying to peer out and figure out what the competitors number is.

Go volunteer! It's so much fun!

purplnurpl
May. 15, 2007, 10:42 AM
1. love the volunteers
love the judges
love the ORGANIZER
love your horse

2. If you have an issue/concern don't bite off the TDs head.

3. Be thankful that there even is a HT for you to enter!!!

4. Take an extra second at the start box and after you hear "5, 4, 3, 2, 1, have a nice ride" say, 'thank you so much [with a smile]'.

5. Warm up arenas are probably the most nerve racking places to be. Don't get mad. Just go about your business and say 'sorry' sometimes.
shot, even when it is clearly not my fault I always say, 'oops, sorry, my fault' just so people won't bite my head off.

6. If you have a snarky horse [mare!] that does not like neighbors please bring sheets to cover the stall walls or ask for specific accommodations. Be curtious, this is a biggy. If not for yourself then for your fellow stable mates.



My quirky pet peeves:

0. COACHES THAT SCREAM ACROSS THE WARM UP AT THEIR STUDENTS.

1. Those who feel the need to scream 'UP' in front of every fence so their horse knows it needs to jump....up? If I were a horse I would stop. I think anything more than a whisper 'whoa' or a cluck for forward is distracting. the horse is right under your breath. he can hear you!

2. Don't get pissed off in the warm up arena. It's a TOUGH place to be and rider/horses do get in the way. just deal with it. and if someone changes the height of a fence. JUST DEAL WITH IT!
(I can speak for this one cause in my warm up at Holly Hill Mike Huber came in with his students and set the little 3'3'' oxar to prelim + height with mega width (yes, most likely illegal). Needless to say after that my horse jumped 2' over every SJ fence. Thanks Mike!) no complaints here! lol.

3. WE HEARD YOU CALL FOR THE OXAR THE FRIST TIME!!! Do you think your horse appreciates you screaming at the top of your lungs!?!

3a. People who scream all the way around XC just to make a scene cause they are 'Eventers'.

4. People who gripe about their dressage scores. "I don't know WHAT that dressage judge was looking for??? in disgust.

um...maybe an obedient horse and proper geometry. duh!
(can speak for this one too. I got "rider needs to look up definition of circle" one time. I laughed and went home and worked on circles)

5. and for sales: those who put "would be a good three day horse" what the hell is a three-day horse??

6. the people that go to HTs and tell everyone they are 'three-day'-eventers. what the hell is a 'three-day' eventer? I guess we will see you at Rolex and Badminton sometime soon?

snicker. sorry, you opened my little can. lol.
as you all can tell I am a very quiet rider. I appreciate a peaceful atmostphere, as does my horse.

Invested1
May. 15, 2007, 10:43 AM
Above all else, remember that this is supposed to be FUN!!! :D

up&atem
May. 15, 2007, 10:48 AM
If your horse is lame, pull him up. (sorry couldn't resist);)

Synrgystyk
May. 15, 2007, 12:26 PM
1. love the volunteers
love the judges
love the ORGANIZER
love your horse

You can never say "thanks" too often or to too many people involved in putting on an event.


People who gripe about their dressage scores. "I don't know WHAT that dressage judge was looking for??? in disgust.

um...maybe an obedient horse and proper geometry. duh!
(can speak for this one too. I got "rider needs to look up definition of circle" one time. I laughed and went home and worked on circles)

And I'm *always* complaining about my dressage score -- but rarely do the complaints involve the judging. :lol: Although, just *once* I'd like to discover that a test with which I was happy also scored well. (So far I've learned that if I like the way the test rode, the judge probably didn't -- and vice versa. :rolleyes: ) Oh well, at least I've never claimed to be a "dressage rider."

Lorree

Invested1
May. 15, 2007, 12:28 PM
(So far I've learned that if I like the way the test rode, the judge probably didn't -- and vice versa. :rolleyes: )
Lorree

Ditto!! :yes: :lol:

blackwly
May. 15, 2007, 12:40 PM
Polo wraps in stadium or, God-forbid, x-country. that kills me.

purplnurpl
May. 15, 2007, 01:12 PM
that's an interesting one. Never heard it before..

what gets you about polos in SJ?
the only thing I can come up with is that polos are not for jumping maybe? because they can unwind?
: )

LisaB
May. 15, 2007, 01:18 PM
I thought polos weren't allowed.
On dry land, they unravel
When going thru water, they retain water and unravel and also expand (constricting the leg)

ravenclaw
May. 15, 2007, 01:21 PM
At events, you have an assigned time for each of your 3 rides. Sometimes the schedule gets behind, but events are usually pretty good about running on time. I have seen a few riders that were obviously from the hunter ring throw a hissy fit in the warm-up because they weren't ready when it was their time.

I used to ride hunter/jumpers, so I know at those shows there is more flexibility with when you ride and you can take longer in your warm-up if you want to. This is way things are done at h/j shows, but it isn't this way at events. Riders from other disciplines need to respect and abide by the differences. In most cases, it's probably just lack of knowledge instead of wanting to act like a turd. :winkgrin:

melodiousaphony
May. 15, 2007, 01:50 PM
At events, you have an assigned time for each of your 3 rides. Sometimes the schedule gets behind, but events are usually pretty good about running on time. I have seen a few riders that were obviously from the hunter ring throw a hissy fit in the warm-up because they weren't ready when it was their time.

And to think, one of the many things I was REALLY happy about when I switched from h/j to eventing (I never got too deep in h/j ::refrains from a rant::) is having a ride time. I would _hate_ getting all warmed up only to figure out the class before mine had another half hour to go.

Paks
May. 15, 2007, 02:29 PM
2. If you have an issue/concern don't bite off the TDs head.


Awww Come on TD heads are tasty especially with Hoisin Sauce.



2. Don't get pissed off in the warm up arena. It's a TOUGH place to be and rider/horses do get in the way. just deal with it. and if someone changes the height of a fence. JUST DEAL WITH IT!
(I can speak for this one cause in my warm up at Holly Hill Mike Huber came in with his students and set the little 3'3'' oxar to prelim + height with mega width (yes, most likely illegal). Needless to say after that my horse jumped 2' over every SJ fence. Thanks Mike!) no complaints here! lol.



She is from the hunter/ jumper world thier warm ups areas make ours look like precision military drills.

I would say though that if some BNR breaks this rule d. The only practice fences that competitors may jump are those flagged fences provided by the Organizer. No part of the fences may ever be held by anyone while a horse
is jumping. These fences may not be raised more than 10 cm (4 inches) above the maximum height permitted for the competition in progress (or about to begin), nor may the spread exceed the maximum permitted. Grab your Hoisin Sauce and look for the TD.

purplnurpl
May. 15, 2007, 03:11 PM
oh ya. yikes! I am terrified of Hunter/Jumper arenas.

my post was more general

lol. after that warm up fence incident I was so pleased with my horses preformance I looked up legalities in the rule book. Hoping that I could have a friend jack up a fence for me at every horse trial.

That fence was probably right at 3'7'' not ANY lower. but the width...lol. questionable for Training Level. It seemed a bit bigger than any 3'6'' fence I would set for sure.

this is a fun thread. : )
I do feel sorry for TDs.

Eventer13
May. 15, 2007, 03:13 PM
People who don't prepare their horses (training or conditioning) yet expect them to perform at their best.

People who don't pat their horses after their ride. Or who take care of their own comfort coming off XC before their horse's (luckily I don't see this too often).

People who lack the horsemanship skills such as proper cool out, bandaging, etc.

People who care more about their looks than their horsemanship (again, not seen much in eventing, which is why I like it).

eventrider
May. 16, 2007, 07:35 PM
I am curious about the polos in SJ thing.I have used polos at Advanced in SJ before....what is the problem? I have seen horses at Rolex do SJ in polos as well. Are they not allowed now?

blackwly
May. 17, 2007, 09:38 AM
I am not sure if there are any actual rules regarding polo wrap use at horse trials. However, the main reason they are unsafe is that they readily absorb water and will expand, loosening and sliding down the horse's leg. This can occur even in a damp arena or on dewy grass, or with sweat. Safer alternatives (if you're bent on using wraps rather than boots) would be exercise wraps- this is what is used on the track. This is essentially a thin layer of sheet cotton which covers the same area of the polo with a tight, elastic, adhesive bandage like vet wrap or a saratoga wrap. I've used these at a 3 day on a horse with boot rubs, and they will go the distance if applied correctly.

The main reason polos are my "pet peeve" is that they don't really serve any functional purpose, and they are a little unsafe. They may provide a little protection against interference, but there are definitely better options which provide more protection, support and which won't unravel. And, of course, it is all related to the PTSD I'm still suffering 15 years after enduring the "wrapping" portion of my H-A.

That being said, I use polos too...when showing a horse to prospective buyers, schooling dressage at a show, etc, because they look flashy. But flashiness is probably not a good enough reason to use them over fences, in competition, IMHO.

Trixie
May. 17, 2007, 09:47 AM
At events, you have an assigned time for each of your 3 rides. Sometimes the schedule gets behind, but events are usually pretty good about running on time. I have seen a few riders that were obviously from the hunter ring throw a hissy fit in the warm-up because they weren't ready when it was their time.

As a hunter rider I must admit that I am deeply envious of eventers and their start times.
If hunters had that policy, I might actually get home before9 p.m. one of these days.

eventrider
May. 17, 2007, 09:51 AM
Thanks for the reply about the polos....I know there have been a lot of posts lately about the ineffectiveness of polos, how they "don't do anything". I have not responded to any of these topics yet. I wanted to know if polos really did anything, so I wrapped my own leg and went for a jog! While obviously, no wrap is going to keep the leg from flexing and be able to "support" the flexor tendons, the wraps DID provide support, much like vet wrap to my leg. It was like a not-so-severe compression bandage. Just like people are prescribed support hose after injuries or laying in a hostipal bed for a while, the polos did provide that kind of support. I like them because they offer support to a degree, without making the horse dependant like SMB's, etc. They protect against rubs and are soft material. My horses legs are just as hot under neoprene boots as polos. And I like that you get practice wrapping everyday. Obviously, done wrong or used in the wrong situation they can be dangerous, but for those of us that know how to wrap and don't use them in wet conditions I think they serve their purpose. Just my 2 cents! Maybe everyone should wrap their own legs and walk around in them a little while! LOL

GreystoneKC
May. 17, 2007, 09:56 AM
Mostly my "peeves" are based on the feeling that eventing should be SAFE and FUN for both partners. Much as I joke about not liking bling or neon, I'd MUCH rather see that than any of the above.

So people like me who show up completely blinged out from H/J land, but also have spottless half-white ponies, "stylish" clothes, and tack you could eat off of (though we wouldn't because that would just be nasty) are cool with the eventer crew too!!! LOL Even though I think I get made fun of behind my back... ;-) ;-)

Speedy
May. 17, 2007, 10:12 AM
I am a firm believer in spotless pony, spotless tack, and spotless riding clothes. I am completely against matchy-matchy everything, particularly in shades of neon. The time and money that it takes to achieve matchy-matchy would be better spent in most cases on an extra riding lesson.

sharri13
May. 17, 2007, 10:12 AM
People, kids and adults, who do not properly condition their horse.

BuddyRoo
May. 17, 2007, 10:21 AM
I'm not an eventer....yet. ;)

But reading through this thread I have to applaud everyone. I'm pretty impressed. For the most part, all of the peeves/comments are about taking care of the horse, being respectful to others, and coming prepared. You eventer folks rock!

bambam
May. 17, 2007, 10:34 AM
Snipey comments by the side of the ring or watching someone else go XC
Thank goodness you put in a caveat- I was afraid we weren't going to be able to hang out together at events :winkgrin:

My pet peeves:
People who do not appreciate the volunteers and are not nice to them.
People who use their horses as couches after x-c- drives me batty. That horse just hauled your butt around x-c, you can talk to your friends about how wonderful that horse was when you are standing next to them, rather than wandering around talking to people for ages afterwards with your butt still firmly planted in the saddle (that one just pushes my buttons).
BNRs who think they are so special that at an HT the rules that apply to the smurfs do not apply to them- only a couple of those that I have come across, but they are there.
People who blame the horse for their screw-ups.

InVA
May. 17, 2007, 10:35 AM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...

Trixie
May. 17, 2007, 10:43 AM
People who are forever insisting that the "time and money spent on matching clothes are better spent on riding lessons."

How do you know that that person doesn't spend as much time and money on riding lessons as is feasible to them? And secondly, you've got to wear something. I've not found that having a blue saddle pad that matches my blue T-shirt took all that much time out of my life, or that much expense or effort.

I too am against neon :) or anything that makes my eyes bleed, be it poor riding or neon orange.

eqsiu
May. 17, 2007, 11:00 AM
So people like me who show up completely blinged out from H/J land, but also have spottless half-white ponies, "stylish" clothes, and tack you could eat off of (though we wouldn't because that would just be nasty) are cool with the eventer crew too!!! LOL Even though I think I get made fun of behind my back... ;-) ;-)

We probably do, but I have many eventer friends who came from the hunter world. The comments probably are of the "I can tell she's a hunter by x,y,z" variety and not anything too derogatory. We're always thrilled to bring people back from the dark side. :winkgrin:

Invested1
May. 17, 2007, 11:01 AM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...

Gonna have to disagree with you on this one--I think the curly manes look fun--every single time I see one (my horse included), it brings a smile to my face. :D

InVA
May. 17, 2007, 11:13 AM
Gonna have to disagree with you on this one--I think the curly manes look fun--every single time I see one (my horse included), it brings a smile to my face. :D

UGH! (... on floor, writhing, gagging, retching....)

hee hee

wookiee
May. 17, 2007, 12:02 PM
Gonna have to disagree with you on this one--I think the curly manes look fun--every single time I see one (my horse included), it brings a smile to my face. :D

Curly manes are dead HANDSOME!! (http://farm1.static.flickr.com/129/402919916_212bfed49a_o.jpg)


:yes:

Sorry, couldn't resist!

Xctrygirl
May. 17, 2007, 12:15 PM
Thanks for the reply about the polos....I know there have been a lot of posts lately about the ineffectiveness of polos, how they "don't do anything". I have not responded to any of these topics yet. I wanted to know if polos really did anything, so I wrapped my own leg and went for a jog! While obviously, no wrap is going to keep the leg from flexing and be able to "support" the flexor tendons, the wraps DID provide support, much like vet wrap to my leg. It was like a not-so-severe compression bandage. Just like people are prescribed support hose after injuries or laying in a hostipal bed for a while, the polos did provide that kind of support. I like them because they offer support to a degree, without making the horse dependant like SMB's, etc. They protect against rubs and are soft material. My horses legs are just as hot under neoprene boots as polos. And I like that you get practice wrapping everyday. Obviously, done wrong or used in the wrong situation they can be dangerous, but for those of us that know how to wrap and don't use them in wet conditions I think they serve their purpose. Just my 2 cents! Maybe everyone should wrap their own legs and walk around in them a little while! LOL

See I couldn't have said it better. We do use the real polo wraps on the track. Same ones I use on my eventers. And we use them on horses that cost millions of dollars. We use the thinner wraps when a horse is going to breeze. That or ace Bandages. So lets see... if we use them regularily across the board on all our expensive as heck racehorses, why then would eventers be better off NOT using them in Stadium??? This is beyond confusing to me.
True on the track we make sure to have good velcro and if its not perfect we add safety pics to keep from the bandage unrolling or eletrical tape around the velcro. But I do that on my polos if my velcro isn't great also.

IF your polos are slipping guess what... you're not putting them on right. Here's how I know.... we can put 4 polos on a Tb, send it out to a muddy sloppy wet track and then GALLOP 2 miles and return to the barn and they're still in the correct place with the correct pressure.

Polos are just like big bad bits... they're only as dangerous as the hands using them.

FYI, I use Polos here and there in eventing and jumper shows. No bandages lost or slipped yet.

~Emily

InVA
May. 17, 2007, 12:47 PM
That's all well and good emily, but what do you think about Curly manes....and DON'T hold back!

eventrider
May. 17, 2007, 02:04 PM
Emily, if you agree then I know I am not crazy ;). And I too think curly manes are super cute!!!! Makes my horses crest look rounder too! Plus, I do wet my horses mane and then comb it out and it still looks curly, or at least full of body.

up&atem
May. 17, 2007, 02:17 PM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...

Agreed. it looks amateurish! :eek:

Janet
May. 17, 2007, 02:18 PM
Thanks for the reply about the polos....I know there have been a lot of posts lately about the ineffectiveness of polos, how they "don't do anything". I have not responded to any of these topics yet. I wanted to know if polos really did anything, so I wrapped my own leg and went for a jog! While obviously, no wrap is going to keep the leg from flexing and be able to "support" the flexor tendons, the wraps DID provide support, much like vet wrap to my leg. It was like a not-so-severe compression bandage. Just like people are prescribed support hose after injuries or laying in a hostipal bed for a while, the polos did provide that kind of support. ... Maybe everyone should wrap their own legs and walk around in them a little while! LOL
But there is a BIG difference between a human leg and a horse leg.

The human leg is full of MUSCLES. And bandages DO provide support to MUSCLES.

But the horse leg has very few muscles. It is mostly bone and ligaments and tendons. Very different.

Janet
May. 17, 2007, 02:29 PM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...

Best solution to that is not to braid in the first place. :D

eventrider
May. 17, 2007, 02:34 PM
Janet...I do understand this, however....wrap your ankle as you would with an ace bandage and then decide if it gives NO support. Your ankle is not full of muscles. I am not advocating that the polos provide tons of support, but I think they are just as good as brushing boots and cover (cup the fetlock) better. I would not go do gallop sets in them, but for flat and SJ they do a good job. Of course this is all with the caveat they are applied correctly. Oh...and sticks don't seem to get stuck up them when I hack either! I do make many of my students use them in lessons because it is a great chance for me to get them to practice wrapping with suppervision. And we all know from our pony club days that it takes lots of practice to wrap well.

Janet
May. 17, 2007, 02:35 PM
My pet peeves that are particularly relevant to people new to eventing

1. People who do not know the rules and then argue with the TD about what the rules ought to be.

2. People with unfit, unprepared horses.

3. People who have no idea how fast they are supposed to be going on cross country.

4. People who are rude to the volunteeers (especailly the secretary and the jump judges.

5. People who complain, but don't DO anything about it.

Janet
May. 17, 2007, 02:44 PM
Janet...I do understand this, however....wrap your ankle as you would with an ace bandage and then decide if it gives NO support. Your ankle is not full of muscles. I am not advocating that the polos provide tons of support, but I think they are just as good as brushing boots and cover (cup the fetlock) better. I would not go do gallop sets in them, but for flat and SJ they do a good job. Of course this is all with the caveat they are applied correctly. Oh...and sticks don't seem to get stuck up them when I hack either! I do make many of my students use them in lessons because it is a great chance for me to get them to practice wrapping with suppervision. And we all know from our pony club days that it takes lots of practice to wrap well.

Yes- when you wrap your ANKLE, you can proved support to the JOINT by limiting the range of motion. However, it really only helps when you are walking. If you are running and jumping, your ankle is going to move in spite of the bandage, and will still hurt.

Similarly, if you wrap above and below the fetlock JOINT you CAN provide support to the joint by limiting the range of motion. As with the human ankle, it is pretty effective in protecting a healing soft tissue injury in light work by limiting the range of motion. When I was rehabbing Moo from a suspensory injury I was VERY contientious about wrapping his fetlock joint. SO it isn't as if i think they do nothing. But I don't think you can wrap the fetlock in a way that will do much to limit the range of motion landing over a full size jump.

And many people wrap entirely above the joint, or wrap over the joint in a way that doesn't limit range of motion, and think they are providing "support".

Xctrygirl
May. 17, 2007, 05:11 PM
That's all well and good emily, but what do you think about Curly manes....and DON'T hold back!

Ummmm uhhhh

OK OK I CAN'T STAND IT....

1 bucket: $4.00
1 sponge: $2.50

A flat beautiful mane in pics: Priceless!!

~Emily

Jazzy Lady
May. 17, 2007, 05:47 PM
I hate curly manes too. In fact, my horse's mane is so thin that when I unbraid it it is VERY tight, frizzy curls. In which case, he stays braided all day for a one day as it needs LOTS of water to lay flat and usually not enough time to dry the horse :)

Dr. Doolittle
May. 17, 2007, 06:22 PM
I'm with the "anti curly mane" crowd...Aack! :eek:

I have a pix of my late, former horse with a curly mane over a X-country fence at CDCTA--it's on his "memorial wall", so will hang there forever--in infamy! Oh, the shame! :uhoh: We were low on water after using what we had to give him a drink, and then some quick sponging (it was October, so he wasn't that sweaty); somehow the "wetting down of the mane" got lost in the shuffle between stadium and X-country...and I braid *really* tight, so it truly looks like the horse got a rectal probe plugged into a light-socket!

Now the "mane-wetting operation" takes utmost precedence, and is done *the moment the horse is untacked after dressage". :p

I can't add to any of the other pet peeves, other than the "matching neon colors for cross country garb" (unless you're a kid), because I am old and conservative...:p

And the thanking of volunteers, which I have to NAG my students to do, especially the ones just starting out...EVERY volunteer you come in contact with needs to be thanked!!!!! (Thank you ;))

And one more thing that may or may not have been mentioned among all the good previous posts--people GALLOPING around the jumping warmup areas, hell-bent for election! :rolleyes: (It totally freaks my horse out, since she sees the wild eyes, the foaming at the mouth, the tension evident in every muscle--and that just the riders! :lol:--but from my observation, the unnecessary "hopped up craziness" transmits itself to others in the warmup area, not to mention many of the riders who do this are semi out-of-control *while* galloping; I've seen WAY too many "near collisions". :eek:)
You *don't* need to do 200 meters at "steeplechase speed" to warm your horse up for a course of stadium fences, OR for a cross country run at the lower levels.

(Okay, off the soapbox on that one...;))

Janet
May. 17, 2007, 10:01 PM
You *don't* need to do 200 meters at "steeplechase speed" to warm your horse up for a course of stadium fences, OR for a cross country run at the lower levels.

No. But 3 or 4 transitions between 350 ("show jumping canter") and 450 ("cross country speed") can be an essential part of the warm up routine for cross country.

Flying Hippotamus
May. 17, 2007, 10:32 PM
Pet peeves from an organizer/secretary point of view:

1) people who event but don't volunteer.

2) I have heard the expression RTFM - short for a Tech pet peeve about reading the manual. I frequently use RTFO - (not till after I hang up the phone of course) Where do you think you are supposed to find out which dressage test to ride. It's not priviliged information- it's published for goodness snake!

3) Late entries - I'm hitting with fees like crazy this year, let's see if it helps...

4) Anyone that says "cross your own track" about X-C. Hand me that piano.

5) People who think that I get paid the "big bucks" to run horse trials so I can make up things they did wrong and eliminate them. (does that make sense?) anyway - give me a break!

I want to add something positive because that is what eventing is. I run horse trials because I love the sport, the people and the horses. It's the best!

Hug a TD today!

Dr. Doolittle
May. 17, 2007, 11:40 PM
Yes, and I both *do* that (very useful canter/gallop adjustability exercise :)), plus recommend all my students do it--in warmup...

However, this is NOT what I'm talking about (and I think most of us know "to whom I refer"...:D Think the Lone Ranger, here..without the "sliding stop" :p)

Hannahsmom
May. 18, 2007, 09:16 AM
As a volunteer (these have already been listed, but wanted to agree with others)
1. People who aren't ready at their time because they had to wait for their trainer to warm them up. That's not even necessarily riders from other disciplines. Wonder what they do when they are on XC and have to think for themselves?

2. People who don't read the rules

As a rider:
1. Riders who don't volunteer and don't arm twist and beg all their riding friends to volunteer and sign up for work days and any other local volunteer opportunities.

2. Riders who would rather sit around after they are done then offer an hour or two to the organizer.

3. Loud trainers in warmup. Egads, even my horse freaks out.

eqsiu
May. 18, 2007, 10:48 AM
For those who hate the perm look, what should someone who has a curly horse do? I've done it. Mainly because I was still trying to get my super secure braids out during x-c warm-up lol.

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 11:21 AM
I usually just use a bucket, water, and a sponge :), but if you're pressed for time, why not try a water spray bottle? (you can buy a cheap one anywhere, or just use an old fly spray container)--that way you can just spray the mane down; it will "air dry" ;)

Aspire2JumpHigher
May. 18, 2007, 11:27 AM
You could always beg someone to do it for you. There are plenty of aspiring eventers turned groom-for-the-day who would gladly soak down your horses mane.

We can be picked out by the star-gazed look in our eyes as our trainers trot off to the start box. Some of us are also toting around tail brushes, boot wipes, etc. :D

In agreement to what's already been posted I also am annoyed by people who don't call out their jumps and gallop in already clustered warm-up areas. :(

mbdobbs
May. 18, 2007, 11:36 AM
OK, my mare has a pretty thin mane and when those braids come out the only word to use is AFRO. Really, it's pretty bad. I never cared that much though, but after reading these threads, I think I'm going to be spongeing it down down after the braids come out.

See ya'll at Virginia HTs (maybe)

Melissa

Synrgystyk
May. 18, 2007, 12:32 PM
Y'know, I absolutely *loathe* even the idea of braiding. But I'll be sure to braid next time I know Xctrygirl is going to be watching -- just so I can take out the braids and go for the curly look. :lol:

Lorree

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 12:50 PM
Lorree, now you're just being mean! :winkgrin:

(And we would all *love* to have an Aspire2jumpHigher, but for now, she is *all* *mine*! I just got her, and am not giving her up without a fight! :D)

Synrgystyk
May. 18, 2007, 12:56 PM
Lorree, now you're just being mean! :winkgrin:

I know....but it's Em so I'm excused. Maybe even encouraged!! ;)


(And we would all *love* to have an Aspire2jumpHigher, but for now, she is *all* *mine*! I just got her, and am not giving her up without a fight! :D)

*looks around for gauntlet on the ground*

Well, where'd you put it?? :lol:

Lorree

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 01:03 PM
:lol: :lol:

Aspire2JumpHigher
May. 18, 2007, 02:37 PM
Suddenly I'm feeling very popular! :D

Now, now ladies...I'm sure there is more than enough of me to go around...for now. With the way the pounds are falling off there might not be for long. :eek:

I'm more than happy to run from horse to horse sponging and tacking, just park all your trailers in a row so I can go right down the line. Dr. D first, Flyingtails second, and so on and so forth. :lol:

Dr. D did you catch my signature addition? hehe

flutie1
May. 18, 2007, 03:44 PM
Pet peeve - Rude, mean people!

Jazzy Lady
May. 18, 2007, 04:07 PM
People who think that just because they paid an entry fee they can do whatever they want.

Please remember that even though you paid, you are a GUEST on someone else's property, so treating organizers with respect, listening to the ground jury and not arguing with volunteers and paid workers is NOT something one should be doing while on someone else's property.

Camstock
May. 18, 2007, 04:29 PM
Not responding with a smile and a greeting when smiled at and greeted.

Non-volunteers

Overuse of golf carts/scooters

Let's just say "Self-interested parking"

Being held up in the event check-in line because of incomplete entries. Those folks should go automatically to the back of the line or to a rank penalty box somewhere and have to bring fresh-baked brownies with walnuts to the event secretary as a penance.

Best things:

Rubbing and hugging pony even if two rails were pulled etc.

"Crap, I forgot my dresage girth!" "Here, use mine."

Thanking volunteers

Organizers who prominently post a list of specific ways competitors, who may have an hour or two to spare, can help. Ask and you shall receive.

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 07:47 PM
Suddenly I'm feeling very popular! :D

Now, now ladies...I'm sure there is more than enough of me to go around...for now. With the way the pounds are falling off there might not be for long. :eek:

I'm more than happy to run from horse to horse sponging and tacking, just park all your trailers in a row so I can go right down the line. Dr. D first, Flyingtails second, and so on and so forth. :lol:

Dr. D did you catch my signature addition? hehe

I *just* caught that "new sig line" (hubby and I had a good chuckle...;) :lol: :lol:

As for your generous offer(s), we would have to pre-arrange that in advance, so it would require some "forethought"--of course with eventers, where there's a will, there's a way! :winkgrin:

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 07:59 PM
Not responding with a smile and a greeting when smiled at and greeted.

Overuse of golf carts/scooters


These are *big* pet peeves of mine, too---and often the "perpetrators" are able-bodied 20-somethings (young legs and feet, not lame, *not* in chronic pain from arthritis, etc...:sigh:) The only ones who get a "pass" from this (IMO) are those few young folks who are riding multiple horses.

I am *always* on "shank's mare", and try have a positive attitude towards everyone around me at HTs (pain be damned!); it's only basic decency...;)

Xctrygirl
May. 18, 2007, 08:06 PM
Y'know, I absolutely *loathe* even the idea of braiding. But I'll be sure to braid next time I know Xctrygirl is going to be watching -- just so I can take out the braids and go for the curly look. :lol:

Lorree

Now wait...

There is NOTHING wrong in my book with going xc WITH the braids still in. It's a very nice alternative to the curly look.

Lorree, you obviously don't remember when I soaked Spice down before you were headed to xc at some event. And voila, no curls that day either!!

~Emily

Synrgystyk
May. 18, 2007, 11:22 PM
Lorree, you obviously don't remember when I soaked Spice down before you were headed to xc at some event. And voila, no curls that day either!! ~Emily

You're right; I don't remember. But it must've been DRPC 'cause that was my first Rec event and the only time I braided. (Even post-Robbie-lessons it still took me two hours.)

I really wish eventers did braided tails -- I like doing tails. :sigh:

Lorree

CarrieK
May. 18, 2007, 11:38 PM
Jack Russells. Yapping, snapping, irritating, always under-foot Jack Russells.

Okay, the owners bother me more than the dogs, but only just.

I mean, I dunno, I could be wrong, but when it says leash your dog, it means leash your dog. It doesn't mean everybody leashes their dog but you. Even when you're by your trailer. Even when you're by your RV. Leash 'em.

Better yet, leave 'em home.

Because the next li'l stinker who grabs me by the ankle is gonna get squished.

Now, please don't flood the board with examples of how your dog is leashed and under control. Obviously I'm not talking about you and your JR. I'm talking about the ones that're running around and sinking their teeth into my Achilles.

;)

Dr. Doolittle
May. 18, 2007, 11:40 PM
Oh, my...:lol:

(Yet someone *else* with whom I simply MUST agree! :winkgrin:)

Invested1
May. 19, 2007, 08:22 PM
Well the good news about all you anti-curly mane folks is that you'll be able to pick me and my boy out more easily! :lol:

Dr. Doolittle
May. 20, 2007, 04:00 PM
You better watch out, Invested, at the next HT, I may be comin' at ya with a water bottle in hand! :D

CarrieK
May. 21, 2007, 02:43 AM
Invested, Dr. Doolittle ain't kidding, and I got the pic to prove it:

http://www.ramonafair.com/images/tracy.jpg

;)

Invested1
May. 21, 2007, 08:48 AM
Invested, Dr. Doolittle ain't kidding, and I got the pic to prove it:

http://www.ramonafair.com/images/tracy.jpg

;)

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Awh, pony with the crimpy hair:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2192440350055239353GpSwHl

And this is what he says to those of you who don't like it:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1137553191055239353KmNdzO

:D

Dr. Doolittle
May. 21, 2007, 09:44 AM
:lol: :lol:

Now I wish I were as tall as that woman in the picture ;), but that's not going to happen in this life, so where do I find me one of them Super Soakers?!? :D

(Watch out, Invested--I'll be able to get the Ted-man from a distance, tongue out or not! :p)

Invested1
May. 21, 2007, 02:03 PM
(Watch out, Invested--I'll be able to get the Ted-man from a distance, tongue out or not! :p)

OTTB--I'll tell him to RUN AWAY!!! :lol:

InVA
May. 21, 2007, 02:10 PM
Ummmm uhhhh

OK OK I CAN'T STAND IT....

1 bucket: $4.00
1 sponge: $2.50

A flat beautiful mane in pics: Priceless!!

~Emily

WHEW! THANKS, EM! I knew I wasn't crazy! But I also love Janet's solution... don't braid the first place! voila!

barnmaven
May. 21, 2007, 10:30 PM
Pet Peeves:

1. Unleashed dogs...and yes the leash also attached to a human on the other end.

2. Moms and dads, mucking their little darling's stalls, cleaning the tack, grooming the horse....etc....etc....etc



........in addition to writing all the checks.

Dr. Doolittle
May. 21, 2007, 11:11 PM
1) yes, and I can't even "indulge" in this particular behavior, since I own a Whippet (and they--like Greyhounds can never be off leash if not in an enclosed area...) So maybe I'm just jealous...:rolleyes: But anyway :p

2) Clearly these are children who are not (and never were) in Pony Club ;)

Emstah
May. 21, 2007, 11:25 PM
When I was little I thought there was nothing cooler than the after-braid curls on my pony. Luckily I had a mother who understood just how wrong that look really is and steered me in the right direction. Without her guidance, I would see this picture of me and my old boy and cringe because it would have undoubtedly been overtaken by a big curly mess if I had had my way that day :)

http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1154952614055635239NqPSCA

It bothers me when people do not pay attention while walking the XC. The horses come through at intervals of time (generally 2mins at regular horse trials), so while walking the course, it isn't too tricky to remember that another one should be along shortly. I've seen many riders almost trample people who were wandering along the course not paying attention or who did not realize where the course went and had no idea where to go to get out of the way. I've also been the rider almost doing the trampling and it is quite gripping to be yelling at people to watch out while simultaneously dodging them as they scatter out of the way! Especially those people with children or slow moving dogs!

It can be hard to get your bearings when you go to an event for the first time, so when you pick up your packet from the secretary, be sure to get a course map and a grounds map so you can figure out where everything is and the course XC takes. That way you won't be standing in the middle of field and suddenly have a horse galloping at you with a screaming rider! Also, don't be afraid to ask if you aren't sure where something is or where you are supposed to be.

And above all, have fun! Don't expect your first few times to be perfect. There are a lot of rules to remember so do read the rule book. Even if you read and memorize it though, when you are out there riding the rules can get confusing and muddled, so don't beat yourself (or the volunteers!!!) up if you get yourself eliminated on a technicality. It happens to everyone, and once you get the big E because of a technical rule, you won't ever mix up that rule again!

It would probably help you to go to an event as a spectator, or better yet volunteer before you ride in one so that you can get a feel for how the day progresses. If you are doing 3 phases in one day, it may seem like you will have plenty of time inbetween rides, but you won't! Be sure to give yourself time to walk your courses (sj and xc) and figure out where your dressage ring is.

Ok, thats all for now, getting sleepy! Let us know how it goes!!

sunhawk
May. 22, 2007, 02:06 AM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...
Oh, well I like them!:lol:

Equa
May. 22, 2007, 07:56 AM
Pet peeve? People who spur their horse into a flat-out gallop between the last fence and the finish after loping half heartedly around the course...then pulling up sharply and stopping hard after the finish flags, and THEN sitting on their puffing horse waiting for their friend who was riding after them...I often work on the finish and I tell these people off and dob them in to the TD (mean bad volunteer person!). If they are really really bad, I radio it in. The higher levels never ride like this, it's always the lowest level riders. Hopefully a little chat with the TD on the way back to the stables clears it all up and they never do it again.

As for curly maes - I can't do without one. VERY easy to get a good grip on XC when needed. Much easier to tangle the fingers in a curly mop than a sleek bob.

toeknee
May. 22, 2007, 08:21 AM
i have nothing new but can agree with many....curly manes! AHHHHH!! it was so funny to read this because i thought i was a weirdo for cringing at the curly manes. to each his own, but i will not let my horses out in public with curly manes:) i think it is so funny that people put there dogs on leashes but let them run loose, annoying but funny. clueless people walking cross country. people who dont appreciate their horses....oh i am sure there are many more....

InVA
May. 22, 2007, 10:44 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol:

Awh, pony with the crimpy hair:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2192440350055239353GpSwHl

:D

That poor horse! He's in DRAG!!! ( that, or he needs to fire his hairdresser!)

Invested1
May. 22, 2007, 10:48 AM
That poor horse! He's in DRAG!!! ( that, or he needs to fire his hairdresser!)

Whatever--he looks adorable! :D

InVA
May. 22, 2007, 11:53 AM
Whatever--he looks adorable! :D

I confess... he IS cute in SPITE of his hairdo...

(curly manes=billy ray cyrus hair! )

eqsiu
May. 22, 2007, 11:56 AM
2) Clearly these are children who are not (and never were) in Pony Club ;)

You would be amazed at what I see pony club parents do..and the kids who think they only have to do it themselves at rallies. Thank God my mother was not like that. We would have killed each other by now.

JSwan
May. 22, 2007, 12:01 PM
1) Lack of ability to pace their horse/knowledge of pace

2) People who blame mistakes on their horse. Actually - that should be number one. And not just for eventers.

Oh - and I have a suggestion for those with the curly mane problem - ROACH it! That's what I did - and my boy looked quite stunning.

I had to let it grow back in for hunting - cuz I... ahem..... was in dire need of something to hold onto.....

Dr. Doolittle
May. 22, 2007, 12:02 PM
:lol:

Well, I was in PC back when dinosaurs trod the earth :D (I tend to believe things were stricter then, and there was also simply less of a "child centered mentality" in general :sigh:...)

Back then, I did get some help from the maternal (and paternal) "parental units"--especially when I was really young (6 or 7), and then more help along the way, of course--but it was NOT the kind of "help" I think *you're* talking about! :eek: ;)

Invested1
May. 22, 2007, 12:03 PM
I confess... he IS cute in SPITE of his hairdo...

(curly manes=billy ray cyrus hair! )

Awh thanks. :D

Dr. Doolittle
May. 22, 2007, 12:06 PM
Yes, JSwan, that's a bit pet peeve of mine, too--it's childish, but adults do it too (and of course once in awhile it IS the horse--but in the case of mistakes, almost always the rider! What I *really* hate to see is a rider getting a horse to a bad spot for a jump, getting left--or jumping ahead because the horse chips--getting it in the mouth in the process :mad:, then getting mad at the horse! :rolleyes: If I get a less-than-perfect distance to a fence, I will *always* apologize to my horse, and give it a pat for forgiving me!)

Invested1
May. 22, 2007, 12:32 PM
If I get a less-than-perfect distance to a fence, I will *always* apologize to my horse, and give it a pat for forgiving me!)

Ditto. I've said "SORRY!!" (out loud, on course) to Tedi on more than one occasion. :sigh: :yes:

eqsiu
May. 22, 2007, 03:34 PM
:lol:

Well, I was in PC back when dinosaurs trod the earth :D (I tend to believe things were stricter then, and there was also simply less of a "child centered mentality" in general :sigh:...)

Back then, I did get some help from the maternal (and paternal) "parental units"--especially when I was really young (6 or 7), and then more help along the way, of course--but it was NOT the kind of "help" I think *you're* talking about! :eek: ;)

Yeah, I'm talking teenage C's whose parents do everything. My mom always polished my boots for me, and sometimes wiped down tack, but that was so I could spend the time on my horse.

Wellspotted
May. 22, 2007, 03:36 PM
I thought the OP's question was not what we think about hj riders coming into eventing, but about noneventers or new eventers coming into jumping.
More about how riders from one discipline compare to those from another. :confused:
Could we get back on course, please?

eqsiu
May. 22, 2007, 03:39 PM
I thought the OP's question was not what we think about hj riders coming into eventing, but about noneventers or new eventers coming into jumping.


I think the peeves generally address all new eventers, not just hunter converts. A lot of the horse care stuff is geared at people who haven't taken sole care of their pony or who just don't know how to in the first place.

Wellspotted
May. 22, 2007, 06:13 PM
Originally posted by Veebug22--
What are the things that get YOU about non-eventers coming into the sport?

Veebug, I read this question as What do we think about noneventers coming into the sport of show jumping? Is that what you wanted to know? Or is it What do we think about noneventers coming into the sport of eventing? Because my interest in your thread was to find out what show jumping people think about people coming into show jumping from hj or other noneventing backgrounds, but the majority of reply-posters seem to think the thread is about what we think of noneventers (e.g., hunter/jumpers) coming into eventing. So I'm confused. :confused: :)

Synrgystyk
May. 22, 2007, 10:07 PM
Veebug, I read this question as What do we think about noneventers coming into the sport of show jumping? Is that what you wanted to know? Or is it What do we think about noneventers coming into the sport of eventing? Because my interest in your thread was to find out what show jumping people think about people coming into show jumping from hj or other noneventing backgrounds, but the majority of reply-posters seem to think the thread is about what we think of noneventers (e.g., hunter/jumpers) coming into eventing. So I'm confused. :confused: :)

Ummm...if the OP had wanted to ask about people coming into showjumping, the question probably would've been posted on the *Hunter/Jumper* board. Since it's on the Eventing board I'd say it's a pretty safe assumption to read the question as asking about noneventers coming into eventing. :yes:

Lorree

criss
May. 22, 2007, 11:34 PM
Also, discussions wander off topic. It happens. Sorry, OP! :)

CarrieK, I so totally agree...I completely do not get why the most annoying, ankle-biting breed in the known world is the one so many horsepeople like to have around. They're cute, I guess, but when they're bored they're absolute menaces, and if you want to have one at an event, cage/leash that sucker at all times!!! I personally would never bring a dog to an event, and if I were on the road so much that that was the only way I could have a dog, I would bite the bullet and realize my lifestyle was such that I shouldn't have a dog.

As for moms doing the work at events...well, it ain't always what it seems. My mother (who I loved very much and was otherwise very close to, don't get me wrong) was an absolute menace at events. She swore up and down that she was not a competitive person, but she was so blisteringly intensely focused on competition through me that it made every single event or show we ever went to absolute misery because I was never working quite hard enough at giving the competition my all. She would do stuff for me, sure--not always what I wanted/needed done, but she did stuff, mucked my stalls 150 times an hour, walked my horses any time they weren't about to be ridden, generally fussed and fidgeted...and then screamed at me for not doing it myself! I'm fairly sure that a lot of people thought that I was lazy and ungrateful, but it really wasn't true. It was this weird passive-aggressive little-league-parent thing that she did, and while I did appreciate her help in some ways, I'd've happily done without it if I could have foregone the craziness too, and I would've happily mucked my own stalls if she hadn't made sure to beat me to it every.single.time. My trainer wanted to get her to stop coming to events, but there was no way that was going to happen.

The last event I went to during her lifetime--and I feel really bad about this now, in some ways, or course--wasn't with her. She wasn't feeling well, so my fiance went instead. She got all bent out of shape about how she had wanted to go, but not if he was going too because it was supposed to be just us, made me feel totally guilty, and then wasn't feeling good enough to go anyway. I had a great time at that event, didn't really get stressed out at all, and that was nice. Of course, I didn't know then that she was sick because she was dying, but, well, I didn't know. Oof, sorry, I think this is really oversharing.

So, moving past my personal issues, I would say, crazy pushy parents are a pet peeve of mine, especially ones who can't admit that they care about the competition when they really do.

eqsiu
May. 23, 2007, 11:26 AM
I too enjoy events more when my mom doesn't go. We drive each other nuts. That is why I loved pony club rallies. She wasn't allowed in the barns at all!

Criss, while my mom isn't dying (very sorry to hear about yours), she has a debilitating illness and I now regret that we fought at events. She isn't able to come watch much anymore. :(

criss
May. 23, 2007, 03:27 PM
Thanks, Eqsiu.:sadsmile: Sorry your mom is sick.

I should say, again (for the sake of my own guilty conscience over saying anything bad about her, I guess), that she was a fantastic mother pretty much any time we weren't at a horse show.

But yeah, the non-parental-interference thing was pretty much the only good thing about PC rallies...coulda lived without getting points off for my breeches being too dark a shade of beige, though... :rolleyes:

InVA
May. 23, 2007, 04:32 PM
[QUOTE=criss;2452160]Also, discussions wander off topic. It happens. Sorry, OP! :)

CarrieK, I so totally agree...I completely do not get why the most annoying, ankle-biting breed in the known world is the one so many horsepeople like to have around. ].

There is a reason they're shaped like footballs! PUNT! (oops another peeve is out!)

Aspire2JumpHigher
May. 24, 2007, 11:23 AM
It bothers me when people do not pay attention while walking the XC. The horses come through at intervals of time (generally 2mins at regular horse trials), so while walking the course, it isn't too tricky to remember that another one should be along shortly. I've seen many riders almost trample people who were wandering along the course not paying attention or who did not realize where the course went and had no idea where to go to get out of the way. I've also been the rider almost doing the trampling and it is quite gripping to be yelling at people to watch out while simultaneously dodging them as they scatter out of the way! Especially those people with children or slow moving dogs!

Okay...seriously I would never imagine bringing my dog onto a XC course while people are riding! :uhoh: Not only because I have a rather exuberant boxer but because riders have enough to worry about on their own! Imagine coming through some trees into an open field and your horse catching sight of a dog and woo-hoo the ride is dumped into the circular file.:eek: People should be more considerate and thoughtful of riders and horses that are not desensitized to dogs. :sigh:

I myself tie a lead rope around my waist with my pup blissfully attached to the other end so she can go in circles around me as she pleases. Of course, I grab her close any time a rider comes by…you just shouldn’t trust that their horses are okay with wiggly boxers like yours are.

On that same not, at DRPC I was out in the field videotaping for Dr. D. I was so worried that horses coming out of the lane/tree line into the field would spook at my bright blue jacket…so I very carefully ducked behind a tree or two and the feeder…so anyone who saw a blur of blue running from tree to tree knows who I am! :D

mandalea
Oct. 1, 2009, 06:34 AM
Anyone who ever yanks their horses face off.

Yep, and at my first HT, I saw some girl beat the tripe out of her horse with a broom handle, then proceed to kick it in the belly.

I've seen some pretty horrible stuff at some shows.

I didn't have the guts to say anything before, but if it happens again, I will definitely report it. It is against the FEI Horse Welfare rules.

And I hate people who judge my horse. Yes, he gets hairy in winter, and he's not big and flashy. But he does a bloody good dressage test, and will jump the moon if I asked him to. And he is SOOO much better behaved than the flashy, prissy WB/TB crosses. (No offense to anybody that has one, but here in AUs, they are always the ones rearing in the dressage warm-up)

And no, I might not have the $700 jacket that is the current fashion. Yes, mine might be a hand me down from my neighbour, but it does it's job, it meets the requirements, and it's comfy.

And Meredith is right on the ball. I am sick of people cutting into my circles when I am warming up. SO what if your horse is 17hh, and mine is 15hh. I am cantering, you are trotting, you should be stopping for me. It is easier for you to stop.

At my first HT, when I was warming up for stadium, I had some guy cutting in front of me whenever I want to jump the schooling oxer.

His horse would stop on the line, back up into the rider behind him, then he would do a half-as$ trot, let his horse refuse, and it would start all over again. Even with people yelling at him to get out of the way !

Then, the next day for XC, he was allowed on course without a back protector, and he ended up being dumped right next to my horse, when I was already having problems with him, and I ended up retiring.

I think it was because the open and junior classes were run together, and he thought us kids were just stupid or something.

Really, it's just people who scoff at those who don't look the part, then get shitty because we are actually successful at something.

Xcntrygirl: I ALWAYS say thankyou. They didn't have to come if they didn't want to. I have helped organize a few of my High Schools shows, and have had to stay up till 3:00 in the morning the night before, organizing my teams helmet covers, saddle pads, etc after spending all day setting up, then having them blow up in my face because they didn't come to ME, and now they don't have a sparkly browband, as planned, because I have mine and my sister horses to get ready, and I'm sorting everybody else out, telling people they're out of bounds etc.

Catalina
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:30 AM
Being fairly new to eventing myself, I don't really have any pet peeves. I am just beyond thrilled to have discovered a sport that I love and where the people are all so nice. I have met so many great people and I cannot imagine going back to jumper land :no:.

I do prefer the non-curly mane look, though. But, I usually do as Janet suggested and not braid at all :lol:. Of course, now that I am about to move up to Training in 2 days (:eek:), I guess I will have to braid :sigh:.

I also just bought a bling bridle (I couldn't resist, it was half price :winkgrin:). I think Connor looks handsome in it; my trainer wants to disown me :lol:.

tullio
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:40 AM
One thing that really gets to me is seeing people who are totally overmounted. In my foray into eventing I saw some people that had big, fit, disobedient horses that they didn't seem capable of handling in an arena, let alone out in the open. Not sure why all that horsepower is needed to conquer BN? But, people who have too much horse and don't know what to do with it is my pet peeve in all disciplines.

Since many other posters shared their favorite thing about eventing, I will tell you mine as someone coming from the H/J world: Eventers in general are the most upbeat, enthusiastic, optimistic folks I have ever been around. I was so impressed to hear riders at all levels come back to the barn from each phase and praise the heck out of their horses, and enthuse about the progress they had made since their last outing. There was a lot of emphasis on bettering themselves, and not as much on beating someone else/winning the event. I really liked that.

rideonbestrong
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:45 AM
All good comments...and meet people eventing, those stabled/trailered near you, others you find yourself next to. This is a friendly lot of folks, except for the few hold outs who are think they are above and beyond the rest of us, or are too wrapped up in tension...forgot them and enjoy.

pday09
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:58 AM
You sound like a conscientious rider that would make a great eventer! As with trying anything new, start small. Don't be afraid to go BN your first event, even if you're showing in the high level jumpers. You can always move up next time, but if you over face your horse and go home upset, the both of you will end up with unnecessary confidence issues.
Get GOOD cross country instruction from a REAL EVENTER before you go out and compete. Jumping those solid fences is a lot different than any stadium round.
DON'T think its about the ribbon. I love the jumpers because I can come home at the end of the day with a fistful of ribbons. When you go to an event, you might have the best ride of your life and not even place. The competition where I live is usually very stiff, so make sure your dressage is ready to rock, because placings are usually decided there. It was years before I could actually say I won an event. The great thing about eventers is that no one cares how you placed. We prefer to ask "how did you do?" rather than "how did you place." Because it doesn't matter, if you make it through clean, that is prize enough!
I love eventing because there is NOTHING like the rush you get after a good xc round. It makes all the hard work, butterflies, and $$$ so worth it. Eventers are also a great bunch of folks. Introduce yourself to the people next to you (before/after their rides of course, I know I tend to get way too focused to chit-chat) but I think you'll find that it's a lot of fun.

Jealoushe
Oct. 1, 2009, 09:05 AM
This thread is so old, but I will add to what I said then.

People who use major bittage because they either;

a) haven't trained their horse properly and can't use their aids to get things done or,

b) think it looks cool because they need so much hardware.

Of course, some people NEED major bittage, but it's easy to tell who does and who doesn't.

asterix
Oct. 1, 2009, 09:16 AM
Catalina, I'll let you in on a little secret: you can TOO go training without braiding. I do it all the time and my dressage scores don't track, trust me, whether or not I have braided. They seem to have more to do with, gasp, how I ride and how my horse is going (and sometimes what the judge thinks of my horse before we get in the ring -- you all know what I mean!!!). :D

Janet
Oct. 1, 2009, 09:24 AM
I do prefer the non-curly mane look, though. But, I usually do as Janet suggested and not braid at all :lol:. Of course, now that I am about to move up to Training in 2 days (:eek:), I guess I will have to braid :sigh:.
At Training, I only braid if it is a championship, or if the horse is (or is expected to be) for sale.

Catalina
Oct. 1, 2009, 09:55 AM
At Training, I only braid if it is a championship, or if the horse is (or is expected to be) for sale.

Shhhh..., but I plan on braiding this weekend, especially since my trainer is riding one of my boys and she would KILL me if he wasn't braided, but after that, I might just go back to the unbraided look :winkgrin: (after all, I have gotten in the 20s a few time with an unbraided mane :)).

saje
Oct. 1, 2009, 10:07 AM
I've decided that since

1)my horse's mane is quite thin,
2) it lies politely all on one side,
3) he hates it braided and will spaz trying to itch unless I do a bazillion teeny ones,
4) I show alone & on a budget

that he looks far tidier with his mane pulled very short and neat than with a braided, rubbed, and repaired mane.

If we get good enough to get to the Championships I'll spend the bucks for a braider and a sleazy, until then he's going more or less au naturale.

My peeves are
-people who think the world should step out of their way because they ride a high $$ horse w/ high$$ trendy equipment,
-those who have unruly dogs that are left in the stall to bark their fool heads off ALL.DAY.LONG (but I love seeing the well behaved dogs),
-those that are rude to volunteers and organizers
-people who swipe brooms, forks, and muckbuckets! I'll happily lend you my stuff if you ask, but if you take it I'll be PO'd!

It's ok to be a newbie to the sport (it's great actually, welcome!), but at least TRY to educate yourself about the rules and such, and do NOT expect it all to be spoon fed to you. You might be cut some slack if you've obviously put in a good effort to get it all right, but whining that "nobody TOOOOOLD me!!1!" isn't going to get you far.

inquisitive
Oct. 1, 2009, 10:50 AM
I really wish eventers did braided tails -- I like doing tails. :sigh:

I do :D


2. Moms and dads, mucking their little darling's stalls, cleaning the tack, grooming the horse....etc....etc....etc
........in addition to writing all the checks.

K, have to back myself up on this one. I've been showing since I was 4 (started with leadline, and all except the last 3 years in the hunters). My mom rode growing up, and now finds joy in my riding. I couldn't keep her from going to my shows if I wanted to. She's a big part of my horsey-life and I never ask her to do anything (except, hey, can you please grab my crop, or whatever). I try to tell her to let me do things but she likes being busy and likes doing horse things. Please don't think that every child (or adult in my case) who has a parent doing things for them is a spoiled brat!!! I'm just spoiled, but appreciate every moment of that, and tell her constantly.

mjrtango93
Oct. 1, 2009, 12:09 PM
OK this drives me NUTS...


Curly manes from having braids in! UGH! PEOPLE... WET the braids before you take them out... just squeeze a sponge on each one.. then when you take them out the mane lies FLAT!

Horse's look TERRIBLE with curly manes!

whew.. vent over...

Ok so apparently you can't buy the 4 year old I have now! He has a curly mane.....all the time. Don't know why, but no matter how wet you get his mane the second it dries it looks like he was just unbraided. His tail is starting to do it too now that it is getting longer.

paintedponiesrule
Oct. 1, 2009, 04:11 PM
Question, Why is it that eventers do not braid tails. I have a halter bread Paint = very big butt so he would look silly with a pulled tail but my thinking is it either needs to be pulled or braided but apparently not?

Pet pieve
1) unfit/un prepared horses but also unfit riders!
2) Is it really that hard to remember a dressage when you have had over 3 weeks since you have entered the event to learn??? (yes I understand that many people have multiple horses and shows before hand but these are not normally the people who forget)
3) show the dressage judge some respect and braid your horses mane, a quick braid takes 20 minutes, the more you braid the quicker you will get.

If you horse tried for you praise him even if he just got that rail down that cost you 1st place as more than likely it was your fault and not his.

Volunter at events, it will make you much more appreciative of people who are there to help you. I do not volunter if I am competing as I show out of my trailer and I would prefere not to have my horses standing at the trailer all day un attended.

Oh and I LOVE curley manes!! but my XC colors are also pink and black :)

Coppers mom
Oct. 1, 2009, 04:42 PM
My pet peeve would be rude people, especially in the warm-up. I was at a CT one time, and was getting ready to go next in dressage. This guy comes up to me and says "You don't think you're going next, do you?". I said yes, because after all, the secretary had just told me I was going next. The guy actually said to me "No, you're not. My horse is in his bubble, and we need to go now". He started trotting around the arena, so I just let him go. Then I got in trouble for going after my ride time *head desk*

Another pet peeve is that I'm the idiot who can never remember their test. I don't know why, but I could do the same test all season, go every weekend, and I'd still blank out going down the center line every single time. It's pretty horrifying to say the least :lol:

asterix
Oct. 1, 2009, 06:06 PM
I'd like to find that bubble and put MY horse in it :lol::lol:

We will just have to agree to disagree about showing the judge respect by braiding. I live 50 minutes from the barn, the horses live out 24-7 in a 70 acre field (not so easy to find them when it is dark out. There are woods, a stream, it's a whole horsey ecosystem). I am adult with NO braiding ability on a strict budget. It is not worth it to me to sacrifice sleep, or my horses' turnout, so I can fumble through putting in fugly braids that will only make the judge snicker.

I show respect for the judge by being neatly and correctly turned out, knowing my test, and trying my best to have a properly prepared horse appropriate for the level. Yes, I am that person who does not wear a jacket on warm days, now that it is NOT required for one day trials. Some of my best scores have been on unbraided horses, jacketless.:winkgrin:

Janet
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:27 PM
I show respect for the judge by being neatly and correctly turned out, knowing my test, and trying my best to have a properly prepared horse appropriate for the level. Yes, I am that person who does not wear a jacket on warm days, now that it is NOT required for one day trials. Some of my best scores have been on unbraided horses, jacketless.:winkgrin:

Same here.

riverpup
Oct. 1, 2009, 08:36 PM
I really love eventing, mostly the horses, and of course the people too.

But it drives me batty to see someone sitting on their horse after XC, chatting to a pal.

Your horse is not a couch!! --- get off, loosen the girth and walk her cool!

Since you asked....:D

Eventingjunkie
Oct. 1, 2009, 10:25 PM
Question, Why is it that eventers do not braid tails. I have a halter bread Paint = very big butt so he would look silly with a pulled tail but my thinking is it either needs to be pulled or braided but apparently not?

Our dressage trainer, who is also an "S" judge says that you should never braid horse's tails for dressage. Not sure why not. But also at the warmblood inspections they only braid the tails when horses are being shown hunter in hand, never for future dressage horses.

Artfulldodger
Oct. 2, 2009, 08:13 AM
Exactly as Riverpup said My huge pet peeve is when riders do not get off and cool out and take care of their horses after XC. OR when you see a rider leaving their horse tacked up and sitting sweating in their stall while the rider goes and changes and takes care of their needs before their horse's. I don't see this all that often but wow does it make me lose respect for that rider.
As for braiding I always braid for dressage. As for stadium I braid sometimes. It has kind of become a little bit of a joke in our barn. My trainer likes horses braided, so out of respect to her if you are in 1st -10th you braid unless you are over 18 and then you only have to braid if you are 1st- 9th ( unless you are in 9th and don't feel like it and then it is 1st-8th)

scubed
Oct. 2, 2009, 10:59 AM
Organizers who prominently post a list of specific ways competitors, who may have an hour or two to spare, can help. Ask and you shall receive.

This is a great one.

If you ride, volunteer.
If you organize, make it easier for your volunteers.
I once offered to volunteer for a 1/2 day at an event that I was near due to a work conference, but could do an afternoon on Saturday and morning on Sunday and they said they could only use full day volunteers :confused: Boy, they must have an easier time getting volunteers than many places

Other pet peeves:
people walking the courses who pay attention neither to whether horses are coming, nor to the jump judges telling them that horses are coming and they need to move

people who say, "but I've used it at other horse trials" to the volunteer who tells them their bit/spurs/whip are illegal. Not all volunteers have the resources to check everything, but know these rules

Things I love about eventing:

The starter who notices that my horse is running sideways and bucking in the warm-up and asks if I will be ready at my time or need some extra

The BNRs who are riding multiple horses at events, but are unfailing polite to the volunteers and show up for every ride on time

The organizers who are really organized, take great care of their volunteers and pay attention to event evaluations, thus improving the event each year

The riders who happily volunteer equipment to each other

The riders who tell the next person where the tricky bits are as they come off the cross country cross

The riders/trainers/grooms/volunteers/organizers/officials who always have a kind word and often a cold beer for you after a rough go

Equa
Oct. 3, 2009, 05:43 AM
Hey CoppersMom, maybe you should have leaned over and pointed pointedly at his horse and said "POP!! Bubble all bursted, now you'll just have to wait for me to go, and maybe use the time to help him find a new bubble...."

Oh yeah, and my biggest peeve is non-vollies - people who have to support their indulged "child" (usually a 21 year old at their 250th event). Mum, Dad, Aunty, Uncle and all the dogs have to be available for warmup, applause, and debrief for each phase, so can't possibly assit the organisers.

pinkdiamondracing
Oct. 3, 2009, 09:24 AM
Ditto. I've said "SORRY!!" (out loud, on course) to Tedi on more than one occasion. :sigh: :yes:

Not a pet peeve-- but on this subject---- I heard a girl @ Caber Farms HT yell "I Love You!!!" to her horse after he saved her butt over a pretty big and hairy looking Trakehner!!! My Ddad-- who is an eventing trainer commented" he earned that one!!" I thought it was-a) good that she knew she rode him to a crappy spot, and b) that she acknowleged his effort to bail them out of the mess she put them in out loud for the crowd to hear

lionstigersbears
Oct. 3, 2009, 01:17 PM
Not a pet peeve-- but on this subject---- I heard a girl @ Caber Farms HT yell "I Love You!!!" to her horse after he saved her butt over a pretty big and hairy looking Trakehner!!! My Ddad-- who is an eventing trainer commented" he earned that one!!" I thought it was-a) good that she knew she rode him to a crappy spot, and b) that she acknowleged his effort to bail them out of the mess she put them in out loud for the crowd to hear

When I was eventing all the time, I was definitely a rider who talked to my horse. I do get that shouting 'UP!' or what have you before a fence is silly and pointless, but I did and probably still will when I start eventing again talk to my horse throughout the entire course. In a normal, perhaps slightly breathless voice, along the lines of 'hey, look it's a cool log jump, we like logs, I know this one looks big because its up this hill and there are those flowers there, but this is going to be fun, here we go, ok, good boy!' which I knew had absolutely no affect on my horse whatsoever, but it kept me breathing and somewhat calm so it did help. And I am guilty of having shouted 'GOOD BOY' after a sticky jump or whenever my horse went through water (his huge fear). So, yeah, the people that shout I think are probably doing it for themselves rather than any misguided notion that it actually affects their horse, or at least that's what I always think.

My biggest pet peeve was people who thought because they had a trainer with them they got some sort of priority in the warm up ring and that everyone else should avoid the twenty meter circle they are doing at the end of the tiny ring with their trainer in the middle of it shouting directions. And I cursed the life of a girl (in my head obviously) who wouldn't let me pass her on course. If your horse is spinning in circles in front of a jump, refusing to go over it, there is a rider behind you and the jump judge is asking you to let the other rider through, get the hell out of the way and let me through!

ohhthatgirl
Oct. 3, 2009, 04:52 PM
The Pet Peeves
+ Poor presentation. You don't have to be fancy, but please be clean & safe. (Actually, I prefer not to be fancy. Classic tack and equipment. No bling, no neon.)
+ Grey horses having manure stains on XC. (Throw in a curly mane and uh oh! :eek: haha)
+ People who don't know how to win graciously and those need to accept that it just wasn't their day.
+ People who don't dismount, loosen their girth, and hop off their ponies after XC.

But I do love the fact that people will genuinely ask you how you did; how the volunteers always wish you your best; and how eventers usually have a "horse first" mentality.

mandalea
Oct. 3, 2009, 05:55 PM
Not a pet peeve-- but on this subject---- I heard a girl @ Caber Farms HT yell "I Love You!!!" to her horse after he saved her butt over a pretty big and hairy looking Trakehner!!! My Ddad-- who is an eventing trainer commented" he earned that one!!" I thought it was-a) good that she knew she rode him to a crappy spot, and b) that she acknowleged his effort to bail them out of the mess she put them in out loud for the crowd to hear

I talk to Taffy all the time :)

In stadium, he can be going really well in the warm up, then the first 2 jumps he's ok, then he starts having a break down, which is when I start half yelling 'good boy !' at him :D I do it on XC as well.

He's a seasoned pro, but he still gets really nervous. I tell him he's the good boy he is, the whole time. :)

knitgirl
Oct. 4, 2009, 08:11 PM
I don't event, but I jump judged at the Maui Jim and the AECs this year and I have to say, I was really touched when people did thank us. Both days were long and fairly hot with no shade, so it was very nice to be appreciated.

Neets
Oct. 4, 2009, 10:54 PM
I definitely agree about manure stains. This goes for paints too! At the AEC's, there was one girl in my division who, although she was very nice and looked to be a competent rider, had an absolutely filthy, manure-stained grey horse. There is no excuse for not washing your horse. Yes, the water there felt like it was pumped in from Arctic Ocean, but having a clean horse is non-negotiable. At least scrub at it with a curry and use spot-out if you're running late!

Another along this line is people who have someone else scrub their horse's white spots at 6am in the morning on a freezing cold day. Get your butt out of bed and do it yourself! (I am not talking about the people who have crazy parents that just LOVE scrubbing white. Lucky you! :) )

People who don't call fences when they're schooling. At my last XC school, there were three jumps at the beginning of the course: one beginner novice, one novice, one training. I called novice, and when one of the other people in the warm up started heading towards it, I called novice a bit louder, and she responded, "That's where I'm going!" :mad:

Would it kill you to inform someone else about it, and maybe wait for the person who's called it before you to go?! (It bothered me even more that this was an experienced, professional rider in my area who goes up to I. Just because you think you're the sh*t does not give you the right to any fence you want!) /rant over.