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olympicdreams04
Mar. 4, 2007, 11:16 AM
I am an event rider who has been asked...okay well, begged to exercise ride a friends TB's. The hours are NOT my friend, but I am hard pressed to turn down $750 a week. Here is my question: what is standard procedure. In the past, I have hacked horses out for this guy, but never actually galloped them. I event though the Advanced level and galloping horses it not a problem and I am fairly certainly my riding is of the appropriate skill level to handle this, just not sure what exactly is expected. Usual lengths (I'm sure they vary)? Stirrup length? Get on get off or do I cool out? Any and all information would be helpful.

kenwoodallpromos
Mar. 4, 2007, 01:17 PM
Clockerbob.com. Bob was a morning workout clocker for many years and was happy to respond to some of my emails. Also Gary Stevens has his own website. Mnay trainers and farms that train TBreds up to racing are online- try "racing links"

Equilibrium
Mar. 4, 2007, 01:44 PM
First off are you going to be at the track or a farm?

At the track you will need a license. You will have to be watched by outriders in the morning who will asses you and say yay or nay to you working in the mornings.

Obviously as you've evented at upper levels I don't think you are going to have problems. I galloped for 13 years and did the Future Event Horse League here in Ireland. This required none of the skill of upper level eventing and I thought it was way harder. O.K. possibly because of the dressage stuff, but you have to be very fit to do eventing. Fitness is a big part of galloping.

Just listen to what your told to do and do it to the best of your ability. There are rules such as no galloping on the rail as this is where breezes take place. Always pay attention to what's going on around you. Loads of people are out there making a living so they are very protective of their livelihoods. So always pay attention and ask questions from people you respect. If I came to your eventing barn I'm sure you would appreciate a person who is trying to learn so I would ask questions.

Stirrup length depends on the individual horse. A lot of people ride short all the time. I like to ride long when a horse is just jogging as I can make him use his hind leg. Most of the time I would put my stirrups up mid length for galloping. If I was on a horse that was a know puller or difficult to gallop, then I would ride short. These are things you learn as you go along. Just remember, the longer you ride, the longer you ride. We could always spot newbies because they always rode way too short in order to impress and most of the time ended up on the ground. Also, very hard to get a lazy horse into the bridle when your stirrups are up your arse!

Usually, horses are brought out in sets. You get a leg up go to the track come back get off set your tack and on the next one. You might have 5 mins between horses. All tracks have break time to harrow so you might get a coffee in at this time.

I'm going to get flamed here, but there is a big diffrence in an event rider galloping and a hunter rider wanting to gallop. Don't care, there is a huge diffrence.

Clothing. You need a vest, appropriate helmet and wear jeans with paddock boots and half chaps or full chaps. Or get yourself a good pair of tall kroop boots and jeans. Always where jeans over the boots in this situation.

Anyway, hope I've helped

Terri

Linny
Mar. 4, 2007, 02:46 PM
Great advice already offered.
One other thing, racetracks and training tracks are measured in furlongs (1/8 miles) and 1/16ths.You will need to become familiar with the poles around the track marking the distance from the wire. They are measured backwards from the finish line. So when you are at "the 1/8 pole" you are 1/8 mile (1 furlong) from the finish line.
If you are at a training center, determine how big the track is then check out the poles. Trainers tend to give orders like "jog him backwards to the 1/2 mile, then turn and to 'round twice." This means trot clockwise to the 1/2 mile pole then reverse and gallop around to the finish line, past the line and around again. Most training ends at the finish line, but not all. Sometimes horses get wise to things and get lazy near the wire. Trainers may try to trick them up and have them keep galloping beyond the wire.

solargal
Mar. 4, 2007, 03:51 PM
Ditto on the event riders. They usually don't have much problem getting started. If at the track you will need to learn the basic rule of the track.

i.e.
Stay off the rail if you aren't working.
When going backwards, the gates have the right of way.;)
Don't panic when a horse is running off.
Where to pull up.

There are lots of little things. The pay sounds really good, you'll learn as you go. Don't worry about stirrup length, do whatever you feel comfortable.

QHJockee
Mar. 4, 2007, 09:12 PM
Remember the slower you are galloping the more outside you should be. If you are passing call "Inside" (or in the case, "Outside") or "Coming on your inside/outside. Always be aware of your surroundings and keep looking all around. If you know the name of the person galloping in front of you I like to call out the name as well: "Coming on your inside Cristyn", that helps with the confusion.

You may also like to know that a lot of the horses come out of the stall with the saddle not tight, so keep in mind you may need to tighten from the saddle, not the ground, unless you need to reset the tack. Do you know how to tie a knot?

PM me, I'll be happy to help.

Be sure you have a handy pair of goggles, I prefer the turf goggles as they seem to have the best scope of vision and sun blocking. I can wear them all morning as opposed to traditional jockey goggles.

holmes
Mar. 4, 2007, 11:05 PM
My word of advice - Don't hit them harder than you can ride them!

Prime Timber
Mar. 5, 2007, 10:14 AM
I have galloped from NY to FL and I found most tracks to be the same the farm is different and much more low key. It's a great learning tool and there are plenty of quality folks out there with great advice, just find some someone you trust and let them guide you. If you are on the east coast pm me and I can give you the names of some real ,honest, good folks that won't stear you wrong. Your gonna love it:winkgrin:

gardenie
Mar. 5, 2007, 10:18 AM
If not do you have health insurance? What does it cover?

Make sure this guy takes care of you. Galloping horses is great fun, but don't kid yourself, you will fall off sometime, and you can get hurt.

Equilibrium
Mar. 5, 2007, 01:27 PM
Every licensed trainer has to have workmens comp so that shouldn't be a problem.

HLAS, Oh yes, best advice possible. My rule on smacking when one was acting up is, never get myself into something I can't get out of. Needless to say, their wasn't much stick usage on badies from me!!!!

Terri

tbracer65
Mar. 5, 2007, 02:41 PM
Every licensed trainer has to have workmens comp so that shouldn't be a problem.

HLAS, Oh yes, best advice possible. My rule on smacking when one was acting up is, never get myself into something I can't get out of. Needless to say, their wasn't much stick usage on badies from me!!!!

Terri

This is not true. Not every racetrack requires that every licensed trainer have workmens comp. I don't. So you better check this out, too.

jengersnap
Mar. 5, 2007, 03:01 PM
Wow, TBRacer, where do you ride? If the OP is in NY or any of the nearby states, the trainer will certainly have to have workman's comp coverage on the riders at the track.

Also to answer your last question, you get on and get off. The hotwalkers/grooms walk horses or they just put them on the machine, depending on the outfit. DEFINATELY get comfortable riding boots. Hubby's are Kroops too. After 30+ years, he's rubbed the legs so much the hair is permenantly gone. I kid him about having smoother legs then mine.

Have fun! Perhaps you can go over one morning before starting and just watch from the rail. I've been doing that for years and the respondants here are spot-on on their advice.

olympicdreams04
Mar. 5, 2007, 07:53 PM
You guys have all been so helpful, I really appreciate your advice. Will I be the laughing stock of the track if I wear breeches? I'll try to refrain from fullseat, but I LIVE in breeches. Also, just to clarify, I will be at a private farm not at a track...yet. We'll see how much I like it. I am riding 10-15 horses a day now and then working all night at a vet clinic and not making 1/2 of what I could make exercising so I think the risks may be worth it. And I can def stomach the hours. I'll let everyone know how it goes and will be PMing a couple of you for more info.

holmes
Mar. 5, 2007, 09:03 PM
I would not wear breeches for the main reason - a lot of grooms and hot walkers are rather ferrel, and you will attract a lot of unwanted attention. I would dress down, jeans, rugby shirt - something you would garden in.

The hours are really not bad, it makes a great excuse for afternoon naps.

solargal
Mar. 5, 2007, 11:18 PM
If you are just going to the guys farm and not a training center or anything, breeches are fine. I doubt many people will be there. Now if you go to the track or big training center, people are probably going to give you a hard time.;)

Barnfairy
Mar. 5, 2007, 11:59 PM
Years ago one summer I galloped at a farm (if you can even call it that -- it was a very very small stable) and I wouldn't have been caught dead wearing breeches there. It just would have felt like eventing in cowboy boots. So it comes down to the atmosphere around the particular farm, I suppose. I wore jeans, half-chaps, paddock boots, and a clean T-shirt or polo tucked in. I never even carried a stick.

Sometimes what goes on at small farms can be rather different than the track environment. We didn't have a training track at home. We hacked out or did laps around the nearby water tower. Trainer would tell me what he wanted done as he threw me up (literally) into the tack. On weekdays I hot walked whatever horse I had ridden (did I mention it was a small stable?) I learned how to set up legs. Even did stalls once in a while if needed. Most weekends we shipped in to the track. I helped load up the trailer. I couldn't ride there (no license) but I did walk hots. Yes, there were some characters with elevator eyes, but for the most part everyone I dealt with was very professional and respectful.

Though I was in good shape and had ridden a lot when I agreed to ride there, I was very young and quite small then. I did have trouble with one young stallion in particular who knew he was entire and spent a lot of time in the air. The trainer had me ride with longish stirrups (though still a bit shorter than my average jumping length) using a double bridge and I had good enough balance that most times I could stick out the shenanigans, but as I wasn't very strong then he could still get the better of me. Speak up if you are uncomfortable. A good trainer won't want to jeopardize either you or the horse.

Acertainsmile
Mar. 6, 2007, 10:40 AM
I would suggest if you are starting out at the track that you are ponied first... I had a "newbie" come into the barn, she was a very good rider and had been excersising at a very good farm. She was a little unsteady on her first two horses, nerves played a part in this too. I let her know things like when you are jogging the wrong way to say coming by when she passed other horses. There is racetrack etiquette! Also to stay off the rail, and pull up from a gallop towards the outside, and always be aware of whats behind you! If you are switching from eventing to galloping at the track, the reins are different, (thicker) the saddles are different also. It might take a few miles for you to get your "riding" legs. Just make sure you are put on easy horses at first so you can get fit.

I had ridden show horses/event horses for years, since I was 6, and started galloping when I was 17, it was alot different. I galloped for 25 yrs from New York to Fla.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 6, 2007, 12:29 PM
My base of riding forever has been eventing. I competed up through Intermediate and now am an asst trainer on the track and an active ex. rider. During the years I have galloped on average between 5-10 sets a day.

The secret to my success has been my attire. It used to be half chaps or full chaps and jeans. Now I have sadly conformed to everyone else a bit more.

I wear regular shirts, safety vest and have an army of jackets to cover every element that mother nature can whip at me.

The pants and leggings combo are the big thing for me. Most ex. riders on the tracks wear leggings underneath jeans and either paddock boots and pant clips, or taller jockey like boots that reach to around the knee. Both give you protection against calf rubs, a HUGE problem among ex. riders. Its pretty important to have the heavyweight kind, not the thin ones that Dover sells.

Me, I add one more thing to it, I wear Ace Brand neoprene knee support wraps, the leggings over the bottom edge of the knee support so that my entire leg, from top of knee to ankle is protected. But thats because I have had a lot of rubs and got sick of bleeding all over my jeans.


Knee Wraps:http://www.americarx.com/productimages/kinray/687319.gif

Here's a pic of me and you can't really tell all the bulk I have on underneath my jeans.

http://www.finalturngallery.com/album751/fh9

~Emily

Equilibrium
Mar. 6, 2007, 01:23 PM
Put a picture up of me galloping a few years ago in case anyone is interested.
Terri




http://s8.photobucket.com/albums/a7/teb36/?action=view&current=indian2.jpg

Xctrygirl
Mar. 6, 2007, 01:28 PM
Oh man Equilibrium, what I would give to be your size!! I always feel like I make even big horses look small. Meanwhile you look great on that horse.

So you survived working for D wayne...Ok I'm impressed. :)

~Emily

holmes
Mar. 6, 2007, 01:47 PM
I was talking to someone about riding - he said nah you can be 10 and a half stone and be fine, which I turned around and was like I am 12!

Equilibrium
Mar. 6, 2007, 01:54 PM
xcitygirl,
Thank you, just lucky to be small. Yes I did survive working for Wayne. I remember back when I was smoking, I tried to never let anyone see I smoke anyway he saw me and said, Those things will kill you. In my mind I was thinking, yeah right some of those things I have to breeze for you will kill me quicker than cigarettes.

Also have seen really small people that looked more heavy on a horse than a taller larger person. It depends on your athletisicm more than your actual weight. Even if your small you can be very disruptive to a horses balance.

Terri

Xctrygirl
Mar. 6, 2007, 02:07 PM
Ok Hung Like a Stallion, you're name has just become too difficult and long to type over and over. Hence you just got a nickname...."Studly" :D

If you dislike it too much, Pm me and I will amend.

Ok now,

Equilibrium, I agree completely. I think I have been luck to weight around 10-11 stone. http://www.metric-conversions.org/weight/pounds-to-stones.htm

But I have seen people in all shapes and sizes who are ranging from very useful to all out hopeless.

I manage to keep myself in the "useful but not Edgar Prado" category. And as long as I stay there I keep going out and doing circles.

~Emily

olympicdreams04
Mar. 10, 2007, 11:28 AM
I went out to "interview" on Friday morning (yay, don't start riding til 7!), popped on a couple of horses and took the job and finished sets that day. Have a busy Monday, but start officially on Tuesday. It's really a great farm with very sane, well cared for horses and I seem to get on with the trainer well enough. The other rider, though a bit brusque, I think will be good to ride with. The only draw back is the LOOOOOONG drive. I am somewhat regretfully quitting my job Vet Teching which I do from 8pm to 4am and obviously can't do and exercise ride and sleep. I sent out in jeans with boots and halfchaps beneath them and an appropriate skull cap and vest, goggles, and a crop. Was a litle out of place, lol. They are very low key and I think I will probably gradually convert over to breeches and tall boots. One of the riders didn't wear a helmet!!!!! and the other didn't wear a vest, both of which are staple apparel items for me, but if they want their innards coming out their ears, so be it.

Equilibrium
Mar. 10, 2007, 02:07 PM
O.K. I think I would have issues galloping somewhere where helmets aren't madatory, call me prima donna I'm used to it, but holy shazam batman, no helmets. Well at least you had a good day. I am a helmet and vest person all the time too. I sort of feel naked without my vest.

When I was in California I did this schedule for a month. Gallop from 4:30am to 9:30am, 10:30ish to 2:00pm ride showjumpes for Richard Spooner, then 8:00pm til 4:00am vet clinic. I had to keep an eye on things and do meds every 2 hours. You could sleep inbetween. Crazy, but I was young then and couldn't spend any of the money I was earning!
Terri

olympicdreams04
Mar. 10, 2007, 07:40 PM
O.K. I think I would have issues galloping somewhere where helmets aren't madatory, call me prima donna I'm used to it, but holy shazam batman, no helmets. Well at least you had a good day. I am a helmet and vest person all the time too. I sort of feel naked without my vest.

When I was in California I did this schedule for a month. Gallop from 4:30am to 9:30am, 10:30ish to 2:00pm ride showjumpes for Richard Spooner, then 8:00pm til 4:00am vet clinic. I had to keep an eye on things and do meds every 2 hours. You could sleep inbetween. Crazy, but I was young then and couldn't spend any of the money I was earning!
Terri

I've been at the vet clinic for months and ride hunters and dressage horses from the 10-2ish hour so something has to give. Glad not to have to work nights anymore consistantly but I will still be "on call" so we shall see how it goes. I really like the trainer and the other rider so I am not too concerned with the no helmet thing...personal choice I guess. I wonder about insurance, but we will see.

QHJockee
Mar. 11, 2007, 08:27 PM
O.K. I think I would have issues galloping somewhere where helmets aren't madatory,

I used to keep a few horses at a training center where one of the jocks would come and gallop horses for his g/f and wear a vest but no helmet. I often wondered the logic behind that. And it wasn't just him, it was several folks. I dunno, I realized they don't call them "pinheads" for nuttin!

So happy you are fulfulling your dreams

Barnfairy
Mar. 11, 2007, 11:04 PM
What I don't get are people who wear a helmet but don't bother to fasten the chin strap. Why wear one at all then?

olympic, I hope it all works out for you and that you continue to share with us what you can. :)

HunterJumperGin
Mar. 20, 2007, 11:53 PM
Not to hijack, but... someone mentioned not pannicking when getting run off with earlier. What DO you do when you have an "Oh, crap, here goes" moment? Something I've always wondered...

Congrats Olympic Dreams!! Perhaps I can live vicariously through you? :D

GallopGirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 12:44 AM
Not to hijack, but... someone mentioned not pannicking when getting run off with earlier. What DO you do when you have an "Oh, crap, here goes" moment? Something I've always wondered...


You know going into it, it's going to happen at some point. You can't keep fighting, so you let them go for a while. Try to stay hugged up on the inside rail so you don't kill anyone else and ride to the point where you normally pull up - like just past the start finish line, then try to pull up. If it doesn't work, you get back down, save your strength and try it again the next time around. If you get into a fight and pull for all your worth and lose all your strength, then you're really hosed. Now the horse is still running and you have no muscles left - they're jello. You just have to conserve your energy and pull up where and when you can.

If you're in serious trouble you can yell for the outrider to try to come and save you. Most of the time when I got run off with it was just because the horse was really fresh and didn't want to gallop, s/he wanted to work. You just go with it and pray you don't run up anyone's rear. You then might have to deal with the wrath of the trainer, but that's not near as bad as the feeling of being totally out of control. But they know it happens every once in a while, so it's not that big of a deal.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 08:47 AM
Just as an alternative view, I gallop at a track without outriders, so the "Oh Crap" moments are up to you to fix.

Basically as has been stated, everyone in this industry knows its a part of daily training life. I knw from personal experience that overcoming the urge to pull your hardest was the big thing in reducing run offs for me. The moment you try to "Lock down" on their mouths, is pretty much when you feel turbo kick in.

Its a very hard thing to learn to drop the reins but really thats what is the key. And I agree the biggest thing to look out for is where everyone else around you is on the track. Steering becomes a bigger issue.

I had one about 2 years ago, who took off but he went out a notch while lugging out. It was far worse when I was 6-9 wide off the rail and trying to pave a path of safety for both me and the rest of the normal gallopers. That was at a track with outriders but since I didn't call for help, they assumed I was just brainless. Believe me when I got him pulled up I was shaking and the wrath I took from the outriders for not calling for help was way way worse than what the trainer said to me. But the outriders were right, if you need help, don't wait, scream for it immediately.

Even if it might be possible to get the horse back yourselves, get help coming so they can help you and protect the other horses and riders out there.

~Emily

gallupgirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 09:54 AM
I'll add.....don't ever allow the horse to lope when backtracking, even a little----it can quickly turn into a runaway and a backwards runaway....:eek:

Stay well off the rail when galloping......I know this sounds really, really basic but you would be suprised at how many people don't get it.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 10:04 AM
Oh and gallupgirl reminded me...

IF you are going by someone, PLEASE be courteous and yell "Coming by" or "On your inside" or "RAIL" or something like it.

I had a really scary moment at Belmont last winter. I was galloping first set, in the dark going into the wind, and a person came by me on a black horse, dark tack, dark jackets and never said a thing. He literally brushed my leg as he went smoking by. And mind you I was at least 12 feet off the rail.

IF you can't be seen easily, please be vocal enough so we can at least hear you coming. Fast rolling hoofbeats for 5 seconds doesn't cut it in a windstorm.


~Emily

olympicdreams04
Mar. 21, 2007, 02:38 PM
Okay, so first week was more or less uneventful, baring one cartwheeling incident that involved cows. Fortunately, the track is/was very deep and no damage done to either party. When I showed up for work yesterday, the trainer had hired a girl on long-term salary, with a contract or atleast thats what I gathered. Instead of firing me however, she sent me to a friend. I was initially skeptical but when I went in today, the facilities are lovely, the horses are acceptable, and I can get on twice as many in the same amount of time. So far so good. I am ever so tempted to wear breeches as the jean seams are doing a number on any part of my body they touch, but I have to keep my distance from the other riders as is. Damnit!

Barnfairy
Mar. 21, 2007, 02:59 PM
I don't know if this would be of any help, but, I use stretch jeans for riding. :uhoh: "Riders" jeans (a division of Lee) from WalMart, 98% cotton 2% lycra. For some reason I find them much more comfortable than all cotton Levis or Wranglers, even though the seams are in the same place.

When I exercised I ended up with nasty nasty sores on the insides of my legs below my knees. I think if I were to do it today I'd follow Emily's advice and wear leggings under the jeans.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 04:04 PM
I am ever so tempted to wear breeches as the jean seams are doing a number on any part of my body they touch, but I have to keep my distance from the other riders as is. Damnit!

Ok let me sound stupid for a second, ...WHY are you staying away from the other riders? And which track are you riding at? Or training center?

~Emily

holmes
Mar. 21, 2007, 04:10 PM
Oh and gallupgirl reminded me...

IF you are going by someone, PLEASE be courteous and yell "Coming by" or "On your inside" or "RAIL" or something like it.

I had a really scary moment at Belmont last winter. I was galloping first set, in the dark going into the wind, and a person came by me on a black horse, dark tack, dark jackets and never said a thing. He literally brushed my leg as he went smoking by. And mind you I was at least 12 feet off the rail.

IF you can't be seen easily, please be vocal enough so we can at least hear you coming. Fast rolling hoofbeats for 5 seconds doesn't cut it in a windstorm.

So me crying 'Oh ****' every stride is not enough?

Arcadien
Mar. 21, 2007, 04:38 PM
For nasty sores under jeans, my "magic formula" that always worked (and even protected old healing sores!):

#1 Long sock (all the way up to knee)
#2 (don't laugh) long maxi pad - the sticky side to the sock on inside of leg, long so it covers inside of knee well down calf.
#4 Ace wraps (always fasten on outside to avoid bump)

Put jeans over that, you look like everyone else but your legs are PROTECTED baby!

(Note, you can wear same maxis a few times, but eventually need to change as they soak up sweat fast, guess that's what they were designed for, LOL. I've heard of others using diapers, but the pads work best for me)

One other tip, use shoes/boots with good treads - I once started to feel insecure, couldn't seem to keep my feet under me, and finally realized the treads on my boots had worn smooth - new boots, security returned instantly!

Did someone tell you to always carry a crop yet? Usually it stays stuffed in your belt &/or back pocket, but boy when you need it, you'll be very glad it's there! Especially with babies who may have a melt down in the middle of the track (been there, didn't have the stick, had to get ponied back to the barn, the stinker)

Sigh, just writing about it I miss it, but my 40 yo knees are telling me to stick with my own horses - at least I have 2 babies that may soon get to galloping and give me some flashbacks!

Good luck,

Arcadien

Xctrygirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 04:43 PM
So me crying 'Oh ****' every stride is not enough?

My dear friend Studly...

If you live up to your screen name, then I will likely hear that "appendage" flapping up behind me....

And then your screams coupled with the aerodynamic sounds will yes be just enough. ;)

~Emily

holmes
Mar. 21, 2007, 05:21 PM
More like my arms flapping - doing the funky chicken down the stretch as I bobble around ontop!

Xctrygirl
Mar. 21, 2007, 08:24 PM
Just go hop on Messaging, at least that way the hopping up and down will coordinate with his random tail swishes!!

~Emily

holmes
Mar. 21, 2007, 09:48 PM
HA HA HA - it was really bad as when i rode him I did not adjust Michael's stirrups (I thought doing so would be rude), borrowed a helmet far too small for me, was riding in my sneakers (which did not fit into the irons) and when Peter and one of the other lads went trotting off, he was the laziest son of a gun. I was tempted to kick him in the flanks to try and get him too move, but decided not to draw more attention to myself as my riding at that point was HORRIBLE!!! I was really embarrassed!!!!

HunterJumperGin
Mar. 21, 2007, 11:44 PM
Thanks for the replies to the "running away" question. I doubt I will ever get to gallop on a real track, so I suppose I will have to stick with those "Impromptu oh crap moments" w/ muh OTTB on the back 40. Yall have GUTS!

Equilibrium
Mar. 22, 2007, 02:00 AM
Eventer,
A quick fix for your legs would be polo's under your jeans, you know on the lower leg. Every now and then I would forget my chaps (hmmm, where did I leave those last night-ha ha), and they would work just fine and they're very comfy as well.

Terri

olympicdreams04
Mar. 22, 2007, 04:37 PM
You guys crack me up! Emily, I have recently lasso'd me a cowboy and am rather content playing around with him for now. Mmmmmm tight Wranglers and undershirts. Okay okay, and it doesn't help that the riders at the track are not all that attractive. Nice yes, attractive no, been in jail yes, speak english no. You get the idea. Anyway, to be a little more specific but to attempt not to be explicit, the seam in the crotch is the one causing the problem. I have always lived by the philosophy that underwear is just another thing contributing to the laundry pile and thus is not a necessity. This has never caused me a problem, despite the many hours spend sitting trot. I'm just weird I guess. You guys/girls jinxed me by talking about run aways. Had one today. Came back to the barn with jelly arms to the response, "Oh yeah, he hasn't been out in two weeks since he breezed...threw a shoe." Came around the first turn and he thought it was time to get down to business. That was that. Somewhat fortunately, a flock of crows landed on the fence bordering the backside, he did a double take and was preoccupied just long enough to get his head around. Definitely been an interesting second week!

Barnfairy
Mar. 22, 2007, 04:45 PM
I have always lived by the philosophy that underwear is just another thing contributing to the laundry...:o TMI! TMI! :o

I'm glad you survived your runaway. How fortunate those crows weren't the harbingers of doom.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 22, 2007, 07:05 PM
OK couple things...

1.) Woo Hooo on the cowboy.. "Save a horse, Ride a Cowboy" Great way to live!!!

2.) There are folks who like smaller loads of laundry here too. I think what helps them are jeans with less seam and more elasticity. Play around with a few brands. Rocky mountain Jeans are good sometimes too. ASk the cowboy, he'll know where to find them ;)

3.) Aren't run offs fun!!! Crows can be a godsend, they are just enough to look at either at the right time or wrong time!!!

4.) Still thinking about the cowboy...:)

5.) Other riders who speak spanish. Look over and smile and say "Sonria quando tu mirra a mi nalgas." :) (Pronounced, Sohn Ri Ah quan doh 2 mir rah a (Short vowel) Me Nal gas)
{Translation: "Snile when you look at my butt"} They'll laugh and think you're cool. Next time I'll give you something equally fun to say that can make them blush. :eek:

OK thats it...

~Emily

threeday0902
Mar. 22, 2007, 08:36 PM
I have to say that exercise riding has been about the best thing since I went Intermediate for the first time. I just started galloping at our local track and what a BLAST. Although I am more sore now then I have been in forever! Like since the last bad spill I took. I got on one today that just pulls but if you lighten she goes faster! The trainers instructions were- let her pull but you will be in trouble if you soften or pull back to hard. Don't let the workers come up on you inside or she will drop in and start breezing. Good luck and don't fall off. Ummm- OK- I have been at this for two days but sure!!
HAve ridden event horses for my entire life but.... Wrong Icon- it was fun!

Xctrygirl
Mar. 22, 2007, 09:56 PM
Ohhhh thats nothing. :eek:

A friend of mine was galloping once years ago, getting fit again having taken time off for a bit.

She got one that just went......for 8 full laps on a 7/8ths track. It was rough to watch, and because not outriders, she just kept going around and around.

I know this sounds like an exaggeration, but sadly its true. Good news is that both she and the horse were fine. The horse got a week off and turnout time, and she went back to jogging a few more weeks.

~Emily

Arcadien
Mar. 22, 2007, 10:09 PM
Okay fellow adrenaline junkies, your reports have me straining to throw out my plans take on new office job next week, and instead get ready to help the Monmouth ex. rider crew get them ready for the meet come April - HELP!

Kidding aside, it is pretty cool, isn't it? I only evented as far as Prelim, but my memories from that vs roaring under the finish line (ok only in a morning work!)... ? I know it's two different worlds, but with the risks similar (upper level eventing that is!) and the thrills comparable...

Ah shoot I'll prob'ly be a good girl & take the job, but sure glad I have two 2 yo's of my own that will soon be broke enough to start jogging - and then galloping, WOOHOO!!!

Enjoy & PLEASE keep sharing! ;)
Arcadien

Equilibrium
Mar. 23, 2007, 01:24 AM
Eventer,
Your not weird, I'm in the same underwear catergory as you!!!!:)
Terri

ivy62
Mar. 23, 2007, 08:05 AM
Listening to all you guys makes me think I missed something in my youth! Actually I did want to work at the track but personal things kept me out of it. Sounds like a blast. The leg wraps do work have used them when I forgot my chaps and had to exercise several horses..
I am living vicariously through all of you Woohoo!
Love the runaway stories.......
HAve a friend from England who used to do the 2 year olds at Newmarket wow she has stories! Keep 'em coming..
Olympicdreams04-good luck with the cowboy!

olympicdreams04
Mar. 24, 2007, 10:07 PM
Terri and Emily: I am glad I am not the only conservative laundry doer here. NoUn Club unite! Went out to my favorite bar in town last night and had a blast (this was after the rodeo, but unfortunately those cowboys weren't all the attractive...few too many bulls to the face/knocks to the head). Took my partner in crime home and then made the lessthanwise decision to meet the cowboy for a little late night munch at (w)Affle Ho(use). This was at about two o'clock. At nearly seven o'clock I was still in the back of the Affle Ho parking lot trying to convince said cowboy that horses really did need to be fed, pronto. *evil grin* This lady (I use this word lightly) definitely lusts after atleast one country boy. For those of you familiar with FL breds, have the nicest ride on a Frappie's Notebook colt. What a nice boy. The rest of the week went off more or less without a hitch and look forward to another week in the saddle!

Xctrygirl
Mar. 24, 2007, 10:20 PM
OK can I just say I am laughing MFAO,

A waffle House parking lot...???? OMG girl, at least go to a real parking lot, like Wal Mart or Target!!!

So now I am dying to see the cowboy (hint: PIC!!)

And I really MUST re-iterate that the elastic leggings are crucial. Most everyone I know who gallops wears them. GET SOME

Good luck this week. I start for a new barn on Monday. We'll see how this goes.

~Emily

olympicdreams04
Mar. 27, 2007, 01:09 PM
OK can I just say I am laughing MFAO,

A waffle House parking lot...???? OMG girl, at least go to a real parking lot, like Wal Mart or Target!!!

So now I am dying to see the cowboy (hint: PIC!!)

And I really MUST re-iterate that the elastic leggings are crucial. Most everyone I know who gallops wears them. GET SOME

Good luck this week. I start for a new barn on Monday. We'll see how this goes.

~Emily
Emily,
I will work on getting a pic. No promises, but I'll do what I can. To give you some food for thought, he's short, be we're not talking jock short. Has sort of a Tim McGraw thing going on (or atleast he likes to think so). Above all, I have no idea how he moves his ass so well in such tight jeans, but I will just enjoy and not concern myself with 'how'. Now I must defend the AffleHo parking lot...to be a little more specific, the AffleHo was attached to a hotel, so it was really a hotel parking lot. Dark, nice tree for cover, secluded. I wasn't going to wander around town at 2 am so I made do with what I had. It certainly did the job (had to Resolve the hell out of my shotgun front seat and attack my FAVORITE 'Ford' shirt with bleach). Anyway, he is apparently a glutton for punishment. He is too old for me and I don't give in very easily, even with guys my own age. Still hasn't gotten all that he wants, if you know what I mean, but he doesn't give up. Now about those other exercise riders...going to play pool with one tonight before he heads back home to NY. He is definitely the most entertaining part of my exercise riding day and I will miss him, but atleast I get a little more entertainment before he leaves. Picked up some leggings today and will cross my fingers. Hope your day went well at the new track!

Xctrygirl
Mar. 27, 2007, 01:19 PM
Ok first who's the guy from NY? I galloped at Belmont the last 2 winters, '05 + '06.

Second, not new track, just different barn. Still Fair Hill. Going well so far but may have to invest in shin guards for how their stirrup leathers are rubbing through my leggings. Ugh.

Third, Get a pic and I still think Wal Mart Parking lots have the truly class vibe to them ;)

Keep kicking and remember to pull the leggings up to your knees.

~Emily

Equilibrium
Mar. 27, 2007, 01:40 PM
Yes, we need pictures. I miss my time at the track now,lots of nostalgia coming back! Would love to share some funny stories, but this is a family board!

Travelling back from Cal to East Coast with a detour in Winnipeg, with best friend, 2 dogs, a car that kept breaking down, the border patrol, being strip searched, that's a good story!

Time I came to work and got fired because even though I was on time I was in someone else's clothes and driving his car. Won't mention trainer that fired me but he had another agenda.

Walmart parking lots are much better and really if you can upgrade to Cracker Barrel, well then your cruising!

Geez, I'm old now!

Terri

Equilibrium
Mar. 27, 2007, 01:42 PM
Crap, even though I'm mid 30's, I'm hoping my stepmom isn't having a look at the racing thread! Not that she's under any illusions, but still.

Terri:)

jengersnap
Mar. 27, 2007, 02:25 PM
You guys (and gals) are keeping me in stitches! Thanks.
Hubby made his decision yesterday on what he's going to do this year. His options were take over the local estate auctioneering business he works for occassionally, or go back to galloping and his own home business. He decided on galloping, so yippie to more hanging out on the rail and polluting my mind with stories I can warp kids with years later :D

At 59, he's getting up there, but he still seems to enjoy breezing most of all. Oh, and he's another proud member of the NoUn club. Where do I order his bumper sticker?

http://new.photos.yahoo.com/jengersnapshorse/album/576460762326983384/photo/294928803356477269/1

Equilibrium
Mar. 27, 2007, 02:45 PM
I think it's time for the noundies rider clique!
Terri

olympicdreams04
Mar. 28, 2007, 05:12 PM
Hello again all:
The NoUn club is officially in operation. Come one, come all! I'm still trying to sort out my daily attire and right now I am dressing in leggings (which seem to have helped but not as much as I would like), jeans, two pairs of tall socks and a pair of ankle socks, tall boots, a *husband* beater, vest, and shirt over vest (I do this because my vest, which I got custom made for free from an event I won some years back, has a white stripe through the center that I try my damnedest to keep clean). So far, I am fairly pleased, but I am still tinkering with the shirt under/over or both to accomidate the vest. Low and behold, the exercise rider is awesome. Figures he's heading home. Can't figure out why he's riding fire breathing beasts, he is musically talented beyond beliefe. Funny guy, totally sweet, built like a steeplechase jock. Meeeeeoooooowwww! or rather *mare whuffling noises*. The more I like the exercise rider, the more the cowboy likes me. I smell T-r-o-u-b-l-e. Got an interesting offer today that involves going with some of the horses that are leaving FL up to VA. Don't want to jump the gun and will supply more details as they become available. So Mr.Exercise Rider, lets call him B, has to show off a little now and then on the shitheads. Must impress the girl or whatever. We take a set out yesterday and as soon as we set foot on the track, the colt he's on starts giving him shit and he makes all macho like and gives him a few good thumps in the ribs and really razzes him forward. Seems to do the trick and makes him look like he has a nice seat...or butt...whichever. Anyway, do a couple of turns, pull up, trot back, and then out of nowhere, another horse gallops by on the rail and Mr. StudlyColt turns into Mr.StopNRearNSpinNDump. Both the horse and B hit the ground, leaving matching butt prints in the track. No harm done, but a good laugh had all around. Also, I would like to defend WaHo by saying that the tree under which I was parked was beautifully draped in spanish moss, and the coffee was free after two or three hours. I think that above all, Sams Club takes the Parking Lot Cake, followed closely by Cracker Barrel and THEN comes Walmart in a dead heat with WaHo.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 28, 2007, 09:20 PM
I am sorry, but for reasons that elude even me, I can not join the NoUn club in full service. I will gladly be a "in the spirit" member, but ain't no way my Un's and my butt witll be apart if I am on a horse. Now, leading one in the paddock for a nice race is a whole nother story! ;)

Ok in defense of the parking lot issues, I did have a quite romantic night alongside a road in Upperville, Va. And believe me if you know that area, you also know there ain't much cover there!! But when the moment strikes.... well you know. :D

As for the stud colts, they're always proving that even the best of riders can fall down and go boom. My fav was last year when the 2 yr old gelding galloped through the inside rail...and we both stayed upright. I still have that memory to shake my head on.

Ok so let's see today I took new turf filly with ginormous stride out to gallop in the fields of Fair Hill. (Read: NO RAILS, fencelines, or other stoping elements. AND random gopher holes, track gullies and somewhat soft ground.)
So what I can say with authority is this,
I did not, 1.) Get run off with 100%, 2.) I was never out of control 100% 3.) I didn't fall off.
Beyond that it was "exciting." Key here is if you panic, try try try to keep your hands down against the neck. I didn't and there were many "wheeee...ugh this isn't fun....wheeee God please let us stop" moments.

Meanwhile New job is good, but new saddles are chaffing in *cough* BAD places. See why I wear undies....dear gods if I didn't. Yikes. :eek:

Sooo Tell us more about the Virginia thing. I don't know anyone who goes from Florida to Virginia.... unless its show world.

~Emily

Iride
Mar. 28, 2007, 09:58 PM
xcountrygirl - I hate gopher holes. :mad: I hate the THOUGHT of them. :o That's the thing about galloping in fields - I love it, but am always completely paranoid about the errant hole. More than getting run away with. :yes:

As for the chafing issue: I've never tried it but I hear that lube glide stuff helps - whatsitcalled - BodyGlide I think...

GallopGirl
Mar. 28, 2007, 10:28 PM
A little strategically placed vaseline does the same job as the Body Glide, and is a little cheaper. You can find lots of good non chafing stuff at sports stores geared toward hard core bicyclists that have to deal with smaller saddles than we do.

Barnfairy
Mar. 29, 2007, 11:04 AM
Well. It would seem that there is an entirely different kind of exercise riding also being discussed in this thread. Given that sending thoroughbreds to the breeding shed quickly has become something of an established practice, I suppose it's only natural that some of their riders follow suit.

Regale us with tales of protecting your bits from the world with a mere single layer of fabric if you must, but, as a member of the enormous-granny-panty-wearing clique, I feel it is my duty to remind you the importance of using a...helmet...at all times while...mounted.

I think we are all well aware of the increased risk of contracting herpes, amongst other diseases, from animals coming off the track.

Carry on ladies.

As for chafing, I do believe a forum search of the "Inverness" problem may provide some insight to relief.

Xctrygirl
Mar. 29, 2007, 11:46 AM
OK I am laughing a bit too hard.

"WE" (Boyfriend and myself) foumd the source of the chaffing issue... It seems that when one wants to shave the inverness valley quickly and with a razor, care should still be taken. Raw unhappy red bumps and denim rubbing together were the source. Now 5 days later, life is good again. Just.

Thanks for the glide tips, but I am not someone who ever does well with glide like products. Overflowing is a bad thing!!!

Meanwhile the gopher holes eluded us again today as we galloped some babies outside. Just fyi the other riders do know where the holes are so I just follow them and I am learning as I pass them to go, "Oh ok here's one."

~Emily

DeeThbd
Mar. 29, 2007, 12:02 PM
A couple of other observations after being around racing TBs for a dozen or so years....
Be selective about WHAT you get on....sometimes you'll be asked to get on horses that riders who have been around a while refuse to throw a leg over....flippers, bolters and so on.
Also - trainers greatly value a rider who can pinpoint soundness (or even mental) issues in their horses.
And, having finished the rest of the NoUn thread, I think the same advice applies to a lot of exercise riders you might meet too! (grin)
And, Jengersnaps....the next time I see your hubby I might have a very difficult time keeping a straight face. GRIN!
D>

Equilibrium
Mar. 29, 2007, 12:53 PM
Dee,
Must have missed working for these trainers that like to know when something is wrong. My most favorite line is , "You don't get paid to think". I once told a trainer I thought one of my horses had serious hock issues. He looked at me and said, do you ever think so and so horse has hock problems because your making him think he has hock problems. Your vibes are making him go a bit funny. Well so and so broke down before the Preakness and I was made into a scapegoat. I humilitated myself by staying for 3 more months after that because I didn't want to be a quitter. This is from a trainer that once told me, never let anyone put you down or take you down mentally.

Most trainers I work for would like to know about these things if you put it in a way that makes them feel they've noticed the problems themselves. It's called stroking egos and us women know how to do that.

Terri

solargal
Mar. 29, 2007, 01:35 PM
Dee,
Must have missed working for these trainers that like to know when something is wrong. My most favorite line is , "You don't get paid to think". I once told a trainer I thought one of my horses had serious hock issues. He looked at me and said, do you ever think so and so horse has hock problems because your making him think he has hock problems. Your vibes are making him go a bit funny. Well so and so broke down before the Preakness and I was made into a scapegoat. I humilitated myself by staying for 3 more months after that because I didn't want to be a quitter. This is from a trainer that once told me, never let anyone put you down or take you down mentally.

Most trainers I work for would like to know about these things if you put it in a way that makes them feel they've noticed the problems themselves. It's called stroking egos and us women know how to do that.

Terri

Absolutely. They always have an excuse don't they.

Iride
Mar. 29, 2007, 04:38 PM
Emily - wooden or plastic sticks, or those little poles with little flags, in gopher holes are a very good thing :yes:

Xctrygirl
Mar. 29, 2007, 05:37 PM
Yep and they hav them. Just that the snow pushed them down a bit.

Much as i would like to go out and flag every hole, I am brand new at this job and don't want to jump in too far too fast!

They know whats out there, I am made aware of whats there and honestly the big ass rocks are a bigger concern for me. I am doing what I feel comfortable doing without stirring the pot.

Maybe next week I'll mention something and or just go out and mark 'em....if the FH officials say its ok. (Not my backyard ya know)

~Emily

jengersnap
Mar. 30, 2007, 03:06 PM
Dee,

Most trainers I work for would like to know about these things if you put it in a way that makes them feel they've noticed the problems themselves. It's called stroking egos and us women know how to do that.

Terri

Yeah, sad but true of most trainers. My husband much prefers to ride for the ones who really want an answer when they ask him "So, how did s/he go?". He'll tell them. Same reason he usually galloped his own horses. If you don't want to listen when somethings not right with the horse in training, you deserve to fail. The horse sure can't speak up, and around here it seems everyone wants to send 'em, send 'em, send 'em and never let them rest. Drives me nuts. But you're right, with most you have to do some really careful persuasion if you want to look out for the best interests of the horse.

olympicdreams04
Mar. 30, 2007, 08:10 PM
As the racetrack turns. So cowboy, in all of his slightly obsessed madness will be put in his place shortly (tomorrow night) and told to back off. Nice guy, cute guy, amazing butt and talented dancer but beyond that he's too old, too attached, and too demanding. Sigh. I will continue to stare at his ass though. In a very strange and somewhat um...stressful twist of fate, I am taking 4 of the horses that I am exercising N to Fingerlakes because the hauler of those backed out. 12 are going up on a semi tomorrow AM and ten or so are staying behind, probably to move to Middleburg next month. Still in the works with the VA deal. Anyway, so taking the 4 to NY and the exercise rider is coming with. Was supposed to leave today but it didn't quite work out that way, though the day was spent in a lovely and relaxing fashion hanging out. Getting up to NY is easy, I can drive for hours without too much concern (though 24 IS about my limit). However, once I get there, it seems they don't plan on me leaving. I do have to wait around to find something to take back (horses, hay, something to make it worth my while). They want me to gallop though. Big money but hard work. Not a HUGE fan of the track, though I do love my Fingerlakes Alum to death. I like the exercise rider WAY too much and feel like I am getting in over my head, but in true riding fashion, I grab mane and kick on...somewhat literally ;)

ivy62
Mar. 30, 2007, 10:33 PM
So you will be in NY? Any chance of you coming east and downstate? Are you not training for eventing any more?
Maybe we could hook up at Rolex this year? Love the stories...keep 'em coming....
Also, check out biking underwear..it is padded in the crotch and works well I have a pair!

olympicdreams04
Mar. 31, 2007, 09:47 AM
Hey Ivy! We definitely have to meet up at Rolex. If you need something transported, I would be happy to come downstate, but no time for a little vacation unfortunately :(. Busy as "all get out". I have three horses right now in my personal herd...well four actually, a broodmare, an Intermediate Mare, a Training Gelding, and an exceptionally talented Novice gelding who will go all the way with luck. Just exercise riding to pay the bills. Eventing is where my hear lies!

ivy62
Mar. 31, 2007, 09:51 AM
Keep in touch as Rolex nears and we will have to find some time to get together after hours. Maybe you could join us for dinner or something...Nothing going south right now but I do have a filly in Texas! Do you believe it! An Oldenburg baby...YIKES!
The galloping stories and the cowboy stories are a hoot! Boy if I were only 20 years yonger!!!!!
Pm me and can give you my cell number.......

DeeThbd
Apr. 2, 2007, 05:38 PM
[QUOTE=Equilibrium;2326075]Dee,
Must have missed working for these trainers that like to know when something is wrong. My most favorite line is , "You don't get paid to think".

Yeah, I guess I should have qualified with the words GOOD TRAINER!!!! Been in that boat as a groom, and told exactly the words quoted above. Had one trainer thank me for catching the fact that the filly I was rubbing was bucking her shins - got a little glory for that as the trainer herself missed the fact - and had been training successfully for over 30 years (bit of glory there! )
You ARE right...some trainers are downright hostile. On the other hand, I always regret a NICE filly (temperament, not ability) filly I rubbed who started banking her bedding under her front heels till her toes were vertical...I was ignored, and the poor girl ended up snapping an ankle in a race.
I guess there's an ego qualification in some jurisdictions for training certification....
Dee

olympicdreams04
Apr. 5, 2007, 10:59 AM
Poll over pasterns. I'm up in NY after nearly 36 hours and many trials and tribulations on the road. Gonna try to do some riding at the track next week...was supposed to be heading home this week, but definitely not going to work that way. As it seems now, I'm coming home to NY. Excited, definitely. A little nervous, but that's okay. Obligations in Ocala will send me back atleast by the end of next week and I will probably head back up here in the middle of May and stay until I return to FL next winter. Really, I'm just giddy with the excitement of it all. Wanted to return to NY for the summer all along, as I love the climate and the events really are great. And there's the best part, the exercise rider. I'm so bad...and crazy. We'll see how it goes...so far so goooooood ;) . At the farm that his family owns I am scoping out several prospects. One of the big black beasts needs to be a dressage horse, they have a lovely chestnut that SCREAMS $20,000 hunter! Lovely flat kneed mover, totally a doll and built like a beast! I nearly bought one of the horses they have for myself before I left and I think that I will have to comandeer him for my next big time eventer if things go well. Sigh. Life is good. Hope things are going well for all of you guys. Em? Tracey?

LyndaPellitteri31
Apr. 6, 2007, 07:23 AM
I have absolutely nothing to add to this thread, except when I was riding I didn't wear undies, but a pair of elastic stretch shorts or whatever they are called. I was bleeding all the time. I wore half chaps, but still managed to rub blisters all over the insides of my knee and scrape the skin off the inside of my leg half way down my calf. I never thought about the maxi pads.

You guys are awsome. Some of you need to write books, esp Emily. I would buy one in a second. HAY HUNG how was Messaging to ride? He is such a cute horse. How did you manage to get to ride him? I want to hear the whole story.

LyndaPellitteri31
Apr. 6, 2007, 07:27 AM
I have absolutely nothing to add to this thread, except that I wore elastic stretch shorts when I rode and no underware. I was bleeding all the time. I wore half chaps, but still managed to get blisters all over the inside of my knees and scrape skin off the inside of my legs to half way down my calf. I never thought about the maxi pads.

You guys are awsome. Some of you need to write books. Especially Emily. I would buy it in a minute. HAY HUNG tell me about your riding Messaging? He is such a cute horse. How did you manage to get him to ride? Is he a nice horse to ride? Tell me the whole story :)

Xctrygirl
Apr. 6, 2007, 02:30 PM
Now see I want to hear what "Studly" has to say about His ride on Messaging. Because I can tell you if I had to ride him I quickly grabbed for Michael's spurs. And paryed it wasn't one of his "happy" (Read: Buck, spin twirl snort) days. He should have been named Iron Sides. But he's a lovely boy and I think the cutest thing is watching Michael's 7 (?) yr old daughter Lucy ride him. Lucy is tiny and she just gets up there and flops her legs on him to make him go and he walks quiet as can be to the track and back! (Flop is probably the wrong word when describing a child of 2 Olympic riders. Oh well)

About books, you'd be surprised how much of what I tell is a big no no to be discussing at all. Even if you think your life experiences belong to you, think again. In racing your life belongs to the trainer, owners and anyone else who doesn't want you speaking. Its actually pretty annoying. But only to really verbose people like myself!!

~Emily

SteeleRdr
Apr. 6, 2007, 02:47 PM
Emily-

Are you not riding/asst training for Michael anymore?

Xctrygirl
Apr. 6, 2007, 07:41 PM
You know I have to laugh. I seem to have kept the biggest secret without trying to at all!!

I thought I posted in November that I was not gonna be with Matz because over the winter he takes all his horses to Florida to train. And my budget being what it is, I couldn't afford to have 2 houses (Fl and MD) Additionally at the time my father had just had his prostate removed because of cancer and I felt like it was better if I stayed here.

Ever since then, 5 months later, people have been constantly "Shocked" that I am no longer with Michael.

I could foreseeably work for him again once he returns this month but..... well I really like this new job and I get every Sunday off with this one!! As oppossed to every other Sunday. And well its really nice to sortof have a life!!


And for the record, I was never an assistant trainer for Michael. It has been misprinted once in the Blood Horse and I have never said that I was an assistant for him. I do not want it said that I was trading myself falsely on his name. He has been far too good to me for me to even think of doing that to him.

So now I am still galloping at Fair Hill and loving life.

~Emily

LyndaPellitteri31
Apr. 6, 2007, 08:07 PM
Awwwww Lucy....She is such a doll. I think she is 7 or 8. 8 According to some of the profiles on her daddy that I have seen. But she may be 9 now. I wish I knew how to add attachments to this cause I have the cutest picture of her and her dad. I would love to see a picture on of her on Messaging.

Sheesh, all the restrictions!!! When you retire can you do it then? When I was at Aqueduct I wasn't even allowed to tell anyone how much I was making. That made it kinda hard to negotiate if I thought that would get me better pay.


Hahaha why am I having a hard time seeing Messaging act like a bad boy. Spurs? WOW. He must have some spunk.

HUNG, or Studly, whatever you are called, WHERE ARE YOU!!!!

:D

SteeleRdr
Apr. 6, 2007, 09:49 PM
I assumed that you had (as you mentioned a new barn), but I just wanted to make sure I had it right.

Sorry about saying asst trainer, I thought I recalled someone saying you were, on here, and also reading it elsewhere. Didn't mean to put titles on that you didn't have, truly honest mistake.

Good luck with the new job! Having a life must be nice!! (I work 40hr weeks at a desk M-F and then work for Bay and another barn on the weekends).

gallupgirl
Apr. 7, 2007, 09:11 AM
Emily,

Are you allowed to tell us..........and I guess the people around Fair Hill that are just watching workouts and such could say........hint hint

Does he use any 'show horse' training on his racehorses? ie......ring riding, dressage work or anything of that sort? I've always been curious about this!

Iride
Apr. 8, 2007, 07:02 AM
Emily,

Does he use any 'show horse' training on his racehorses? ie......ring riding, dressage work or anything of that sort? I've always been curious about this!

I'm not Emily but... a friend told me that he hacks out his horses a lot in the fields, and gives them lots of turnout too. I could be mistaken (but I'd like to think it is all true ;) )

holmes
Apr. 8, 2007, 08:32 AM
Emily,

Are you allowed to tell us..........and I guess the people around Fair Hill that are just watching workouts and such could say........hint hint

Does he use any 'show horse' training on his racehorses? ie......ring riding, dressage work or anything of that sort? I've always been curious about this!

According to a reliable source (Indian Charlie) with Barbaro, Michael played a game of polo at Royal Palm Beach Polo Club, did 2 dressage tests at Rolex, and schooled him over a steeplechase course during the 5 week period between the FL Derby and the KY Derby - he was going through 4 sets of plates per week during that period.

You do not want to hear about my ride on Messaging - Iron Sides is right. I think you minimally need to have qualified for the olympics to get anything out of him. Next time I will shorten the stirrups, so I do not look like a complete muppet bobbling around on top.

LyndaPellitteri31
Apr. 8, 2007, 10:18 AM
I DO I DO I DO!!!! Tell me us everything!! Qualify for the olympics HAHAHAHA!!! Awww sweet horse.

I am not sure about using Indian Charlie as a reliable source. Michael Matz never rode Barbaro. Now there is Michael Matz Jr who is a polo player (Sr's son). That's pretty funny though LOLOL. :eek: :eek: :lol: :lol:

olympicdreams04
Apr. 8, 2007, 01:31 PM
Still in NY! Craziness, huh? Going to exercise at the track next week, make a bit of money so I can afford to drive back to FL. Probably head back to FL on the 17th, have court date for an accident that wasn't my fault on the 20th, head to KY for Rolex on the 25th, back to FL on the 1st, to Europe on the 6th, back to FL on the 14th, to NY shortly thereafter. Poor truck and trailer will see more than 5000 miles this month! Crazy! Finally I do have a couple of pictures. Check out my http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d37/olympicdreams04/ (photobucket) for pics of the the new guy, my new tat, and all my ponies.

Equilibrium
Apr. 8, 2007, 01:49 PM
HLAS,
Since you are in KY, tell Indian Charlie Charlene that worked at the strip club and galloped for Wayne says hello. He will crack up laughing, although it was about 12 years ago. That was a seriously funny and long drawn out paper for quite sometime.

Terri

holmes
Apr. 8, 2007, 05:14 PM
LyndaPellitteri31 - it was a joke. IC ofcourse is not a reliable source, their slogan is 'we never let the truth get in the way of a good story' - though they did run the story about Barbaro playing polo, doing dressages at rolex, etc.

Messaging is a great lead pony - does his job very well (even with Big Mama giving him a hard time), as for his show jumping career - rumour has it he has gone over a cross pole a few times on slow days at the barn - so you never know.

As for Michael's son Mikey - I played polo (and partied) with him in Southern California. He is a great guy, great player and I am sure he will go far.

LyndaPellitteri31
Apr. 8, 2007, 10:45 PM
LOLOL I know Hahahaha.

You know, I wouldn't doubt if Michael M gets a hunkering to jump a pole, he may take messaging over a little jump every now and then when no one is looking.

Isn't "Mikey" Like, 24 years old or something? At that age he has a lot of hope.
Dang, My dad is same age as Sr and his youngest is 28 LOLOL.

holmes
Apr. 9, 2007, 09:40 AM
I think he is a couple years older than that -

Xctrygirl
Apr. 9, 2007, 05:24 PM
Oh I have seen Messaging jump some of the logs around Fair Hill. However it wasn't Michael on his back at the time.

Let's just say that he wasn't immensely brilliant. (Read: Hit both 2' logs with both fronts.) Course he could just need a bigger jump. But I ain't gonna be the one to spur him towards bigger!!!

Let's see latest ex. riding story:

Have new 2 yr old I am riding. In the shedrow the first few days after they came in from Florida this sucker was umm, ready to give his stud career a test run on anything that passed in front of him. Yippee. So today he got to go up and go around on the big main dirt track. I crossed myself about 3 times before I left the barn, and if my translations are correct one of the guys read me my last rites!!!

Well it went fine. In fact it was beyond fine, the big oaf can actually gallop nicely for his experience level.

I am exhausted today from having gone to Ny to watch the wood and the other Saturday stakes, and staying over and spending time with my sister and seeing her first solo gallery show in the village (Shameless plug: www.plane-space.com)

So I am just awake now after a 5 hour nap after work!!! Forgive me if i make no sense.

~Emily

holmes
Apr. 9, 2007, 06:26 PM
I highly doubt Messaging would need a bigger jump - probably just a bucket of feed the other side. I am not going to offer to jump him - - -

olympicdreams04
Apr. 18, 2007, 07:58 PM
Okay so the riding bit of the exercise world is going wonderfully. Have plenty of rides, enjoy almost all of them, got the style down and the breezing is awesome. Now what about breezing out of the gate. To leave the gate, do I just sort of grab mane and hold on? Anything special I should know? I've schooled the gate but not actually used it to breeze. As for the exercise rider...more to come. I have never been so f-ing frustrated in my entire life.

Acertainsmile
Apr. 18, 2007, 09:05 PM
Leaving the gate is kind of like jumping, go with the horse, have light contact for steering, and it's okay to grab main or the yoke...I would probably start out slow, and trot a young horse, then work up to galloping out, and work up to breaking one. Some horses can be really fast leaving the gate, I galloped and rode races, and had one mare that was really quick, the first time I broke her she really surprised me and almost left me sitting there!

endorphins4u
Apr. 20, 2007, 07:30 PM
Iain, I'm gonna send someone over to you that needs your guidance ok..

This one has a NO RETURN policy too..

ivy62
Apr. 22, 2007, 09:16 PM
Lauren,
I tried to PM you but it wouldn't go through....sorry you will not be there but if you ever are in my area please let me know. What about those equestrian club tix, how many and what do they get you?
Let me know....e-mail me direct...

BeginnerExcersizeRider
Mar. 14, 2009, 02:45 PM
im looking into starting to gallop at a race track and was just looking for some advice,anything would be helpful. would it be better to start off at a farm ??

also a big question i had was how long should i ride to begin? it would be better to ride long..? maybe aroung jumping length?, because i have a feeling if i start off riding to sh0ort i ill end up on some the ground, however i have had some people tell me that galloping shorter is easier..??

thanks guys

Newby =)
(feel free to PM me )

SEPowell
Mar. 15, 2009, 02:42 PM
Start off where you're most comfortable. Your position will gradually change and as it does you'll become very balanced riding short. IMO the most important thing to keep in mind is keeping the horse balanced and never ever throwing him off stride to slow him down. You want to be the most subtle quiet rider imaginable and you want to keep the horse tuned into you. A good exercise rider is very important to that horse's development as a race horse.

equinelaw
Mar. 15, 2009, 04:12 PM
im looking into starting to gallop at a race track and was just looking for some advice,anything would be helpful. would it be better to start off at a farm ??

also a big question i had was how long should i ride to begin? it would be better to ride long..? maybe aroung jumping length?, because i have a feeling if i start off riding to sh0ort i ill end up on some the ground, however i have had some people tell me that galloping shorter is easier..??

thanks guys

Newby =)
(feel free to PM me )

Since you are a newby you may not realize its better to start your own thread then to bring up an old one. This thread is 2 years old! Its somebody else's thread. You need a your own so people do not get confused.

danceronice
Mar. 15, 2009, 07:13 PM
Since you are a newby you may not realize its better to start your own thread then to bring up an old one. This thread is 2 years old! Its somebody else's thread. You need a your own so people do not get confused.

LOL, and on some boards if you do that you'll get the threads merged and a lecture from the mods about starting a new thread and "haven't you ever heard of a Search button, it's already been discussed"!

Arcadien
Mar. 16, 2009, 03:07 PM
LOL and some threads, like this one, reincarnated bring fond memories back for me (although I suppose the opposite can be true as well - some threads I wish would die and stay dead keep coming back!)

Anyway, the OP sounds young, so best bet is to find a racing farm nearby and slip under the trainers wing. Pay attention, ask questions, listen & learn! You need to learn a lot to gallop safely and there is definitely a right, step by step way to learn it! Farm is the best way.

Meantime, you'll do your dream a favor to workout at home and get as fit as possible. Push-ups, crunches, squats & lunges, until you can't move - then rest and do it again! You still won't be fit enough, but at least your body will be a bit prepared for the onslaught.

PS, post where you live and where you'd like to be riding and you might get some specific help.

Arcadien, who likes threads like these cuz they make her reminiesce (sp?) about one good old galloping summer... but who couldn't make enough to pay the farm mortgage doing it, so back to an office job sigh...

actcasual
Jun. 29, 2009, 01:21 PM
After jealously watching this thread come and go a few times, I'm reviving it because I think I may be getting on my first actual in-training racehorse in the morning.
A smallish but generally well regarded trainer a few barns down is aware that I am the much dreaded hunter/jumper rider, but he wants me to shedrow a couple tomorrow. Over the next few days he'll take me out with the pony a few times. He understands that I have never been out on the track and he's willing to put me on the better behaved beasts as I come along. My much more veteran race friends agree that this is a trainer who actually *has* a few reasonable animals for me to learn on.
Besides going to the farm, which isn't an option right now, is this the most sensible starting point? Are there specific questions I need to ask or concerns I should have? (I've accepted that, although I'm in okay shape, I'm nowhere near appropriately fit enough to actually be doing this. But I'll get there fast.)
Based on the earlier incarnations of this thread, I do plan on wearing jeans, half chaps, and underwear. I borrowed a vest for now and I plan on riding about the same length that I would to flat a jumper. I'm honestly a little embarrassed because my helmet is sized to fit when I do the hunter hair, so I guess I'm rolling into a race barn with hair patties?
I know the outriders will be on me right away about being licensed to gallop. Can anyone tell me more about the evaluation process there? What kind of grace period can I squeak out before I absolutely have to gallop for the stewards -- or whoever -- for my license?
Any other suggestions, advice, stories, whatever... would be totally appreciated.

jengersnap
Jun. 29, 2009, 02:39 PM
Ohhh a zombie thread! The undead rise again! (just teasing ya)

You gallop for the outriders, who hopefully the trainer has a good relationship with also and will tell to keep an eye on you. Sounds like the trainer is doing everything he can to help you out and start you as safe as he can. Once you get to the track he'll explain about who belongs in in which lanes, which directions you can do what in, where the poles are, what the dogs are, coming off the gap(s) and so forth and so on. Some of that stuff varies by track so best to get it from him. If you've friends vouching for him already that's a good sign. VA...Charlestown?

Oh, and get a good comfy pair of boots. Your feet/legs will thank you.

actcasual
Jun. 30, 2009, 12:59 PM
Not Charlestown, Colonial Downs. That's why I have some stricter time constraints.
I ordered new paddock boots last week. Should be here any day and I'm *really* excited about that. But the trainer had actual jumper-style tread wrapped around the irons of most of the exercise saddles, which I whole-heartedly appreciated.

jengersnap
Jun. 30, 2009, 02:59 PM
Sorry, I meant Colonial. I do that ALL the time and never catch myself. I know the stall man and a trainer at Colonial. If you want to PM me your email address I could talk to the trainer, as she exercises her own, and see if she'd like to get in touch with you and help you out. Or you might even know each other already. ;)

EquineRacers
Jun. 30, 2009, 05:23 PM
act - That is how I started and let me tell you it was no way to learn to gallop and I also came from the H/J background, but I made it and let me assure you you will not get fit "fast", it takes A LONG TIME to become fit enough. Be prepared to have to stay with the pony for a long time. You not only have to watch out for yourself, but for the other riders around you with the hot crazy horses being muscled and whiped around as well as the gate works, etc. Starting to ride long is a great idea, mostly for you need to learn the balance difference between H/J and galloping, looks the same as "two-point", but completely different! LOL Has this trainer ever galloped before? If so that would be great so he can give you advice as he is ponying you.

As far as the outriders go, its really all depends on the track and what relationship you have with them and the relationship between trainer and them. The track near my house wouldn't let me on without a license so I had to search for a track that would. I found one about 45 mins away and had a good long talk with the outriders, they told me what trainers I was no allowed to gallop for and I followed all their rules and advice. I was there for 1 month before getting my license and at this point, I didn't have a pony person, I had to get it done on my own and let me tell you I got bucked off more times they I could count. What showed them and let them give me my license was that I never gave up and yes I did get better and stayed on longer. LOL (The main reason for the license is insurence reasons). Once, I got my license I was able to move to a track closer to my house and start learning the right way and I had a wonderful trainer with a pony who helped me along!

I've been off on my own and gallop everything from TBs, to QHs, and even a few Arabs here are there (now those things are crazy lol). Good luck to you, try hard, don't give up, try not to get down on yourself (it happeneds), and you'll be okay!

actcasual
Jul. 3, 2009, 02:43 PM
Well, I have never felt more hunter princess in my life than when I get off a TB in the stall, tug the saddle and bridle off, and turn the horse over to the hotwalker/groom team. :)
Despite all the hunter rider jokes, I don't think I've ever actually done that before.
ER -- You're absolutely right. This doesn't seem like the best scenario for learning, but I guess it's the best available option? I don't have the financial flexibility to move to Maryland, find a farm position, and then decide that the racehorses aren't for me. With only about 25 days left in the meet, I don't expect to do a ton before the track closes. The trainer does ride and pretty nicely.
AND after three days of shedrowing, I got ponied up to the track today! I guess it's the racehorse equivalent of the mechanical pony outside the drug store, but the pony lady was amazing, the horse was darling, and I couldn't stop grinning.
Jenger, I'm pm-ing you my email. Thank you both for the responses.