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fargonefarm
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:44 PM
I'm sure that there are more than a few of us out there that feel we should know certain things about horses, but are too embarrased to admit that we don't.

I am a horse professional, but admit there are some basic things that I *know* I should know, but don't. So here's the thread: Don't be ashamed to ask because no one will judge. Those of you who know the answers, feel free to answer. Ask your stupid questions away!!!

I'll start:
1) I can never remember what a horses' vision is (blindspots, etc.) and what colors they see and don't see (if any).

2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

Anyone else?

Slewdledo
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:48 PM
I should be able to post the trot. I still struggle with that!

Huntertwo
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:51 PM
Never have and do not know how to wrap a leg...:o

shmeg<33
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:54 PM
I suck at being able to tell a horse with good conformation vs. bad conformation. hehe. Oh and I often get the parts of the leg mixed up...there are more. Just cant think if them right now

fargonefarm
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:56 PM
I'm actually a pro at wrapping legs (we won't go into how I got that way:eek: )

Always wrap towards the back of the horse, meaning the ball of the wrap should always go away from the front. I always start just above the ankle and go down a couple of times and then work my way back up. Usually if you're using pillow wraps, you don't have to worry about being too tight.

Vision, anyone? This one kills me. What the heck is their vision!? I cannot remember!

deltawave
Nov. 15, 2006, 09:58 PM
I always have a hard time finding that dang "bean" when I clean a sheath. Could be because I've only ever owned mares! :D I've done my fair share of sheath cleaning, but the bean is ever-elusive for me. :dead:

I can never remember which rein goes on the outside when you use a double bridle or pelham. Actually I'm not sure there IS a consensus on that...and I don't use one anyhow, so... ;)

Can never remember which is which: a Chambon vs. a deGogue, nor travers vs. renvers and all those crazy dressage terms. :p

tullio
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:03 PM
I have no idea how to give shots. I always boarded my horses and even now, working in a barn, the barn manager is either there or living on the property and is to be called immediately if there's a problem.

Add that to my absolutely awful squeamishness, and I've never learned to give a shot. I do want to learn, but I'll probably just pass out.

Fargone, try this url:

http://www.equusite.com/articles/safety/safetyEyesight.shtml

I think it sums it all up pretty well for ya, and you can bookmark it! :D

JH
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:15 PM
"Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me."

I think it's probably so the girth wont slide and pinch the horses skin when it's tightened.

I get confused about what the judges are looking for in all the different kinds of hunter classes.

*Teddy*
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:18 PM
2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

Anyone else?


so that it is easier for the rider to tighten it while mounted ( as your supposed to tighten it on the left while mounted.....

how can you tell if a boot (ie tendon boot) IS snug enough???

Simkie
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:19 PM
I don't know how to feel for the digital pulse. :no:

MacknCody
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:23 PM
I can never remember what a horses respiration should be...

I also can't "feel" the wrong diagonal. I have to look down. Anyone else have this problem?

Fargone: I read an article on horses vision fairly recently and the vet explained it like a person with color-blindness. They can see some colors but not all and in various shades. I think red and green are the clearest? Maybe...

Show Gypsy
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:24 PM
I have been riding for 14 years and cannot for the life of me come up on the correct diagonal. I can feel that I'm wrong and change within 1-2 steps (although apparently this weekend was an exception :o), but everytime I try to come up on the right diagonal I end up being wrong.

Also, I had never jumped without my stirrups until last year.

I have never taken a horse's pulse. Is it under the jaw?

I have never really cleaned a sheath. I've picked at crusties, and I snuck up on my old gelding once or twice and got the bean, but I've never set out with a full artillary to do the deed. (I have a mare now, so that solves that!)

In_
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:33 PM
Average Pulse: 36-42 beats per minute. You can feel it under/the side of their jaw,as well as in the pastern (digital pulse)
Average Respiration: 8-16 breaths per minute
Average Temp: 100.5
Healthy Temperature Range: 99.0-101.0

Horse's blindspots are directly infront and directly behind. The colors they can see (as far as I know) is still an ongoing debate. I remember a recent Equess discussed the posibility of them seeing every color we see, except muted. Think pastel.

GrayTbred
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:39 PM
Cannot reassemble a bridle. The bit always ends up backward.

Usually blank out on the meaning of "outside" and "inside" when other riders shriek these words at me as they approach in the arena.

Always have to think twice about the difference between the hock and the fetlock.

And so much more.

AM
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:45 PM
Forget trying to feel a pulse especially digital. I've only ever felt that when my horse had laminitis. Instead get a cheap stethescope and just listen to the heart to count the beats.

Another good "vital sign" to become familiar with is bowel sounds. Just place your ear on your horse's barrel in front of the hing leg and listen. Once you know their regular pattern you can hear when the sounds are either increased, changed in pitch, or decreased.

Hillside H Ranch
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:46 PM
"Cannot reassemble a bridle. The bit always ends up backward."

I'm so happy to hear this! I'm not the only one-it happens to me every single time!

Until recently I had never used a full cheek snaffle, and I could not figure out the bit keepers.

There are so many more that I'm sure I'll think of later.

MacknCody
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:49 PM
Average Pulse: 36-42 beats per minute. You can feel it under/the side of their jaw,as well as in the pastern (digital pulse)
Average Respiration: 8-16 breaths per minute
Average Temp: 100.5
Healthy Temperature Range: 99.0-101.0

Horse's blindspots are directly infront and directly behind. The colors they can see (as far as I know) is still an ongoing debate. I remember a recent Equess discussed the posibility of them seeing every color we see, except muted. Think pastel.

Geez walking dictionary!:winkgrin: how do you know this stuff? I must admit I start zoning when it gets to the "boring" stuff like respiration(amazing none of the ponies have died yet)

BTW I read the color thing on the Equisearch(?) website maybe? I think its a magazine/ online forum thing... good lord I'm getting daft in my old age:uhoh:

Fluffie
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:51 PM
snaffle rein outside the pinkie, curb rein between pinkie and ring (IF I remember correctly :lol: )

elastic on left--easier to adjust saddle than moving leg with sword attached :eek:

I can never remember the name of those stupid chestnut-things on the back of fetlocks! :mad:

Zig
Nov. 15, 2006, 10:57 PM
Umm... from the daughter of a rocket scientist, we have the admission that she barely knows her right from her left... thank god for the L on the left hand.


I also forget which side the mane should be on... again... a right left issue...

tbtrailrider
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:01 PM
What "scope" is.....

tbtrailrider
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:01 PM
I can never remember the name of those stupid chestnut-things on the back of fetlocks! :mad:


Ergots !

SBT
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:06 PM
I can never remember the name of those stupid chestnut-things on the back of fetlocks! :mad:

Ergots. :D My horse's are practically nonexistant, probably because he skids around in his paddock so much he wears them down. :rolleyes:

Until recently, I did NOT really know how to tie a western cinch. I just guessed, and after numerous loosening episodes, finally decided I should check online. Turns out I was doing it right all along, and the horse in question is just a wide tub o'lard who can hold his breath for a VERY long time. ;)

I still don't know how western stirrups are supposed to attach to the saddle, nor where the stirrup leather buckles are supposed to sit. They could be upside down and I'd have no friggen' clue... :no:

And for the life of me, I can't figure out why cinches have buckles on both ends, leaving the buckle tongue on the tied end just hanging out to poke something. :confused:

kellyb
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:11 PM
And for the life of me, I can't figure out why cinches have buckles on both ends, leaving the buckle tongue on the tied end just hanging out to poke something. :confused:

Because some people use a latigo on the left side that has holes in it - so both ends of the buckle are utilized. It is personal choice really whether you'd rather do the western knot or use the holes in the latigo. Personally I do the knot because you can get it 'just right' without being in between holes :winkgrin:

kellyb
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:12 PM
As for me...

I will never understand all of the things that come with riding in Hunterland, and I will never stop holding my breath/making stupid faces over jumps :sadsmile:

Jamie2337
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:12 PM
I cannot tell my leads when I am cantering...

snaffle635
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:17 PM
I also can't "feel" the wrong diagonal. I have to look down. Anyone else have this problem?



I'm cool with my diagonal, but can't do it with my canter lead. Gotta work on that one!

Oh, and I don't know doodly about basic horse nutrition.

MistyBlue
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:17 PM
Remembering not to let anything medical panic the living snot out of me.
I know all the normal range stats for equines...and even know my own horses normal resp, heart rate...right down to each horses' normal temps depending on what time of the day it is. (both run a little higher normal range after 3 pm)
However anytime something is slightly wonky on either horse...I guess, second guess and third guess estimates on what might be causing it and within a short time am imagining the worst...then panic mode sets in and by the time the horse is feeling normal again I'm an absolute wreck. :eek:

I can also never remember which side a horse's mane should be on for English or western...I get them mixed up.

retsasid
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:17 PM
Vision and girths have been addressed.. I had such witty answers!

Standard for reins is that the more used, or more necessary, one goes on the inside; less used goes on the outside. Goes for pelhams, gags, draw reins, etc. Basically, you don't want to be cranking on the pelham rein when you just need a little "woah" from your snaffle rein. You can always switch 'em. Doesn't really matter.

Fluffie - ergot ;) and my horse doesn't have them! Is he more evolved?...or has he skipped an evolutionary step? I may never know.

tbtrailrider - scope is totally personal. Tends to refer to height - scope for 3'6 means can do the 3'6, perhaps at the top of its range. A safe rule of thumb is that if the horse clears a jump with effort, that is the limit of its scope (for now.) You can also watch a horse's hind end to determine scope. Watching some high level jumpers, esp grand prix horses, I'm surprised the horses don't flip head over heels with how much SPRING they get from their back end! It's crazy. (This is something I actually only noticed this weekend, watching Marilyn Little & Romeo in Raleigh.)


Umm.. I suck at fitting martingales. And weird bits, like loose rings and pelhams. And eyeballing girth sizes...and knowing when a horse is (subtlely) lame while riding.

dogchushu
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:21 PM
I have to hang the headstall over my own head to get a bridle reassembled correctly. Otherwise, something always ends up crooked, backwards, twisted, or upside down.

I can't wrap a tail without the darn thing slipping off. I get so paranoid about wrapping it too tightly. I just use the pre assembled tail wraps for shipping. I find someone else to wrap it when it's braided.

I don't know why boots have swagger tabs. They've never given me a swagger.

And I've never figured out how to get a martingale stop on without using language that would make a sailor blush and frighten small children.

But the big mystery of horse ownership: where the devil are all those hoof picks I've bought over the years? I swear, you could melt down all my lost hoof picks and make an F350 out of them!

Seven
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:28 PM
But the big mystery of horse ownership: where the devil are all those hoof picks I've bought over the years? I swear, you could melt down all my lost hoof picks and make an F350 out of them!

:lol: :lol: :lol:

ddashaq
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:32 PM
Despite having polo wrapped a gazillion legs, I still have a tendency to wrap the right ones backwards. In fact, I passed this on to one of my friends who was finally corrected about it when she was on her college polo team. I was a wee bit embarrassed!

Lynnwood
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:40 PM
Ergots. Supposed to have been the left overs of when equines were multi toed

Why must I buy a new sweat scrapper for the wash rack every day...only my horses use it!! Do they eat them..use them to ground out the hot wire when they plan big escapes

When should you poltice vs. set up vs. ice vs. pack feet and set up to many choices only 4 legs!!!

Kementari
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:41 PM
Count me in on the diagonal club. :(

I am incapable of making simple decisions about which blanket to use. I attribute this to the fact that my horses are almost never blanketed. :winkgrin: Unfortunately, one of them has been sick, and I spend ten minutes agonizing each night over what to put on him! :eek:

I cannot braid with yarn (but my braids with elastic look REALLY good! :cool:).

I'm sure there are more, but it's late and I'm too tired to think! :D

WindyIsles
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:46 PM
Where all the leadropes vanish off to :rolleyes:

Now THAT is the big mystery in our barn - we have about 40 horses ours/boarders and I think we've bought even leadropes to lead everyone of those horses - but we can NEVR find them! :confused:

JoZ
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:48 PM
I don't know what it means (or what it feels like) to have my horse "in front of my leg". Um, about half of him is in front of my leg and the other half is in back of my leg, and I thought that was kinda the goal.

I also can't give an aid when a certain foot is in the air, or striking the ground, or beginning to move forward or any of that.

ThreeHorseNight
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:48 PM
I have to hang the headstall over my own head to get a bridle reassembled correctly. Otherwise, something always ends up crooked, backwards, twisted, or upside down.

Hey, I used to do that!

I must admit, that after years of riding around in dressage arenas, I can't remember the letters. Oh, I have a way of remembering that the letters are AKEHCMBF, but when I'm riding I can never remember which side of the arena E and B are on, and which diagonal K, H, M, and F are at the end of. (I memorize my dressage tests by which way I turn and whether I do movements in the middle of the arena or end, rather than by letters.) It's a good thing I'll probably never make it past training level. ;)

R D Lite
Nov. 15, 2006, 11:49 PM
How to braid (well) and how to clip (well). In the two years I've owned him, my horse has had health or training issues that mean I don't want to clip in the winter (it is Montana, and my poor little TB needs that coat if he's not being worked too hard!) and I don't need to braid in the summer. So those skills I will have to acquire later. :)

However, having a very sick horse for a year has taught me LOTS and LOTS about various vet skills. Need a leg wrapped? I'm your girl. Shots? No problem. Want a second opinion as to which leg your horse is lame on? Okay. Can't identify that bump/scrape/creeping crud? Ask away. Need a hand getting that ointment into your horse's eye? I've got some tricks up my sleeve. :winkgrin:

Lynnwood
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:01 AM
Threehorsenight. Starting at A and working counter clockwise

A Fat Black Momma Cat Had Eight Kittens. AFBMCHEK

Peggy
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:02 AM
According to GM, scope is the ability to jump wide fences. Not always used that way tho.

I think I finally got the footfalls for the various gaits down.

Renvers - travers - whatever

While I can place the dressage letters around the ring, I don't really ride off of them, but more by patterns.

Definitely challenged at feeling pulses. Anywhere. And am clueless and feeling for the extra powerful digital pulse that accompanies lameness.

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:13 AM
2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.



It makes no difference. In fact you should alternate which side you girth up on. Its much better for your saddle it you do. Most saddles when viewed upside down down the panels will have asymmetry if they are only girthed up on the left side. Same thing for always mounting on the left- much healthier on the horse's back and saddle to alternate. Thats my PSA. :D

JH
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:14 AM
I don't know what it means (or what it feels like) to have my horse "in front of my leg". Um, about half of him is in front of my leg and the other half is in back of my leg, and I thought that was kinda the goal.


That's just a way of saying that the horse is listening to your leg and moving forward off of it.

I can't braid a tail (yet), and I'm not quite sure how to attach a tail bag. Someone please tell me how to attach a tail bag. :) I know the bag has a string at the top but how is it tied on? I even had a friend show me once but I still can't remember. :no:

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:23 AM
I can't wrap a tail without the darn thing slipping off. I get so paranoid about wrapping it too tightly. I just use the pre assembled tail wraps for shipping. I find someone else to wrap it when it's braided.

If you are wrapping w/o the tail being braided you can take a little section of hair from the side of the tail and lift it upward while doing one wrap over it. You can do that two or three times and it prevents the wrap from sliding. Although you end up with little kinked pieces of tail!


I don't know why boots have swagger tabs. They've never given me a swagger.

IIRC they were used back in the day to pull the boots on. Certainly couldn't do that with the decorative ones today! I like your explanation though! :lol:



And I've never figured out how to get a martingale stop on without using language that would make a sailor blush and frighten small children.


Me either! :no: Although I wonder if you put it in pretty hot water for a little bit before attempting such a task if it wouldn't make the rubber more flexible??? Might be worth a try...



But the big mystery of horse ownership: where the devil are all those hoof picks I've bought over the years? I swear, you could melt down all my lost hoof picks and make an F350 out of them!

They have escaped with all my pulling combs of course! Thats where they've gone! :yes:

Kementari
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:25 AM
Braid the tail (just the long part - starting at the bottom of the tail bone). Put an elastic (or your tie of choice) in the end. Insert tail into tail bag. Take one string, and bring it from the back of the tail through the top of the braid (as in, between the tail bone and the braid) to the front. In other words, you want one of the "hanks" of hair that begins the braid on the left of the string, and two on the right. Or vice versa. Tie to the opposite string. Repeat if you have two sets of strings.

That's assuming you just have the single kind of bag. If you have the triple-tube kind, well, that's a different story, and if anyone knows a relatively simple way of tying those in, I'm all ears! :winkgrin:

I have the special ability to convince myself that my horse is off/has heat in any leg you like if I look/feel hard enough. On the bright side, I have learned that it is best to go with my first impression, which ends up being right 99% of the time. :D And I got one of those laser temp thingies, so I can double check my phantom heat issues! :lol:

Dazednconfused
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:10 AM
Those of you who can't wrap legs - I too had this problem. I had lots of people try to explain it to me in lots of different ways. Never worked. Had to come up with my own method - when wrapping the right leg, you should be wrapping clockwise around the leg, and when wrapping the left you should wrap counter-clockwise around the leg. Maybe it will help you? :)

Lauren!
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:23 AM
I know nothing about breeding or bloodlines. I have my horse's family tree :D (http://www.pedigreequery.com/without+hesitation2) but I have no idea if it's any good or what it means (beyond who his parents, grandparents, etc. were). I only did the tattoo research so I would know and be able to celebrate his biological birthday :lol:

Dazednconfused
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:29 AM
That's just a way of saying that the horse is listening to your leg and moving forward off of it.

I can't braid a tail (yet), and I'm not quite sure how to attach a tail bag. Someone please tell me how to attach a tail bag. :) I know the bag has a string at the top but how is it tied on? I even had a friend show me once but I still can't remember. :no:
Make your own - we arab folk tend to use Guardtex. Vetwrap is okay during the not-so-hot months and white only. Step by step -

1. Wash and condition the tail, rinse as usual.
2. Wait until it's dry, brush all the tangles out, use your favorite spray conditioner - I swear by Healthy HairCare Moisturizer. Eqyss Avocado Mist is almost as good.
3. Braid, starting slightly loosely at the end of the tailbone, tightening as you go down. Leave some of the shorter, feathery hairs out of the braid. Braid as far down as you can, secure with a rubber band (the ones made for horses).
4. Make a 'hole' at the top of the tail between the sections of braid and the tailbone, and fold the end of the braid through the 'hole' - keep going around until you get to the end of the tail - you should have a 4-5 inch long wad of braided tail with several 'loops' deep, if that makes sense.
5. Take a piece of Guardtex, and pull it through the hole, so that the end of the piece of Guardtex is at the end of the braid, at the back of the tail, with the other end at the front.
6. Tear off and hold the piece in place. Start wrapping with a new piece around the first piece, around and around and under the wad, around some more, go through the hole again if you like, until the whole 'wad' is covered with Guardtex (so that you can't see any hair through the first layer or two of the guardtex).
7. Now you'll need flyswatters - I like bailing twine. Take about 5 pieces of twine, fold it over, cut in half (now you should have 10 strings). Pull it through the hole so half of the ten strings hang on one side, and the other ten on the other.
8. Secure twine with electrical tape, around the braid/guardtex. Write down the date you did the tail directly on the wrap with a sharpie, and voila', you have a fail-safe tailwrap that is not going to knock you out if it whacks you in the head (that's always what happens to me with your traditional tailbags), has flyswatting abilities, and makes the hair grow at a ridiculous rate - plus keeps it protected and clean - to the point that on most non-grey/pinto horses that you can wash and condition just the top of the tail and easily get away with going to a show. You can leave it in usually about 3 weeks to a month in summer, and much longer in winter.

http://www.sstack.com/shopping/product/detailmain.jsp?itemID=1548&itemType=PRODUCT&RS=1&keyword=tail+wrap - there's a link to where you can buy Guardtex. Great stuff!

nappingonthejob
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:47 AM
martingale stops - use boot pulls! Wiggle them into the martingale stop facing opposit directions, and you can then either step on one boot pull and pull up with the other, or have someone grab one side and help you stretch it open. Just be careful not to let go if you're stepping on one...they'll fly up and try to poke out your eyes. Not that I know from experience or anything.

Chipngrace
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:44 AM
And for the life of me, I can't figure out why cinches have buckles on both ends, leaving the buckle tongue on the tied end just hanging out to poke something. :confused:

I buckle both ends of my cinch!! My latigo has holes in it every few inches and I'll just slide it into one of those and the put the remaining leather up in the keeper in front of the pomel.

ReSomething
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:57 AM
I have no clue how to properly clean a stall. I hang out and spy on the barn workers so I have an idea how it is done but I've never, ever had a horse with a stall and never had to do it. Picking manure out of a paddock I've done a lot, and I've picked out one or two piles worth from a stall but never really cleaned one.
Of course there is more, and I am also in the diagonal club. Or the can't-tell-my-diagonal club, really.

aregard
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:01 AM
I don't know if a male horse has a prostate.

The reason I wonder is I have one of the most frequent pee-ers in the universe. He doesn't pee a lot (not at all like a racehorse :) ) but he pees every 45 minutes or so. It's weird.

goeslikestink
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:09 AM
not having enought knowlede of said easy boots so i asked --

ChocoMare
Nov. 16, 2006, 07:05 AM
I have no clue how to properly clean a stall.

The way I was taught in the Dark Ages:

1. Pick all the obvious big piles, sifting as you go so you can leave behind as many shavings as possible.

2. Gently rake the clean, top shavings all over to the four sides of the stall, banking them up the sides.

3. As you're banking, you can pick the golfballs (my word for single, manure balls). Feel free to use your hands ;)

4. Dig out all the wet spots.

5. Put down a layer of SweetPDZ, focusing on the wet spots.

6. Slowly bring back the banked shavings, again getting the individual golfballs you may have missed. Put a bit more towards the center.

7. Add fresh shavings around the perimeter.

Ta dah!

mintyfresh
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:05 AM
I'm pretty good with most things but....

I've never had to use a poultice and have no idea how to do so.

I don't know how to do an IV injection.

I have no clue what I'm reading when I look at low level dressage tests (training/intro) though suspect if I understood I could probably do it, lol.

Horse_poor SS
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:06 AM
Remembering not to let anything medical panic the living snot out of me.
I know all the normal range stats for equines...and even know my own horses normal resp, heart rate...right down to each horses' normal temps depending on what time of the day it is. (both run a little higher normal range after 3 pm)
However anytime something is slightly wonky on either horse...I guess, second guess and third guess estimates on what might be causing it and within a short time am imagining the worst...then panic mode sets in and by the time the horse is feeling normal again I'm an absolute wreck. :eek:

I.

Know mine all too well! Called the vet the other day? her comment-

You have QUITE the imagination!

Is this a clique in the making?? Altho with my illness/accident prone beastie being in my barn, an active, necessary imagination must come into play....

I ALWAY worry that I get the tendons/ligiments mixed up, and which needs hard footing and which soft? Sadly, I know the suspensory one-like the back of my hand. Anyone for some long Loooong walks on dirt roads??

OOPS! Under my alter!!!!

carolprudm
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:13 AM
My family thought it absolutely hysterical when they caught me googling Camel toe

Jaegermonster
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:14 AM
I don't know how to feel for the digital pulse. :no:


Actually it's "Distal" but don't feel bad, I can't feel it either. I know where it is, just never can feel it.

arabhorse2
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:34 AM
Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

I eliminated that problem by buying girths with elastic on both sides! :D

I really, truly, have no clue what most bits are called, and what they're supposed to do. :uhoh: I've always ridden in either a loose ring snaffle, or a D ring.

JCS
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:46 AM
I thought of this while reading the recent threads about nosebands. How the heck do you know if a horse "has its tongue over the bit" or is "crossing its jaw"?? What does that feel like to the rider?

And also, why in the name of god would a horse want to put its tongue over the bit--when I think about the underside of MY tongue, it makes me think it would hurt like heck to have the bit under there.

Huntertwo
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:00 AM
My family thought it absolutely hysterical when they caught me googling Camel toe

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Ruth0552
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:01 AM
My family thought it absolutely hysterical when they caught me googling Camel toe


ROTFLMAO. :lol: :lol: :lol:


Isn't there something about horses aren't supposed to eat broccoli? Not sure about that one.

And I also don't know how to poultice.

eponacowgirl
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:01 AM
How to deal with a horse with an abcess!! I've never, ever had a horse with an abcess before two weeks ago.

Mind you, I knew it was coming... I just didn't know how to make it better!!

MyGiantPony
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:02 AM
I stripped down my bridle a few weeks ago and completely blanked out on which way the buckle on end of the reins faces.

Is that the first sign of Alzheimers?

philosoraptor
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:02 AM
Let me help you...


I'll start:
1) I can never remember what a horses' vision is (blindspots, etc.) and what colors they see and don't see (if any).

Blind spot behind is easy because if you're standing behind him and cant' see any of either eye, he can't see you. And just like us, directly in front of his nose is a blind spot.

There's a little debate about how vision changes when the horse raises and lowers his head, and somewhere I had found an interesting article that suggested horses forced into a certain frame were in a way forced to be ridden blind because of the angle & height of their head.


2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

It's there because that's the last side you'll tighten before mounting. You should be doing the last of the tensioning from the elastic side of the girth because it's far easier to do (that's why it is elastic). See, easy to remember. :)

I wish I could keep breeding terms staight: sired by, out of, by

I can't figure out draw reins because I've seen them put on different ways. I personally have no use for them. Maybe I'm just puzzled by their very existance.

I also wish I could keep farrier direction terms straight: medial, lateral, dorsal, whatever. Whatever happened to inside/outside, left/right, and top/bottom? :lol:

DairyQueen2049
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:11 AM
[QUOTE=JoZ;1999838]I don't know what it means (or what it feels like) to have my horse "in front of my leg". Um, about half of him is in front of my leg and the other half is in back of my leg, and I thought that was kinda the goal.

[QUOTE]

And keeping them IN BETWEEN your legs and mean old Mr Gravity - there's another goal!

I finally got walk/trot/canter down, WITH leads and diagonals - and went gaited. Running walk and rack - errr ummm - whats she doing NOW??? :lol:

I never ever got the peanut roller head set thing. What was up with that?
And the 4 beat canter thing....yuk.

Chicago skrews - can you say come off at the wrong time?

And just when you get the hang of a western cinch center fire rigging came along.

Just where exactly DOES the saddle pad go - how far forward - and that little lift that trail riders do to the pad to tuck it into the saddle and leave the back bone free and dry -does that really work??

onelanerode
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:20 AM
Ugh -- I get my diagonal wrong about half the time too. So annoying! I used to not have a problem with this, but after taking 5 years off from riding, there are a few things that are now problematic.

I do not know much about feet. What differentiates a good trim from a bad one, what types of shoes do what, what a balanced foot looks like, etc. Of all the things to be slack about, this, I feel, is one of the worst ... no foot, no horse, right? :( Every time JB posts about feet, I go through and read her posts and look at the pics, if available, and try to see what she sees, but most of the time I am clueless.:no:

I know the textbook ways to give shots, but I've never actually given one b/c I am pretty darn squeamish about that sort of thing. (I don't receive shots well either.) Now, washing/bandaging a wound, no problem. But shots squick me out.

I should have much better eq than I do for the amount of time I've been riding.

I don't know how to put together a double bridle.

I don't know how to walk a course (but I'll be learning this soon).



On stall cleaning, a good technique that a friend once showed me was to remove all the obvious piles. Then locate your wet spot(s), pull the shavings away from them, dig them out, and toss the dry shavings up against the stall walls. Any random "apples" that didn't get picked up with the piles will fall down to the base of the banked shavings and are easy to locate/scoop up. Then you can spread whatever you use to control ammonia and such and either let the stall dry out a bit or pull your dry, cleaner shavings back down from the walls and spread out on the floor, leaving a slight bank along the walls and in the corners.

Renn/aissance
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:27 AM
I must admit, that after years of riding around in dressage arenas, I can't remember the letters.

A Fat Bay Mare Can Hardly Ever Kick.


And I've never figured out how to get a martingale stop on without using language that would make a sailor blush and frighten small children.

It's impossible. Even the two-hoofpick method fails.

I always have trouble feeling pulses, unless the digital pulse is strong. At least I'm learning to give shots.

hollyhorse2000
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:32 AM
I can't put a bridle together if my life depended on it.
I have to look down to check both diagonal and lead.
Can wrap a leg.
Have a hard time seeing conformational flaws (other than obvious ones) or bad feet (other than obvious ones).

BUT -- after once toying with breeding my Paint mare, I can tell you everything you need to know about color dominance, odds for getting pinto, blah blah blah!

Foxygrl516
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:44 AM
Ok, here's a question:

I am very good at knowing different kinds of bits, and what they do. Even if it's a bit I've never seen I can look at the mouthpiece and where everything attaches and tell you this bit's purpose.
HOWEVER, there is one bit that I thoroughly don't understand and it's fairly basic (I think atleast). It's a 3 ring. I have one, ride in it a lot, love it, know what it does for my horse (hense why there is confusion). Most people call it and "Elevator Bit" and I"ve heard people fussing about people combining those with Running martingales (Mixed messages and all). BUT, if you look at the bit and how it is put together it looks obviously to be a bit with leverage therefore encouraging a horse to drop his head because it puts direct pressure on the Poll. When I use it on my horse this is exactly the effect it has. I even use it with 2 reins sometimes (weird idea I came up with one weekend that actually worked really well). One rein on the big hole so to act like a basic snaffle, and one rein on the bottom ring to give extra leverage only when needed.

So WHY is it called an Elevator bit?????? Why do people think you shouldn't use it w/ a martingale b/c of mixed signals? Seems those 2 things give very much the same signal...? Someone please explain. I'm obviously missing something here!!!!!

Angela Freda
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:46 AM
Umm... from the daughter of a rocket scientist, we have the admission that she barely knows her right from her left... thank god for the L on the left hand.
Um, I hate to tell you this but there is an "L" on the right hand also.
For a Dyslexic that ol' "L" thing was never very helpful.

Small Change
Nov. 16, 2006, 09:53 AM
Actually it's "Distal" but don't feel bad, I can't feel it either. I know where it is, just never can feel it.

Nope, digital, as in digits and foot. Distal and proximal just refer to where you are on a limb or body part. You feel the digital pulse in the distal aspect of the forelegs. The horse has distal pulses all over his body, but only four digital pulses. :)

JCS
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:20 AM
There are many of you saying you can't put a bridle together...

Back when I was a wee lass, our pony camp always had us take apart and put back together a bridle, blindfolded. Whoever did it fastest got a Hershey bar. :)

It was an awesome teaching tool, because now I can put together any bridle, any time, without thinking about it.

Now you ladies over the age of 21 could do the same thing as a drinking game. Whoever puts the bridle together fastest (blindfolded) gets a glass of Cabernet. Or something. I guarantee you won't have any more problems with bridles.

Frog
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:35 AM
Breeding terms are easy! "Sired by" is the same as "by"- I can't tell if you think these are different. "Out of" a mare, because the horse literally came out of the mare!! They don't come out of stallions!


But I don't know half the stuff you guys know, probably because I don't ride or have a horse... I've never seen a horse colic, and I am always afraid that if I see it I won't know what it is, or won't notice.

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:39 AM
I thought of this while reading the recent threads about nosebands. How the heck do you know if a horse "has its tongue over the bit" or is "crossing its jaw"?? What does that feel like to the rider?

And also, why in the name of god would a horse want to put its tongue over the bit--when I think about the underside of MY tongue, it makes me think it would hurt like heck to have the bit under there.

The handfull of times I have had this happen was when I was longing a horse with side reins on. He would be going around and if he started to resist the side reins all of a sudden he would start flinging his head and would put up a huge fuss. He had gotten his tongue over the bit. :rolleyes: It is generally pretty obvious b/c like you said it definitely isn't comfortable!

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:43 AM
Just where exactly DOES the saddle pad go - how far forward - and that little lift that trail riders do to the pad to tuck it into the saddle and leave the back bone free and dry -does that really work??

Its always good to lift up the saddle a bit and really pull the saddle pad into the gullet. I think its to make sure you aren't putting undue pressure on their withers or across the spine.

MeredithTX
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:51 AM
I have never used studs on shoes, so I know nothing about those.

I also don't know how to poultice, give injections, or check pulse!

Diagonals I can do, but I suck at feeling leads on a straight line.

To make myself feel better, I will pat myself on the back for knowing how to wrap legs, braid, clean stalls, and put bridles back together! :D Anyone want to teach me the others though?

Linny
Nov. 16, 2006, 10:51 AM
I have no idea how to french braid and thus cannot braid a tail.
I'm good with leads and diagonals (trainer made us practice feeling with eyes closed) but cannot see a distance to save my life.
Too squeamish for shots
I wish I knew more about the fine points of conformation
I know the concept of "in front of the leg" but in practice...not so good
It's been years since I've done bandages of any kind so I've really forgotten

tullio
Nov. 16, 2006, 11:02 AM
We should have a COTH Pony Camp.... I would be happy to share my can't miss techniques for tail braiding and bridle assembly if someone wants to give me the crash course on emergency equine medicine and intro to farrier-y. My current shoeing knowledge tops out at "looks right" and "doesn't look right."

KaraAD
Nov. 16, 2006, 11:03 AM
So, I'm ok with most of the stuff mentioned here but I am embarrassed to admit that I can not, for the life of me, properly attach a curb chain on a pehlam. I know it has to lay flat and goes on the hooky thing but on which side of the bit, how tight should it be.

None of my horses go in a pelham but whenever someone else at the barn asks me to help them, I can't do it.


Oh and don't bother trying to get the stopper on a martingale without cursing. We should check with a physics professor, but I'm pretty sure it is NOT possible to get the stopper on without using a couple of 4 letter words as grease.

LD1129
Nov. 16, 2006, 11:07 AM
I cannot tell my leads when I am cantering...

OHOH me neither. When im on I just cant tell/feel it!!!!! :confused:

Sakura
Nov. 16, 2006, 11:20 AM
I am terrible with arena traffic etiquette. Faster traffic to the inside or on the rail? Who has the right of way horses going to the left or right?

Also, I am a complete numb skull when the topic of equine drugs/medications come up. I have the hardest time remembering them all. But I do know Bute, Bannamine and Ace :p. I know there are sedative "cocktails" but I could not list or even remember the combinations... And unfortunately if you were to ask me to list what vaccinations my horses should get I would probably know 70% but would flunk on what time of year and how frequently they would need to be boosted :uhoh:.

As for the digital pulse... correct me if I am wrong (that is what this tread is for after all ;) ), but I was told that if you can find a digital pulse than you need to call the vet ASAP because the only time it is apparent is as a symptom of founder.

Mtn trails
Nov. 16, 2006, 11:28 AM
"Just where exactly DOES the saddle pad go - how far forward - and that little lift that trail riders do to the pad to tuck it into the saddle and leave the back bone free and dry -does that really work??"

Put the pad on a little forward, slide back so when you put on the saddle in its correct spot - end of tree right behind shoulder - you have at minimum 1" of pad all around.

You should pull up the pad into the gullet of all saddles, not just western, so there's no undue pressure on the wither. My husband neglected to do that with his pack horse but noticed it around 2 miles down the trail and that was with a very thick and fleecy pad. Repacked, tucked the pad up but the damage was done. Two weeks later, he had a fistula the size of a fist. Horse was down for the rest of the summer and into the fall and always had a scar.

Too Old for Pony Club
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:12 PM
Ok, here's a question:

I am very good at knowing different kinds of bits, and what they do. Even if it's a bit I've never seen I can look at the mouthpiece and where everything attaches and tell you this bit's purpose.
HOWEVER, there is one bit that I thoroughly don't understand and it's fairly basic (I think atleast). It's a 3 ring. I have one, ride in it a lot, love it, know what it does for my horse (hense why there is confusion). Most people call it and "Elevator Bit" and I"ve heard people fussing about people combining those with Running martingales (Mixed messages and all). BUT, if you look at the bit and how it is put together it looks obviously to be a bit with leverage therefore encouraging a horse to drop his head because it puts direct pressure on the Poll. When I use it on my horse this is exactly the effect it has. I even use it with 2 reins sometimes (weird idea I came up with one weekend that actually worked really well). One rein on the big hole so to act like a basic snaffle, and one rein on the bottom ring to give extra leverage only when needed.

So WHY is it called an Elevator bit?????? Why do people think you shouldn't use it w/ a martingale b/c of mixed signals? Seems those 2 things give very much the same signal...? Someone please explain. I'm obviously missing something here!!!!!


Calling it an elevator is a North American thing. All of our Pony Club (so, British) literature refers to it as a "Continental Gag" or "Dutch Gag". An elevator looks like this: http://www.quickbits.net/other/76.htm . When I think of it as a gag, it makes much more sense to me (but try walking into a tack shop and asking for a Dutch gag--most of the staff have no idea what you're talking about). The only thing that makes me crazier is when people call it a "3-Ring snaffle". It's NOT a snaffle.

Oh, and using it with two reins is the most correct usage.

sarapony
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:20 PM
I must be the only person on earth who didn't curse when putting the martingale stopper on my new martingale. It was easier than putting bit guards on!

cosmos mom
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:23 PM
ground mounting...is...not my friend :(

OnyxThePony
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:23 PM
"Scope" is the ability to jump various widths/heigts/combinations thereof and look good doing it. We used to use it in reference to oxers "scopes out over it" like a telescope, I guess, but the defination kinda changed.. I don't even hear it anymore.

That's the only one I noticed wasn't answered.....
A good rhyme for banadaging is "Inside towards the nose" so that every time you wrap, when the bandage is on the inside of the horse's leg, it's going towards his nose. I still occasionally hear old students chanting this ;) in....side..towar....dsthenose :lol:

I can never remember offhand:
Which is ridden in, a chambon or DeGogue
TPR, well temp yes, but I have to think think about the "textbook" P and R


I've never:
Given an IV and I was a trainer ;) Vets do that LOL
Clipped without getting *some* kind of line somewhere

Indy
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:24 PM
Um, I hate to tell you this but there is an "L" on the right hand also.
For a Dyslexic that ol' "L" thing was never very helpful.

Exactly! Don't EVER ask me for directions because I will get you lost at least once.

Horse related....I don't know how to clip ears. I can clip anything else, just not ears. I chalk that up to owning beasties who were really violent about having their ears clipped so I always had my trainers do it. Since I've never had a cooperative candidate to learn on, I don't know how...

chawley
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:25 PM
Despite having polo wrapped a gazillion legs, I still have a tendency to wrap the right ones backwards. In fact, I passed this on to one of my friends who was finally corrected about it when she was on her college polo team. I was a wee bit embarrassed!

I unfortunately have wrapped a million legs too, and I still have to consciously watch the start of the right leg to be sure I do it correctly. I'm right handed, so maybe that has something to do with it.

jn4jenny
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:27 PM
For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

I don't know how to use a lungeing cavesson or side reins. I've been taught how to lunge with a halter or bridle, but once you get the serious hardcore stuff, I get lost. But my trainer tells me that I'll have to learn sometime soon if I want my new five-year-old horse to start carrying his head lower!

I can't set up a series of jumps without a tape measure to regulate the striding. And yes, I try the "let's see how big my stride is" game every time I put the tape measure out, and can't figure out how big my average stride really is. And I have to have the distance chart in my pocket or I'll goof that up too.

Foxygrl516
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:34 PM
Calling it an elevator is a North American thing. All of our Pony Club (so, British) literature refers to it as a "Continental Gag" or "Dutch Gag". An elevator looks like this: http://www.quickbits.net/other/76.htm . When I think of it as a gag, it makes much more sense to me (but try walking into a tack shop and asking for a Dutch gag--most of the staff have no idea what you're talking about). The only thing that makes me crazier is when people call it a "3-Ring snaffle". It's NOT a snaffle.

Oh, and using it with two reins is the most correct usage.

So it IS NOT actually an elevator bit? That is just incorrect terminology? I just call it a 3 ring (NOT snaffle). Some people in my area call it a bubble bit and that really bugs me. So I'm right, it's purpose is that of a curb in a sense that it puts pressure on the poll and lowers the head? And the people that get mad about the martingale and "mixed messages" are just assuming since it's an "elevator" that it serves some other purpose? Wow.

That's funny about the reins. I've never seen anyone use one this way. I was just working at a HT in May (where I do most of my good brainstorming) and was thinking about how leverage pisses my guy off if used constantly (which is why the 3 ring was hanging useless in the tack room) but that leverage sure would be a good thing to have ever few strides with a half halt. So I bought tiny reins and tried it. I don't think I've ever been so successful with a combo like that. It is awsome. Glad to know I'm not totally off the wall in doing this. :) Thanks for the info!!!!

handydandyjake
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:36 PM
Never have and do not know how to wrap a leg...:o

Neitehr can I, and I really should!! I'm way too afraid to try it anyway, waaaay too many horror stories!

Foxygrl516
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:39 PM
For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

I don't know how to use a lungeing cavesson or side reins. I've been taught how to lunge with a halter or bridle, but once you get the serious hardcore stuff, I get lost. But my trainer tells me that I'll have to learn sometime soon if I want my new five-year-old horse to start carrying his head lower!

I can't set up a series of jumps without a tape measure to regulate the striding. And yes, I try the "let's see how big my stride is" game every time I put the tape measure out, and can't figure out how big my average stride really is. And I have to have the distance chart in my pocket or I'll goof that up too.

Poultice:

It's really easy! All you need is a bucket of poultice, paper of some sort, pillow (or no bows) wraps and standing bandages.

Smear Poultice all over the horse's leg from knee to fetlock. Front to back, cover tendons and all.
Then wet your paper (Can use the inner paper lining of feed bags, paper towels, whatever) and wrap it loosely around the leg over the poultice. Squeeze it a little so it sticks to the leg.
Then just wrap! Pillow or no-bow first, clock-wise on rights, counter clockwise on lefts, then wrap a standing bandage over it so it all stays put. Poultice doesn't need to be done very tightly. Obviously if it's too loose it'll slide down, but if you can fit a finger or 2 in between the leg and the bandage you're good to go!

OnyxThePony
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:40 PM
Poulticing For Dummies :lol:
Slap the stuff on the leg, just under 1/4 inch thick.
Wrap over the poultice with saran wrap or plastic bags to keep the poultice wetter, longer (longer drawing time) OR
Use paper lunch bags dipped in water for lesser drawing time.
Wrap with no-bows over all that.
Wrap with standings over that.

texang73
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:43 PM
I can't braid. At all.

Nor can I body clip.

Nor do I know how to pull a trailer. I've owned horses for over 20 years, and have never owned a trailer...

jazzrider
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:45 PM
Diagonals I can do, but I suck at feeling leads on a straight line.

Ditto! :confused:

LulaBell
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:51 PM
i have no idea what a mullen mouth is. zero clue why sometimes draw reins are put in between the horse's front legs or why they're done on the sides. no clue on the difference between a flash attachment and a figure-8. any help?

i'm good with the wrapping, pretty good at feeling diagonals - not 100% but prety good. leads are felt easily. i was taught how to clean a stall by the best.

Fessy's Mom
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:51 PM
Okay, what about the latest change in terminology regarding seats. Exactly WHAT is the difference between a full seat, half seat and two point? I was always taught that half seat and two point were interchangeable. But at the Jeff Cook clinic at EA last week, he was explaining that half seat is full seat, but with your upper body forward and two point is your bum out of the saddle.

:confused:

Fessy's Mom
Nov. 16, 2006, 12:54 PM
i have no idea what a mullen mouth is. zero clue why sometimes draw reins are put in between the horse's front legs or why they're done on the sides. no clue on the difference between a flash attachment and a figure-8. any help?

i'm good with the wrapping, pretty good at feeling diagonals - not 100% but prety good. leads are felt easily. i was taught how to clean a stall by the best.

Mullen mouth is a solid bar bit.

No idea on the draw reins, but don't see too many people using them to the sides anymore.

A flash and figure eight do pretty much the same thing, to keep the horse's mouth shut, but flashes are usually used by dressage horses and figure 8's are used by jumpers. I personally think a figure 8 looks really sporty! :cool:

JH
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:06 PM
Actually it's "Distal" but don't feel bad, I can't feel it either. I know where it is, just never can feel it.

Actually "Digital Pulse" is also correct, and the more commonly used term, as the pulse is taken from the "Digital Arteries" in the horses pasterns.

JointVenture
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:11 PM
Okay, what about the latest change in terminology regarding seats. Exactly WHAT is the difference between a full seat, half seat and two point? I was always taught that half seat and two point were interchangeable. But at the Jeff Cook clinic at EA last week, he was explaining that half seat is full seat, but with your upper body forward and two point is your bum out of the saddle.

:confused:

My understanding is that "half seat" is just sitting a bit lighter in your tack, slightly forward, basically hovering. Two point, of course, is "jumping position," so your butt is out of the saddle and your upper body forward (hip and ankles aligned). In full seat, your shoulders, hips and ankles are aligned with more weight in the saddle.

Sign me up as another person who can't pick up my diagonals correctly to save my life. I always start posting and sit two beats. :rolleyes: You'd think I'd be able to figure out how to get it right the first time!

On wrapping...do both the pillow wraps and the standing wraps get wrapped in the same direction (i.e. clockwise on the right legs and counter on the left)? Do you start wrapping on the inside of the leg or the outside? Thanks!

TomP
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:18 PM
<<...elastic on left--easier to adjust saddle than moving leg with sword attached...>>

I must not be understanding what you're saying here. It appears to me that you're saying the sword (I'm assuming you're talking about horse cavalry) is on the right so it's easier to adjust the saddle on the left. If I remember correctly, the sword is worn on the left since most troops (swordsmen) are/were right handed and would, therefore, have their sword carried on the left. That's where I wore it anyway (No, wasn't in horse cavalry, but in air cavalry units and we wore swords on occasion.) Not arguing, just trying to understand what you were saying.

Tom

sparkliest
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:20 PM
I have to sing a little 'velcro towards the back' song while putting on splint boots or I will put them on backwards every time.

When watching other people ride, I cant see a late lead change. But I can feel them when I ride so why cant I see them?

Too Old for Pony Club
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:20 PM
So it IS NOT actually an elevator bit? That is just incorrect terminology? I just call it a 3 ring (NOT snaffle). Some people in my area call it a bubble bit and that really bugs me. So I'm right, it's purpose is that of a curb in a sense that it puts pressure on the poll and lowers the head? And the people that get mad about the martingale and "mixed messages" are just assuming since it's an "elevator" that it serves some other purpose? Wow.

That's funny about the reins. I've never seen anyone use one this way. I was just working at a HT in May (where I do most of my good brainstorming) and was thinking about how leverage pisses my guy off if used constantly (which is why the 3 ring was hanging useless in the tack room) but that leverage sure would be a good thing to have ever few strides with a half halt. So I bought tiny reins and tried it. I don't think I've ever been so successful with a combo like that. It is awsome. Glad to know I'm not totally off the wall in doing this. :) Thanks for the info!!!!

Weeeeell, whether it's incorrect or correct is based on your background. As I said, Pony Club (British) calls it a gag, which makes sense to me.

I've ridden my horse in this bit (http://www.doversaddlery.com/happy-mouth-mullen-mouth-3-ring-elevator-horse-bit/p/X1-010033/cn/1473/, though I wouldn't call this mullen-mouthed), and he HATED it with a martingale--he was still learning to balance cross country and my hands weren't quiet enough. His balance is now better (as are my hands!), and we get along best with that bit, one rein on the largest ring (the snaffle ring) with NO martingale.

I think of it in terms of elevating the front end, rather than elevating the head. My horse will balance well in this type of bit, because it helps me to get him off my hand and off his front end. For me, it acts like a really big half-halt, rather than bringing his head and nose up too high.

I'm a PC dork, and put together the visual tables at our Quiz: this is what we had for gags:

The Dutch gag/Continental gag: http://shop.valleycountry.com.au/catalogue/category2/category159/category171/p5758http://www.hopevalleysaddlery.co.uk/acatalog/534.jpg
The American gag: http://www.horse-tack-and-equestrian-clothing.com/assets/product_images/thumbs/AC_4_69.jpg
The Cheltenham gag: http://shop.valleycountry.com.au/catalogue/category2/category159/category171/product1835
The Elevator: http://www.quickbits.net/other/76.htm
The Duncan gag: http://store.securehosting.com/stores/sh205878/shophome.php?itemprcd=EQBg20
We also had a "polo gag" which had a curved centre link (like a half moon), but I can't find a suitable online pic.

TomP
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:30 PM
<<...Um, I hate to tell you this but there is an "L" on the right hand also.
For a Dyslexic that ol' "L" thing was never very helpful...>>

Yep, there's an "L" on the right hand but it's backwards! <g> Guess if you're dyslexic, then the rule would have to be the "L" hand is the Right hand! <g>

Tom

Alter top
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:32 PM
One can also feel a digital pulse when there's an abscess, so not just foundering...

There's a TON I don't know, and the more I know the more I realize I don't know.

I don't know how to give shots, I know virtually nothing about the various western disciplines, and there's a ton of vet stuff that I don't know (except for the stuff I've learned from experience, like abscesses and kick wounds!).

Like ringbone: how is that managed?

[r.oo and l.ulu]
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:44 PM
Well I'm 17, so do I get some leeway? :)

When tracking right, I cannot pick up the correct diagonal except from a canter-trot transition...yet I can pick up the correct diagonal (without looking) going the other way at anytime anyplace anywhere.

I couldn't see my leads until 1 year ago.

I don't understand the finer points of feeding. I know that sugar/starch = bad and fat/fiber = good, and maybe a bit more than that, but then you've lost me. I'd like to know the correct ratios for supplementation as well.

I can give IV and IM injections, but I shake badly when doing IV injections and I still need help in finding the "triangle" for the IM.

I'm a stall nazi, so no help needed there. :lol:

I don't understand what wormers kill what and where the different worms reside in the horse.

I can never remember the horse's respiration and pulse, but can easily remember temperature.

I have a very hard time determining how much contact is too much, or too little. Although I've just recently switched from western to dressage, so maybe that explains my hesitancy to take up contact with the mouth.

I don't know how to use a surcingle and side reins.

I don't know how to jump (jump well, that is :lol: ).

I don't know how to drive a truck and trailer, but again...I'm seventeen so that doesn't really count yet, does it?

Sakura
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:47 PM
I have always been told that the flash nose band is to help hold the bit in the correct position... not to keep the mouth shut (that is the noseband's job). Haven't a clue the figure eight noseband, would guess that it does the job of both the noseband and the flash.

Alter top... should have generalized "foot ailments" in my post, not just founder.

Another question: How exactly do bots get into the horse if the eggs of the bot fly are laid on the outside of the horse and not somewhere where they will likely be ingested by the horse (unless the horse scratches his knee with his teeth I suppose...)?

KaraAD
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:48 PM
For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice!

In addition to the other instructions, a tip for poulticing - get your hands wet (I put a couple of inches of water into a small bucket and keep it next to me) before you reach into the poultice and as you are smushing it on. That way, it will stick to the horse and not to your hands and you can mold it onto the leg better and your hands are less messy when you're done.


IM (intramusclar) shots are easy. I found this great article one time. www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1018/ANR-1018.pdf
IV is a bit tougher and something I personally like to leave to a vet (unless really necessary).

FlashGordon
Nov. 16, 2006, 01:55 PM
For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

I used to poultice legs daily when I worked at a summer camp... 50-60 horses going 2-3 hours a day, often jumping, and the ground was like concrete. Lots of puffy legs.

It is really easy. Basically we'd get a clay-based product, and rub it all over the leg below the knee. Then we'd cut up brown paper bags, wet them, and wrap them around the leg on top of the poultice. On top of the paperbag went standing bandages. We usually left them on for 24 hours, then removed them and rinsed the dry poultice off. It really did the trick to reduce swelling and heat.

When poulticing a wound or a hoof, we used warm water, epsom salt and a baby diaper. Animalintex is nice too as it contains poulticing agents but it can be pricey.

As far as things I should know and don't.... uh this is really sad but I don't know how to ask for a flying change! Yes I could probably fudge it but I've never been taught properly. Spent too much time riding green beans and projects who weren't even close to being able to do one!

JH
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:09 PM
I eliminated that problem by buying girths with elastic on both sides! :D

I really, truly, have no clue what most bits are called, and what they're supposed to do. :uhoh: I've always ridden in either a loose ring snaffle, or a D ring.

Mullen - A mild unjointed snaffle, with a bowed mouthpiece often preferred by horses that are extremely sensitive to bar contact.

Loose Ring Snaffle - The "standard" single jointed snaffle. The joint allows the rider to move each half of the mouth piece independently from each other for greater control than a Mullen. The joint in the bit also allows for a harsh "nut cracker" effect when needed for correction.

Eggbut Snaffle - Identical to the loose ring in all aspects except that the rings are not free to rotate through the ends of the mouth piece as they are on the loose ring. The Eggbut is preferred by horses whose lips get pinched by the rotating rings of the loose ring snaffle.

D ring Snaffle - Same jointed action as the Loose Ring and Eggbut, with the added effect where the Dees create pressure at the sides of the horses mouth, and this adds a little more control than with the ringed snaffles.

French Link Snaffle - Has a round edged figure eight shaped link in the middle of the mouth piece that creates a "double jointed" bit. The link in the mouth piece allows the bit to fit more naturally to the shape of the horses mouth, and is generally considered to be more mild than the single jointed bits.

Dr. Bristol - Looks deceivingly like the french link, but the link of the Dr. Bristol is a flat rectangle that is set at a slight angle relative to the rings at the ends of the mouth piece. The link of the Dr. Bristol acts against the tongue of the horse to create a bit with a more severe action than those of the other snaffles.

Mtn trails
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:10 PM
I can't tell when a horse is working off his hind end. I'll push and push with my legs and seat but really can't tell the difference. I can tell when he's on his forehand or feeling strung out but can't feel the lift in his spine or him really using his hiney.

Always end up taking too much contact on my horse when riding in an arena. No wonder Thistle is so resistant. I have to keep reminding myself to soften more. Rode last night on a longer rein and she was much happier and more willing to bend and her halts were better too.

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:14 PM
I am terrible with arena traffic etiquette. Faster traffic to the inside or on the rail? Who has the right of way horses going to the left or right?


Always pass left shoulder to left shoulder, that much I know! :yes:

JH
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:25 PM
Braid the tail (just the long part - starting at the bottom of the tail bone). Put an elastic (or your tie of choice) in the end. Insert tail into tail bag. Take one string, and bring it from the back of the tail through the top of the braid (as in, between the tail bone and the braid) to the front. In other words, you want one of the "hanks" of hair that begins the braid on the left of the string, and two on the right. Or vice versa. Tie to the opposite string. Repeat if you have two sets of strings.

That's assuming you just have the single kind of bag. If you have the triple-tube kind, well, that's a different story, and if anyone knows a relatively simple way of tying those in, I'm all ears! :winkgrin:

I have the special ability to convince myself that my horse is off/has heat in any leg you like if I look/feel hard enough. On the bright side, I have learned that it is best to go with my first impression, which ends up being right 99% of the time. :D And I got one of those laser temp thingies, so I can double check my phantom heat issues! :lol:

Thanks Kementari !! :)

BAC
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:29 PM
2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

Actually its supposed to be on the off side of the saddle, at least that is according to one of the British magazines I read (either Horse or Horse & Rider or Your Horse, can't remember which). The article was on proper use of tack/equipment and it said keeping the elastic end on the near side means when you tighten the girth you are only stretching the elastic portion of it. By keeping the leather end on the near side it allows the entire girth to stretch when you tighten it, since its stretching from off to near side (the entire length of the girth) instead of just from the elastic end. Not sure if I described it correctly, nor do I know if this is true or not. Anyone care to comment?

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:30 PM
Another question: How exactly do bots get into the horse if the eggs of the bot fly are laid on the outside of the horse and not somewhere where they will likely be ingested by the horse (unless the horse scratches his knee with his teeth I suppose...)?

Yep you are on the right track. The female bot fly lays the eggs on the horse's coat- legs and such and the horse licks them which stimulates them to hatch. The botfly larvae enter the horse's mouth and burrow into the cheeks and gums for about a month until they are swallowed. The second and third stage larvae eventually attatch themselves to the stomach lining and live off of blood and tissue and mature through the winter. Then they are pooped out and pupate in the soil for ~5-6 weeks when they then hatch into mature botflies in the spring and early summer.

FYI... there are more than one species of botflies. The common botfly lays its eggs on legs and such but other species may lay them on the face or other body parts. I just recently learned that.

ComingAttraction
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:32 PM
No one should ever be embarassed to ask questions. No one knows everything nor can anyone remember everything that they have ever learned.

Slewdledo
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:33 PM
I have to hang the headstall over my own head to get a bridle reassembled correctly. Otherwise, something always ends up crooked, backwards, twisted, or upside down.


:lol: Me too. And sometimes I STILL get it wrong!!

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:33 PM
Actually its supposed to be on the off side of the saddle, at least that is according to one of the British magazines I read (either Horse or Horse & Rider or Your Horse, can't remember which). The article was on proper use of tack/equipment and it said keeping the elastic end on the near side means when you tighten the girth you are only stretching the elastic portion of it. By keeping the leather end on the near side it allows the entire girth to stretch when you tighten it, since its stretching from off to near side (the entire length of the girth) instead of just from the elastic end. Not sure if I described it correctly, nor do I know if this is true or not. Anyone care to comment?

I do, I do!! :yes: I will give my PSA again- Its better for your saddle and the horse's back to alternate which side you girth up on and which side you mount from. Only girthing up on the left side flattens the left panel of the saddle and can cause asymmetrical muscle development on the horse. Today girth up and mount on the left sidel, tomorrow girth up with the elastic side on the right and mount from the right side, etc. etc. etc. We no longer carry swords so this is a tradition that can be tossed out.

onelanerode
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:34 PM
I don't know how to ask for a flying change either. I grew up riding some fantastic but very green ponies, and flying changes were not among their skills. They'd jump anything you pointed them at, though. :p

Can you use a colored pad during the dressage phase of a schooling CT, is it strictly black or white for dressage, always?

And how the hell do you change your whip over the neck without getting your reins and whip horribly tangled?! (In hunterland, where I am from, we used to just pull the whip up parallel to the shoulder till it cleared the withers and then switch hands and put it back down where it belonged.) My eventing trainer's been working with me on the "proper" way to change your whip hand, but this apparently requires more coordination than I have. :(

I'm quite amused at the number of different phrases people have come up with to help them remember the proper order of dressage letters. The one I was taught: All King Edward's Horses Carry Many Bloody Fools.

A tip on poulticing -- Walmart's shop towels (the heavy-duty blue paper towel-type things) are great for poulticing. They conform to the leg much better than wet brown bags and are more durable than paper towels. I'd always heard that saran wrap was for sweating, not poulticing. Anyone?

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:35 PM
In addition to the other instructions, a tip for poulticing - get your hands wet (I put a couple of inches of water into a small bucket and keep it next to me) before you reach into the poultice and as you are smushing it on. That way, it will stick to the horse and not to your hands and you can mold it onto the leg better and your hands are less messy when you're done.


Wearing surgical gloves prevents you from having to pick out poultice from your fingernails for days after! :yes:

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:41 PM
On wrapping...do both the pillow wraps and the standing wraps get wrapped in the same direction (i.e. clockwise on the right legs and counter on the left)? Do you start wrapping on the inside of the leg or the outside? Thanks!

Yes, both the padding and the bandage get wrapped in the same direction. You can actually anchor the end of the bandage under the padding as well.

Slewdledo
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:42 PM
ground mounting...is...not my friend :(

Not only is it not my friend either, it HATES me! :winkgrin: I can try to be all suave and attempt to jump and then pull myself up...and I end up with a halfhearted jump followed by sliding down the horse's side. And I am NOT stretchy - it's all I can do to lengthen the stirrup and get on!

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:54 PM
Can you use a colored pad during the dressage phase of a schooling CT, is it strictly black or white for dressage, always?


Traditionally black or white is preferred but if its just for a schooling ct and its not some obnoxiously loud color you'd be okay. Although you can't really go wrong with black or white.




I'd always heard that saran wrap was for sweating, not poulticing. Anyone?

Same here. Saran wrap keeps everything moist and sweaty and you want to use paper for poulticing because its the drying action of the poultice that helps keep the leg tight and allows the drawing to occur- if the poultice is kept wet it doesn't really do its job.

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:57 PM
A really good resource that has a lot of answers to these questions are the United States Pony Club manuals, especially the C level manual and the B, H/A, A manual. Mine are dog-earred from being read so many times and I still use them! They are an invaluable addition to your equine library. They cover almost every imaginable topic in a very easy to read and understand way and have great illustrations. :yes: You can get them from www.abebooks.com for next to nothing a lot of times.

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 02:58 PM
I don't know how to tie a stock tie. :uhoh: I have one of the fake ones and if I ever am forced to use a real one I have to get someone else to tie it for me!

cosmos mom
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:00 PM
Not only is it not my friend either, it HATES me! :winkgrin: I can try to be all suave and attempt to jump and then pull myself up...and I end up with a halfhearted jump followed by sliding down the horse's side. And I am NOT stretchy - it's all I can do to lengthen the stirrup and get on!

There must be a trick to it!!! I watch the kids at the barn hook a heel over a bareback pony and up they go- It's witchcraft I tell ya!!!!

areaIIeventer
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:01 PM
What the heck is DMSO?
I know it comes in a white bottle and is vet-related, but what does it actually do for a horse?

Is SMZs just a generic antibiotic? What do you typically give it for? How much? Can you buy it in a tack shop or is it vet-prescribed?

Ive always boarded and *knock on wood* never come to a point where I have needed to use either products, so I just dont know anything about them

arabhorse2
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:07 PM
Cosmos and Slewdle, as far as ground mounting goes, just say no!!! :lol:

I use either a mounting block, or more usually, my mobile tack box to mount up. It's supposed to be better for the horse's back anyway, because you're not pulling on them.

I used to be embarrassed to use one, but it was either that or quit riding after I got a bad back/pelvic injury. I can't lift my left leg up high enough to get in the stirrup, and God help me if I have to get off, or get thrown off during a ride! :eek:

I can usually find a downed tree that'll give me just enough height to get back in the saddle.

Pah, ground mounting is highly overrated!!! :D

hey101
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:12 PM
Unless it is 3-legged lame or there is swelling or a cut or definite heat (and therefore 100% obvious), I have a VERY hard time deciding which leg the horse is lame on. I am quite good at discerning that there is a lameness problem SOMEWHERE, but... In spite of repeated reading about which leg hits the ground when the head goes up or down or what side of the hip is higher.... I can almost never tell which leg is the issue.

In fact it's quite comical sometimes to see me out there in the pasture or ring or wherever, mimicking the horses' gait and then evaluating that if ~I~ were the sore one, and was walking like that, which leg would be hurting me!!

In the end I usually give up and just assume the horse needs a few days off or whatever 8-)

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:17 PM
What the heck is DMSO?
I know it comes in a white bottle and is vet-related, but what does it actually do for a horse?

Its a big time anti-inflammatory. It easily penetrates membranes and eases pain. If you get it on your skin, when you exhale you will taste garlic. No joke. It can carry other chemicals which is why its sometimes used, so you have to be sure if you apply it there is no flyspray or residue of anything else on the horse's skin. Its a fairly controversial drug.


Is SMZs just a generic antibiotic? What do you typically give it for? How much? Can you buy it in a tack shop or is it vet-prescribed? You can get them from the vet or with a Rx, but I don't think you can buy them otc. You usually have to give something like 15 tablets 2x a day depending on the horse's weight of course. They dissolve easily in water so they are fairly easy to administer. They are usually given for more minor things- abscesses or minor wounds, and Tribrissen or something more aggressive is given for puncture wounds or more aggressive infections.

cosmos mom
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:30 PM
What the heck is DMSO?
I know it comes in a white bottle and is vet-related, but what does it actually do for a horse?

Is SMZs just a generic antibiotic? What do you typically give it for? How much? Can you buy it in a tack shop or is it vet-prescribed?

Ive always boarded and *knock on wood* never come to a point where I have needed to use either products, so I just dont know anything about them

DMSO= Dimethyl sulfoxide- is a vehicle that moves molecules across membranes- many times used alone to reduce inflammation or in combination to apply topical medications. Be careful to use it on clean skin (horse's), also be carefoul that you don't get it on your skin in combination with a chemical because it will carry it right into your skin and you will dose yourself with whatever chemical-plus your mouth will taste like garlic for hours ;).
SMZ= Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim it is a broad spectrum antibiotic- aka Bactrim- for bacterial infections- vet perscribed. (little trick: they disolve in water immediately)

Duramax- I guess we posted at the exact same time :D

Duramax
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:33 PM
Unless it is 3-legged lame or there is swelling or a cut or definite heat (and therefore 100% obvious), I have a VERY hard time deciding which leg the horse is lame on. I am quite good at discerning that there is a lameness problem SOMEWHERE, but... In spite of repeated reading about which leg hits the ground when the head goes up or down or what side of the hip is higher.... I can almost never tell which leg is the issue.

In fact it's quite comical sometimes to see me out there in the pasture or ring or wherever, mimicking the horses' gait and then evaluating that if ~I~ were the sore one, and was walking like that, which leg would be hurting me!!

In the end I usually give up and just assume the horse needs a few days off or whatever 8-)

"Down on sound" is what I use to diagnose. When the horse is trotting and is head bobbing lame, his head will go down on the sound leg, and the head will come up on the lame leg. Sometimes its tough to tell if its front of back, but at least you can narrow it down by 50%!

JH
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:35 PM
Actually its supposed to be on the off side of the saddle, at least that is according to one of the British magazines I read (either Horse or Horse & Rider or Your Horse, can't remember which). The article was on proper use of tack/equipment and it said keeping the elastic end on the near side means when you tighten the girth you are only stretching the elastic portion of it. By keeping the leather end on the near side it allows the entire girth to stretch when you tighten it, since its stretching from off to near side (the entire length of the girth) instead of just from the elastic end. Not sure if I described it correctly, nor do I know if this is true or not. Anyone care to comment?

If you were to tighten the girth from the non-elastic side.... Then as the elastic stretches, either the girth has to slide, or the saddle has to slide to take up the space made from the stretching elastics.

I think having the girth not slide while tightening would be preferable for preventing girth sores (I also lift up and stretch out their front legs).

Some horses are very sensitive, and just a small wrinkle of skin under the girth close to their front legs could cause a girth gall.

eclipse
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:37 PM
Ok, if you're cantering (or trotting) across a large open field, no edges or fencing in site, how do you know what is the correct diagonal (or lead)??

Dazednconfused
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:44 PM
Yes, both the padding and the bandage get wrapped in the same direction. You can actually anchor the end of the bandage under the padding as well.
But it doesn't really matter where you start the bandage, as long as you are wrapping the standing-wrap and quilt the right direction.

Simkie
Nov. 16, 2006, 03:58 PM
Ok, if you're cantering (or trotting) across a large open field, no edges or fencing in site, how do you know what is the correct diagonal (or lead)??

If the horse is bent to the right, then you should be on the right lead and rise when the left shoulder comes forward, and it would be opposite if the horse is bent to the left.

If you're going in a straight line, then it doesn't matter. It is good to periodically switch your posting diagonal or lead so the horse uses himself evenly.

:)

hey101
Nov. 16, 2006, 04:10 PM
"Down on sound" is what I use to diagnose. When the horse is trotting and is head bobbing lame, his head will go down on the sound leg, and the head will come up on the lame leg. Sometimes its tough to tell if its front of back, but at least you can narrow it down by 50%!

Duramax- oh, I'm well versed on the theories and tricks! I can recite them verbatim.:yes: But in actual practice, I STILL can't tell.:no: Sadly, my little trick of mimicknig the horse's walk helps me quite a bit, but it's probably not fool proof. I tell you, I am hopeless at it. :confused:

The good thing is that I am VERY good at knowing when something is NQR in the first place, so in the end the horse gets time off and a close watch to make sure things don't get worse (at which point I"d call the vet). ;)

hey101
Nov. 16, 2006, 04:11 PM
Ok, if you're cantering (or trotting) across a large open field, no edges or fencing in site, how do you know what is the correct diagonal (or lead)??

There is no correct diagonal when you are hacking, but you should change your diagonal every 5 minutes or so to make sure you even the balance and distribution of weight-bearing on the opposing pairs of legs.

AHorseSomeDay
Nov. 16, 2006, 04:57 PM
I can never remember what the leading rein, opening rein, and indirect rein do? My trainer explained it to me but it went in one ear and out the other. :confused:

OnyxThePony
Nov. 16, 2006, 05:27 PM
I'd always heard that saran wrap was for sweating, not poulticing. Anyone?


Same here. Saran wrap keeps everything moist and sweaty and you want to use paper for poulticing because its the drying action of the poultice that helps keep the leg tight and allows the drawing to occur- if the poultice is kept wet it doesn't really do its job.


That was me who originally said you can use Saran.. and you can! Learn something new every day, huh. Essential for a 72 hr poultice, and around here, essential for a 48 hr poultice.

Avra
Nov. 16, 2006, 05:36 PM
I can't feel OR see diagonals, despite the fact that I've been riding since before I could walk. When I showed in IHSA equitation classes in college, my teammates stood at the ingate and gave me the thumbs up/ down. Before that, my mom did it. Dumb, huh?

It also took me a really embarassingly long time to figure out how to read a mercury thermometer.

sk_pacer
Nov. 16, 2006, 06:18 PM
What the heck is DMSO?
I know it comes in a white bottle and is vet-related, but what does it actually do for a horse?


Chemically, it is di-methyl sulfoxide. It is actually a by-product of the pulp and paper industry and has been used as in industrial cleaner for years. I would imagine it made it's way into medicine via some maintenance worker noticing that his arthritis got better when he cleaned parts with this stuff.

Ibex
Nov. 16, 2006, 06:39 PM
I don't know what it means (or what it feels like) to have my horse "in front of my leg". Um, about half of him is in front of my leg and the other half is in back of my leg, and I thought that was kinda the goal.

I also can't give an aid when a certain foot is in the air, or striking the ground, or beginning to move forward or any of that.

I could NEVER figure that one out until I started riding my coach's schoolmaster recently. No idea how to describe it, but it's definitely was a lightbulb moment. It just feels like you're sitting way further back, and the power is in front of you.

The part that gets me tho, is to have them in front of your leg, you want them OFF the forehand. I know it really does work that way, but written down it's very weird!

GatoGordo
Nov. 16, 2006, 08:18 PM
I'm not very good on percentages of protein, fat, etc., or other nutrition things. I also don't remember much about species and stages of internal parasites.

DMSO can also be given via stomach tube or intravenously for "dummy" foals, concussions, encephalitides, and anything else causing swelling in the central nervous system. I've also seen it used for colitis/enteritis.

Ringbone is very difficult to deal with, IMO, with a grimmer prognosis, than, say, hock issues. It's managed in a similar way to hock arthritis, with some combination of joint injections, Legend, Adequan, oral supplements for those that wish, adjusted expectations, and a Bute and a day off when needed.

Vaccines:
Potomac Horse Fever -- if you're in an area where it's endemic, one booster early spring, another booster early summer; ask your vet whether it's seen in your area -- it's not just around the Potomac River, but has been seen in MN, CA, KY, etc.

Flu and Rhino -- depends on how much your horse is exposed to strange horses -- 2-4x/year

West Nile -- 1x/year, spring, around here, but we get our first hard frost in October or November. Some people do it 2x/year.

EEE/WEE (equine encephalitis) -- again, 1x/yr, spring, but in places with higher mosquito populations, 2x/yr

Rabies -- 1x/yr, any time, except in some parts of the West where it is nonexistent

Tetanus -- 1x/yr, any time

Some people vaccinate for strangles, but the vets I've worked for don't recommend it routinely.

Some people vaccinate for botulism, usually those whose horses are fed off of round bales.

I could go on for hours about a lot of random medical things.:winkgrin:

Sakura
Nov. 17, 2006, 07:51 AM
I can't feel OR see diagonals, despite the fact that I've been riding since before I could walk. When I showed in IHSA equitation classes in college, my teammates stood at the ingate and gave me the thumbs up/ down. Before that, my mom did it. Dumb, huh?

It also took me a really embarassingly long time to figure out how to read a mercury thermometer.

"Rise and fall with the leg on the wall" is a helpful little rhyme for posting on the correct diagonal ;)... When the outside shoulder is forward your butt is up, when it is back your butt is down in the saddle :).

Renn/aissance
Nov. 17, 2006, 11:41 AM
Back when I was a wee lass, our pony camp always had us take apart and put back together a bridle, blindfolded. Whoever did it fastest got a Hershey bar.

I would have loved to do that! We had races, but no prizes. When I'm working with the little camp kids I always have races to put bridles back together at the end of the week. It's a disaster enough as it is- I think blindfolded it would be more of a mess! I swear, no matter how many time you tell them, they still attach the noseband to the throatlash...


For the love of God, someone PLEASE tell us how to poultice! I don't know either!

Ingredients:
Poultice. (This is important.)
Rubber/latex gloves (optional)
Brown paper (grocery bags work well)
Bandage quilts
Standing bandages
Hot water

1. Tie up the tail. Poultice is messy and you do not want it in the tail because then it will get swished all over you and your horse.

2. Cut the brown paper into rectangles the same width as your horse's cannon bones, long enough to wrap at least twice around your horse's leg. You may also want smaller rectangular strips to cup the fetlock joint. Let the paper soak in a bucket of hot water.

3. Make sure your horses legs are clean; if you shampoo, make sure all the soap has been washed away. Wet down your horse's legs.

4. Don gloves if you have them, then dip your hand into the poultice bucket and pull out a big glop. Warm this in your hand for a moment so that it will slide onto your horse's leg easier. Then stroke your hand down the horse's leg to apply a thick coat of poultice. You want it approximately a quarter to half an inch thick all around.

5. Once you're done poulticing, take off your gloves and grab the brown paper rectangles. Wrap them around your horse's legs like bandages, on the inside towards the nose. If you applied poultice down and under the fetlock joint you may want to cup the joint with the smaller rectangles so that you don't get poultice all over your bandages.

6. Standing-bandage your horse's legs.

7. Some poultices should be left on longer than others; a general average is 24 hours. Check the label. When you go to remove the poultice, it will either be damp or dry. With some poultices, being damp is a good thing. Others, you want to be dry. Check the label on this too. Usually you can pull off bits of poultice with your bare hands and then wash the dust off of the horse's legs, but if the poultice is still wet, you may want to gently scrape it off with a hoofpick. Stick newspaper or something under your horse's legs while you're removing poultice because if you grind poultice clay into rubber matting, it may very well stay there.

8. Hope you don't have to have too much practice.


Exactly WHAT is the difference between a full seat, half seat and two point?

In full seat, the weight in your seat is distributed evenly on your seat bones. In half seat, the weight is primarily on your crotch and sometimes upper thigh. In two-point contact your seat has no connection to the saddle.

I should know what product my horse was last wormed with. I swear I wrote it down in his book. Apparently I didn't.

JCS
Nov. 17, 2006, 12:22 PM
I'm quite amused at the number of different phrases people have come up with to help them remember the proper order of dressage letters. The one I was taught: All King Edward's Horses Carry Many Bloody Fools.

My favorite: "All King Edward's Horses Canter Merrily Bucking Freely."

This thread is so educational. I've learned so much that I never knew but didn't know who to ask...

shade
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:22 PM
excellent poultice post Renn...I was going to post but you beat me to it..LOL..

Also if when you pull the paper off and find wet spots those indicate areas of heat. And for the life of me I can't remember why I've poulticed with saran wrap..but there is a reason.

Someone asked how to tell if tendon boots were on tight enough. Pull the straps until you feel the elastic kick in, then back off a smidge. That way they'll be tight enough but not too tight. Hope that makes sense.

Jaegermonster
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:37 PM
Actually "Digital Pulse" is also correct, and the more commonly used term, as the pulse is taken from the "Digital Arteries" in the horses pasterns.

Oh, I had always heard distal as in the farthest from the heart. I guess I just always think of Digits as fingers :). Whatever you call it, I still can't feel it.

naters
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:43 PM
I'm sure that there are more than a few of us out there that feel we should know certain things about horses, but are too embarrased to admit that we don't.

I am a horse professional, but admit there are some basic things that I *know* I should know, but don't. So here's the thread: Don't be ashamed to ask because no one will judge. Those of you who know the answers, feel free to answer. Ask your stupid questions away!!!

I'll start:
1) I can never remember what a horses' vision is (blindspots, etc.) and what colors they see and don't see (if any).

2) Why the heck does the elastic part of the girth have to be on the mounting side? Never made much of a difference to me.

Anyone else?


Girth: It doesn't... I put mine on the opposite side for my conveinience, and so that my billets stretch evenly, and so that I am not constantly pulling on one side or another.

KaraAD
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:44 PM
Tribrissen or something more aggressive is given for puncture wounds or more aggressive infections.

Tribrissen is a brand name for a Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole so it has SMZs in it. Generally my vet perscribes Tribrissen fairly interchangeable with SMZs. The advantage of Tribrissen is that the company sells it in paste form. You generally administer one full tube (depending on the weight of the horse) once per day. With SMZ you generally have to give it twice a day but SMZ pills are alot cheaper.

SuperSTB
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:45 PM
Average Pulse: 36-42 beats per minute. You can feel it under/the side of their jaw,as well as in the pastern (digital pulse)
Average Respiration: 8-16 breaths per minute
Average Temp: 100.5
Healthy Temperature Range: 99.0-101.0

Horse's blindspots are directly infront and directly behind. The colors they can see (as far as I know) is still an ongoing debate. I remember a recent Equess discussed the posibility of them seeing every color we see, except muted. Think pastel.


I went to staples- bought a package of those cheap business cards for the printer. On the computer type up for one side of the business card the vitals (info above) and on the backside typed up the local emergency contact info for the vet, farm, farrier.
Printed and laminated the cards- attached a keychain loop and gave them out to everyone at the barn. Easily attached it inside the tack truck or in the first aid box.

I have them everywhere- in the tack trunk, the door of the truck, hanging by the feed and in the grooming bucket.

naters
Nov. 17, 2006, 02:49 PM
Those of you who can't wrap legs - I too had this problem. I had lots of people try to explain it to me in lots of different ways. Never worked. Had to come up with my own method - when wrapping the right leg, you should be wrapping clockwise around the leg, and when wrapping the left you should wrap counter-clockwise around the leg. Maybe it will help you? :)

When wrapping the horses (ie standing in front of him, or facing the same direction he is?) right leg, you should be going clockwise (question: the toe being 12 o'clock, and the heel being six o'clock?)?
Thanks!

good booie
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:00 PM
Someone once told me a long time ago to wrap the leg the way the hair grows on your arm on that side. Never questioned myself after that:).

Pirateer
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:07 PM
I know a lot of stuff, but there is one thing especially that gets me.

Blankets. Seriously. Having never owned a horse, and just dealt with what was on the horse, the temperatures that require blankets/blanket changes confuse the heck out of me. I have learned the difference between Fill and Denier (go me!) but what fill for what temp is just....too much.

Mostly I just copy what other people do and base it off of what coat I'm wearing.

(that said...I can poultice, wrap, give shots (IM anyway), braid, etc....)

I have never officially cleaned a sheath. Udders, yes. Picked at a sheath when grooming? Yes. Scouted for Bean? nope.

eclipse
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:39 PM
Please tell me I am not the only one that just nods my head in agreement,
when my trainer says "do you feel that? Now doesn't that xxxx feel better?" Of course, I have no earthly idea what she's so exited about, as I can't feel a damn thing different!! :D

naters
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:41 PM
Someone once told me a long time ago to wrap the leg the way the hair grows on your arm on that side. Never questioned myself after that:).

Oh, man ... what??!!! I don't get it!! the way my hair on my arms grows is from inside (thumb side) to outside (pinky side).

But isn't that the opposite of what the "clockwise/counterclockwise" person just said?

Simkie
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:51 PM
I'm surprised people have a hard time remembering how to wrap!

If you're wrapping the left, start your polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your right hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your left hand.

If you're wrapping the right, start with the polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your left hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your right hand.

If you start wrapping on the inside, the roll of the polo will always be towards the horse's head before you start actually wrapping.

Here's a crude diagram of what you see when you begin to wrap: http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2102723130048290005HNlpyI Helpful? :lol:

4cornersfarm
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:55 PM
I don't know how to drive a gooseneck trailer. I learned how to drive a trailer pulling one off our tractor when I was 13, which was um, 31 years ago, and I can put a regular tagalong trailer anywhere, any time, but I have never driven a gooseneck. Everyone says it's easier, but when I look at those long monsters I feel faint. And I've towed a three axle four horse tagalong Kingston - now that was a long trailer! :lol:

Twilight
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:59 PM
I blame my inability to wrap on my left-handedness. I must not hold the bandage facing the correct way or something because I get it backward each and every time.

Yes, what I don't know would fill volumes - but one thing I really have absolutely no clue or concept of how to execute is a leg yield or shoulder in or whatever that thing is called. Can't do it even if I was facing a firing squad.

Amber_M
Nov. 17, 2006, 03:59 PM
-I have no clue what horses need to be fed. Like, all of the percentages and crap give me a headache.

-I can hardly tell if my horse didn't get a lead change in the back.

-I suck at finding distances to fences.

Amber_M
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:01 PM
I'm surprised people have a hard time remembering how to wrap!

If you're wrapping the left, start your polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your right hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your left hand.

If you're wrapping the right, start with the polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your left hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your right hand.

If you start wrapping on the inside, the roll of the polo will always be towards the horse's head before you start actually wrapping.


I always just remember that the velcro should come around the front and point backwards.

cedarboy
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:03 PM
I don't know the difference between a fetlock and a forelock.

tullio
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:09 PM
when I learned to do polos, I was told "think of the wrap floating in the breeze as the horse runs - you would want it on the outside!" (if you don't get it, imagine four wraps flapping in the breeze on the inside of the horse's legs! )

As always, the 'visual' approach worked for me!

Cedarboy - forelock is on the forehead. ;-)

zagafi
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:10 PM
What is the difference between sidepass, halfpass and leg yield for Pete's sake??

I *think* sidepass is done from a standstill and leg yield while going forward, but what about halfpass? Gaaahh!!

eclipse
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:19 PM
What is the difference between sidepass, halfpass and leg yield for Pete's sake??

I *think* sidepass is done from a standstill and leg yield while going forward, but what about halfpass? Gaaahh!!

Halfpass is done with the bend toward the direction you are going. Leg yeild is done with the bend away from the direction you are going. And I belive, these can be done in all 3 gaits!

Oh, and for wrapping, I always think of "pull accross & toward you" on the front of the legs. That way you are not pulling over the tendons!

Tuckertoo
Nov. 17, 2006, 04:50 PM
I also can't give an aid when a certain foot is in the air, or striking the ground, or beginning to move forward or any of that.


Me neither.


For the wrapping, I try to think of it as how you swim. You know when you swim (not the alternating arm stroke, but the breaststroke I think) you start with your arms in front of you and then bring them back to your side. Thats the way the wraps should go, you start on the inside, go toward the front, wrap across the front toward the outside of the leg, back in the out side, then it wraps around the back of the leg, forward on the inside of the leg, etc... I don't know if this makes any sense to anyone :/ I'm not very good at explaining these things.

Pirateer
Nov. 17, 2006, 05:25 PM
Oh, and for wrapping, I always think of "pull accross & toward you" on the front of the legs. That way you are not pulling over the tendons!

Ok, Soapbox time...


NO PULLING WHEN WRAPPING. NO PULLING. NOOOOOOO Pulling.

Sorry. Its a problem. Bandage Bows are nasty ugly things caused by yanking a wrap across the front of some poor beast's legs.

Even tension all the way around is your friend.

Jaegermonster
Nov. 17, 2006, 05:33 PM
Oh, man ... what??!!! I don't get it!! the way my hair on my arms grows is from inside (thumb side) to outside (pinky side).

But isn't that the opposite of what the "clockwise/counterclockwise" person just said?


Yup that's right. If you are facing the same way as your horse your hairs are going the correct way.
Put the end of the wrap on the inside of the leg up high and wrap from the inside out, around the front of the leg, with even tension. If you do it correctly the velcro, if you have it, should be back at the top and facing towards the horse's butt on the outside of the leg.

Sannois
Nov. 17, 2006, 06:04 PM
I have ridden and shown and trained and groomed and taught for almost 40 years so this one is embarrasing... I cant braid.. I suck at it, I have a fear of braiding, I always hire it done, I could practice I never have. There I said it!!! ;) :eek: :winkgrin:

Sannois
Nov. 17, 2006, 06:38 PM
The forelock is the hair on the head between the ears, and the fetlock is on the lower leg, you know the location that gets pretty shaggy on some horses! ;)

MacknCody
Nov. 18, 2006, 12:05 AM
-I have no clue what horses need to be fed. Like, all of the percentages and crap give me a headache.

-I can hardly tell if my horse didn't get a lead change in the back.

-I suck at finding distances to fences.

I do NOT get that! I've always wanted to ask if thats true. How do they canter on one lead on the front and not on the back, I don't see it, it doesn't seem pyshically possible. Pleaseeeee explain!!! :no: :lol:

Amber_M: feed is hard for everyone and like everything else I tend to think you have to guess and check for each horse on what will really work. It just comes with practice. "And glancing at what everyone else is doing sometimes..." :lol:

catknsn
Nov. 18, 2006, 12:14 AM
I can't braid worth a crap either.

I have never cleaned a sheath. Sorry. I have never been at a barn with anybody who cleaned sheaths! The entire concept is something I've only read about on this message board.

I can't see distances either, which is why I never jumped higher than 2'6. Well, I can see them when it's too late LOL.

I still can't give an IM injection and there really is no excuse for that. I really need to get someone to teach me.

But after many years in polo, I can honestly say that I am a kick-butt leg wrapper. :D

Sakura
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:13 AM
I do NOT get that! I've always wanted to ask if thats true. How do they canter on one lead on the front and not on the back, I don't see it, it doesn't seem pyshically possible. Pleaseeeee explain!!!

I had a mare that cross cantered all the time. It really is a matter of hind end strength and a ton of transitions is supposed to help fix the problem. However, this mare would always fall apart after about five strides (and only to the left... she could canter all day to the right, or so it seemed).

I ended up selling her to a guy who trail rides her. He rarely canters and she is happy not to have me torturing her any longer :p.

Spoilsport
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:30 AM
I can braid a mane but not a tail :eek: ! People tell me it's really easy, just like French braiding human hair. I can't do that either :eek: !

naters
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:46 AM
I'm surprised people have a hard time remembering how to wrap!

If you're wrapping the left, start your polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your right hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your left hand.

If you're wrapping the right, start with the polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your left hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your right hand.

If you start wrapping on the inside, the roll of the polo will always be towards the horse's head before you start actually wrapping.

Here's a crude diagram of what you see when you begin to wrap: http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2102723130048290005HNlpyI Helpful? :lol:


I wrap well, but it always takes me a few minutes for my brain to communicate with my hands.... which is why I was looking for an easier way to think about it....

I always start, but then always have to quit, take it off, and start over.

naters
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:48 AM
I'm surprised people have a hard time remembering how to wrap!

If you're wrapping the left, start your polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your right hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your left hand.

If you're wrapping the right, start with the polo on the inside. Anchor the end with your left hand--you will be cupping the tendon. The roll of the polo will be in your right hand.

If you start wrapping on the inside, the roll of the polo will always be towards the horse's head before you start actually wrapping.

Here's a crude diagram of what you see when you begin to wrap: http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2102723130048290005HNlpyI Helpful? :lol:


YES!!! That graphic is very helpful!!! Thanks! Maybe if I can picture that, then I won't have to wrap, unwrap, and rewrap ;)

naters
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:50 AM
Me neither.


For the wrapping, I try to think of it as how you swim. You know when you swim (not the alternating arm stroke, but the breaststroke I think) you start with your arms in front of you and then bring them back to your side. Thats the way the wraps should go, you start on the inside, go toward the front, wrap across the front toward the outside of the leg, back in the out side, then it wraps around the back of the leg, forward on the inside of the leg, etc... I don't know if this makes any sense to anyone :/ I'm not very good at explaining these things.

I LOVE that one!!!

naters
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:54 AM
Yep, I have always subscribed to the "velcro always points to the back" line of thought. But usually I don't know I am wrong until I have wrapped already. Sometimes its because I roll the wraps the wrong way after washing them.

Heck, I have usually just used tendon boots (velcro to the back), and hopefully won't have to use standing bandages much!


I had a trainer once tell me to start from the OUTSIDE of the leg, and not start on the inside.

I have always started on the inside... any thoughts on that?

annikak
Nov. 18, 2006, 10:04 AM
wrapping? Forward, outside, then back- works on all 4 legs- altho my vet ALWAYS wraps the left hind wrong- and she grew up on a standardbred farm where they wrapped all the time!;) She says as long as the pressure is even, its all good!

Plumcreek
Nov. 18, 2006, 11:00 AM
"I also can't "feel" the wrong diagonal. I have to look down. Anyone else have this problem? "

This isn't so hard to learn. Trot your horse somewhere safe on a straight line, sitting trot, and close your eyes. Try to hear and feel which shoulder is going back and front hoof is hitting the ground, then when you think you've got it, look down to check. Keep doing this until you seldom miss. Then try the same thing and start posting while your eyes are shut, then look down to check.

Plumcreek
Nov. 18, 2006, 11:14 AM
Question - "I don't know what it means (or what it feels like) to have my horse "in front of my leg". Um, about half of him is in front of my leg and the other half is in back of my leg, and I thought that was kinda the goal."

My H-J trainer's sister substitutes for lessons sometimes. She has the best explaination:

"It is like pushing a wheelbarrow." Up and in front of you. While your arms lift and drive forward to push the wheelbarrow, your legs and seat work to lift and drive forward the horse's BALANCE up and in front of you.

I personally invision sucking the horse's back up into my lap. Works for me.

Need4speed
Nov. 18, 2006, 01:21 PM
Okay, here goes......


What the heck does "riding on the buckle" mean?????????????????


:o

Simkie
Nov. 18, 2006, 01:39 PM
Okay, here goes......


What the heck does "riding on the buckle" mean?????????????????


:o

For me it literally means that I'm riding on the buckle--my hands are holding the buckle part of my reins, or close to it. IOW, I'm riding on a very loose rein, and not asking the horse for any contact.

Tuckertoo
Nov. 18, 2006, 01:40 PM
Okay, here goes......


What the heck does "riding on the buckle" mean?????????????????


:o




Riding on the buckle is when you ride with your reins as long as they can be and you hold them where they buckle together, on the buckle.:yes:

Need4speed
Nov. 18, 2006, 01:49 PM
For me it literally means that I'm riding on the buckle--my hands are holding the buckle part of my reins, or close to it. IOW, I'm riding on a very loose rein, and not asking the horse for any contact.

Thank you :)

GatoGordo
Nov. 18, 2006, 02:39 PM
Oh, I forgot to mention, I can not french braid.

If you are good at finding the right spot for digital pulses, you can often feel a pulse on a perfectly normal, healthy horse. IMO, it takes a while to get a feel for what's a normal digital pulse and what's an excessively strong one, and each horse differs -- what's "elevated" (strong) for one horse may be normal for another. Furthermore, the pulse may be stronger in one leg or another all of the time, and the pulses tend to be stronger after a workout. Finally, I knew a horse who was eventually euthanized due to the horrific pain of acute laminitis without having bounding pulses. You have to evaluate digital pulses in the context of what else is going on with the horse. The correlation between pulse strength and hoof pathology is far from perfect.

To look for a digital pulse on the fetlock, feel the end of the cannon bone, then look for the sesamoids in the back. In between these two hard spots, there will be a squishy spot, which is where your blood vessels run.

skyy
Nov. 18, 2006, 03:32 PM
1) I can't figure out the difference between good contact and pulling on his mouth.
2) I can't see a distance to save my life. When I'm 1 away I can tell if it will be good but am always surprised when it is bad.
3)Unless I'm huffing and puffing to get my horse to go forward I can't tell if he's in front of my leg.
4) I have no feel and don't know how to get any.
5) I have no concept of where my body actually is on my horse. When I think I'm leaning back , my trainer says I'm straight. When I think I'm straight, she says I'm ahead. When I think I'm ahead, we're all in trouble!
6) I have no idea how to feel what is going on with my horse behind the saddle (where his haunches are). I can only tell where his shoulders are by looking at them.

Tennis, anyone?

I can determine lamenesses by look and feel and am right about which leg it is almost all of the time, no matter how subtle!

flogarty
Nov. 18, 2006, 03:36 PM
I can't braid

I hate riding bareback

I hate trail riding

Hocus Focus
Nov. 18, 2006, 07:05 PM
In my mind, I would like to continue riding. In my body, something is telling me...watch out!!!! You are not going to bounce this time!!!!

JH
Nov. 18, 2006, 07:49 PM
I can't braid

I hate riding bareback

I hate trail riding
:eek: Sounds like you had a bad day...

Linny
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:10 PM
I cannot ever remember the difference between a half turn and a half turn in reverse. :cool:

OnyxThePony
Nov. 18, 2006, 08:23 PM
I cannot ever remember the difference between a half turn and a half turn in reverse. :cool:

A half turn is a U. A half turn in reverse is an S. That help? :lol:

We used to call them "jumper reverse" and "hunter reverse".

I know there is so much I dont' know... but I"m such a geek that I have to look anything up when I don't know.

When I did my coaching exam, the examininer asked me what a 'curb' was. As in, where you would find a curb injury on a horse. I had NO idea. Told her that. "I have NO idea!!" Then almost started laughing, cos I aced the rest of the test.
I looked it up with a vet, who laughed. Turns out it's a very archaic english draught/driving horse type term for an injury you'd really never see on a typical riding or H/J horse :lol:

bamboozled
Nov. 18, 2006, 10:13 PM
I have questions:
1. Why is it called a "vertical" when clearly the rails are all "horizontal"?
2. I cannot body clip to save my life.
3. confounded by farriers and their reasonings.

But I can:
1. discern a pending colic from 500 paces away
2. detect the slightest lameness
3. clean a stall with the best of them

Swagger tabs do not make me swagger either :winkgrin:

Simkie
Nov. 18, 2006, 10:16 PM
1. Why is it called a "vertical" when clearly the rails are all "horizontal"? If you look at the fence from the side, it is all in one vertical plane. Other fences, when viewed from the side, have more than one vertical plane :)

Wanderluster
Nov. 18, 2006, 10:51 PM
I just learned thanks to DD's horsemanship class in college that-
The gallop is in fact a fourth gait with four beats as opposed to the canter with three.
That backing a horse is actually the trot backwards. Legs move on the diagonal. Left front right hind. Right front left hind.
And to think all those years that I heard "walk backwards" about the cadence.
Sheesh so many years so much to learn. :eek:

Renn/aissance
Nov. 18, 2006, 11:13 PM
Turns out it's a very archaic english draught/driving horse type term for an injury you'd really never see on a typical riding or H/J horse

My Gotta-friend had a curb. He was not typical in any description, but he was a hunter. :)

gf
Nov. 18, 2006, 11:25 PM
Standard for reins is that the more used, or more necessary, one goes on the inside; less used goes on the outside. Goes for pelhams, gags, draw reins, etc. Basically, you don't want to be cranking on the pelham rein when you just need a little "woah" from your snaffle rein. You can always switch 'em. Doesn't really matter.

Thank you for this! I've been having a problem regulating the length of my curb rein - when I switched the curb to the outside rein it totally solved the problem. Thanks!

Mtn trails
Nov. 18, 2006, 11:29 PM
My favorite: "All King Edward's Horses Canter Merrily Bucking Freely."

This thread is so educational. I've learned so much that I never knew but didn't know who to ask...

I learned "All Kind Elephants Have Cuddly Mothers and Bad Fathers." The "and" can be used as the X.

I can braid manes great but not tails. Never could braid a tail. If I had another hand, then maybe I could braid a tail.

nightsong
Nov. 19, 2006, 12:12 AM
FORElock is on the FOREhead; FETlock is on the FEET. With double reins, if youhave the top rein on the outside of your fingers, you just have to either move only your pinky or turn your whole hand outwards to tighten JUST the snaffle (top) rein, which is what you generally WANT to do. the curb (bottom) rein is just emergency brakes and seldom used. A "vertical" fence is straight up and down.

Simkie
Nov. 19, 2006, 12:32 AM
I learned "All Kind Elephants Have Cuddly Mothers and Bad Fathers." The "and" can be used as the X. And I learned "All King Edward's Horses Can Make Bad Friends" :)

JH
Nov. 19, 2006, 04:02 AM
I remember once hearing someone talking about putting "run downs" on a race horse. They said it was a kind of wrap, I always wondered how they are done and what the purpose for them is?

tmo0hul
Nov. 19, 2006, 09:30 AM
I remember once hearing someone talking about putting "run downs" on a race horse. They said it was a kind of wrap, I always wondered how they are done and what the purpose for them is?

Running down refers to when the horse hits the ground with the back of the fetlocks. Depending on how bad they run down, there can be abrasions. Therefore trainers will wrap the ankles (front, back, or both) with vetwrap or elasticon for the race. Now, this is not the only reason racehorses legs are wrapped for a race. If the horse runs down very badly, the can actually wear through the vetwrap. In that case, a rundown patch is used. There are different kinds. Disposable ones are made by 3-M that are basically just a circular plastic sticker about the size of a baseball. These are put over the vetwrap on the back of the fetlock. There are more substantial ones that are made of pre-formed felt or thick foam that are placed under the vetwrap.

Trails
Nov. 19, 2006, 09:52 AM
I can't pull a mane. Can't braid either.

lilblackhorse
Nov. 19, 2006, 11:01 AM
wow, I have to say that this thread, in all my years coming here, is probably the most informative ever.

Ok--I wanted to mention to the elastic girth person who said she just said screw it and bought a girth with double elastic on it. Please please be very careful with a double elastic end girth---I find that people tend to overtighten girths as it is---technically you should be able to slip a hand in there (no withered horses probably need them a tad tighter so the saddle doesn't roll), but with a double ended girth, you run the risk of truly over tightening. Please be careful.

And as for wrapping, I like the hair analogy. I nearly blew my B rating because of my wrapping---PC addage is "if you can't do it well, don't do it at all". Hence the comment with big font and exclamation points regarding the "PULL IT"....do not pull wraps. Wrap to the outside from the inside of the leg, just leaving the wrap ON the leg, maintaining the same tautness--don't pull, don't take the roll off the leg at all, just leave it on the leg. I usually start half way down the leg, you want a nice inverted V if you do it correctly on the front of the fetlock--and then I go back up and finish high. As others mentioned, the velco tabs should face back if they end on the outside.

As duramax mentioned, I highly recommend the PC Manuals, especially the C and B/HA/A books. Just two, everyone should have them in their libraries.

I guess the only thing I admit to is not always being able to feel when I am holding up the front end. But since I don't ride the lame horse anymore, it's moot.

Good questions all!

Classic Melody
Nov. 19, 2006, 10:13 PM
I don't know what people mean when they say a horse has "knee action" and somehow it's a bad thing for hunters. I get the impression that it means the horse is actually a GOOD mover, but needs to be less flashy for the hunter ring - that is my guess and I could be 100 miles off. ???

I also don't know what it means when people talk about wanting their farrier to "square" their horses' toes. I've even studied the hoof of a horse belonging to a boarder who uses the phrase all the time trying to figure out what's different about it. Of course, what I don't know about horse shoeing could fill a book!

KristiKGC
Nov. 19, 2006, 11:26 PM
I don't know what people mean when they say a horse has "knee action" and somehow it's a bad thing for hunters. I get the impression that it means the horse is actually a GOOD mover, but needs to be less flashy for the hunter ring - that is my guess and I could be 100 miles off. ???

Hunters should move with a flat knee as opposed to, say, a dressage horse which would have more bend in it's knee.
For example (not the greatest pictures, but they demonstrate my point):
Hunter knees: http://www.online-horse.com/graphics/brown.jpg
Dressage knees: http://www.dressagehorseinternational.com/images/latest_news/horse.jpg

Hope this helps a little!

teal tea
Nov. 20, 2006, 12:52 AM
I don't know how to tie a quick release knot. I've been shown way too many times to keep track of and I've read articles and viewed step by step descriptions but I still cannot "understand" it. The same goes for braiding and leg wrapping.

Sabine
Nov. 20, 2006, 01:00 AM
I'm actually a pro at wrapping legs (we won't go into how I got that way:eek: )

Always wrap towards the back of the horse, meaning the ball of the wrap should always go away from the front. I always start just above the ankle and go down a couple of times and then work my way back up. Usually if you're using pillow wraps, you don't have to worry about being too tight.

Vision, anyone? This one kills me. What the heck is their vision!? I cannot remember!

I am a wrapping freak too and I think the way you explained you need to add that it ALWAYS has to around the outside of the leg and back and forward on the inside- so you don't cause any tendon damage...I just LOVE neat and tight wraps- of all kinds...:)
A horse can't see colors- just orange I think appears as color, the blindspot is towards the rear of the stifle- just between the hock and the stifle- if the head points forward- the least precise vision is straight ahead- the best is from when you imagine a horse's eye as a circle of vision- from about 15degrees off the front to just about the point of the stifle/hock....

Sabine
Nov. 20, 2006, 01:02 AM
And as much as I'd like to know more about it - but I always HATED chemistry- and so I really suck at putting together generic nutritional feeding plans for horses- and I rely on prepared feeds mostly- and feed groups that are recommended- I kind of read what other folks recommend and follow that...:)

kellyb
Nov. 20, 2006, 10:59 AM
I do NOT get that! I've always wanted to ask if thats true. How do they canter on one lead on the front and not on the back, I don't see it, it doesn't seem pyshically possible. Pleaseeeee explain!!! :no: :lol:



It is physically possible - it is also very awkward. It is just like it sounds, they are on two different leads from front to back. It is easy to tell because the legs look all jumbled, and it looks & feels like there is a lot of "air" in between strides (i.e. lots of up down movement). It is so weird looking I can tell right off the bat by looking at it. And riding it is a no brainer; say you are on the left lead, you feel that rocking motion, where your right butt cheek is coming down first with the right side of his body...well if he is on the left lead up front and right in the back, your right butt cheek comes down, but then your left side get jostled around like crazy as his rear is coming down on the left side first... :yes:

zagafi
Nov. 20, 2006, 11:10 AM
I don't know how to tie a quick release knot. I've been shown way too many times to keep track of and I've read articles and viewed step by step descriptions but I still cannot "understand" it. The same goes for braiding and leg wrapping.

Oh, man! I could teach you a quick release knot in minutes! I was taught a very effective one and taught it to the kids at horse camp this summer--they can STILL do it, too!

It's easy to demonstrate; harder to explain. Do you use tie rings or something else? I'll try to explain if you tell me what you usually tie to!

Sakura
Nov. 20, 2006, 09:46 PM
What is the shelf life of an unopened bag of feed (considering it is kept in a cool dry place)?

MacknCody
Nov. 20, 2006, 11:22 PM
Hunters should move with a flat knee as opposed to, say, a dressage horse which would have more bend in it's knee.
For example (not the greatest pictures, but they demonstrate my point):
Hunter knees: http://www.online-horse.com/graphics/brown.jpg
Dressage knees: http://www.dressagehorseinternational.com/images/latest_news/horse.jpg

Hope this helps a little!

Awesome! I'm glad someone else asked this, I always had trouble with it too! I love getting pics with explanations.....helps my slow brain:lol: :lol: Sorry to hijack your post Melody....

Kellyb: thanks for reply, I'll have to watch for it when other people ride(course I'm sure the other boarders won't appreciate their horses being eye-balled obsessively by some weird chick with her crazy beasties, oh well):cool:

Roney
Nov. 21, 2006, 10:17 AM
I KNOW someone here knows why most jump saddles have three billets and most girths only have two buckles... :confused:

nightsong
Nov. 21, 2006, 10:20 AM
Roney, it's a spare, in case one billet strap breaks. It also happens to be handy in adjusting the saddle correctly on the horse's back.

MeredithTX
Nov. 21, 2006, 10:20 AM
I KNOW someone here knows why most jump saddles have three billets and most girths only have two buckles... :confused:

I'm not sure if this is true, but I heard it was in case you break a billet then you have an extra.

harvestmoon
Nov. 21, 2006, 10:44 AM
I'm miserable at mucking stalls. :D I'd like to fix that, though...

OnyxThePony
Nov. 21, 2006, 12:28 PM
What is the shelf life of an unopened bag of feed (considering it is kept in a cool dry place)?

It's the same for an open bag, since the bag doesn't actually block out much environmental spoilers (sun/heat/air/etc)
- and it varies *widely* according to the feed due to things such as moisture content, process (ie extruded vs pelleted vs mix), vitimin/mineral blend/interaction. etc etc
If you have a particular bag in mind, you should ask your feed agent. They will be able to find out.

twohotponies
Nov. 21, 2006, 01:20 PM
There are so many things that I don't know but here are the ones I would like the most help with...
1. I cannot clip feet/fetlocks without it looking like a my horse just had a fight with a weedeater and lost.
2. I am having the hardest time telling if my saddle is fitting or not. There are dryish patches symetrically behind each side of the withers and matching clean spots on the pad, I'm thinking it isn't fitting.
3. How do we stop the wee beastie from pulling back when tied? So far she has fallen down twice when the knot didn't give. Don't tie her? Ever?

I am also at a self care facility now and there are quite a few interesting people there. The newest interesting thing I have been told is that you should never ride your horse in an arena if you use that arena to free longe in because your horse will take off with you. I am an experienced horsewoman and have never heard this before in my life, I also don't believe it because when you only have one arena sometimes playtime and worktime happen in the same place and I have never had a problem. Come to think of it, neither has my trainer. Where do peole get this stuff?

Lambie Boat
Nov. 21, 2006, 01:53 PM
how much hay should each horse eat per day? how do I know how much each horse weighs? those flimsy weight tapes don't seem very accurate. And the size of hay flake varies from bale to bale (we don't have all-you-can-eat round bales here)

Leather
Nov. 21, 2006, 02:33 PM
how much hay should each horse eat per day? how do I know how much each horse weighs? those flimsy weight tapes don't seem very accurate. And the size of hay flake varies from bale to bale (we don't have all-you-can-eat round bales here)

Here's an article the discusses hay/forage intake.
http://www.admani.com/AllianceEquine/TechBulletins/TheOnePercentRule.htm

This is an easy way to estimate your horse's weight based on measurement:
http://www.nacmo.org/members/weight.tpl

I'm EBO
Nov. 21, 2006, 03:16 PM
Here's how to take a digital pulse: You're feeling for a vein that's about the size of a pencil lead, that is slightly above and centered between the bulbs of the heel. I use my middle finger, but you can use which ever finger is comfortable except the thumb (you feel your own pulse if you use the thumb). Usually, you'll feel only a slight pulse unless something is wrong. If you can't feel anyhing, feel around in a small circle until you do. It will be easier to find if your horse has been moving prior to the search, so walk him around if you're initially stumped.

Pulses are different on every horse. If you can't find one on your subject, try another horse. If you find it once, you'll become an instant expert thereafter.:yes:

It's a good idea to establish what's normal for your horse at rest and just after exercise.

What I don't know, among other things, are the particular uses of all the boot types that are out there. Fetlock boots? Overreach boots? (although that's pretty self explanatory) galloping boots? I get they're all for protection of some sort, but .......? And how do you tell if your horse needs one or another?

moonriverfarm
Nov. 21, 2006, 04:38 PM
Dressage terms.
Uphill/downhill.
Why we call a 17h 1300 lb horse "cute".
Oh and the names of certain cross country jumps.

Carrera
Nov. 21, 2006, 04:51 PM
I also can't "feel" the wrong diagonal. I have to look down. Anyone else have this problem?


Me too!!! I have been riding for 18 years and I can't seem to figure it out...and let me tell you I have been yelled at a lot because of it!

lotsospots
Nov. 21, 2006, 07:44 PM
And THIS, my friends, is why Pony Club was invented!! :) Well not exactly, but this is all stuff that is covered in Stable Management!! They really should have PC for adults!

Groom&Taxi
Nov. 22, 2006, 02:28 AM
In the last week or so, I've learned to wrap legs and have given my first antibiotic injections - yay me. Have looked for a pulse but haven't found one yet.

I can pull a mane, and though I don't know how to do it yet, I see braiding in my future.

I can muck a stall and pull a bumper pull trailer. Have a decent eye for conformation and lameness but not as good as my 14yo daughter's.

A couple of things I feel like I need to know how to do but don't - yet - are pull a shoe, use a twitch, and change a tire on the trailer.

G&T

Regalmeans
Nov. 22, 2006, 09:23 AM
I don't pull my horse's mane. I, in theory, know how to. But I hate doing it, and so I pay my trainer to do it and she tacks it on my bill.
I know HOW to give IM shots, but I'm slightly scared of doing it (needle phobia) so I make the trainer or my best friend (who's a former vet tech and works in a lab with animals) do it for me. I've also never wormed my horse (full care board is a lovely thing).

That said... I can clean a sheath (well my gelding's anyway, he's super easy though) and do perfect wraps (to the point where at one point I was one of the only people my trainer would let do HER show horse - I used to work as a groom), and make an amazing liniment brace/rub down for my horse post show. I have an AWESOME eye for lameness (owning a 22 year old OTTB does that to you!) and I can change a tire on our four horse trailer (although I can't drive anything larger then my Honda Civic - I CAN change a trailer tire, dangit!).

LSM1212
Nov. 22, 2006, 11:36 AM
Executing a slip/quick release knot. For the love of God, I just can't seem to "get" it. :D

And canter leads..... most days it seems I have no clue. Somedays, I'm just lucky!

I'm also in the "can't start posting on the correct diagonal" club and the "don't know how to wrap properly" club too. :D

But after a discussion with my trainer the other day, these are some of my goals for next year. To master these things. :)

I'm EBO
Nov. 22, 2006, 12:29 PM
Know what? These helps/definitions/how tos should be compiled, put in alpahbetical order and stored in the archives.

Not So Practical Horse(WO)man
Nov. 22, 2006, 12:41 PM
omg I feel so bad for not knowing this but I can't identify colic for the life of me

but im young and i still have so much time to learn

add me to than non-conformation eye club

though i can spot lameness fairly well, i never trust myself and always need that second opinion

Invested1
Nov. 22, 2006, 01:05 PM
I'm also in the "can't start posting on the correct diagonal" club

I know my diagonals unless I get flustered. Perfect example: I took my horse into a dressage show where he was acting like a total pig. Watching the video, I actually looked very composed whereas inside I was freaking out about forgetting the test, trying not to brace, remembering to breathe, etc. I remember glancing down and honestly having absolutely no clue if I was on the correct diagonal or not!! I had a 50/50 shot and I chose WRONG!! :eek: :lol: Every time I watch that tape, I cringe. :D

crackerjack
Nov. 22, 2006, 01:17 PM
Bits... I'd like to know more about the function of bits. Any good websites?

LSM1212
Nov. 22, 2006, 01:35 PM
I know my diagonals unless I get flustered. Perfect example: I took my horse into a dressage show where he was acting like a total pig. Watching the video, I actually looked very composed whereas inside I was freaking out about forgetting the test, trying not to brace, remembering to breathe, etc. I remember glancing down and honestly having absolutely no clue if I was on the correct diagonal or not!! I had a 50/50 shot and I chose WRONG!! :eek: :lol: Every time I watch that tape, I cringe. :D

:D I know if I'm not on the correct one. And about 75% of the time I can feel it w/o having to look. It just transitioning up and down and trying to pick it up the first time that I can't seem to master. :D

JoZ
Nov. 22, 2006, 01:36 PM
Is chocolate bad for horses?

I know it is very bad for dogs and cats. The local Mexican restaurant has a candy dish at the front -- I usually take some peppermints for the heese. Last time I took a few tiny Tootsie Rolls for me as well... and the horses mugged me for them. I will admit I handed some out. And then said "well I hope THAT wasn't a bad idea..." :eek:

sk_pacer
Nov. 22, 2006, 03:04 PM
Is chocolate bad for horses?


Don't know of it being bad for them in the same way as cats and dogs, but I don't think it is all that healthy either. IF you show, don't even THINK of letting them have chocolate - positive test for caffeine and theobromine

ElonGrad1997
Nov. 22, 2006, 03:14 PM
I would love to know the meaning behind the letters in dressage arena. They seem so random to me.

JoZ
Nov. 22, 2006, 03:24 PM
Don't know of it being bad for them in the same way as cats and dogs, but I don't think it is all that healthy either.

Don't worry, it won't become a habit, I like the Tootsie Rolls too much myself, LOL. Frankly I was surprised they liked them. On the other hand I'm not too concerned with them being "not all that healthy" when you consider the size of a Tootsie vs. a horse. Can't imagine Peeps are at the top of the nutrition list either! ;)

JoZ
Nov. 22, 2006, 03:33 PM
I thought of another thing I don't know. I think if I thought hard enough I could fill a book. I hope it doesn't outweigh what I *do* know!

Here are two sentences:
- In general a horse should have between 1-2% of his/her body weight in hay per day. For a 1,000 lb. horse this would be 10-20 lbs.
- Horses are grazing animals and should have hay in front of them at all times.

I have heard both and believe both to be true. How do YOU reconcile these two?

Our horses could finish 20 lbs. of hay in 1 or 2 hours max. And most if not all of them would be too fat on 20 lbs. Our hay is not rich, it is local grass hay. They cannot be on grass of any kind in the winter; they are on drylot (well, I WISH it were dry, more like mudlot) and in their stalls overnight. They get almost no grain (about 1 cup to hold their vit/min and supplements).

Sebastian
Nov. 22, 2006, 05:18 PM
Okay, I'm going to attempt to describe a quick release knot...

Picture a standard horizontal tie rail:

1) Put the rope over the rail and pull it under and back toward you.
2) Put both pieces of rope in your right hand.
3) Make a large loop with the end of the rope (part that's away from the horse that came under the bottom of the rail).
4) Flip the loop over the top of your right hand
5) Put the loop back up through the small "circle" made by the rope next to your right hand
6) Release with your right hand and pull the "loop" until the knot is tight.

Viola! ;)

To release, simply pull the end of the rope.

Good Luck! :winkgrin:
Seb

tbgurl
Nov. 22, 2006, 05:24 PM
Things I don't know:

1) Assorted dressage terms (throughness, flexion, bend, schwung, ying, yang, etc.)

2) How to slow down a horse's rhythm. My mare trots like she's on speed sometimes and it seems like I can't slow her down for the life of me without using my hands. It's like my posting rhythm HAS to follow the trot rhythm, no matter how hard I try to slow it down.

2) How to give shots. Actually, I do know in theory because it was part of one of the classes I had to take in college, but practically speaking I've never done it.

3) Pedigrees. I know who the sire/dam and everything is, but actually deciphering a pedigree and evaluating it is beyond me, as are terms like tail male and tail female lines, etc.

4) Warmblood conformation. Honestly, when I look at warmblood horses with what others claim as "good" or "excellent" conformation, they don't look at all to me what my basic horsecare books say is good conformation. I can pick out conformational defects like cow hocks, ewe-necks, etc., but knowing what proportions and stuff are desirable on a sporthorse is a mystery.

JoZ: The first sentence is correct, but the second sentence needs a little qualifying--yes, horses are grazing animals and should be free to eat at all times. However, when they are on pasture they don't spend 24 hours eating...they also sleep, and run, and play, and stand around swatting flies, and stand around making ugly faces at each other, etc. It also takes longer to snip off individual bits of grass instead of grabbing mouthfuls of hay so they eat slower. When they are in stalls, they don't have much of anything to do except eat. So that's why I think they can polish off 20 lbs. of hay in a short amount of time and stand around being bored the rest of the time.

Also, 2% of the body weight is a high figure...most horses probably only need about 1.5%. Each horse is different (easy keepers, hard keepers) so that's why they give you that range. 1% is the minimum, however. 10-15 lbs. of hay per day is a fairly easy figure to reach, and this is assuming grass hay is fed and not alfalfa, which is more calorie-dense. Also, any grain fed would cut into the 1-2% figure.

Gnalli
Nov. 22, 2006, 05:30 PM
Don't worry, it won't become a habit, I like the Tootsie Rolls too much myself, LOL. Frankly I was surprised they liked them. On the other hand I'm not too concerned with them being "not all that healthy" when you consider the size of a Tootsie vs. a horse. Can't imagine Peeps are at the top of the nutrition list either! ;)


No you didn't just say Peeps are not healthy!!!:mad: :winkgrin: Why, why, they are made from eggs- and sugar of course, but stilllllll--PEEPS are HEATHLY. Why? B/C they make your horses do goofy stuff for you to laugh at and they say laughter is the best medicine. So there.Na-na-na=na boo boo.:D

Sakura
Nov. 22, 2006, 05:46 PM
I don't know a darn thing about Fox Hunting :no:... and I live in the heart of Hunt Country USA :o:uhoh::o.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Nov. 22, 2006, 06:24 PM
Don't worry, it won't become a habit, I like the Tootsie Rolls too much myself, LOL. Frankly I was surprised they liked them. On the other hand I'm not too concerned with them being "not all that healthy" when you consider the size of a Tootsie vs. a horse. Can't imagine Peeps are at the top of the nutrition list either! ;)

They are at the top of the list of a horse's MENTAL nutrtition. Here's how it works. There's a blood brain barrier, right? And you need energy to think and process and learn, right? And sugar is energy, right? So you need a lot of energy to make it across the blood brain barrier so your brain gets enough sugar to do its job. 5-6 peeps seem to do it for Ted.

nightsong
Nov. 22, 2006, 07:20 PM
I think Ted would MUCH prefer 50-60.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Nov. 22, 2006, 07:46 PM
nightsong, you are absolutely correct. But then Ted's brainpower would far exceed mine, and that could be dangerous.

Plus, we had a serious Peep Crisis last year after Easter, and I just can't bear the thought of another round of peep-withdrawal-induced DTs.

myhorsefaith
Nov. 22, 2006, 08:24 PM
what does the term "daisy cutter" mean? is it good or bad?

sometimes i think i know when it means then someone uses it in a different situation and i'm all lost again.:confused:

To the MAX
Nov. 22, 2006, 08:35 PM
what does the term "daisy cutter" mean? is it good or bad?

sometimes i think i know when it means then someone uses it in a different situation and i'm all lost again.:confused:

"Daisy cutter" is a term to describe a very good mover in the Hunter world. They have hardly any knee action OR, their feet sweep across the ground so effortlessly that it looks like they could cut the tops off of daisies with their toes.

BeastieSlave
Nov. 22, 2006, 08:39 PM
what does the term "daisy cutter" mean? is it good or bad?

Usually it's used to describe good movement on hunters. Think back to the pictures of the hunter trot vs. the dressage trot that showed the differing knee action.... The hunter trot has long and low sweeping action (daisy cutter) as opposed to a dressage horse who lifts its foot with more of a piston-type action (daisy stomper) ;)

Satin Filly
Nov. 23, 2006, 01:10 AM
Umm... from the daughter of a rocket scientist, we have the admission that she barely knows her right from her left... thank god for the L on the left hand.


I also forget which side the mane should be on... again... a right left issue...

I only seem to have hard time with left & right if I have to decide which is which rather quickly :lol: :o . But I do know which hand is my left and right. Its much easier for me to relate left & right when riding by refering to them as (example) inside leg/hand or outside leg/hand. If you get what I mean??;)

As for the mane,
It should always lay on or be braided on the right side. The horse's left and right are the same as your left and right if you are facing the same direction as they are (like if you both are facing a wall, not face to face). Or just remember the side of the mane goes on the same side you first attach your girth too (which should be the right side).

Now my question is.......who and why decided the mane should lay on the right side??:confused:

Tuckertoo
Nov. 23, 2006, 08:48 PM
So, I know this thread is way down there on the list of recent postings, but I thought of another one.:)

What is the difference between a dress sheet and a cooler?