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View Full Version : Who was/is the best trainer you ever had?



faraway46
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:23 PM
You know that being a great rider doesn't make you a great trainer.
Some are BNT, others are not, but are worth their weight in gold. I guess the key is to be able to explain not only tecnical things simply, but also being able to convey a feeling in such an explicit way that you can almost feel it yourself. And they also must have great timing when to say things, or when to push and when to stay put..

Who do you think is one of the best trainers you have ever had? The one you most learned from?

Texan By The Grace Of God
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:33 PM
Kate Worsham without a doubt. I still ride with her =) ... I was a very timid and nervous rider due to a previous trainer who wasn't the nicest person in the world. From day one Kate has made a HUGE difference in my self confidence!! I love her even though she can be an equitation natzi at times haha

Hucklebug
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:35 PM
I'll play

Only considering past trainers and not present, Ginny Sorkin. She imparted in me the greatest amount of my "horse philosophy" that i use to date; she is the most ethical person I've ever met, and even though she's an ammy herself now, she always makes time to answer all the questions I throw her way, be it horsey, non-horsey ethical, or crying to her like a mommy when my heart gets broken.

I think what made her the best was her ability to explain things in ways that made sense so they were easier to apply and understand the purpose. She is very much into flatwork and taught me a great respect for the benefits of lateral work and other basic dressage/flatwork and I use it all to this day. She also made sure I knew how to thoroughly take care of a horse/tack/set course etc. so my practical knowledge dates to her.

2 tbs
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:37 PM
Who do you think is one of the best trainers you have ever had? The one you most learned from?

The one I ride with now and have been riding with for the last almost 12 years! :yes:

I have had 7 other instructors and truthfully, I'd call them just that, instructors. My very first one, I still think of as a good horsewoman. She knows her stuff but she taught me when I was 8 and then moved on to have a family when I was 10. I learned a lot but she didn't have the time to teach me beyond w/t/c/jump 2ft on packer school horses.

My current trainer is randomly threatened, er, reminded gently ;) , that she's not allowed to stop teaching me! I hope some day to be half the rider/horsewoman she is. She knows her stuff, has been there done that but you'd never know it to look at her. She's spent her time in the big rings, she's shown and won at the Garden, rode with some of the biggest BNT's but can still start a kid w/t and take them as far as she went - she has the most peaceful manner and has patience of a saint! She is a wonderful person and a fantastic gift to horses. She's one of those naturals-she touches the reins and horses just respond...it's amazing to watch! :yes: :sadsmile:

My retired horse would literally change his body language and over all expression when he heard her voice. He knew the "smart one" was there to help his poor mother figure out what the heck she was doing! :lol:

Just My Style
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:40 PM
I had two that I would consider "great". The first is Arlene Orr Amery (Windy Top Farm, Chester NJ) who taught me as a pony kid. She laid a good foundation in riding AND horsemanship. She was a Frank Chapot student and passed on a lot of Franks wisdom. She encouraged us to hang out at the horse shows to just watch and learn. She took us on field trips to USET finals and Maclay finals, so we could see how the "big kids" did it. She didn't put up with any garbage and ran one of the tightest barns I have ever seen. She also taught me that you can do anything that you believed you could, even if that meant buying an old retired lesson pony, cleaning her up and going to A shows. She told me that I could win if I wanted to and I won Middlesex and Monmouth on that $500 pony- all because Arlene said I could. :)

The second was Maxine Best who trained me as an older junior. She helped me with style and got me a lot of great rides that I would have never gotten without her help. She was very honest and outspoken. You knew exactly what was expected of you and she didn't settle for anything less. Always ride your best. I was a limited budget kid. She always said that lessons were for learning and that we went to the shows to win. No wasting time. No wasting money. Simple as that. :D

Dixon
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:43 PM
Cathy Simm of Hunters Run. There may be trainers with better timing and tact, but her teaching of all-round horsemanship, showmanship, and true empathy for the animals has made me a far better competitor and horse person than the trainers who simply inflated my ego and sat me on fancy horses for the sake of making more money.

Pirateer
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:44 PM
Amy Sherrick von Schiller (sp?) formerly of VIC, now of Cazenovia!

Janet
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:47 PM
Not counting present trainers, the two I got the most from in the shortest time were
Gene Estep
two semi-private lessons. I fully credit those two lessons with getting me past my "B" test. Particularly with getting the "stopper" round clear- NOBODY else, including his owner, could get him round with less than one stop at almost every fence. Also with understanding how your weight, and "sitting vs standing" are used as aids. The fact that it was a semi-private, with my sister on a VERY different horse from mine, made it particularly valuable- the difference between what he told her to do (on a hot horse) and what he told me to do (on an elderly, lazy horse) is something I have internalized and used ever since.

Sally (Lord) Ike
2 weeks of "Pony Club clinic" at GMHA. The "image" she created by saying that, when you go around the corner you need to "change to a lower gear" so you "keep the revs up" even though you are going slower, is another thing that has stuck with me.

Both of these were 1971 or earlier.

By the way, I still see Sally Ike at meetings and events, but does anyone know what happened to Gene Estep?

Not So Practical Horse(WO)man
Aug. 2, 2006, 06:48 PM
The best trainer I've ever had is the one I had now. Though currently I am very frustrated because she's having a mid-life crisis and changed her cell phone number and lost contact with everyone. When I first started riding with her two years ago, I was in the most advanced group at the lesson barn I started at and I felt like I was going no where. From the very first time I took a lesson with her my riding started changing dramatically. i can ow win the eqs. I'm dissappointed I'm moving and I wish I could take her with me. She's no big name trainer and comes off as difficult with some people but without her stubborness I would not be where I am today. Not only has she taught me alot about riding, she has taught me alot about life in general.

If she had more money she could have the potential to be as big as Beezie Madden or George Morris.

Limerick
Aug. 2, 2006, 07:07 PM
Melissa Jones Sarle at www.Paramountshowstables.com She is the first trainer I've had that "nagged" me for a whole winter to fix my lower leg. It's pretty much fixed and man, it makes a difference. She has made me into a much better rider than I was two years ago and she believes in me and that makes a difference too. I learn a ton watching her ride as she is so darn soft but effective-rides beautifully! She has added a lot of details to my ride and I know I'm better off for it. :)

LSM1212
Aug. 2, 2006, 07:15 PM
Not to sound cliche' .... but my current trainer. I have learned more from her than all my other trainers combined. Though we may not agree all the time, her teaching methods have worked best for me.

My position is better than it ever was even better than when I was a kid... she knows when to push, and when to back off. She is always encouraging (unless I'm being an idiot and then she gets on my case).

She is very knowledgable and has a knack for being able to explain things in multiple ways depending on the rider so they can "get it". :)

She is also an accomplished rider and sets a great example.

She posts on here so I'll give her a little plug.

Angela Walker
www.royalhillfarm.com (http://www.royalhillfarm.com)

:D

Silk
Aug. 2, 2006, 07:20 PM
Skip Billingham. Somehow, he gave me and the pony confidence to jump fences I never thought we could. If I still wanted to ride competitively in the hunters, I'd still be with him. I also won a lot with him.

JointVenture
Aug. 2, 2006, 07:33 PM
I'm not going to give a name. However, I'll say that in my experience of having...oh...7 or so trainers, that the very best are those who build up your confidence and give you instruction that is translatable to lots of situations. I want to learn to apply it myself rather than to hear what I need to do in that very instant. Tough with a smile is perfect, too. :)

Bumpkin
Aug. 2, 2006, 07:58 PM
Gary Henley is who comes to mind first with me.

brynleigh
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:04 PM
Orly Dehoyas, unfortuntely he is not with us anymore. He could make you feel like you could do anything when you walked up to the ingate. He instilled more confidence in me during the three years I rode with him than nay other trainer before or since.

worth_the_wait08
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:09 PM
my current trainer is all that i could have hoped for and more. she's young (only a few years older than me) which some people could view as a bad thing but really it's not. she can instruct me without being just a teacher, you know? i'm her only older student who rides more than once a week so we're pretty close. i came from a barn with another trainer who started me riding. i learned some bad habits from her-well not learned really but they were inforced because she didn't correct them. she was all right for beginners but i wasn't going anywhere with her and she refused to get any school horses only ponies (i'm 5'7'' with amazon legs) plus she wasn't that knowledgeable...we went to a show once and she had to ask my current trainer (who was her assistant at the time) how to measure the strides between jumps! :eek: i mean, i thought that was something most students knew how to do, let alone trainers. anyway, i consider my current trainer my friend (corny i know, but w/e) and we go on road trips to watch some big shows in the summer and stuff. i would be devastated if she ever moved/quit training!

OkLurchers
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:12 PM
I loved Orley too...also John McConnell for schooling at horse shows--he's the only trainer who ever really helped me with my old jumper, & Tony Font--super great for clinics.

Sebastian
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:23 PM
Michael Henaghan. He's just brilliant... :yes: Tough, but brilliant.

Seb :)

Andrew
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:24 PM
I owe and thank Linda Will , Hunt & Hackaway in Milroy, PA for giving me solid basics and GM for polishing me off...

Briaffer
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:31 PM
Hands down Thom and Wissie Brede. I trained with them for 8 years and they were the best riding years ever!

TheOrangeOne
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:34 PM
Current trainer. He can read people and horses remarkably well. He knows when to push and yell, when to take it easy and call it a day, when to reprimand the horse and when to tell him "it's OK, let's keep going".

crackerjack
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:34 PM
Holly Mitten - instilled confidence in me even though my horse was certifiably insane. :yes:

John Kersley - made lessons productive yet fun even though I was still riding aforementioned insane horse

va2uga
Aug. 2, 2006, 08:40 PM
my first trainer definately was one of the best i had. she taught me so much, and was always there loving what she did, always making sure that we understood everything, but pushing us to be better. she was never satisfied if we werent, and if she thought that we didnt understand something, would make sure that we could come extra to teach us that concept, on and off the horse. she was wonderful.

i also really enjoy our coach at college. she has helped me improve drastically, a long-awaited improvment on my behalf! even after only a year at school, i can definately see how much she has helped, and she is always encouraging. those two are amazing!

faraway46
Aug. 2, 2006, 09:32 PM
Is he tarining students? Has anybody trained with him? What's he like?

I've googled Jonathan Soresi and he seems good, too (says he helped train with GM the Leone brothers, Steinwedell, BUrdsall and Tarnapol). Any body know him?

Can anybody recommend some BNT that has a good rep, has trained great riders, and doesn't act like a BNT in the NYC area?

RubyRock93
Aug. 2, 2006, 09:38 PM
I've learned the most from my current trainer, who is by far the best of my many trainers. Kara Kozlowski

Janet
Aug. 2, 2006, 09:40 PM
Currently, I would have to say Ernest Dillon, who I clinic with twice a year.

He focuses on getting the flat work/approach right, so the jumps take care of themselves.

shanj
Aug. 2, 2006, 09:56 PM
Cathy Simm of Hunters Run. There may be trainers with better timing and tact, but her teaching of all-round horsemanship, showmanship, and true empathy for the animals has made me a far better competitor and horse person than the trainers who simply inflated my ego and sat me on fancy horses for the sake of making more money.

I leased a horse from a client of Cathy Simm's when I was younger (14). That horse sure wasn't easy to ride, but really knew his stuff and taught me more than I could have imagined. I agree, she seemed like a great lady whenever she would watch me ride at the shows.

As for me, my previous trainer Pat Lautenbach from Newmarket made such an impact on my riding. My parents couldn't afford to purchase a horse, I always had to lease, but she seemed to make my parents money work very well for me and my riding today is still a result of her teaching.

PS: This is my first post!

SteeleRdr
Aug. 2, 2006, 10:09 PM
I'd have to say Bay Cockburn was the best I had, not a h/j trainer, was actually a steeplechase race horse trainer. I rode horses for him for several years and he taught me the most about riding and getting over fears. He surely didn't help my eq, but after riding with/for him, I can get on just about any horse and make them go around nicely. I learned how to ride green horses and take them from fresh OTTB to taking them foxhunting to getting them in the show ring. At the same time one of the girls who also rode with him also gave me pointers (she is a former upper level rider, former ammie jockey, and the daughter of a dressage judge). She also helped me tons while working for Bay. I definitely think I learned the most from riding with Bay (although you have to be partially insane to do it!).

Wallysfolley
Aug. 2, 2006, 10:48 PM
Even though I love the current trainer I have. I will say that the 2 best trainers I've ridden w/ were Jean Brooks in Washington (state) and Judy Pirtle in good ole Alabama. I had a chance to go back out to WA and train for a few months w/ Jean, but I ended up getting engaged and getting a real job. Just wouldnt be realistic at this time. And once I get another horse (one day), I will start going back out to see Judy...the best money I've ever spent on lessons.

palisadespony
Aug. 2, 2006, 11:28 PM
Russell Stewart.

The Best.

Release First
Aug. 3, 2006, 12:19 AM
Jo Ann Postel. She was encouraging, supportive, challenging and taught all of us to be true horsemen. She has started many professionals.

BaileysIrishCreme
Aug. 3, 2006, 01:04 AM
Two come to mind, both my former and current trainer. They both post on here so I'll give them a little plug.

My former trainer, Jana (Anyplace Farm) helped both my pony and I in so many ways. If it hadn't been for her he'd most likely still be lame and I'd still be at the same crappy barn getting no where. From the very first time I took a lesson with her my riding started changing dramatically, as someone else mentioned w/ their trainer. After just a few lessons with her I learned more than I had in many months from my other trainer at the time. She focused on every detail, picking out and showing me things no other trainer ever had; the little things that create that final polished look. She encouraged us to hang out at the shows to just watch and learn, which I did a lot when my pony still wasn't sound or ready to show again. She taught me how to clip and braid. She got both my pony and I further than I ever thought we could get. She took a crazy lame pony and a timid rider and in a matter of months turned us into a confident pair jumping 2'6" courses and doing well at shows. She's extremely supportive and generous. Not only did she lay a good foundation in riding and horsemanship, but she has taught me a lot about life in general. We still talk weekly, almost daily, and she's always there with good advice, horse related or personal. We've gone on many road trips and places together and she was always able to turn an ordinary ride to a show into an adventure listening to 80's music ;).

My current trainer, Terri (bonstet) is a wonderful person, an accomplished rider who always sets a great example and runs a successful barn (www.cveq.com ). She's very encouraging and supportive. Even after you feel like you've had the worst ride she is able to pick out something you should be proud of and finds an accomplishment, no matter how small. She's very knowledgable and honest. Although we're not quite as close as I was/am with Jana, she is still someone I consider a friend. I can talk to her about anything and I know she'll be there with advice. She's brought Bailey and I even further to where we're jumping 2'9", 3" consistently, confidently. I had my first show in the rain/snow/hail with her (that was fun ;)). I had my first Rated show with her. I'll have my last show on Bailey with her.

Both Jana and Terri would get on your horse and try to find another way to make something work if it wasn't. They didn't just keep telling you to do the same thing if it wasn't working out, like past trainers did, which I liked. I love how each is able to get their point across and never yell. I have come so far and have learned so much from both of them. Who know's where I'd be now if it wasn't for them. Thanx guys :)!

fourmares
Aug. 3, 2006, 01:44 AM
Gedeon Heinrich in Gilroy CA is the best trainer that I have ridden with. He was on the 1960 Modern Pentathlon team and rode with DeNemethy. My current trainer, Susan Salo is the only trainer in this area, near Davis, CA that comes close. She rode with Gene Lewis.

foursocks
Aug. 3, 2006, 07:43 AM
Steve Wall of Harmony Farms (I think he judges now), who I trained with for almost a decade as a kid. I learned so much and so well from him that when I got back into riding after 12 years off, most of his training was still with me (it just needed some heavy de-rusting).

My current trainer (Mehdi Kazemi, Winters Run Farm) takes most of the credit for not only de-rusting me, but also for positively challenging me as I move from hunters to jumpers. I learn from him nearly every day.

One of the best things about both of them is the sense of humor they bring to teaching- it was great for me as a dopey, airhead kid, and it is much needed for me as a stressed-out, somewhat perfectionist adult!

Anyplace Farm
Aug. 3, 2006, 08:33 AM
Two come to mind, both my former and current trainer. They both post on here so I'll give them a little plug.

My former trainer, Jana (Anyplace Farm) helped both my pony and I in so many ways.
My current trainer, Terri (bonstet) is a wonderful person, an accomplished rider who always sets a great example and runs a successful barn.

Bailey -- what a nice compliment for both Terri Young and I! I have to say, I take the fact that you are so happy in your relationship with Terri as a compliment too, since I hand picked her for you! Terri was by far the best choice out there in our area and we are lucky to have a professional like her in our vicinity.

You make it easy to teach you because you have more guts, more willpower, more determination than anyone I have ever worked with. I don't know one soul I have ever taught that would have gotten up, dusted herself off and kept a straight face the way you did after that mare we looked at threw you to the ground like none other.

And when you and Mr. Bailey were in your SCF days and he was throwing you to the ground like a bad blanket -- I can't believe how you just kept on going. With that continued determination, you are going to go very far in college at RIT and as you continue riding with Terri. There's lots more on the horizon for you, girlie!

You really made me feel good -- thanks.

Ride'emCO
Aug. 3, 2006, 08:49 AM
My two favorite trainers are John Manning, who I rode with through highschool, and my current trainer, Terri Young at Clairvaux.

I improved more with John in 2 1/2 years than I have with any other trainer in my 23 years of riding. I went from Maiden to Jumpers in that time, and could get on anything with no fear and have a good ride.

Although I have been riding with Terri for a relatively short time, I can say she is one of the most talented riders and trainers I have had the pleasure of working with. Horses are (happy) putty in her hands, and she accomplishes this with quiet patience, never yells or gets upset (even when I am riding like a blockhead and think she should :winkgrin: ). She reminds me, when something isn't working out, that, "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result". :D

Anyplace Farm
Aug. 3, 2006, 08:50 AM
Oh, I guess I should say who the best trainer I ever had was --

David Meacham at Virginia Intermont College. He came out of the GM system and was practically a clone of him. I had absolutely no clue when I met that man and every rider in my class had years of formal training and horse shows under their belt. I was this yahoo that didn't know how to post correctly, didn't break my ankles correctly, had no clue what an indirect rein was and so on.

His very tough, very rigid system worked well for me, although I watched several girls drop out of his classes because he upset them too much. He upset me too but 'quit' just is not in my vocab.

Shortly after starting in his program, we had our IHSA tryouts. They bring in an impartial judge. I swept my classes on a horse I'd never ridden and made the team. All because of a little natural talent and his excellent, concise teaching. Eventually, I was the one David would use as an example in his classes, "Watch Jana..." I loved that.

After college, I stood side by side in schooling areas with all the greats -- George, Anne, Melanie, Jolicoeur, Jenkins, Matz, Best, Fargis, Frank & Bill, you name 'em -- nothing they said was anything foreign to me and none of the advice they gave their riders was anything David wouldn't have said.

I'm not nearly as good a rider as I was in college, but I haven't forgotten a thing. I'm on my quest to rack up some more miles in the ring and eventually, I am determined that I will best myself.

2old2nobtr
Aug. 3, 2006, 02:29 PM
The best for me was Bob Buxton (Buxton Hunt Farm) who took me when my confidence was extremely low and I wondered if I had the wrong horse. He built my confidence up and showed me how to ride my WONDERFUL horse. We did great things at home and at the shows.....

The other person was Ronnie Mutch. Although he wasn't my daily trainer, I did several clinics with him and BOY WHAT A WONDERFUL EXPERIENCE. And Bob Buxton followed Ronnie's methods which kept me going.

I've since lost contact with Bob but he was the best for me. :cool:

tidy rabbit
Aug. 3, 2006, 03:17 PM
John Ducharme hands down. No contest. Wish I were still in the bay area so I could ride with him.

shawneeAcres
Aug. 3, 2006, 03:22 PM
I Only rode with him a few times, but he was fabulous, the late Brian Jones. Wonderful sense of humor and really good with the kids as well (I was anything BUT a kid! LOL)

MissintheSouth
Aug. 3, 2006, 03:26 PM
Davera Ackenbomb and Joc Davis at what used to be Friendship Stables (she is no longer there). She isn't big time and I rode with her when I worked there as a working student, but I left there a much better rider and horsewoman!

Indy
Aug. 3, 2006, 04:03 PM
My first trainer's father, who was a fabulous old-time horseman. He used to throw me up on new lesson ponies that came in to see what they would do and he really helped me to learn to RIDE. Didn't matter to him if it was pretty, so long as it was effective. I had pretty much no confidence in myself as a rider (thanks to his daughter) but a summer of him helping me changed that so much. He helped me to realize that I did still love to ride and that I wasn't worthless on top of a horse. Plus he and his wife both taught me a lot about good horsemanship and sportsmanship.

DraftHorsePower
Aug. 3, 2006, 04:21 PM
Not a H/J trainer... but Diane Royce. I rode with her from my 10-15 year old years, and although there was no jumping involved, i credit my entire riding foundation to her. I STILL remember tips and descriptions that she told me that long ago, and use them. I have gone back a few times since then to lesson with her (I am 23 now) and I always come away with new valuable info.

I also loff my current trainer, Nancy Roche, I have gone through a lot of trainers on the horse I have now, and I have to say that I think she is the only one who has HONESTLY believed in us. That has really made a dramatic difference in our riding relationship and my confidence. :yes:

jewll27
Aug. 3, 2006, 04:24 PM
I have to say the trainer I ride with now is the best Ive ever had. Shes patient but firm, doesnt make me feel stupid when I ask questions, and doesnt expect me to just know how to do something. www.threesacharmfarm.com Julie is her name. Shes fantastic.

Chef Jade
Aug. 3, 2006, 04:41 PM
Definitely Cris Chastain, still my mentor, support, and one of my best friends! :o She is brilliant in setting exercises to indentify and correct both a horse and rider's flaws. She is a master of metaphors to help those non-natural horse people understand the concepts she is teaching.

I am sure she will never forget asking me what I learned at a George Morris clinic in which I had recently ridden. My reply, " I learned I have the best trainer in the world!" :D Cris took me from riding a nasty stopper of a morgan pony (who actually became a great little horse and still lives with Cris, 21 years later) to making the cut at the (now) USEF medal finals - on a horse kept in a backyard I might add.

Second best thus far would be Frank Madden. In the short time I rode with him while training/competing indoors, he really fine-tuned my riding.

melliebay Aefvue Farms Chesapeake Bay
Aug. 3, 2006, 05:29 PM
Beth Thomas in Davidsville, PA. She worked for the Chapots as well as in England. Best all-around horsewoman I've ever met, there isn't a problem in the world that she doesn't have a sensible solutions to. I still call her for advice all the time.

MyGiantPony
Aug. 3, 2006, 06:04 PM
I've been blessed with two very special trainers.

Margaret Cawley taught me through most of my junior years until I went to college. She not only gave me great instruction - proper turnout, horsemanship, riding skills, thinking skills, etc....she was a huge influence on helping me become an adult. She was always frank, honest, ethical - I can never express my gratitude. Only one complaint. The $itch hasn't aged a day. But I'll bet there's a helluva portrait in her attic. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Col. Bud Kitts was the other trainer. He always had more confidence in me than I did. He always knew just when to push me and when to back off. Never heard a mean or unkind word out of his mouth. The horses always came first. I want to say he took me to a higher level than Margaret - and he did in some ways, but I guess it would be more accurate to say he took me into a different world to explore.

Rivermeer
Aug. 3, 2006, 06:38 PM
Kris Moyer at Legacy Farms (located in Telford PA) is excellent!!


Heather

Chef Jade
Aug. 3, 2006, 07:07 PM
Kris Moyer at Legacy Farms (located in Telford PA) is excellent!!


Heather

OMG - I rode with Kris for a few month when I lived in Philly years ago! :yes: I loved her and wondered if she was still around.

BaileysIrishCreme
Aug. 3, 2006, 08:59 PM
Bailey -- what a nice compliment for both Terri Young and I! I have to say, I take the fact that you are so happy in your relationship with Terri as a compliment too, since I hand picked her for you! Terri was by far the best choice out there in our area and we are lucky to have a professional like her in our vicinity.

You make it easy to teach you because you have more guts, more willpower, more determination than anyone I have ever worked with. I don't know one soul I have ever taught that would have gotten up, dusted herself off and kept a straight face the way you did after that mare we looked at threw you to the ground like none other.

And when you and Mr. Bailey were in your SCF days and he was throwing you to the ground like a bad blanket -- I can't believe how you just kept on going. With that continued determination, you are going to go very far in college at RIT and as you continue riding with Terri. There's lots more on the horizon for you, girlie!

You really made me feel good -- thanks.

You are very welcome, I meant everything I said. There's SO much more I could have added, it was hard limiting it. I had to add in the part about the 80's music though ;). Thank you for everything!

Yes, I am very lucky you suggested Terri and it worked out the way it has. After you, I thought moving on to any trainer would be hard, since we seemed to connect so much, but it really wasn't.

Thank you for everything you said. I will most definitely keep in touch while i'm covered in snow this year at RIT. I don't know if I really have "more guts, more willpower, more determination than anyone I have ever worked with" but nice to hear :). I'll never forget that fall from that mare or all those challenges Bailey through my way, but hey in the end it makes you a better rider right?

hideyourheart03
Aug. 3, 2006, 09:19 PM
Two trainers have really affected me throughout my life. One with a few words she said one day and the other with both my riding and everything else.

The first was one of my previous trainers, Nancy Demus, who gave me the biggest compliment of my life by telling me that no one (other than herself) could school my leased spooky TB better than I was doing. I was beaming for the rest of the day. That one comment instilled in me confidence in my riding.

The second is my current trainer, Melissa Jones Sarle. She took me from an average, slightly rough-around-the-edges, 2'6" local rider, to a competitive 'A' and 'AA' Eq rider at the 3' and moving up to the 3'6" (now granted, this was on different horses but still). She never told me it wasn't possible to find a competitive 'AA' BigEq horse on teeny tiny budget and helped me find that horse even though it didn't mean a lot of $$$ for her. She instilled in me a lot of confidence that I am good at something and never was too busy to listen to anything I said - whether it be horse related, school related, or anything else. She also truly values my opinions and listens to all the suggestions that I have about new things to try with my horse/other horses that I watch her ride. At the same time though, she doesn't take any crap and when I'm saying dumb things (about how I want to sell my horse, etc.) she tells me to stop being dumb and sleep on it. I couldn't be the person or rider I am today without her.

curlybrilliance
Aug. 3, 2006, 10:59 PM
My trainer now in Western MA. She is an amazing teacher and friend. She is incredible with kids and really knows how to teach the right way with safety as the number one priority and building confidence as the second. She has trained some riders from day one who are now conquering in local shows and would be doing more if we had the time and resources to go farther. She knows her stuff and can train riders and horses up the the top levels. She doesn't use any gimmicks or anything and goes by the book. She loves what she does, she loves her students, and loves her horses. She also remembers and forces her students to remember that riding is fun and reminding us, even in the most frustrating moments, that there is a reason we love this crazy sport. how many other trainers would tell you to sing while you jump a line or trot across the diagonal to keep you breathing? She also managed to talk my parents into letting me ride again after I had a bad accident, after which I was forbade to even go to the barn. For that, I will forever be in debt to her and always will be gratefully.

She is also an incredible friend and person who has faced many challenges and conquered all of them in style.

Roxy SM
Aug. 4, 2006, 12:23 AM
Mark Laksin and Barbara Soley
I am SO fortunate to have both as my trainers, hopefully forever! My horse and I are rapidly improving, and everything they say makes complete sense.

Cover Story
Aug. 4, 2006, 02:52 AM
Laurie Kiser Mace at Hunting Ground Farm

FirstLadyJrJpr
Aug. 4, 2006, 03:01 AM
Sally Collins.
She brought me from the small ponies to the high juniors and low gp's

jewll27
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:07 AM
Kris Moyer at Legacy Farms (located in Telford PA) is excellent!!


Heather

I rode and worked for Kris when Sharon was still there. Really nice lady.

authentic pony
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:18 AM
I don't like switching trainers and have only been with 3 in the 14 years I have been riding. My current trainer I have been with for 6 years, adore, and cannot wait to get another horse with him. He is like a father to me, has done great things for my riding and has let me ride some amazing horses.

But I have to say, the summer I spent with Meredith Taylor & Matt Amoroso was the only time I can ever remember being completely confident in my riding and not having my lack of confidence get the better of me at the ingate. I would do anything to have that feeling back again, it is priceless!

Ponymom4
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:19 AM
That's easy, our current barn trainer, Christer Nydahl at Chadale Farms in Cary, NC. He has an amazing gift for bringing out the best in horse and rider unlike anything I have ever seen. Not only does he train the correct way but he gives the rider the tools to effectively communicate with the horse.

www.chadalefarms.com

bwf
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:52 AM
Paul Cronin, while I was at Sweet Briar. He was the greatest!

CAJumper
Aug. 4, 2006, 01:43 PM
Sue Payne at Smith College - correct, classical riding at its finest. Ten years later and I still hear her voice in my head, instructing me as I ride! :)

imapepper
Aug. 4, 2006, 04:40 PM
Steve Wall of Harmony Farms (I think he judges now), who I trained with for almost a decade as a kid. I learned so much and so well from him that when I got back into riding after 12 years off, most of his training was still with me (it just needed some heavy de-rusting).

My current trainer (Mehdi Kazemi, Winters Run Farm) takes most of the credit for not only de-rusting me, but also for positively challenging me as I move from hunters to jumpers. I learn from him nearly every day.

One of the best things about both of them is the sense of humor they bring to teaching- it was great for me as a dopey, airhead kid, and it is much needed for me as a stressed-out, somewhat perfectionist adult!

My husband rode with Mehdi as a kid in Maryland and loved him.

LetsRide
Aug. 4, 2006, 06:16 PM
Some of us are lucky enough to find a horse, that is/was capable of teaching us more, than another human being ever can.

:)

tullio
Aug. 4, 2006, 06:18 PM
Nancy, Sandy, Liz and Elise at Hollins University.... in four years they gave me the whole package - better equitation, better thinking, a barn full of incredible horses, challenging lessons, fabulous role models. I'll sing their praises till I run out of air.

pwynnnorman
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:16 PM
With her, developing the horse was a collaboration, not a dictation, for horse and human alike. And I like dealing with a strong personality who doesn't have hang ups, communicates willingly and clearly, and simply gets the job done.

Twilight
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:49 PM
I've been lucky - all of my trainers have been great, and for various reasons but I have to say my current trainer is probably the best I've ever had. He encourages me and is very patient when I have meltdowns.

RescueGirl75
Aug. 4, 2006, 07:51 PM
My father: "Jill get back on that God dang horse!"

Nylar
Aug. 4, 2006, 10:09 PM
Another vote for Mehdi Kazemi. Even though he's never been my primary trainer, he's always made time for me. In fact, it was his fault I even started horse showing! He was a huge help the first summer I was teaching, and was more than happy to sit with me and talk through any questions I had about students or ponies (or through the frustration of a bad "breakup" with my longtime trainer.)

Propped Up
Aug. 4, 2006, 10:58 PM
Jimmy Williams...its been a long time ago, but funny thing, I still have that knowledge and those basics today.

theblondejumper
Aug. 5, 2006, 02:22 PM
Another vote for Mehdi Kazemi. Even though he's never been my primary trainer, he's always made time for me. In fact, it was his fault I even started horse showing! He was a huge help the first summer I was teaching, and was more than happy to sit with me and talk through any questions I had about students or ponies (or through the frustration of a bad "breakup" with my longtime trainer.)

One of our barn employees rode with him for nine years and she is constantly telling me how much he helped her as a rider.

pinkhorse
Aug. 5, 2006, 03:02 PM
Beth Manning. I've been riding with her for 19 (yikes!!!) years. And occasionally with her husband, John. They're both good. But Beth brought me back from a 10 year hiatus after an awful experience as a WS for an Olympian (horrible teacher, volotile personality). She's totally been there for me giving me horses to ride and, when I bought my horse has literally held my hand when I needed it. She has a great eye for a horse and for what's happening when someone's on a horse. She says what she means to say and makes it all understandable. She's supportive when she needs to be and a bit brutal when she needs to be also.

I've ridden with and cliniced with Hall of Fame trainers and Olympic riders. Beth's the best.

Also Joe Delano who completely changed my relationship with my horse and taught me enough to change my relationship with horses in general.

horselovr121
Aug. 5, 2006, 06:31 PM
I've been riding with my current trainer since I was 13. I'm 18 now, and about to head off to college. When I first started with her, I was still riding my first horse, a 19 (at the time) year old Arab gelding. At 13, I'd taken basic "dressage" (if you could call it that) lessons, and shown at exactly 3 shows. Two of those were walk/trot dressage at my very first barn, and one was a local "fun show" (the kind with western and english for $7 a class). I rode at a backyard barn with no arena - we had PVC jumps in the middle of a field. My horse didn't know lead changes and refused any jump over 3'. I had a terrible habit of not checking my diagonal.

My trainer has taught me pretty much everything I know about riding, horsemanship, and anything else you can think of. She's been with me through everything, and never gave up on me - even when she spent whole lessons telling me to change my diagonal, while we tried to get my horse over a 2'6 vertical. When it was time for a new horse, she waited as long as she could to tell me, because she knew it would break my heart. She helped me find my current horse, and we showed hunters successfully on the local C circuit for a year before switching to jumpers. She's always been patient but firm, and she knows exactly what to say so that I'll understand - I know exactly what she's talking about practically before the words leave her mouth.

I've recently decided to sell my horse again, because I need something bigger. This is an impossible decision for me, and my trainer has been WONDERFUL about helping me through it. I keep my horse at her barn, and we ride together almost every night. She's become one of my best friends. I can tell her anything, and I'm going to miss her SO much when I leave for college in a couple weeks. :sadsmile:

Lazy Palomino Hunter
Aug. 6, 2006, 12:00 AM
Hands down, Shelby French at Sweet Briar College. She helped me get through a really rough patch in my riding, and has helped shape me into a better horseperson. While I can't say I'm a great rider, I'm 100x the rider I was when I arrived for my placement ride as a freshman.

Interestingly enough, the worst trainer I ever had is listed on this thread as being the best someone else ever had. :o I'm sure the person who wrote it will know immediately. I'm sad you have yet to experience anything better.

faraway46
Aug. 6, 2006, 07:08 PM
Jimmy Williams...its been a long time ago, but funny thing, I still have that knowledge and those basics today.

God, what envy! I would have killed to be trained by him!!! When did you ride with him?

fish
Aug. 6, 2006, 08:53 PM
Probably Trudy Maxwell. A long time ago (24 years), and I still go back and study the notes I'm so glad I took on her lessons.

Eatmydust
Aug. 6, 2006, 09:02 PM
My current "coach" is amazing! Although she's not really my coach, I'm pb'ing her old competition horse, so she's been "coaching" me on him. She is so good at explaining things to me, which alot of coaches find hard! She doesn't make me feel like a crappy rider (even when I mess up) but always finds a way of making a mess-up into a lesson. Also I love the fact that she doesn't get frustrated (or at least doesn't show it) if I REALLY mess-up she just shakes her head, grins and says to try it again. No yelling, no putting down, nothing. She has a million different ways to solve ANY problem I'm having and she listens to me. She's had the horse I'm pb'ing for 14 years now, so she knows him really well. But she listens to what I'm suggesting (whether its a bit change, to a vet call to a grain change) and then asks me why I want to do it. Then we talk about the pros and cons and decide together whether or not we'll go ahead with the change. I love the fact that she respects me enough to listen to me and not just brush me off since I don't have that much experience! And many people have told me that I'm very lucky to be able to pb her horse, since in the last 14 years, not many other people have been allowed to ride him :) As much as I love Lori, I can't really say she's my coach....but I've definatly learned the most from her!!

So my favorite real coach would have to be my very FIRST riding instructor - ohhh 7 years ago? - that taught me to ride. She instilled in me a sense of safety first. No matter what I do, ask myself whether its safe. Then judge whether its fair to the horse to ask of them (ie asking an underworked horse to do a major hour long ride or whatever) Although she never taught any of her students with showring expectations, she always made sure it was fun and safe. Now when I see people at shows I see how the different coaches stress different things. I'm happy my coaches "thing" was safety. No lead ropes on the ground and don't let the horse into your space. No open toed shoes either! Theres alot of her rules that I thought were RIDICULOUS will I went to a barn that had very few barn rules. It was havoc!! To this day, I always point out to people the safety aspect of whatever their doing. Whether they've left a halter on the ground or let go of the reins undersaddle, its now my "thing" ;)

ALips
Sep. 4, 2006, 12:02 PM
Julie Curtin from Woodstock, Ga. She has brought my horse and I to places I never thought I would be able to go. If Julie can't train a horse, I doubt anyone can. The ribbons are a plus, but what matters to me walking out of the ring is my trainer's approval...:yes:

FridayzFortune
Sep. 4, 2006, 12:21 PM
Julie Curtin from Woodstock, Ga. She has brought my horse and I to places I never thought I would be able to go.

alex, you and jake have come SO far! you both looked so good at chateau!

diKecnadnuS
Sep. 4, 2006, 12:28 PM
I've learned the most from Cricket Stone (aka Tackpud). She started training me when I was barely 15 and had just come off of a bomb proof medium to a completely unbroke large pony. She really is a miracle worker! She's my size so it helped having someone that could understand how hard it can be having short arms and legs. She does a great job of explaining things, and makes sure to encorporate technical terms into all of her riders vocabulary.

Some others that I got a lot out of...
Sue Riggs--taught me the importance of riding a rhythm, and relaxing while remaining focused on the course. She really emphasized the flat work and it absolutely works miracles!

Kate Haisch--Really helped me use my position correctly, and taught me how the slightest shift in your weight can make all the difference over fences and on the flat. She uses focal points on the courses so you know exactly where you need to sit up, etc. Just changing your position around a corner can change the entire approach to a jump, and thus the jump itself!

Aaron Vale--As a child he taught me to never give up. When I've had lessons with him since then I somehow gain super powers where I have more guts and confidence than I have ever felt in my life. In a lesson with him I feel completely invinciable and never doubt my decisions.

BridalBridle
Sep. 4, 2006, 06:57 PM
Ron Danta

MissintheSouth
Sep. 5, 2006, 10:42 AM
Julie Curtin from Woodstock, Ga. She has brought my horse and I to places I never thought I would be able to go. If Julie can't train a horse, I doubt anyone can. The ribbons are a plus, but what matters to me walking out of the ring is my trainer's approval...:yes:

I love Julie! My old junior horse is at her barn, Nick (Topanga Canyon)! She also has always seemed to me like a fantastic person, as well as a very talented trainer/rider.:yes:

Jeepgirl
Sep. 5, 2006, 11:16 AM
Nancy Peterson & Liz Courrier when I was at Hollins. I honestly think I learned more in those 2 years then I did in the 10 years previously. And Elise (the barn manager) taught me more than I could have hoped about running a barn & horse management.

sahara511
Nov. 4, 2006, 07:58 PM
In the mid to late 80's I rode with Arlene Orr and Maxine Best doing the pony hunters. I was fortunate enough to be able to show ponies for other people in the barn, so I learned early on how to ride many different types of ponies. They both taught me how to learn from my mistakes, how to be proud from my success and to lose with grace, not always the easiest thing for a young kid to do. And since I was training with Mrs. Best when she got sick, she taught me a lot about life in general, things that had nothing to do with what happened at the show that weekend. I still think about her and miss her!

flogarty
Nov. 4, 2006, 09:47 PM
Susan Lloyd. I've been with her for 10 years- since I was 9, and sometimes I think she knows me better than I know myself. When I was 9 I was timidly doing WT cross rails, and now I do the adult jumpers. She always knows what to say and how to say it to me- and when I need to be hyped up, or when I need to be calmed down. Like when she says "we've jumped way bigger and more technical courses than this- this is cake"... and months later I find out that she was just as intimadated by the course as I was. She knows my horses so well too- especially my jumper, its kinda like he is her horse, she knows him that well.

Equitational
Nov. 4, 2006, 11:17 PM
My current trainer of course! She's not a BNT, but respected locally. Without a doubt, she is the best(for me alteast). She tells me how I should ride and what I should do if x were to happen. I currently take 1-2 lessons a week and usually she only rides my horse when I'm having trouble(maybe once a month). She makes me ride through the problems instead of giving up and letter her fix them. She's taken me from the 2' to the 3'3" in two+ years. If I do something wrong, and make a mistake...she'll tell me what to do for next time and it works! It's a miracle. My only regret is not moving to her barn sooner!

My first h/j trainer is my 2nd fav(well...I've only had three). He was actually a student of my current trainer. He was a perfectionist...always telling/couaching to you throughout the lesson.

Of course I've never 'trained' with a BNT(cliniced with a few) but I'm sure that a recognizable name doesn't always mean the best.

mem
Nov. 5, 2006, 08:35 AM
Victor Hugo-Vidal. Absolutely, positively the best.

La Gringa
Nov. 5, 2006, 09:52 AM
Sandy Aston while she was still with Hap in the early 80's. She was a wonderful teacher, I learned a lot from her. I learned a lot from Hap too, but he's not as good at articulating as Sandy is.

War Admiral
Nov. 5, 2006, 10:35 AM
The late, great Denny O'Keefe, who was pretty much the Gordon Wright of New England. I was so lucky to have the benefit of his wisdom and I miss him every single day. Could REALLY use him right now b/c my nerve has dropped off to next to none and he was the best ever at powering you through that cr*p. You were more terrified of HIM than you were of whatever he was asking you to do, and you damn well DID it, no questions no excuses no repeats.

He was one of the old ex-cavalry drill sergeants. Picture General Patton (watch the movie) to get a general idea of what you were up against. Most of us are aware that GM pretty much worships those guys - wrote an article in COTH to that effect several years ago (which could stand a reprint BTW). What knowledge we lost when they all went!! They were the last of the truly multidisciplinary horsemen... Denny had top students in saddle seat, hunter/jumper, eventing, dressage, and even sidesaddle! He hunted, played polo - not sure if he ever did anything Western, I never thought to ask! But really ANY game you decided you might like to play with your horse, he was UP for it, knew how to do it and knew how to shape you up to win. Everybody was terrified of him - horses, students, fellow trainers - but not in a bad way, more in a way of you knew you were in the presence of a MASTER horseman who took no cr*p from anything breathing. Absolute authority.

His greatest gift and one I've never seen duplicated (although one saddle seat trainer currently gets close) was his ability to ANTICIPATE. He had the God-given ability to watch a horse and rider, see what was GOING to happen several strides before it did, and yell out commands in time for you to fix it and avoid it. You learned by absorbing this with your body and with muscle memory more than intellectually. Ohhhhhhhhhhh I could so use some of that now!!

He was brutally outspoken and wildly eccentric and could be hilarious. Called all his riders "Ya dumb Swede" (for the record - I was the QUEEN of the Dumb Swedes - I owned the copyright on Dumb Swede-dom!). For years as a kid I couldn't work out what Mr. O'Keefe had against the Good Swedish People of the World, until it dawned on me that in European parlance a Swede is a vegetable! :lol: Rarely did you see him at a show ("Why the hell would I want to go and watch YOU ride?" :lol: ). The grim joke among his students was that if O'Keefe turned up to watch you at a show, he either figured you were fixing to DIE that day or figured you were fixing to win something unexpectedly big. More usually the former, but he never did tell you which was which. ;)

The most amazing thing I ever saw him do was get on my old War Admiral gelding, an OTTB who was *barely* cantering on both leads yet and was at that moment having a classic War Admiral meltdown/temper tantrum - and make that horse piaffe all the way down the long side and passage back up the other. ("Now: get back up on your G-D horse and DON'T EVER TELL ME AGAIN that he can't.") O'Keefe was age 85 at the time.

God bless, Godspeed to the best horseman I ever knew. I'd give anything to have him back. :sadsmile:

tuckerlouie
Nov. 5, 2006, 10:43 AM
Ginny Edwards is absolutely amazing. She can be tought at times, but it's was well worth it, I would haven't been able to move up to the A/Os in college if it weren't for what she taught me the 4 prior years.

I had a lesson with her this past summer and her knowledge and understanding of the horse is absolutely amazing!!! She's constantly learning and very active within the industry as well...

I still go to her with questions concerning my horse, even though I only see her several times a year.

CleoBella
Nov. 5, 2006, 02:05 PM
For the most part I would say everyone I have ridden with has helped me become the rider I am today. I learned different things from different people. I moved around very little as a jr. and when I did move, those people that I moved from knew I was moving to get more knowledge or something they didn't do or they moved or my life took me to a different place... Some highlights would be:

Jack Trainor- He taught me to be brave and always make it happen!

Bill Cooney & Frank Madden- Each had something different to offer but for the most part they gave me the polish & poise Karen Healy had started the polish but moved to CA.

Debbie Shaffner/Stevens & Billy Glass- What a different pair of people! Debbie made me very determined. She is tough. They gave me a great introduction into the jumpers and whole other world! Lots of opportunities to ride other horses. They showed me where I could go if I chose to.

Michael Matz- I took a lot away for the very short time I was there (a few years). I think most of my business philosophy is derived on words he said: "The key is to keep it small. If your business is too big you can't be considering every horse and rider. Focus. " For the most part Michael didn't have students so I was and am grateful for the opportunity.

Arlyn Decicco- My flatwork truely came into it's own working with Arlyn. I stretched my mind. I also leased a Dressage horse and learned up to 3rd level movements. She gave me a clear picture that a horse is an athelete and that our programs should be geared around treating them like an athelete. As a rider too I learned to change some of my routines to help me physically.

My Former Students- Having to teach made me a better rider. I had to think about how to convey the message. My students taught me prospective. They were invaluable!

I take all these lessons with me everyday in riding and life in general...
What a lucky person I have been to have touched all of these people and a few others- I am grateful for them all!

BridalBridle
Nov. 5, 2006, 02:40 PM
The horse, PLAY WITH FIRE. If you missed a lick he GOTCHA. He didn't allow for errors and expected perfection. Nothing like an animal being the instructor. He didn't even yell at me, just GOT ME when I got it wrong.

CleoBella
Nov. 5, 2006, 02:43 PM
BridalBridle-

Hahaahaha- So true. Very funny!

DepartRight
Nov. 5, 2006, 03:31 PM
It's a 3-way tie, though the ladies are proteges of Major.
Major Robert Borg, Christine Koch, Sandra Elwood.

La Gringa
Nov. 5, 2006, 03:34 PM
Victor Hugo-Vidal. Absolutely, positively the best.
Victor was also one of the best judges around. He gave really tough workoffs in the medal classes. He loved to make you counter canter forever! RIP Victor.

Whip 'n Spur
Nov. 5, 2006, 04:25 PM
John Turner. I love just putting his name here, an expecting people to know my thoughts on this. He is my favorite trainer, he's tought me so much, it's hard to find a place to start.

MGA828
Nov. 7, 2006, 02:17 AM
My old trainer Jamey Prettyman, he is great!!! I used to train with him and loved him, I thought he was amazing, could ride anything and make it look like a million bucks, and always made me feel like we accomplished something. I no longer train with him only because he is a good 2 hours away from me, however 2 summers ago I did send my greenie to him for more instense training and had some more lessons with him and was very happy. My greenie is now doing wonderful and I couldnt be more happy with the work Jamey did with my youngster. I miss training with Jamey, but we are just to far away now for me to train with him consistently.

I am now training and working with Ann Zinsser who also boards her horses at the farm I do and love her. She is a great trainer and knows her stuff. She is amazing!

Jamey and Ann are both amazing trainers, not to mention amazing people.

Just My Style
Nov. 7, 2006, 07:58 AM
In the mid to late 80's I rode with Arlene Orr and Maxine Best doing the pony hunters. I was fortunate enough to be able to show ponies for other people in the barn, so I learned early on how to ride many different types of ponies. They both taught me how to learn from my mistakes, how to be proud from my success and to lose with grace, not always the easiest thing for a young kid to do. And since I was training with Mrs. Best when she got sick, she taught me a lot about life in general, things that had nothing to do with what happened at the show that weekend. I still think about her and miss her!

Me too. :sadsmile: She was a wonderful "life teacher"- not just riding coach.

mst
Nov. 8, 2006, 01:26 AM
i rode with maxine as a wee little one. she yelled at me all the time. remember her blue vw bug?

Beethoven
Nov. 8, 2006, 02:03 AM
Sunny Stevens hands down.

Just My Style
Nov. 8, 2006, 07:07 AM
i rode with maxine as a wee little one. she yelled at me all the time. remember her blue vw bug?

:lol: I remember that we used to bug her to bring her boyfriend to the barn. She wouldn't do it because she said she didn't want him to know that she yelled at small children and made them cry for a living. But that same tough exterior worked at horse shows. No one messed with her. I also remember that I was champion at Coppergate. I won all my classes. She told me that I should be embarassed at my riding. I didn't ride my best that day. I rode to beat the other kids. Not what she wanted. "Ride your best EVERY time." I had to take my stack of ribbons and prizes and go apologize to her. Looking back, that was one of my best horse shows. Not for the obvious reasons.

Babs
Nov. 8, 2006, 07:23 AM
Oh, easy. Harry Deleyer. I learned so much, not only about riding and jumping but about horsemanship, farming, everything agricultural.

I loved the way he would let the horse be horses, and to work with their basic nature: 1. they need a leader 2. they like to be with other horses 3. they need clear instruction with consistent rewards

It all flowed from there. Young horses might, for example, on a rainy snowy day, have a session in the indoor. Free jumping, three half sisters who share a pasture and are good friends, over small fences and simple combinations, make it joyous, when they get it right and have done a good job, they are done for the day. By the time these youngsters are competing they have had years of jumping experience :-)

drgfly75
Nov. 8, 2006, 08:21 AM
I rode with Joan Keegan (then, Joan Samples). She brought me up teaching me the basics of dressage and jumping. She was easygoing and yet strict when she needed to be. She sold me (I was 10 yrs. old) a lesson pony that was NOT for sale. She made me believe that I could do anything if I put my mind to it. I'll never for get her. Even though I do the hunters now, if I were still in Georgia, I'd still take from her.:)

grantana
Nov. 8, 2006, 10:20 AM
Carolyn and Kenny are THE BEST. Ever. They are true teachers, they know all aspects of horsemanship and they actually teach their students those things. Carolyn is infamous around the barn for her "mini-lessons", either when you are riding and she wants you to focus on something, or around the barn where she sees an opportunity to teach you something about horse care or barn management. They teach just about every level, between the 2 of them, and they do it well. I especially love taking lessons with both of them, if I try to fix something with Kenny, he will have me do one thing to fix the problem and he explains it his way. I can then go take a lesson with Carolyn a few days later, still working on the same problem, and she will tell me another way to fix it and explain that way as well. The best part, for me, is when they tell me 2 different things, is that I can ask either one about something the other said, and they will help me connect one idea to the other. They are also really good at keeping track of what you are doing with your horse (what are you and Grant working on today? How was Grant, what did you do today?). They really CARE. I think GM put it best: "The Kromes do it right. Rarely do I see the basics of riding, teaching, and training done so correctly and thoroughly. Added to that, their horse management is excellent." George Morris, 10/27/2000

:)
2 enthusiastic thumbs up!!:D

justonce
Nov. 10, 2006, 12:56 PM
MARK JUNGHERR!!!! and KRISTI SMITH!!!

playing cards again
Nov. 10, 2006, 04:04 PM
Nancy Whitehead.

Although not for everyone and not without flaw, Nancy IMHO is the best (that I know of) to teach a young professional how to ride like a professional. ;)

One of the rare few who can truly explain "why." :yes:

She also is underestimated, underrecognized, and at times disregarded, despite years of producing winning horses and riders. :(

I attribute this to most peoples' unwillingness to tolerate those (people and horses) that are different, but those that don't watch and learn from her are missing out.

mango1612
Nov. 10, 2006, 06:26 PM
Nancy Demus

Carlos Aramburo

Both are extremely different though!

Ware Whip!
Nov. 10, 2006, 07:52 PM
There is a thread about Barbie Bancroft here..
She was as far as teaching, techinqiue and building confidence.
Producing a well rouned horse person with a bussinessman like work ethic.
And making it all the most fun you ever had..

Eugene Kotan for dressage..what a loss ..

Ware Whip!

La Gringa
Nov. 10, 2006, 07:57 PM
My old trainer Jamey Prettyman, he is great!!! I used to train with him and loved him, I thought he was amazing, could ride anything and make it look like a million bucks, and always made me feel like we accomplished something. I no longer train with him only because he is a good 2 hours away from me, however 2 summers ago I did send my greenie to him for more instense training and had some more lessons with him and was very happy. My greenie is now doing wonderful and I couldnt be more happy with the work Jamey did with my youngster. I miss training with Jamey, but we are just to far away now for me to train with him consistently.

I am now training and working with Ann Zinsser who also boards her horses at the farm I do and love her. She is a great trainer and knows her stuff. She is amazing!

Jamey and Ann are both amazing trainers, not to mention amazing people.

I met Jamey when I first moved to the East Coast. I liked him too. He knows a lot, and rides very well too.

luise
Nov. 11, 2006, 09:33 AM
I've never ridden with any BNT, but in college my friends and I went down to Paper Chase Farms in Middleburg, VA to ride with Joseph Keusch. We were all different levels--from girls that had done medal-maclay as juniors to myself who was just learning how to jump and had been riding for 2 years. Joseph was amazing, as were his horses! He managed to put us on all very appropriate horses for our levels and set up a variety of exercises that we all learned from. And, we really pushed our jumping, raising the jumps every time! Not to mention he is the nicest person and quite dashing too! Paper Chase doesn't exist any more, but I know that Joseph is still around in VA for lessons, if anyone gets the chance.

tullio
Nov. 11, 2006, 04:08 PM
MGA828 and La Gringa - Jamey fans! He is really an awesome person to ride with. I learned a ton from him in just a short time and enjoyed it very, very much. He is very quiet and thoughtful during lessons, but when he does have something to say, it is right on.

Several times while I was riding with him, he worked a horse while I was there to hack. Then we'd both go out and ride around the fields on a little dirt path - how COOL! A rider that takes time to enjoy the horses, whose horses get time to enjoy him. I was really impressed. He can also tell you the life story of the oldest lesson pony on the place, and takes time to fuss over the humble schoolies. I have a lot of respect for that.

(Jamey's is fifteen minutes from me... but our schedules just weren't meshing. Wish I could quit my jobs and just go ride!)

Who's that girl?
Nov. 11, 2006, 10:07 PM
Although I have been fortunate to ride with many excellent trainers that have taught me different things, for the overall picture it would have to be Nancy (Welch - since she still was most of the time I knew her!) Demus. While not a BNT, she sure did work me and the horse on the flat until he had a lot of nice fancy buttons and got us very solid over fences. She was also great for my nerves when I first started riding with her and was a mess at shows. We could go in and win the class and she would tell us "Nice Job", or we could totally bomb and she would say "not your best". Very cool, very steady. Very helpful for a person who brings more than enough of her own emotional baggage to the ring!

I have since ridden with those who would be considered bigger name trainers, but I still miss lessons with Nancy!

Moesha
Nov. 12, 2006, 08:28 AM
The one's who wanted to teach, were happy for me when I did well, dissapointed but encouraging when things fell apart...understood that I had a full life, a budget, and did this because I wanted to. Never tried to use me or my horses, didn't talk about me behind my back, were honest and upfront, really took and interest and cared about my goals. Realized I had to work and fit things in as best I could and that I did this for me, and my horse...and never compromised my well being or my horses for a quick buck or an easy fix.

just three hearts
Nov. 12, 2006, 10:58 AM
I have had many trainers over 30 plus years of riding, the few that stick out for all different reasons: Marty deLeyer, Colleen Kelly and Joyce Przebowski they have each taught me something different. All are great in their own way.

Hunters_Kick_Butt
Nov. 12, 2006, 12:09 PM
Its going to have to be by far my instructer Sara. She has really boosted my confidence and my riding. I really appreciate that!!!

dcm
Nov. 12, 2006, 12:37 PM
Nancy Whitehead.

Although not for everyone and not without flaw, Nancy IMHO is the best (that I know of) to teach a young professional how to ride like a professional. ;)

One of the rare few who can truly explain "why." :yes:

She also is underestimated, underrecognized, and at times disregarded, despite years of producing winning horses and riders. :(

I attribute this to most peoples' unwillingness to tolerate those (people and horses) that are different, but those that don't watch and learn from her are missing out.

Dtr had the pleasure of meeting her last winter, and again this summer (where I also had the pleasure of meeting her). Dtr trains with one of her students, Melissa Hirt, and loves them both.

Nancy's a riot. :winkgrin: She has some of the best stories to tell. :D

Bridgette Pony
Nov. 13, 2006, 07:58 AM
My daughter has trained with Jamey for almost a year - and thinks he's the best. He always pushes her to do her best and never expects less of her because of her age (just turned 10 in August).

Bridgette Pony Mom

bhrunner06
Nov. 13, 2006, 08:48 AM
the only trainer i have ever had, and hope to ever have...Pam Graham. i have ridden with other trainers in clinics (George Morris, Anne Kursinski, Greg Best, Michelle Grubb) and like no one as much as Pam...did I learn alot from them and think they are all GREAT teachers? OF COURSE! (Especially Anne and George)...but I would always go back to Pam, in a heartbeat!! she is the best trainer ever! she knows when to be the "dad" and be tough, and when to be the "mom" and be gentle. she knows what it takes to make her riders do their best. she knows the amount of stress each rider can take and how tough she can be one each of us. she is great with little kids and great with adults...great with first time riders, and great with grand prix riders. i couldnt ask for a better trainer to offer me more wonderful opportunities and insight on not only riding, but becoming a horsewoman as well.

dmj
Nov. 13, 2006, 03:41 PM
Mickey Hayden. By far.

Hucklebug
Nov. 13, 2006, 04:26 PM
The one's who wanted to teach, were happy for me when I did well, dissapointed but encouraging when things fell apart...understood that I had a full life, a budget, and did this because I wanted to. Never tried to use me or my horses, didn't talk about me behind my back, were honest and upfront, really took and interest and cared about my goals. Realized I had to work and fit things in as best I could and that I did this for me, and my horse...and never compromised my well being or my horses for a quick buck or an easy fix.

Amen

dags
Nov. 17, 2006, 09:25 AM
After all the days this thread was on page one it dawned on me last night I had something to say in it :)

I've worked with a lot of pros and trained with a few prior to that . . . but my time with David Josiah was kind of in-between. I showed up needing a training program, and ended as being a groom/instructor/rider/catch everything else that needs to be done employee . . .

David had a great teaching style, didn't yell or get all frazzled, but got the point across without the frivolous niceties. And I don't know that he's the BEST coach out there, but he had a nice mixture of everything: taught clear and coherently, and out of the 5 different trainers that have shown my horse, he is by far my favorite in terms of competence, style, and eagerness. I'll never forget when he got a fourth on him in the Lows at Indio (you know how big that class is) and he called me just as giddy as a little boy :)

But most importantly he taught me professionalism- how to present myself and how to conduct myself as an equestrian professional. I've worked with several other barns and none of them have ever been run as well or with as little gossip as David's.

David moved from California to the East Coast in 1998- he had previously run Morning Mist Farm out of LAEC, but I don't think he planned on riding after he moved. Does anyone know of him or where he is? David Josiah? Would love to see how he's doing.

seahorse
Nov. 17, 2006, 11:10 AM
Amanda Steege for hunters. She is an excellent teacher who is always encouraging and positive. She stresses the basics, hunter position and pace. She never overfaces you or the horse but challenges them in a safe fashion. She an excellent rider who is very in tune with the horse. Horses and riders love her.

Jeff Cook for all around horsemanship and position. He has a wide variety of ways to teach an individual point. He stresses the basics and safety. He is very professional, and at the same time fun to lesson with. You can learn a lot from him in a short time.

TanPatty
Dec. 3, 2007, 11:07 PM
How abt Gabor Francia-Kiss??? Jack Frohm???

ForTheLoveOfHorse
Dec. 4, 2007, 12:00 AM
.

Marcella
Dec. 4, 2007, 12:49 AM
Nancy Whitehead.

Although not for everyone and not without flaw, Nancy IMHO is the best (that I know of) to teach a young professional how to ride like a professional. ;)

One of the rare few who can truly explain "why." :yes:

She also is underestimated, underrecognized, and at times disregarded, despite years of producing winning horses and riders. :(

I attribute this to most peoples' unwillingness to tolerate those (people and horses) that are different, but those that don't watch and learn from her are missing out.

Yep. I was a lesson kid when she was at North Hill and Kent and I were riding in ponies.

Jaideux
Dec. 4, 2007, 01:34 AM
I had an amazing trainer for a bit, but that trainer had some serious issues that needed to be fixed, because they directly interfered with the trainer's ability to do the job. When the trainer was good, the trainer was the BEST (trainer around), but when the trainer was bad, the trainer was (an) AWFUL (person).

I miss the rides I used to have back then, but I don't miss the unnecessary aspects of an unsavory (at times) person.

I had another trainer who rocked my socks, but then that trainer became an amatuer again. I keep harboring a secret wish they will return to teaching one day... but I know better, haha. This trainer knew their fundamentals solid, so much so they could carry students to the very highest point where the only thing holding them back becomes the facility/mount/location/money- certainly not the riding!

And now my trainer is pretty good, and by far the most overall accessible. Still adjusting to each other, but the trainer's track record is so good that I have faith it will all fall in place... just as soon as my gosh darn horse is sound/shod/sane enough to ride for more than a few days at a time! ARUGH (mentally comparable) teenager horses!

They've all had their strenghts and weaknesses- a BNT with some real hang ups, a well-respect local trainer with tons of talent and the unfortunate (for me) situation in life that allows the (winning) True Amateur Lifestyle, and a trainer who used to be hidden and is now just coming into the local light, and no one understands why we didn't know sooner!

meupatdoes
Dec. 4, 2007, 05:59 AM
Wow, what a great post. What a great way to open up the door for people to thank some of the trainers who have helped them along the way.

My list:

Patty Peckham (Arcadia Farm)
Two things I remember (from over ten years ago):
"Just count one, two, one, two, and try to get there on one or two."
"Think of riding is a like a flow chart. Each little action is a box, connected to the next box with a line. As you get better, the boxes stay the same, but the lines get shorter."

During the summers, I spent more time at the barn than at home with my own parents.

And I never got treated any differently because I was the one kid without my own horse.

Thank you, Patty, for my foundation.


Lendon Gray
You let me ride despite the fact that I was the sorriest excuse for a dressage rider I'm sure you ever did see. Unbelievably generous with her horses.
Thank you for that.

Anne Rawle (Watermark Farm in Oxford, PA. Tasker here is her daughter.)
Uses home bred and trained GP competition horses in lessons. We need more people like this to foster the riding education in this country.

You changed my riding in four or five lessons. Thank you, both to you and to the divine Miss Bounce.


Lisa Payne (Loxahatchee, Fl)
That one handed canter pirouette sure was fun!
Dressage without taking it so seriously, and with a great focus on the biomechanics of the horse in each lesson. Can't WAIT to get back to Fla!

Lisa Mitchell (Formerly of Old Salem Farm, now in NOVA)
Took the foundation Patty Peckham gave me and ran with it. Bent over backwards to make riding affordable, to the point of going in on sale horses with me. Took me under her wing and taught me about the ins and outs of the h/j show and sale-horse world. I can not thank her enough.

Gary Kunsman and AJ Garrity (Four Seasons Farm)
Wonderful trainers. They are kind to the horses, honest with the customers and not priced out of this world. Having sale horses with them will enable me to fund my horse hobby, and taking lessons from them will teach me how to really ride those nice horses I'll be able to afford. A program like theirs makes riding the horses I've always dreamed of possible. Can't say thank you enough. And what a great barn community- all the other customers are great!

And also a shout out to Laurie Jakubauskas for putting up with The Hana. He is a special case and I'm glad we found you!

In sum, while I have definitely met a few bad apples in the horse industry, I have met far more wonderful people who were generous with their time, their knowledge, and their horses. Thank you to all of them; it has meant the world to me.

ADD526
Dec. 4, 2007, 06:37 AM
definetly jennifer flurry....ive been riding with her on and off four almost ten years....leave her for silly reasons and end up going back....she doesnt own a barn so she comes to my house or we trailer to a local indoor in the winter but its great having a private trainer. She so personal and great at explaining things and doesnt forget about the little things. Like teaching me to braid and making me do it even to schooling shows so that we could get practice. And ALWAYS wrapping our horses legs in the trailer. theres just so much little stuff that i find its hard to get in a barn like when my horse partly ripped off his shoe and the nail went back into his foot she came to my house to help my mom becuase i was at school....she may not be a BNT but shes definetly the best trainer ive come across

she also teaches the basics like a lot of trainers dont these days. I went to another barn for about a year and was just amazed at the little things the riders didnt do that ive been doing since i was 5 that make a big difference

shes also great becuase if i dont get something she will find another way to explain it and if that doesnt work she'll get on my horse and show me becuase she actualy realized that im very vizual

copper1
Dec. 4, 2007, 06:52 AM
I was a poor kid so most of my learning came from watching clinics and talking with trainers and watching them do their jobs. I groomed the A circuit for a few years and the barn I worked for dealt a lot with BNT from all over. I worked horses for them and they gave me lots of tips if not full blown lessons. I have also learned to watch trainers ride and work with their students. To name a few that I had the pleasure of learning from: Mike Plumb, Frank Chapot, Bernie Traurig ,George Morris, Katie Prudant, Danny Lenehan, Barbie Bancroft, and others who have gone before.
Horses are always the best teachers because once you think you have learned it all, another one comes along and says "no you don't"!

europa
Dec. 4, 2007, 07:26 AM
Mr and Mrs Brown from Atlanta Georgia. They taught out of Pounds Stables. Anyone remember them or know where they are at now?

I rode 2 point until my position was soo tight you could bounce a quarter off it!!! AHHHHH those were the days.

Queen Latisha
Dec. 4, 2007, 07:43 AM
The trainer I have now, I've been with him for 10yrs. and he's fabulous.:D

Dispatcher
Dec. 4, 2007, 08:16 AM
Caole Heller from Rose Tree Hunt Club (EONS ago!) We didn't just ride in the ring--she taught us how to REALLY ride a horse.

Chelsea123
Dec. 4, 2007, 08:26 AM
I have been With Tons lots of Trainers.
But I am SOO happy with my Trainer now!

Adagio
Dec. 4, 2007, 09:31 AM
She is not BNT - has a smaller farm and an uncanny knack of translating what she wants from you as a rider into language you can understand. Her ability with young horses and her years of knowledge have had an effect on not only my riding but my overall
horse(wo)manship. Since I am moving out of state I will miss her dearly - however, if your in Colorado and want a down to earth trainer who can help both you and your horse look up Kim Benson at Flying Star Stables.

danosaur
Dec. 4, 2007, 09:53 AM
MARK JUNGHERR!!!! and KRISTI SMITH!!!

LOVE starlite! I've never ridden with either, but starlite and my barn are barn buddies :lol:


But, I have a few.
Pam hunt and her daughter monica, who I've ridden with for 10 years. are AMAZING. They have worked me through so many riding problems, and pam is fantastic. She has done all this crazy stuff and knows so much that she'll completely surprise you with everything she knows. For example, my four year old has a neck pretty much set at a 90 degree angle to his back, and I could not frame him for my life. Pam hops on and within a second, he is walking around like a prix st. george dressage horse. She looks at me and goes, "I learned this at the spanish riding school in vienna when I rode dressage!" I was like, you what??

the horse Piece of Art
I had an AWFUL ocala experience last year, I don't feel like explaining right now. I've explained it in other posts, look it up if you'd like. But she got my confidence back and helped so much.

Campidano, my current horse
Taught me about green horses, warmbloods, how to stay on a buck, how to feel a hump in a horse's back, spur til your heels touch through their belly, not to give up, and take everything lightly. I have so many stories from this horse it's not even funny

Mary, or "any day now"
she's a sale horse in my barn that I've adopted because she runs away with everybody except me. She taught me how to be soft, how to ride mares, and how to ride a thoroughbred. "let go, let god"

and lastly, my first pony, Mystic Puddin
taught me how to ride, period.
taught me strength, emotionally. Also taught me horsemanship. I know more about colic then the average vet thanks to him and dano, and I'm only 15.

PaintTheTown
Dec. 4, 2007, 10:27 AM
The one I have now...Couldnt ask for a better trainer, friend, and employer :)

Showjumper28
Dec. 4, 2007, 12:26 PM
Ingrid Sneickus, she taught me to be not only a great rider, but a horsman as well. I thank every day that she was so tough and unyeilding when it came to the care of horses and the barn.

theblondejumper
Dec. 4, 2007, 02:00 PM
I have ridden with a lot of people and I was happiest with my first instructor, Patti Pumphrey Anderson. While she is no longer teaching and has relocated from MD to Missouri I will always value what she taught me in the 3 years I rode with her. Patti ran a tight barn, her horse camp was the toughest I have been apart of (5 to 10 little 9 or 10 year old girls cleaning tack, stalls, and bringing horses in and out even in the rain!). She taught me everything I know about bits, tack and horse care. That doesn't mean I have 'A' circuit skills but I can go into a barn and be capable and helpful.

There have been other instructors I have had who have helped my riding tremendously (Jennifer Kennedy, Mary Schimpf, etc) but I will always be thankful for Patti (and her husband Bob--he used to yell at me for leading his horses around incorrectly!) and her instruction. A great start for myself and a lot of other little girls in the Annapolis/Severna Park Md area.

Great thread!

JOBEAN
Dec. 4, 2007, 06:50 PM
Thank god !! A great thread!!


1 Arlene Orr
2 Maxine Best
3 Karen Marsh
4 Jenn Terrill

Too many reasons to list them all... first two kicked my a$$ and taught me... about everything.. Karen gave me many horses to ride.. the last one ... a great horsewoman!!!

Got to love a great trainer!!

pardnersfarm
Dec. 4, 2007, 07:03 PM
Francois Lemaire de Ruffieu
Pam Baker

scribble
Dec. 4, 2007, 09:43 PM
Emil Spadone

EMWalker
Dec. 4, 2007, 10:58 PM
Connie Tour - because she taught me how to ride the green ones and great foundation

Joan Waterman - because she's teaching me how to finesse the rest and helping me reach goals I used to only dream about!

Foxtrot's
Dec. 4, 2007, 11:35 PM
Can't resist - Jenni Martin - who saw a talent in a kid and her pony.
Always an encouraging word, never a cross word, calm and philosophical. Called her her gutsiest kid and at the end of the lesson she would allow the kid to jump the biggest jumps. Was proud of her when she went to the Olympic Games in Pentathlon. Jenni has a real love of horses - with a natural talent and softness on a horse. Way to go Jenni - may all your dreams come true - we love you.

equitationlane
Dec. 5, 2007, 09:01 AM
Victor

magnolia73
Dec. 5, 2007, 09:14 AM
Susan Lloyd. I've been with her for 10 years- since I was 9, and sometimes I think she knows me better than I know myself. When I was 9 I was timidly doing WT cross rails, and now I do the adult jumpers.

I rode with Susan for a long time. I was probably not one of her best students, but she always was supportive and helped me be the best I could be. She also found me really good horses- for a kid on a budget without much talent, I had some very nice horses to ride. I think I appreciate her straightforwardness and honesty- and I took those traits into other parts of my life. I've lost some faith in my riding in recent years and have found that when I just ride off my instinct, it works quite well- and she's the one who gave me those instincts. I've been lucky enough to find a new trainer in NC, Maria Gold, who reminds me quite a bit of Susan- same voice, same straightforward attitude.

Susan's mother, Mrs. Channing is also a wonderful person. She always did these dressage clinics - and I really enjoyed dressage as she was so encouraging and kind. I do a bit of dressage now, and every time I enter the ring, I imagine her and her white hair in the judge's booth and I ride with no nervousness and such clarity of mind.

Maythehorsebewithme
Dec. 5, 2007, 10:05 AM
My current trainer, Debbie Haimowitz. Although not a BNT, she has trained with GM and subscribes to his school of hard work and no short cuts. (I don't think she even owns a set of draw reins.)
She is very tough, but great at explaining exactly how to get a certain effect from the horse or from yourself. (In contrast to my former non-trainer who, when my horse was galloping madly around the ring, would give helpful hints like, "Slow down." Wow, why didn't I think of that?)
My current horse was very green when I bought him and she has very carefully brought us both along.
I drive 40 miles a day to New York from New Jersey to work with her, and it is well worth it.

Parminch
Dec. 5, 2007, 10:31 AM
Originally Posted by Moesha
The one's who wanted to teach, were happy for me when I did well, dissapointed but encouraging when things fell apart...understood that I had a full life, a budget, and did this because I wanted to. Never tried to use me or my horses, didn't talk about me behind my back, were honest and upfront, really took and interest and cared about my goals. Realized I had to work and fit things in as best I could and that I did this for me, and my horse...and never compromised my well being or my horses for a quick buck or an easy fix.


Man does that quote hit home!!!!

I would have to say the best trainer I've ever been associated with is Joe Darby.

Moesha's quote was the reason that I loved Gail Knieriem so much. No matter how dire things were in her life .. she always realized that everyone had another dimension to their life and always made you feel as it that was the most important thing to you and to her always. I miss her terribly.

80s rider
Dec. 5, 2007, 11:11 AM
Marie Zella Speed, (Rest in peace), my true hero. She found me riding around in a cow pasture on a little Arabian mare. Taught me everything and within a year I was winning at the A shows (with a different horse of course). She was my trainer, mentor and horse show Mom, in one little petite package.

sahara511
Dec. 5, 2007, 12:03 PM
Maxine Best - I was training with her when she got sick, not only did she teach me a ton about riding my ponies and being a good horse-woman (girl at the time I guess) but she taught me a lot about life in general! When I think back to my pony-jock days she is one of the first people who comes to mind!

Robert Beck
Emil Spadone

lcw579
Dec. 5, 2007, 12:23 PM
Al Steiert, hands down. He's been gone a long time now but I have yet to find anyone to compare to him. He was a taskmaster and we all choked back the tears at times. But, he taught us all how to really ride and not just look pretty and when he paid you a compliment it really meant something!

And when I think of the horses he bred..... I was just a kid and thought every barn had horse like Abundance standing at stud. I was lucky to have had the chance to work with so many of those babies before they went on to fame and fortune.

He was so good at teaching you, no matter your age, how to work with any type of horse. I learned how to handle the really rank ones that were sent for training and how to ride the quiet ones who didn't need much. He explained how to read the horse and its signals so you could anticipate a problem. And boy, oh boy, you better not make the horse pay for your stupid mistakes! He always let you know just whose fault it was!

He truly was an all-around horseman of the type you just don't find today.

theoldgreymare
Dec. 5, 2007, 02:15 PM
Rode briefly w/ a BNT.....awesome trainer but left for several reasons other than his skill as a trainer. The one who got the most out of me was the late Dick (Greek) Neff. I started with him when he had no experience in the EQ world.....had done hunters for J. Arthur Reynolds previously. In two years he took us kids from showing at the lower levels to competing, qualifying and placing (not me unfortunately!) in the big EQ finals. Not bad for the then "new kid". He had incredible insight into a horse and how to get the most out of it and the rider.

gleaner
Dec. 5, 2007, 02:22 PM
I am lucky enough to have had 3 excellent trainers in my 18 years of riding.

Rosemary Thomas (Summerduck Run Farm, Culpeper VA)
Cathy and Daniel Geitner (DFG Stables, Aiken SC)
JT and Tamara (Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg VA)

Keep1Belle
Dec. 5, 2007, 03:16 PM
Denise Tyler (Tyloria Farm, Bear Delaware) - not well known but taught us to RIDE ON!

Margret Gafford (Sankt George Farm, Petersburg VA)

Willy de Leyer (Instride Farm, Bangor PA)

equit8
Dec. 5, 2007, 04:22 PM
Ed Lane he has the ability to take your round like pictures frame by frame to tell you exactly what you did wrong. He takes that same time either in a lesson or a horse show.

Sunny14
Dec. 5, 2007, 07:21 PM
Trudy Maxwell Glefke- boy could she get the best out of both the kids who rode with her and the horses and ponies she trained.

Bibby Farmer Hill - She is great. Quite the technician. Patient and stern...definitely gets results as you can see with Sassafrass Creek.

Kristen
Dec. 5, 2007, 07:49 PM
Jeff Cook for all around horsemanship and position. He has a wide variety of ways to teach an individual point. He stresses the basics and safety. He is very professional, and at the same time fun to lesson with. You can learn a lot from him in a short time.

I second Jeff! I really wish he were still nearby, I learned an unbelievable amount from him, and I couldn't agree more that he has a way about making lessons FUN. I always, always walked away from his lessons feeling like I really GOT somewhere, never once did I leave frustrated. I also found him to be extremely professional and he is one of the few people in the business who is truly generous. I will never forget how he borrowed my mare to use for the pictures that went along with his series of articles in Practical Horseman for an issue, and to thank me, he offered to come back to my barn a few days later and give not only me but my barn friends a lesson. Well, that lesson ended up being a good two hours long (not just some quickie half hour deal), and when we all went to hand him our checks afterwards, he waved them away, saying that he gave the lesson to thank me for "letting" him ride my horse and use our farm for the article (yeah, like having Jeff Cook ride my horse to be in Practical Horseman was sooooo difficult for me). I thought he was a great trainer before that, but wow, did that experience just impress me! Great trainer, great rider, great horseman, and a great person.

ivy62
Dec. 5, 2007, 08:59 PM
I guess if I had to decide on the best it would be hard. Each one came at very different parts of my life...growing up, we won't say how many years ago, it was Sue Clark..She took me from 4-h to A pony hunters, and yes my pony was cute! She taught me confidence in myself to bring it to the horse not let the horse bring it to me...She gave me lots of basics that stay with me today...
I must 2nd Debbie H. Love the way she handles horses..not only does she follow GM but has a strong dressage back ground also

Presently, the trainer I use (Margaret Cuddy) has been wonderful. I have an OTTB that issues, not with his brain but physical from the track, and she understands the stuff from the track so well he understands and learns so easily and willingly...
So you see each one had what I wanted and needed at the time and am lucky to have had each in my life when they were.

Dannie0303
Dec. 6, 2007, 12:03 AM
Francois Lemaire de Ruffieu


I took a clinic with Francois when I was about 8....I LOVED him!!

I'd have to say for myself

Katie Maxwell- was my equestrian team coach at Clemson. I only rode with her for about 6 months but she helped my eq improve quite drastically

Claudia Garner- Classically trained German Dressage trainer who taught me to RIDE. Hands down the most technically difficult, yet rewarding trainer I've had. She wasn't easy but she taught me SO much. Too bad she lives 2 hours away :(

Bill Curtis- I've only been riding with him since the beginning of the spring but he's tons of fun and helped me a lot with my transition from jumpers to hunters. He has also allowed me to school and show a caliber of horses that this poor kid NEVER thought she'd be able to ride :)

WhatzUp
Dec. 6, 2007, 01:57 AM
Hello,

Without hesitation my current trainer and friend ...

Ms. Lorrie Jamieson of Klondike Victory Farm.

www.kvf.ca (http://www.kvf.ca)

She is the complete package - motivating, positive, & skilled !

I trust her implicitly !

Yours in sport,

Lynn

misterdarcy
Dec. 6, 2007, 06:48 PM
We second Skip Billingham.

JrHunterRider
Dec. 7, 2007, 10:37 AM
Gary Kunsman. He's such a great horseman and is fabulous with young WB's. Him and his daughter run a great business. :D

vanheimrhorses
Dec. 7, 2007, 08:54 PM
Ellen Parker Harrelson deceased, taught in military style when I was fourteen and had an all girls private barn, i remember 25 mounts and dismounts for starters, flat work, 15 mins bareback work, riding with strirrup irons balanced on our feet and no stirrup leathers, then regular jumping work, the day i could jump a jump with stirrups balanced on feet that way i knew i was a rider, those things fell off our feet for months the second we picked up a trot, plus at beginning of lesson we were graded on our grooming and turn out
then Margaret Lee at Foxcroft School
then Margie Goldstein Engle
non big name trainer but excellent teacher Betsy Parker at Hunters Rest Farm

Lou-Lou
Dec. 7, 2007, 09:10 PM
Matthew Lawson! he's amazing

tullyleague
Dec. 7, 2007, 10:56 PM
Robert Beck

And my dear sweet friend from Oxford who posts here. :)

M. O'Connor
Dec. 8, 2007, 07:12 AM
I wouldn't be able to choose one among those I've had...but I'm glad I had them in the order I did, and also to have had the opportunity to observe countless others in schooling areas and at home. It's important to remember that learning to ride is a progression that never ends--once you can do something, the next step is to do learn to do it better, and then learn to combine it with more difficult elements, etc. I've always thought that it's a great thing that riding is a sport that people of all ages can participate in, if only because it so often seems that it takes a lifetime to master...

irishrider
Dec. 8, 2007, 08:18 PM
Missy Clark. period.

scrbear11
Dec. 8, 2007, 08:29 PM
Ellen Shevella.

My Current Trainer. I can't say a bad thing about her. She is absolutely wonderful.

BNTHUNTER
Dec. 9, 2007, 02:43 PM
The best trainer I have ever had the pleasure of working with is Jaye Yonkers in Maryland. She is not only a tried and true professional but she is also described by all that ride with her as a "horsewomen".
I moved out of the area and no longer have the pleasure of riding with her. I look forward to the day when I get to train with her again

TwoDreamRides
Dec. 9, 2007, 03:19 PM
I have a few, all for different reasons. They each taught me some very important things at very important times in my life, when they were exactly the things I needed to be learning!

Sherri Cole of Mystic Hill Farm in Victor, NY.
Taught me that safety is first and foremost. ALWAYS hold on to your horse. If you're sitting around at the barn, you should be helping around the barn. Horses are better than summercamp. In fact, they ARE summercamp. She also found me my first horse, who is still with me 11 years later at 29 years old.

Debbie Barmaster at The Homestead in Ironia, NY.
Monumental in that when I was ready to quit jumping, she started me from the ground up and rebuilt my confidence. If she hadn't been there as a trainer for me 8 years ago, I would not be riding today. She also taught me to forgive & forget and that business is business.

Shawn Mack in New Jersey.
Confirmed that I have had excellent teachers in the past and that I just needed a little fine tuning. Showed me the secrets to success in turnout and in a few little "tricks of the trade". Helped change my horse into something I couldn't have even dreamed of! Put me on imported European jumpers I would never have been able to ride under any other circumstances, proving to me that I am a good enough rider to jump HIGH, the highest & widest I had ever jumped and giving me the opportunity to see what I should be striving for. Improved my relationship with my parents tenfold by sharing his own experiences and hindsight.

Lea Ann Orr of Dreamland Farms in Alpharetta, GA.
An absolute mentor and best friend. She has known and worked with all three of my horses. Allows me to try my own thing and encourages me in my equestrian endeavors. Has taught me that if I can't laugh about it, it's probably not for me. Found my current horse and guided me through one of the toughest times a fifteen year old can experience [when your horse dies suddenly & unexpectedly]. Has provided me with a sweet baby draft cross to try training, to see if its something I really want to do.

Lea Ann & Shawn have honestly been the best, but Sherri and Debbie were pivotal.

JrHunterRider
Dec. 9, 2007, 03:49 PM
I posted earlier on this thread but want to say one more thing-

Thank you to all those other trainers that I've watched ride and instruct in the schooling rings at shows such as Devon. We have to remember that there is always something to learn from someone in this sport.

stfatpony
Dec. 9, 2007, 04:03 PM
Who do you think is one of the best trainers you have ever had? The one you most learned from?


Jack Stedding and Linda Andrisani. Hands down.

MyGiantPony
Dec. 10, 2007, 08:47 AM
The best trainer I have ever had the pleasure of working with is Jaye Yonkers in Maryland. She is not only a tried and true professional but she is also described by all that ride with her as a "horsewomen".
I moved out of the area and no longer have the pleasure of riding with her. I look forward to the day when I get to train with her again

With the added bonus of her ability to feed a sidesaddle addiction...or lead you down that merry path. :D:lol::D:lol: