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Aunt Esther
Jul. 19, 2006, 08:20 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, would like to remind dressage competitors that dressage means white gloves.

Aint Esther would like to point out that black gloves are wrong. Dressage is "dressage," it is not "hunter jumper."

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 19, 2006, 09:00 PM
:confused: But what if you are doing eventing tests?
Then don't white gloves = poser? :confused:

Dressage Art
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:12 AM
Aunt Ester, did you read responces to my "critique us" post? :) The white gloves - they are overpriced and always from thin, not breathable material. There are so much more comfortable black gloves, but I forgot that dressage is not about the comfort, right? STRESSAGE is about making look good every single detail in our outfits. Can we be not as black and white, please?

lizathenag
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:18 AM
ain't Esther right.

EventingRed
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:21 AM
I don’t know, I guess in "real" dressage, however, try telling a bunch of eventers that.

Why is it wrong to wear black gloves? What if your hands are not perfect and it would look worse, not beter?

I think dressage is about fluidity, meaning what looks the best should be used.

fiona
Jul. 20, 2006, 02:57 AM
actually dressage is about sorting out your hand problems and not thinking you can cover them up with bad fashion accessories!

KWPN MOM
Jul. 20, 2006, 08:36 AM
actually dressage is about sorting out your hand problems and not thinking you can cover them up with bad fashion accessories!
Well said fiona!

DocHF
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:59 AM
Aunt Esther, isn't there a rule about not wearing white before June and after labour day?
And if you are going to wear white gloves, may I remind you they look very tacky when stained? This usually demands a new pair of white gloves for every show. Which is how I came to have 6 pairs of white schooling gloves some years back.

But now, all of mine are leopard print becuase they're the only ones the shop hasn't sold out of in show seasons, we're not showing and they match my (leopard) Lippaloosa...

bip
Jul. 20, 2006, 10:47 AM
Everything I touch turns grey/brown. My white show breeches have been worn 4 times and they already have permanent battle scars. I spent most of last night trying to get sweat stains out of my ratcatcher (worn less than 10 times). Don't get me started on the saddle pad. There is NO way I'm adding another single solitary piece of white. Especially not for mother-loving Training level schooling shows. :)

So you folks all have fun with your FEI movements and white gloves. I'm tied up with a bottle of bleach...

nhwr
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:16 AM
Why is it wrong to wear black gloves? What if your hands are not perfect and it would look worse, not beter?

I think dressage is about fluidity, meaning what looks the best should be used.
If your hands are that much of an issue, gloves may be the least concern ;)


White glove are available at a very reasonable price on ebay. Personally I have several pair of youth football receiver gloves. They are white so the receivers hands stand out, pretty durable, slightly tackified (is that a word?) so the ball won't slip and they go one sale every fall at large chain sporting goods stores. You can get a nice pair for $10 or less.

Mozart
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:19 AM
That's not what the rules say.

Elegante E
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:39 AM
the SSg ones are washable. I used Oxiclean on my pants, prewashed them in it and all the green and black came out.

twnkltoz
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:41 AM
And people wonder where the term "dressage queen" came from.

egontoast
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:48 AM
I do believe that our own Aunt Esther is the virtual alias of Ms. Lisa Wilcox.:winkgrin:

Dressage Art
Jul. 20, 2006, 12:06 PM
actually dressage is about sorting out your hand problems and not thinking you can cover them up with bad fashion accessories!

This is just an opinion of Dressage queen :)

My hands get the most compliments from clinicians, judges and trainers. I feel that my hands are the biggest asset of my position and of my riding and for my level of riding my hands are really good according to several professionals. The shocker? I'm riding and showing in black gloves!!!! No, I'm not trying to hide my best asset, as I said before, black gloves are more comfortable and breathable. I have a collection of gloves for every weather to ride in. they are all black. Try to find white gloves for riding in winter or pouring rein.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 20, 2006, 12:25 PM
Aunt Esther, my skin is very white. Especially against the dark bay (albeit somewhat summer bleached) of my horse. Can I skip the gloves altogether?

ToN Farm
Jul. 20, 2006, 12:55 PM
Black gloves are more comfortable?? How so? I wear RSL gloves and they are so thin and soft. And then there are Roeckl's.
http://www.eurosaddlery.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=298

I don't even wear black gloves for everyday schooling and lessons. I wear old white ones, that are no longer in good enough shape for showing. Even when I evented, I wore white gloves for dressage.

Being called a DQ is a compliment imo.

Ja Da Dee
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:13 PM
But who would the rail birds have to point at and laugh about if I didn't ride my Paint horse eventer with my black gloves?

I will sacrifice myself up for the sake of DQ entertainment.

dq for life
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:16 PM
I'll have you know it pulled at my very heart strings to see black gloves with RHINESTONES on them in the tack store. Did they have them in white? No.
But I am such a puritan that I knew I could not possibly show in them.

Actually, I am not showing at all this year until hubby finishes my bigger ring. I got tired of practicing in 20 x 40 and getting lost in the big ring.
So it made it a bit easier to pass on the "bling bling" gloves as they may be a bit trendy, and already out of style by next year when I show again.

Elegante E
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:19 PM
What I want to know is when you put on those lovely soft black gloves, how do you get out the black dye off your hands after your first ride?

Dressage Art
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:35 PM
Black gloves are more comfortable?? How so? I wear RSL gloves and they are so thin and soft. And then there are Roeckl's.
http://www.eurosaddlery.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=298

I don't even wear black gloves for everyday schooling and lessons. I wear old white ones, that are no longer in good enough shape for showing. Even when I evented, I wore white gloves for dressage.

Being called a DQ is a compliment imo.

I did the same before I injured my hand. Now, since I have a permanent injury, the thicker my gloves the better - to protect my hand. Thin ones are not an option for me at all. If you know any white gloves that are thick and don't have thick seams - please do let me know. I'll be happy to wear them.

For me when I ride, comfort is first - beauty is secondary. I would never wear an uncomfortable high heels just to look better. Forget that - it's just not worth it for me. I'm happy that I'm not a Dressage Queen.

mp
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:44 PM
For me when I ride, comfort is first - beauty is secondary. I would never wear an uncomfortable high heels just to look better. Forget that - it's just not worth it for me.

Me neither. High heels really aren't all that uncomfortable to ride in. But it's impossible so to keep the arena dirt out of them. Paddock or tall boots only for me now.

bip
Jul. 20, 2006, 01:55 PM
What I want to know is when you put on those lovely soft black gloves, how do you get out the black dye off your hands after your first ride?

I think you just put the gloves back on! I school in gray deerskin that will always and forever bleed. Last night as we were falling asleep, my husband mumbled that he loved me even though my hands were gray! (it washes off after the second shower, so it doesn't follow me to work, only to bed at night).

knz66
Jul. 20, 2006, 02:22 PM
Doesnt riding in high heels hinder your position? I would think it would have a tendency to put you in a just dreadfull chair seat...


Aunt Ester will be proud, bought my first pair of white gloves this year!

bjrudq
Jul. 20, 2006, 02:39 PM
ssg gloves are synthetic and don't bleed. and they come in black and white, and are machine washable.

when i wore hunter drag(and i did in the dressage ring when it was hot, becasue my black hunt coat was cooler) i wore beige breeches and black gloves. when i wore dressage drag, white or cream breeches and white or cream golves.

i think when you get to the upper levels white gloves are expected but at the lower levels(where i rode) it didn't make any difference. no one even notices.

mp
Jul. 20, 2006, 02:46 PM
Doesnt riding in high heels hinder your position? I would think it would have a tendency to put you in a just dreadfull chair seat...


Aunt Ester will be proud, bought my first pair of white gloves this year!

Ummmm ... they can, if you're not careful. But you will at least give the impression of having your heels down.

Note to all, since Auntie apparently is too polite to mention it ...

It's Aunt EstHer. You could only have an Aunt Ester if you were an organic compound.

fiona
Jul. 20, 2006, 03:23 PM
I can confirm i took beeing called a "DQ" as a compliment.:lol:

dray
Jul. 20, 2006, 03:30 PM
DocHF...
The rule is "No white shoes, gloves or purses before Easter and after Labor Day and only black patent leather outside these time frames (no white patent leasther beore Easter or after Labor Day)."

There is a caveat for winter weddings.


Donna

egontoast
Jul. 20, 2006, 03:39 PM
Ribbon Ho, 2 words "WHITE BODYPAINT"

Dressage art, here's a tip. Just order the black ones you like, in "WHITE">:lol:

atr
Jul. 20, 2006, 04:08 PM
OK, it still beats me how you manage to get so filthy at shows.

I do all my own work--am lucky if I have someone there to help at all--and still manage to get into the ring twice in a day looking reasonably clean and respectable.

Farrier's Daughter
Jul. 20, 2006, 04:15 PM
possibly as a Navy SEAL?

I notice she strikes quickly with a pithy comment on a thread or a starter, then she seems to vanish while everyone heatedly debates her comment. This kind of stealth "bombing" is remarkably effective.

Perhaps she should donate her expertise to Uncle Sam (will accessorites by Hermes compliment military garb...???)

Aunt Esther
Jul. 20, 2006, 05:28 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, does not see why there is discusson regarding black vs. white gloves.

Black = Hunter/Jumper/Equitation
White = Dressage

Aunt Esther does not comment on eventers except to say that if the eventing public think it is okay to "do" dressage in black gloves, Aunt Esther is not surprised. After all, eventing dressage is done by people who, when going across country, ride in garish, vulgar and common colored clothing.

When spectating at eventing competitions - and Aunt Esther is looking forward to several in Britain later this year, while she is on another buying trip to spend more of her endless supply of money - Aunt Esther recommends a good look at the Barbour knapsack. Aunt Esther is not one for backpacks of any kind, but did purchase one on a lark and rather enjoys it.

Aunt Esther is emphatically not Lisa Wilcox. Those who know Aunt Esther personally will attest to the fact that Aunt Esther's eyebrows are "done" in New York.

bip
Jul. 20, 2006, 05:36 PM
OK, it still beats me how you manage to get so filthy at shows.

I do all my own work--am lucky if I have someone there to help at all--and still manage to get into the ring twice in a day looking reasonably clean and respectable.

I have no idea. Pulling the ramp of my van out and putting it back in get me sweating like crazy, even in the cool morning. Then the sweat just attracts EVERYTHING. I never sweated like this when I lived in California, but here I drip. Last show I decided not to put my breeches on until the horse was tacked up because it was too hot for protective pants over breeches. I don't know that it helped much. I must just be kind of a piggy. Even just getting in the saddle seems to smudge something white. I scratch my horse's withers in warm up, and somehow transfer the dirt (how is there even dirt on her? She just had a bath and is positively GLEAMING) right onto my thigh. There is a small green muzzle print on the border of my SADDLE PAD. How could she even REACH THAT? After my last show, the lower calf/heels of my boots were covered in sweat/dirt/horse hair after just the first class. It was hot and humid, but the horse started out clean and it's not shedding season so ???

I guess I don't have as much practice as most of you, but they say practice has to be perfect to make perfect, so at this rate I'm going to be employing A LOT of OxiClean. I should probably buy stock in it or something...

twnkltoz
Jul. 20, 2006, 05:40 PM
twnkltoz, internationally unknown intro rider, doesn't understand why it's such a big damn deal when the rules don't specify. She thinks people should worry a little more about how to ride horses and a little less about being a fashion plate. But then, she's not much of a fashion plate. She also practices dressage without a dressage court, so what does she know?

bjp, I sympathize. I can't go 5 minutes without getting SOMETHING on me. Magnetic personality, I guess...dirt, drool, and creepy men just can't stay away from me!

Dressage Art
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:07 PM
Ribbon Ho, 2 words "WHITE BODYPAINT"

Dressage art, here's a tip. Just order the black ones you like, in "WHITE">:lol:

I love thick SSG gloves preferably with cool crochets, but the ones that are thicker, don't come in white - they come in all kinds of rainbow colors, but not in white!
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1%2D3982

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1%2D39063

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1%2D39005

There only option that they have in the thick gloves is this color (natural) but it will not match my white breeches and my white saddle pad. So I think it's better for me to stick with the black gloves, than wear those.
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1%2D3955

and all white is called close nontact = very thin
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-3922

I'm interested what people with the arthritis do? It must be painfull to ride in thin gloves for them as well?

PS: Somebody wanted black with diamonds? Hare you go:
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-39015

Sandy M
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:24 PM
Aunt Ester, did you read responces to my "critique us" post? :) The white gloves - they are overpriced and always from thin, not breathable material. There are so much more comfortable black gloves, but I forgot that dressage is not about the comfort, right? STRESSAGE is about making look good every single detail in our outfits. Can we be not as black and white, please?


Art - the Neuman Tackified white gloves are not overpriced (IMHO), last a loong time, are breathable in between the leather parts and quite comfortable. My favorites. I have black for schooling and wear them so much I DO wear them out.

fiona
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:38 PM
I do all my own work
It is the business of the wealthy man
To give employment to the artisan.
Hillaire Belloc.
Quite possibly the least likely DQ of all.


twnkltoz, internationally unknown intro rider, doesn't understand why it's such a big damn deal when the rules don't specify. She thinks people should worry a little more about how to ride horses and a little less about being a fashion plate.
It's a fair point well made but people will now call you a DQ so you better get the lingo off pat ...it's an "arena" sweetie not a court.

Whilst i trust Aunt Esther's impeccable sensibilities may i take this opportunity to warn others shopping at British events of the dangers of "waxed cotton" apparel. Barbour is quite safe at a distance of 3 generations but many don't understand the need to quarantine a young example until it is suitably mature. During this process it is most advisable to stick with the accessories. It goes without saying that no one should even consider a cheaper alternative.

atr
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:51 PM
To be fair, bip, I do live in the "high desert" so we don't tend to get as sweaty as those of oyu that live in more humid parts of the counry (Don't think I could go back to that.)

Fiona, don't know how old you are, but I grew up in England with a show on TV (that would now be considered massively politically incorrect) called "The black and white minstrel show." Every time I pull on my white show gloves with my black coat, I feel liek I should be down on one knee singing about my dear old mammy...

But, my trainer thinks I ride better when I'm wearing them... eeek.

atr
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:51 PM
And I'm not really illiterate, just can't work out how to edit posts on here.

twnkltoz
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:53 PM
And I'm not really illiterate, just can't work out how to edit posts on here.
lol...there's an "edit" button at the bottom of your own posts. :)

atr
Jul. 20, 2006, 06:54 PM
Oh, and DressageArt, I use thicker reins for my arthritic fingers. A very Un-DQ pair of pimple-rubber coated eventing reins. But I can at least get my hands out of the claw position by the time I've finished riding. I never ride without gloves of some sort.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:02 PM
I believe these young gentlemen might very well have solved the problem of white gloves, white breeches, white whatever...

(This photo came to me in an e-mail with the subject line "Last Day on Earth")

Linda
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:07 PM
Welllll
I scribed for a judge at a big rated show (california) 6 or 7 yrs ago and the one BIG thing she kept having me write on all the Training level tests was that white gloves were inapropriate at Training level.

She said that the Training level riders (most but not all) were tugging tugging tugging on their horses mouths with each and every step. The white gloves just made it stand out even more. So she was telling the riders - both at the end of their tests and by having me write it down on their tests, that they should wear black gloves until they could be quieter with their hands.

Now obviously wearing black gloves didn't fix the problem, but it made it less noticeable.................

It was a Woman Judge and for the life of me, I don't remember her name.

Aunt Esther
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:14 PM
Welllll
I scribed for a judge at a big rated show (california) 6 or 7 yrs ago and the one BIG thing she kept having me write on all the Training level tests was that white gloves were inapropriate at Training level.

She said that the Training level riders (most but not all) were tugging tugging tugging on their horses mouths with each and every step. The white gloves just made it stand out even more. So she was telling the riders - both at the end of their tests and by having me write it down on their tests, that they should wear black gloves until they could be quieter with their hands.

Now obviously wearing black gloves didn't fix the problem, but it made it less noticeable.................

It was a Woman Judge and for the life of me, I don't remember her name.
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, wonders if the judge in question was also from California and points out that if the judge was truly qualified, she would have spent more time judging the horses and not worrying about something as silly as Training Level Gloves. ;)

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:16 PM
I am of a different school. I want the judge to realize that my poor riding abilities are not due to imbibing wine before the class, but due to my naive and inexperienced dressage background. It's not that I intentionally do such a poor braiding job, but I feel that that type of braid screams "Be gentle with me!" to the observant judge. And the lack of gloves might suggest a lack of feeling in my hands (which is true in the literal sense, too many years of diving into the -70oC freezer without gloves, or taking off boiling flasks from the hot plate).

After all, I am a Ribbon Ho.

EventingRed
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:17 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, does not see why there is discusson regarding black vs. white gloves.

Black = Hunter/Jumper/Equitation
White = Dressage

Aunt Esther does not comment on eventers except to say that if the eventing public think it is okay to "do" dressage in black gloves, Aunt Esther is not surprised. After all, eventing dressage is done by people who, when going across country, ride in garish, vulgar and common colored clothing.

When spectating at eventing competitions - and Aunt Esther is looking forward to several in Britain later this year, while she is on another buying trip to spend more of her endless supply of money - Aunt Esther recommends a good look at the Barbour knapsack. Aunt Esther is not one for backpacks of any kind, but did purchase one on a lark and rather enjoys it.

Aunt Esther is emphatically not Lisa Wilcox. Those who know Aunt Esther personally will attest to the fact that Aunt Esther's eyebrows are "done" in New York.

And Dressage people wonder why we don’t like them. Apparently my dress bothers you. My oh- so- flamboyant navy, burgundy and white attire is simply vulgar.

Every sport has its fashion. What I don’t understand is why people get so caught up in it. For goodness sake it is DRESSAGE, and I am in now way disrespectful to my judge when I wear my black gloves. I have lovely hands, and could ride in white (which I will do so when I am comfortable in it) but until then im going to have to continue to be annoyed by DQ's who have to force a point because they are right, and we are wrong.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:39 PM
Note to all, since Auntie apparently is too polite to mention it ...

It's Aunt EstHer. You could only have an Aunt Ester if you were an organic compound.I simply couldn't let this go by unremarked upon... I can't believe DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho" didn't comment. Perhaps she is too busy laughing.

Well, even if the three of us are the only three who "got it", BRAVA!!!

Aunt Esther
Jul. 20, 2006, 07:42 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, is in shock. She was under the obvious misunderstanding that people posting on this fair bulletin board realized that her tongue was most firmly in cheek.

Aunt Esther is by no means a dressage queen. Of course, she has won numerous championships in dressage at the highest of levels, but this does not make her a dressage queen, the same way that her endless tri-colors in the hunter ring to not make her a hunter princess.

Aunt Esther merely points out what she considers, in her own opinion, to be fashion faux pas.

She would also like to remind her fellow posters that this is the only reference to "faux" of which she shall speak. For to speak of the other "faux" would be referring to knock-off handbags, which she considers a horror.

Aunt Esther rode at Badminton on two separate occasions, and finished both times. On her dressage score. In which she wore white gloves for the dressage tests. On both occasions.

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 20, 2006, 08:36 PM
Dear Aunt Esther,
I think you are the cat's meow! But then, I have a sense of humor.

And while you may have ridden twice at Badminton and finished on your dressage score, the score you recieved while wearing white gloves, I have not. And until I do, I shall continue to horrify you with my black gloves. And my crappy purses. And my basic white trash kind of existance. :cool:

And in exchange, you shall keep me in stiches. I loff you. Platonically, of course. But I loff you.

nhwr
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:01 PM
Want thicker gloves
http://lawn-and-garden.hardwarestore.com/81-511-women''s-gardening-gloves/white-premium-goatskin-unlined-gloves-114155.aspx

At this price, you can buy a pair for every show
http://www.saraglove.com/familydetails.asp?cat1ID=110&cat1Name=Industrial+Gloves&cat2ID=36&cat2Name=Cotton+Gloves&familyID=636&familyName=100%25+Cotton+Parade+Gloves

These are nice
http://www.doityourself.com/invt/u598112#

Dressage Art
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:26 PM
thanks for a great laugh - I just need to wash my keyboard now from my coffee

Caroline Weber
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:36 PM
I simply couldn't let this go by unremarked upon... I can't believe DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho" didn't comment. Perhaps she is too busy laughing.

Well, even if the three of us are the only three who "got it", BRAVA!!!

Make that four. I didn't take organic chem for nothing. :)

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:43 PM
Make that four. I didn't take organic chem for nothing. :)No, I expect you paid through the nose for tuition ;-)

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:48 PM
At this price, you can buy a pair for every show
http://www.saraglove.com/familydetails.asp?cat1ID=110&cat1Name=Industrial+Gloves&cat2ID=36&cat2Name=Cotton+Gloves&familyID=636&familyName=100%25+Cotton+Parade+Gloves
I like these - and the web site says, "With the swickle back this is a perfect formal look for uniforms, parades, policemen, firemen and more."

I have no idea what a "swickle back" is - presumably it has something to do with the stitching (or it's a typo).

Can't beat the price: as low as $1.33/pair when you buy by the case!

Caroline Weber
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:51 PM
No, I expect you paid through the nose for tuition ;-)

Actually, my high school has really good orgo classes...I'm applying to colleges soon, most likely majoring in biochem, as I plan to be a cardio-thoracic surgeon.

Financial aid - whee! My sister is at Dartmouth with almost all expenses paid by the university, and her work-study job is coaching their dressage team. I will most likely do the same thing.

And I admit - my father has a PhD in organic chem. He got me hooked on chem pretty early, and I LIKE chem.

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 20, 2006, 09:56 PM
I have no idea what a "swickle back" is - presumably it has something to do with the stitching (or it's a typo).


Swickle back? Sounds like Mickey Mouse to me. So, won't work. I have five fingers.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 10:12 PM
Financial aid - whee! My sister is at Dartmouth with almost all expenses paid by the university, and her work-study job is coaching their dressage team. I will most likely do the same thing.

And I admit - my father has a PhD in organic chem. He got me hooked on chem pretty early, and I LIKE chem.I liked organic chem, too - just not p-chem <shudder>. Still can't get beyond "you can't cool your kitchen by opening your refrigerator door unless you vent the fridge to the outside"

Or, I guess, to keep this HR, "you can't cool your horse trailer by opening your refrigerator door unless you vent the fridge to the outside" ;-)

I had no idea Dartmouth had a dressage team. THEY probably wear white gloves, to match the rest of their white artic-weather outfits. Dressage on Ice. Luge Dressage. The mind positively boggles.

(I grew up in Lebanon, about 5 miles from Hanover. My brother works with / sort of coaches the Dartmouth fencing team /club / whatever they have.)

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 10:14 PM
Swickle back? Sounds like Mickey Mouse to me. So, won't work. I have five fingers.The fingers in the Mickey Mouse gloves are fat enough that you can put two fingers in each finger slot thing. If you need to.

nhwr
Jul. 20, 2006, 10:31 PM
I used to have a horse named Schrödinger, hahaha. I have the perfect name picked out for the Hohenstein mare of my dreams, Hamiltonian Operator. FWIW, I think that white gloves are required for a Schrödinger wave ;) (Don't forget, elbow, elbow, wrist,wrist,wrist)

ψ

AndalusianMom
Jul. 20, 2006, 10:44 PM
I do so love you, Aunt Esther, and also love your aunt's books, and have always subscribed to the principle that, if you can't always BE good, you can always LOOK good.
If you KNOW you and your horse look good, it has to translate into a more confident ride. Yes?
And, my dears, if you think black gloves will prevent the judge from observing faulty hand position---<ahem>---they see black gloves and they are wondering if the rider is trying to hide something.
The SSGs can be bleached or Oxicleaned and are not expensive and can be kept just for show.
I am personally so daring that I school in SSG zebra print glives, which even
my hard core trainer finds amusing.
But then, they do conform to the black and white decor, do they not?

Caroline Weber
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:05 PM
I had no idea Dartmouth had a dressage team. THEY probably wear white gloves, to match the rest of their white artic-weather outfits. Dressage on Ice. Luge Dressage. The mind positively boggles.

(I grew up in Lebanon, about 5 miles from Hanover. My brother works with / sort of coaches the Dartmouth fencing team /club / whatever they have.)

Well, sort of. They really don't have any dressage horses, so they just kind of make do with what's there...I watched my sister teach the team lessons though, while visiting, and she's doing her very best to convert some of the H/J horses into dressage horses. The team borrows our whites for shows...hopefully, though, over the next few years, great improvement can be made to the team.

Luge Dressage. :) I like that idea...I'll have to mention it to my sister. The more important question, though, is how does one DO Luge Dressage?

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:42 PM
Luge Dressage. :) I like that idea...I'll have to mention it to my sister. The more important question, though, is how does one DO Luge Dressage?Rapidly.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:49 PM
I used to have a horse named Schrödinger, hahaha.But you could never tell if he was alive or dead when you went to tack him up?

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 20, 2006, 11:52 PM
FWIW, I think that white gloves are required for a Schrödinger wave ;) (Don't forget, elbow, elbow, wrist,wrist,wrist)I do believe you are correct about the glove color, but I also believe the correct Schrödinger wave is a three particle wave: elbow, elbow, wrist, wrist, finger, finger. At least, that how the beauty queens I learned it from did it.

Aunt Est(h)er may be able to enlighten us more precisely.

nhwr
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:13 AM
But you could never tell if he was alive or dead when you went to tack him up?
This was difficult because he had the unique ability to spin flip without the benefit of a magnetic field :lol:


but I also believe the correct Schrödinger wave is a three particle wave: elbow, elbow, wrist, wrist, finger, finger. At least, that how the beauty queens I learned it from did it.
You are right if you are considering it from the perspective of momentum space. I was thinking about the seperation of spacial and temporal variables. But has been a while.....

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:19 AM
Make that four. I didn't take organic chem for nothing. :)

Make that 5. It's just that I think esters can be a Good Thing.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:22 AM
This was difficult because he had the unique ability to spin flip without the benefit of a magnetic field :lol:


You are right if you are considering it from the perspective of momentum space. I was thinking about the seperation of spacial and temporal variables. But has been a while.....

My issue is that I can never be certain - is it the p or s orbital? Which is why I am relegated to the lower levels.

And, Aunt Est(h)er, I loff you too. I know I can never attain your fashion or monetary heights. But one day...maybe one day...you will PM me that you need to know how many dopaminergic neurons are in a fly brain, and I will be the only one here able to tell you that.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:24 AM
Make that 5. It's just that I think esters can be a Good Thing.And most of us (except when we are on the receiving end of a purse whomping), agree that Esthers - of the Aunt variety - are a Good Thing.

Polly Esters, however... very bad. Very bad. Especially in this heat. Always go for the natural fibers, even though they may wrinkle.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:35 AM
My issue is that I can never be certain - is it the p or s orbital? Which is why I am relegated to the lower levels.My Dear DGRH... that depends entirely on which test you are riding.

There is a p orbital in the 2005 FEI One-Star (CCI/CIC) Dressage Test A (part of movement 14: at P, circle left 20 metres in medium canter), and there is an s orbital in the 2005 FEI Three-Star (CCI/CIC) Dressage Test B (part of movement 15: at S, circle right 20 metres in medium canter). I'm sure there must be others, as well, but I am way behind the deadline for putting together the program for next weekend's HT in Flagstaff, so I must get back to the grindstone.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:42 AM
Polly Esters, however... very bad. Very bad. Especially in this heat. Always go for the natural fibers, even though they may wrinkle.

Not if you like wearing polartec, they're not!

Just Walter
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:45 AM
baggy clothes hide your fat. :eek:

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:45 AM
My Dear DGRH... that depends entirely on which test you are riding.

There is a p orbital in the 2005 FEI One-Star (CCI/CIC) Dressage Test A (part of movement 14: at P, circle left 20 metres in medium canter), and there is an s orbital in the 2005 FEI Three-Star (CCI/CIC) Dressage Test B (part of movement 15: at S, circle right 20 metres in medium canter). I'm sure there must be others, as well, but I am way behind the deadline for putting together the program for next weekend's HT in Flagstaff, so I must get back to the grindstone.

Yes, this is why I am relegated to First Level. I can only handle a few electrons at any given time. And those are so spread out, especially at training level.

The sad part is, I hated P Chem and had to take a year of it (with Harold Scheraga, no less, a very well respected physical chemist although I bet he had a hard time getting dates as a younger man). The only part I aced was quantum. Go figure, becaus quantum really makes no sense at all.

lesyl
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:46 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol:
DGRH and RAR it is too much! there is coffee all over the laptop, DH thinks I have lost it.

BTW does one need a catalyst to convert to the P orbitals from the S orbital movement in dressage?

nhwr
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:00 AM
can't you only solve the wave equation for one electron? It doesn't account for relativistic considerations. No pas de deux (or more...)

DGRH, I always thought if you did quatum mechanics first, o-chem would be easy. At least that way reaction mechanisms would make some sense!

lesyl, I think a regulation length whip is the proper and classical catalyst to change the energy state in most normal classes. Use it carefully or there will be spin considerations.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:08 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol:
DGRH and RAR it is too much! there is coffee all over the laptop, DH thinks I have lost it.

BTW does one need a catalyst to convert to the P orbitals from the S orbital movement in dressage?I think that if one passes from a P orbital to an S orbital THROUGH X, with an appropriate change of bend at X, a catalyst is not required, but if one wishes to go directly from P to S, a catalyst is most definitely in order.

Some recommendations are:

1. The premature arrival of the water truck
2. The sudden appearance of a hunt in full cry
3. The slow appearance of the Tewksbury Foot Bassets in full cry (if you missed Reynard Ridge's story of the Princess and the Tewksbury Foot Bassets, you missed a good one)
4. Any tent uprooted by a sudden gust of wind
5. Five or more Jack Russell Terrorists disputing possession of some comestible at ringside
6. A hot-air balloon performing an emergency landing in the adjacent parking lot

atr
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:17 AM
Ha! Catalysts! Mere Gadgetry! SO unclassical!

lesyl
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:21 AM
can't you only solve the wave equation for one electron? It doesn't account for relativistic considerations. No pas de deux (or more...)

DGRH, I always thought if you did quatum mechanics first, o-chem would be easy. At least that way reaction mechanisms would make some sense!

lesyl, I think a regulation length whip is the proper and classical catalyst to change the energy state in most normal classes. Use it carefully or there will be spin considerations.

I am beginning to understand my dressage issues better thanks to all of you.
NHWR- perhaps I should review the C3 and C4 photosynthesis paths and the Krebs cycle? If I can visualize the path of electrons on those, then perhaps there is hope for me to memorize a test? At some point I may need to figure out just how many ATPs = x pressure of the spur for the forward motion.

fiona
Jul. 21, 2006, 03:15 AM
baggy clothes hide your fat. :eek:
One of lifes greatest myths as i'm sure Aunt Esther would confirm.

I am as puzzled as Aunt Esther that people may have missed the inherent tongueincheekedness of her posts. I feel rather sorry that she had to clarify her position and rather more than mortified that we have cause to discuss organic chemistry.
I can confirm the existence in British TV history of a programme called the Black and White Minstrels but am reluctant to say more.

Dressage Art
Jul. 21, 2006, 03:35 AM
fiona, I think everybody just enjoyes Aunt Esther's posts on different levels. I don't think that anybody thinks that Aunt Esther's toung belongs enywhere else but in her cheek.

fiona
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:15 AM
And Dressage people wonder why we don’t like them. Apparently my dress bothers you. My oh- so- flamboyant navy, burgundy and white attire is simply vulgar.

Every sport has its fashion. What I don’t understand is why people get so caught up in it. For goodness sake it is DRESSAGE, and I am in now way disrespectful to my judge when I wear my black gloves. I have lovely hands, and could ride in white (which I will do so when I am comfortable in it) but until then im going to have to continue to be annoyed by DQ's who have to force a point because they are right, and we are wrong.__________________
------------------------------


To be serious for one second, Good tailoring and correct dress flatter the rider and help the riding.
As a practical example for a DQ made to measure Kempken boots fit like a glove and are designed to help you give precise leg aids and support your position. A custom top hat from L'Hiver is made to flatter your face and body shape.
Our sport has a long military/ royal court connection and this tradition of correct dress still continues. It becomes not only a mark of respect to the horse but part of the discipline and attention to detail you have to embrace in order to attain the skills to be successful.
It's really not worth getting annoyed over but it is slightly more than fashion.

mp
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:03 PM
Make that 5. It's just that I think esters can be a Good Thing.


Confession!

"Ester" is a term I vaguely remember hearing long, long ago. It was just before I ran screaming from the room and dropped organic chemistry. Thus, I became a writer and not a doctor, scientist or something really useful.

However, the flotsam and jetsam of knowledge that remain from all the science classes I took previous to Org Chem have come in handy: They've allowed me to avoid obvious blunders when I write ads for complex, technical products.

But when the art director tells me I need to cut copy for such an ad, I just tell him to take out every 5th word and see if anyone notices.

bjrudq
Jul. 21, 2006, 12:29 PM
"To be serious for one second, Good tailoring and correct dress flatter the rider and help the riding.
As a practical example for a DQ made to measure Kempken boots fit like a glove and are designed to help you give precise leg aids and support your position. A custom top hat from L'Hiver is made to flatter your face and body shape.
Our sport has a long military/ royal court connection and this tradition of correct dress still continues. It becomes not only a mark of respect to the horse but part of the discipline and attention to detail you have to embrace in order to attain the skills to be successful.
It's really not worth getting annoyed over but it is slightly more than fashion."

i disagree. it is just as much fashion as any other kind of dress. complete with fads.

remember when only upper level riders were supposed to wear white breeches? when silver or gold buttons on your coat were considered flashy? when velvet collars were in? now it's piping, isn't it? the whole get up changes from time to time, true, only slightly, but it hardly harkens back to the military/court tradition.

if it did, we ladies would be riding sidesaddle in elaborate silks and brocades.

no, instead we dress like english gentlemen on the hunt, slightly modified.

and i don't think ANY woman looks good in ANY top hat-they look like the mad hatter-and a derby makes them look like stan or ollie, depending on their weight. and of course a hunt cap or helmet flatters no one. but who is looking at the rider's face, anyway.

i do agree that a properly fitting coat and breeches, good boots and a tidy appearance do help you ride better. the horse cares about that. but not really about how you look, in and of itself. unless he can see carrots sticking out of your pockets.

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:03 PM
I am beginning to understand my dressage issues better thanks to all of you.
NHWR- perhaps I should review the C3 and C4 photosynthesis paths and the Krebs cycle? If I can visualize the path of electrons on those, then perhaps there is hope for me to memorize a test? At some point I may need to figure out just how many ATPs = x pressure of the spur for the forward motion.

Knowing how much ATP you have is critical to ensure completion of any dressage test. And beware the fallout from the lactic acid cycle.

fiona
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:10 PM
disagree. it is just as much fashion as any other kind of dress. complete with fads.
remember when only upper level riders were supposed to wear white breeches? when silver or gold buttons on your coat were considered flashy? when velvet collars were in? now it's piping, isn't it? the whole get up changes from time to time, true, only slightly, but it hardly harkens back to the military/court tradition

I don't remember when only upper level riders were supposed to wear white breeches and you don't have to follow "fashion fads" you can have a capsule riding wardrobe stick with the classics and always look like you care what you're doing. Personally i think Lisa Wilcox looks lovely in her top hat and i've never subscribed to fancy buttons, piping or velvet.

Talking of which i HATE the British team jackets! Bell hop! Old 40's musicals and NY hotels from the movies are what spring to mind.

bjrudq
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:38 PM
lisa wilcox would look good with an upside down feed bag on her head! she can wear anything!

fiona
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:43 PM
that is soooo true!

Sandy M
Jul. 21, 2006, 01:45 PM
But you could never tell if he was alive or dead when you went to tack him up?


MEOW! ROFLOL

MeredithTX
Jul. 21, 2006, 02:17 PM
Whew! The English lit major in me very nearly fainted trying to read through all the chemistry jargon in this post. I am very admittedly in the circle of people here who don't get it.

However, if anyone needs any assistance discussing the symbolism of white gloves, or perhaps searching for the Shakespearian themes in COTH discussions, I'm your woman.

PS - I wore black gloves all spring at Training Level with my tan breeches. Since I think we'll do a couple shows at First this fall, I am upgrading to white gloves and breeches - never fear! But what do I know? I've showed the hunters in a black coat before!

MyGiantPony
Jul. 21, 2006, 03:12 PM
If your hands are that much of an issue, gloves may be the least concern ;)


White glove are available at a very reasonable price on ebay. Personally I have several pair of youth football receiver gloves. They are white so the receivers hands stand out, pretty durable, slightly tackified (is that a word?) so the ball won't slip and they go one sale every fall at large chain sporting goods stores. You can get a nice pair for $10 or less.

I got a pair of white string gloves at Tractor Supply for .99. Yes, folks, that's ninety-nine CENTS. They aren't fancy-schmancy, but they are perfectly suitable.

BarbB
Jul. 21, 2006, 03:23 PM
OK, it still beats me how you manage to get so filthy at shows.

I do all my own work--am lucky if I have someone there to help at all--and still manage to get into the ring twice in a day looking reasonably clean and respectable.

You're one of those people the rest of us watch with a combination of envy and hate. Dust covered, green slimed, broken nails.....we swear that you have a groom hidden somewhere in your tack trunk.
And if your hair still looks human, and not as in SF 49ers human, then we feel totally justified in totally hating you.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 03:48 PM
However, if anyone needs any assistance discussing the symbolism of white gloves, or perhaps searching for the Shakespearian themes in COTH discussions, I'm your woman.OK, I'll bite. What *IS* the origin of white gloves? I'm assuming that dressage got them from the military. Where did the military get them from?

atr
Jul. 21, 2006, 04:13 PM
My hair is about an inch and a half long at the most, so I just run my fingers through it and it looks OK... or as OK as it can topping off the beet red face...

I'm not one of your cool and polished types with the perfect bun and the done nails :)

pvcjumper
Jul. 21, 2006, 04:21 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, does not see why there is discusson regarding black vs. white gloves.

Black = Hunter/Jumper/Equitation
White = Dressage

Aunt Esther does not comment on eventers except to say that if the eventing public think it is okay to "do" dressage in black gloves, Aunt Esther is not surprised. After all, eventing dressage is done by people who, when going across country, ride in garish, vulgar and common colored clothing.

When spectating at eventing competitions - and Aunt Esther is looking forward to several in Britain later this year, while she is on another buying trip to spend more of her endless supply of money - Aunt Esther recommends a good look at the Barbour knapsack. Aunt Esther is not one for backpacks of any kind, but did purchase one on a lark and rather enjoys it.

Aunt Esther is emphatically not Lisa Wilcox. Those who know Aunt Esther personally will attest to the fact that Aunt Esther's eyebrows are "done" in New York.

Does 'Aunt Esther' routinely refer to herself as a third person in attempt to encourage a status of self importance? I just started on the COTH boards, so maybe i dont know that Aunt Esther has MPD...:confused:

MeredithTX
Jul. 21, 2006, 04:26 PM
OK, I'll bite. What *IS* the origin of white gloves? I'm assuming that dressage got them from the military. Where did the military get them from?

Oh I can't tell you where they really came from, but I can certainly theorize about what it might all mean! If you want me to get really creative, I can probably come up with something about AvG in a Christ-like role. ;) Professors loved my papers, but I never took chem past high school, so I don't have anything truly relevant to contribute to this discussion.

2Dogs
Jul. 21, 2006, 04:59 PM
note to self, note to self:

"visit dressage forum on Friday afternoons for riotous end to miserable week"

thanks my little one "h" away from an organic compound and participants near and far

signed:

black-gloved neanderthal from the H/J/E world

showmom07
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:01 PM
The Bionic gloves are great for folks with arthritis.
The Equestrian gloves are only in black.
But they do have a white golf glove.
Do you think Aunt Esther would approve of the black knuckles?

http://www.bionicgloves.com/gloves/

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:10 PM
And beware the fallout from the lactic acid cycle.

All I know is that weaning the wee ones was a b^&%h. Oh, wait, maybe was that the lactating cycle? :confused:

MTx, I'm not an English Major, but I pretend to play one on TV. :yes: I just got back from a little kids production of Disney's "The Jungle Book. " OMGiH, the bastardization of Rudyard Kipling left me faint, faint with horror. :no: Probably as faint with horror as Aunt Esther would be if she ever saw my dress and behavior in public.

I tried to discuss the horror Disney instills in me with fellow mom who went to see show with me and she didn't get it. Apparently she had never heard of (a) Rudyard Kipling, (b) Hans Christian Anderson or (b) the Brothers Grimm (all of which I have probably spelled wrong, but at least I have HEARD of them!! :mad: ).

So, perhaps we can discuss here to cleanse my soul. There must be some horse horror Disney has foisted on the unsuspecting public that we can start with?

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:11 PM
Does 'Aunt Esther' routinely refer to herself as a third person in attempt to encourage a status of self importance? I just started on the COTH boards, so maybe i dont know that Aunt Esther has MPD...:confused:If you have never read "Miss Manners" and never watched "Sanford & Son", you might find Aunt Esther a tad bewildering.

Actually, even if you HAVE read "Miss Manners" and DID watch "Sanford & Son", you might still find her bewildering, but - it is hoped - in a mostly harmless sort of way.

Think of the COTH community as a vast, far-reaching family. Aunt Esther is one of "those" relatives. You know the kind. In an earlier age, she might have been tucked away safely in a country home with a companion, a cook, and a butler, only to appear at important holidays. But now, with modern travel and communication being what they are, the dear girl is simply everywhere.

Watch out for her purse. She wields it with a gusto impressive in a woman of her vintage.

Aunt Esther
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:11 PM
Does 'Aunt Esther' routinely refer to herself as a third person in attempt to encourage a status of self importance? I just started on the COTH boards, so maybe i dont know that Aunt Esther has MPD...:confused:
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, smiles, laughs and heads over to a bottle of fine single malt, shaking her head all the way. :lol:

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:13 PM
So, perhaps we can discuss here to cleanse my soul. There must be some horse horror Disney has foisted on the unsuspecting public that we can start with?"The Miracle of the White Stallions"? At least that keeps this horse-related. Even (sort of) dressage related. In an airs above the ground kind of way.

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:14 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, smiles, laughs and heads over to a bottle of fine single malt, shaking her head all the way. :lol:Um, yes... that is another quirk of the old dear. She does tipple a bit.

chism
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:43 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, does not see why there is discusson regarding black vs. white gloves.

Black = Hunter/Jumper/Equitation
White = Dressage

Aunt Esther does not comment on eventers except to say that if the eventing public think it is okay to "do" dressage in black gloves, Aunt Esther is not surprised. After all, eventing dressage is done by people who, when going across country, ride in garish, vulgar and common colored clothing.


Hey!! I resemble that remark! I guess I'll never be a real dressage queen, always a bridesmaid, never a bride.

MeredithTX
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:54 PM
So, perhaps we can discuss here to cleanse my soul. There must be some horse horror Disney has foisted on the unsuspecting public that we can start with?

I'm not sure about horse horror (although we could revisit the Disney WB thread), but I couldn't sit through the entirety of Disney's Hunchback of Notre Dame. *shudders* How can you make Victor Hugo's work happy and kid-friendly?!?!?!?

However, I did stumble upon this discussion while doing a Google search:

http://www.disneysites.com/boards/showthread.php?t=27537

Aunt Esther
Jul. 21, 2006, 05:59 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, is now bored with this topic. Aunt Esther says that it can all be summed up into one line:

Dressage = White Gloves

AndalusianMom
Jul. 21, 2006, 06:04 PM
and is it Glenlivet or Glenfiddich or Glen Ross?
We may be distantly related...I of course coming from the <ahem> lower class side of the family...

twnkltoz
Jul. 21, 2006, 06:10 PM
twnkltoz is duly chastised and promises to run out and buy some white gloves. She might even break down and shove her substantial thighs into some white breeches and shell out the $$$ for a real live dressage coat instead of the black hunt coat she's been wearing!

<dressage loser>

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 21, 2006, 06:18 PM
<dressage loser>

Maybe "poser?" Loser seems so, well, sad. I prefer the term dressage poser.

Oh, and MTx, interesting site! Who knew there were so many Disney horses? I have not seen most of those movies, but can imagine. Blech. While I admire Disney for their marketing savvy, I wish they would leave classic literature alone!

twnkltoz
Jul. 21, 2006, 06:29 PM
What RR says, goes.

;)

Sannois
Jul. 21, 2006, 07:38 PM
I have seen really bad tests and the rider wore white and really good tests and the rider wore black. I have had 2 judges tell me they could care less what color the gloves are, Black or white! :yes:

Dressage Art
Jul. 21, 2006, 09:49 PM
The Bionic gloves are great for folks with arthritis.
The Equestrian gloves are only in black.
But they do have a white golf glove.
Do you think Aunt Esther would approve of the black knuckles?

http://www.bionicgloves.com/gloves/


OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!! do they really work?

lesyl
Jul. 21, 2006, 10:14 PM
OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!! do they really work?
Yes apparently your hands are instantly correct. ;). Actually prior to the Derby there was a big writeup on them in the local paper (I can't remember if it was and AP wire).

nhwr
Jul. 21, 2006, 11:44 PM
FEI classes require white gloves :yes:

atr
Jul. 22, 2006, 01:15 AM
If anyone wants to borrow a pair, it would appear that mine are now available for the rest of the show season :(

And it's "Poseur"

Having consumed most of Aunt Esther's Glenlivet (Sorry Ma'am) I'm going to bed.

Reynard Ridge
Jul. 22, 2006, 09:14 AM
And it's "Poseur" .

No, I meant "poser." It's colloquial english which means something very similar to poseur. Twinkltoz is a generation younger than I, and I rather enjoy pretending that I am in some way, shape or form in contact with her generation.

poser
n. A wannabee (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=wannabee); not hacker slang, but used among crackers, phreaks and warez d00dz (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=warez%20d00dz). Not as negative as lamer (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lamer) or
leech (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=leech). Probably derives from a similar usage among punk-rockers and metalheads, putting down those who "talk the talk but don't walk the walk".

DocHF
Jul. 22, 2006, 10:40 AM
DocHF, who owns only 5 or 6 purses and has never trained any of them to do anything, so can't be considered a purse champion, would like to remind people who would diagnose our dear Aunt Esther with some multisyllabic mental disorder, of the following:
-You don't have the diploma necessary to diagnose.
-If you DID have the diploma, you would know that it is considered a major mental health faux pas to diagnose someone you have not met face to face, especially if they have not paid you for your opinion first
-that it is not a disorder if it doesn't cause discomfort and Aunt Esther definitely appears to be comfortable
-In any case, Aunt Esther surely has enough money that any diagnosable foibles she may harbour will be politely ignored by her fellow upper strata companions.


And for all of you people still distracted by the Krebs cycle and ATP and other such nonsense: It is perfectly possible to live a happy life without any knowledge of these things, and probably better, if you were forced to learn the ways of Organic Chemistry, Calculus and Biological Physics, to forget them in the service of a cleaner and happier brain.

dq for life
Jul. 22, 2006, 12:59 PM
Even if Aunt Ester were diagnosed it is all curable with a regular morning shot of Cogniac. Plus, why would she pay for others to learn how they can become "just like her"?

fiona
Jul. 22, 2006, 01:38 PM
And for all of you people still distracted by the Krebs cycle and ATP and other such nonsense:It is perfectly possible to live a happy life without any knowledge of these things,

I can confirm that to be true without any shadow of a doubt.
However i, and the many friends in my head are shocked and disappointed by the revelation
No one ever really died laughing as it has always been a lifelong ambition to witness such a glorious event.

DocHF
Jul. 22, 2006, 01:55 PM
I must say Fiona, that your line:

However i, and the many friends in my head
goes so elegantly with Aunst Esther and

her fellow upper strata companions.
that I very nearly succumbed and required a strong cup of Kona handpicked Peaberry to revive myself. But my sig line stands.

nhwr
Jul. 22, 2006, 05:40 PM
And for all of you people still distracted by the Krebs cycle and ATP and other such nonsense: It is perfectly possible to live a happy life without any knowledge of these things, and probably better, if you were forced to learn the ways of Organic Chemistry, Calculus and Biological Physics, to forget them in the service of a cleaner and happier brain. __________________

I'd have to disagree.
p-chem is where I learned about Beer's Law :yes:

Upon completion of quantum mechanchics, my prof gave me a "quantum wrench". I haven't found the problem it won't address :D

fiona
Jul. 22, 2006, 06:20 PM
Yeah but, can it make someone die laughing?

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 22, 2006, 06:41 PM
No, but you could put it together with Maxwell's silver hammer and have the start of a mighty fine toolkit ;-)


When our son* was wee tiny - maybe two or three, he had a t-shirt with Maxwell's equations on it. It said, "And God said... <insert equations...>... and there was light!" He could tell people those were "Meekwell kwayzhuns" on his shirt. They generally left rapidly at that point.

*who is now married to a woman who is allergic to HORSES

lesyl
Jul. 22, 2006, 06:52 PM
And for all of you people still distracted by the Krebs cycle and ATP and other such nonsense: It is perfectly possible to live a happy life without any knowledge of these things, and probably better, if you were forced to learn the ways of Organic Chemistry, Calculus and Biological Physics, to forget them in the service of a cleaner and happier brain.

But but I use them to visualize dressage movements. well not calculus, but biochemical pathways. Plus I am starting to think I will name the next horse Chiral.

nhwr
Jul. 22, 2006, 07:22 PM
so what's nu? ;)

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 22, 2006, 07:35 PM
so what's nu? ;)v over h?

nhwr
Jul. 22, 2006, 08:13 PM
I think you are thinking of a form of Planck's equation.

nu=c/lambda

:p

P.R.E.
Jul. 22, 2006, 09:07 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, does not see why there is discusson regarding black vs. white gloves.

Black = Hunter/Jumper/Equitation
White = Dressage

Aunt Esther does not comment on eventers except to say that if the eventing public think it is okay to "do" dressage in black gloves, Aunt Esther is not surprised. After all, eventing dressage is done by people who, when going across country, ride in garish, vulgar and common colored clothing.

When spectating at eventing competitions - and Aunt Esther is looking forward to several in Britain later this year, while she is on another buying trip to spend more of her endless supply of money - Aunt Esther recommends a good look at the Barbour knapsack. Aunt Esther is not one for backpacks of any kind, but did purchase one on a lark and rather enjoys it.

Aunt Esther is emphatically not Lisa Wilcox. Those who know Aunt Esther personally will attest to the fact that Aunt Esther's eyebrows are "done" in New York.


Aunt Esther in an impostor!!! Because even do, she is right about the white gloves in dressage, when she refers to eventing colors during the cross country as vulgar, she shows that her etiquette was recently learned in a book, but that lacks the knowledge of real equestria tradition. There is nothing more classical in equestrian sports that the colors of an event rider during the cross country, or a racing jockey, etc. Those colors come from a very old tradition and represnt the stabes you were riding for.

Aunt Esther, Aunt Esther in your next trip to Britain , you should not take a tourist trip on a bus, you better spend some quality time getting familiar with real equestrian traditions. What an honor is to wear the colors of your stables.

nhwr
Jul. 22, 2006, 09:47 PM
but I happen to know Aunt Esther lived in Great Britain for a number of years. She is surely aware of the fine traditions there. I think her views on the matter are an expression of personal taste rather than equestrian tradition. Fault her taste at your own peril!

Carry on! :D

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 22, 2006, 11:13 PM
I think you are thinking of a form of Planck's equation.

nu=c/lambda

:pIt's been so long... so many head-bonkings have intervened... I should have asked Mr RAR (PhD in physics), or The Daughter (physics degree from Berkeley) or The Daughter's Boyfriend (astrophysics PhD candidate at Berkeley)... but alas, I thought I could do it on my own... Sigh.

fiona
Jul. 23, 2006, 03:34 AM
So can you express as an equation a or even a venn diagram because that was a day i was in school the formula for success in competition

Correct clothing - the scrutineer being Aunt Esther

Correct training - adherance to the accepted German Scales thereof

Correct conformation - of the horse for reasons of practicality in the rider tailoring.

Adaptability - openess to small variations in training scale and allows for the possibility that Aunt Esther may change her mind re some new item of apparel she has made policy on. Those scurrilous rumour monkeys that say she she doesn't remember what she is saying half the time because she's drunk in hospitality are quite clearly dazed and confused themselves.

I think for the purposes of this exercise we should assume the judges are not blind, biased, corrupt or completely stupid.

Workings should be clearly shown. The best answer get the inaugural COTH Goodwill Peace prize for services in returning humour to the community. A far greater honour than coming to England going to some damp draughty castle and having some mad old bat swing at your head with a sword she can barely lift then insisting on calling you Sir. Although not as good as Aunt Esther picking up the bar bill or giving you the name of her tailor.

P.R.E.
Jul. 23, 2006, 03:42 AM
but I happen to know Aunt Esther lived in Great Britain for a number of years. She is surely aware of the fine traditions there. I think her views on the matter are an expression of personal taste rather than equestrian tradition. Fault her taste at your own peril!

Carry on! :D


Living in Britain, doesn't make her an expert in Equestrian tradition, like living in the Stanford Campus doesn't make you an authority in astrophysics.:lol:

Risk-Averse Rider
Jul. 23, 2006, 11:58 AM
Living in Britain, doesn't make her an expert in Equestrian tradition, like living in the Stanford Campus doesn't make you an authority in astrophysics.:lol:Well, not the Stanford campus, certainly, but the Berkeley campus, that's another (dark) matter entirely...

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Jul. 24, 2006, 03:38 PM
and to keep this entirely horse related, I see the ability to do dressage as a graph which is asymptotically approaching perfection. I, of course, am on the bottom part of the curve. You know, the part of the curve where nothing happens because you haven't reached energy of activation yet. My long term goal is to approach that unstable, high energy state where "something is happening!"

However, I will do it sans gloves. Unless it's winter time, then I do it in ski mittens, heavily lined with polarfleece and insulated. This way I can ensure I am riding from my seat.

Aunt Esther
Jul. 24, 2006, 04:25 PM
Aunt Esther in an impostor!!! Because even do, she is right about the white gloves in dressage, when she refers to eventing colors during the cross country as vulgar, she shows that her etiquette was recently learned in a book, but that lacks the knowledge of real equestria tradition. There is nothing more classical in equestrian sports that the colors of an event rider during the cross country, or a racing jockey, etc. Those colors come from a very old tradition and represnt the stabes you were riding for.

Aunt Esther, Aunt Esther in your next trip to Britain , you should not take a tourist trip on a bus, you better spend some quality time getting familiar with real equestrian traditions. What an honor is to wear the colors of your stables.
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, has a London base in Ovington Square, lived in England for some years, and therefore is au fait to the ways of Britain. Both times when Aunt Esther competed at Badminton, finishing on her dressage score, she rode in conservative colors.

Aunt Esther is not stupid, and does not require an outline regarding riding in one's stable colors. Aunt Esther has, however, been horrified on numerous occasions by eventers making a mad dash across country in bright, garish and vulgar colors. As for racing silks, Aunt Esther has no problem with those being bright and In One's Face.

lesyl
Jul. 24, 2006, 05:00 PM
and to keep this entirely horse related, I see the ability to do dressage as a graph which is asymptotically approaching perfection. I, of course, am on the bottom part of the curve. You know, the part of the curve where nothing happens because you haven't reached energy of activation yet. My long term goal is to approach that unstable, high energy state where "something is happening!"

However, I will do it sans gloves. Unless it's winter time, then I do it in ski mittens, heavily lined with polarfleece and insulated. This way I can ensure I am riding from my seat.

So how does the asympototic curve work with the horse? Is it a combined factor (horse/rider/environment) based curve? What if the horse is at a different part of the curve at a different time?

As for me I have finally converted to riding in sleeveless shirts with the icepack in the sports bra. That way I remain just cool enough to concentrate on leg/hand/forward issues.

JumpingPaints
Jul. 24, 2006, 05:25 PM
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, is now bored with this topic. Aunt Esther says that it can all be summed up into one line:

Dressage = White Gloves

Just to clarify Auntie, is it verboten if said white gloves are cut off at the tips so as to accommodate one's nails, should they be too long to fit in regular-sized white gloves? In such a case, would it be necessary to paint an appropriate color or pattern on one's nails (I'm thinking gold lame or Burberry plaid).

Aunt Esther
Jul. 25, 2006, 08:25 PM
Just to clarify Auntie, is it verboten if said white gloves are cut off at the tips so as to accommodate one's nails, should they be too long to fit in regular-sized white gloves? In such a case, would it be necessary to paint an appropriate color or pattern on one's nails (I'm thinking gold lame or Burberry plaid).
Aunt Esther, national and international Purse Champion, suggests buying larger gloves and, if the ladies large it too big, recommends trying mens sizes.

Iberiansyes
Sep. 20, 2012, 05:17 PM
Dear Aunt Ester,

I humbly intend to disagree with your esteemed position. The rule book does not specify that one must wear white gloves. They just can't be hot pink from what I can tell. I would tender that anyone riding first level or above should wear white gloves (because, as we all know, once you have gotten above training level, you are, for all intents and purposes CERTIFIABLE and "in for a penney, in for the white gloves" as they say) and of course would agree with your esteemed opinion, but at training level, one's decision should be based on what is best for one's horse's mouth, would one not agree dear Aunt Ester?

We hear things from the horse's mouth, but preytell, do we ever consider it? Or is it be fashionable or die? Kind Auntie, do tell me we CAN make a decision based on what is best for the said beasts we aspire to ride!

I was taught by my classical trainer who schooled in Europe in the 50s that wearing white gloves was a right you earned, kind of like a shadbelly, but earlier in one's commitment to this sport (like as you moved up into the actual levels --first and above).

I must say, though, kind dear, that white does indeed look nice. It gives on that nice, clean, "we are here for the tiny sandwiches and the men in tight pants" look.

With all kindest respect,
a humbly certifiable subject

SwampYankee
Sep. 20, 2012, 05:20 PM
Just remember that in white gloves, the judge and spectators can see your hands jiggling and note their position at 600 yds.

belgianWBLuver
Sep. 20, 2012, 05:29 PM
Dear Aunt Ester,

... It gives on that nice, clean, "we are here for the tiny sandwiches and the men in tight pants" look.

With all kindest respect,
a humbly certifiable subject

:lol::lol::lol::lol:
Wish we had more mens in tiny tight pants at the shows here in the USA - like in the Eurozone lands !! Makes our sport more interesting :sleepy:

Kadenz
Sep. 20, 2012, 05:34 PM
Why is it wrong to wear black gloves? What if your hands are not perfect and it would look worse, not beter?


Believe it or not, (fake shocked face) judges can STILL SEE YOUR hands, even when you're wearing black gloves.

Just like how judges can still see your legs, even though you're wearing black boots. :confused:

downen
Sep. 20, 2012, 05:42 PM
My dressage trainer told me I had to EARN my white gloves. I was SO happy the day she told me my hands were good enough for white. :)

Petstorejunkie
Sep. 20, 2012, 06:01 PM
my (leopard) Lippaloosa...
I WANT PICTURES!!!!

Bogey2
Sep. 20, 2012, 08:20 PM
This is an oldie but a goody! The gloves these days don't have to be leather and are washable...that's a good thing:cool: