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VirginiaBred
May. 22, 2006, 07:36 AM
I wanted to start a new thread regarding his recovery. News updates and other insider information should be posted here.

We all did such a great job jingling him through his massive surgery ordeal, let's please keep that up through his recovery. :)

Loved the story on Good Morning America this morning. Very positive about him. :yes:

VirginiaBred
May. 22, 2006, 09:14 AM
After Successful Surgery, Barbaro's Chances Remain 'Coin Toss'

By Ron Mitchell and Ray Paulick
Veterinary surgeon Dean Richardson and trainer Michael Matz flashed smiles during a press briefing that followed afternoon-long surgery Sunday to repair the right hind ankle of classic winner Barbaro that was severely injured one day earlier in the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) at Pimlico. Barbaro was standing and eating in a recovery stall following the surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa. While the surgery to repair the damaged area and fuse the ankle was considered a success, Richardson cautioned that, because of numerous complications during recovery, Barbaro still has a long road to go for survival. "To be brutally honest, there's still enough chance for things going bad he's still a coin toss probably," Richardson said, "even after everything went well (during surgery).
Richardson, who led the surgical team, said the son of Dynaformer (http://www.stallionregister.com/sr_sire_page.asp?refno=1049059&origin=BHonline&result=1) was in surgery for about seven hours. He said one reason the procedure took so long was the amount of time to prepare the colt for surgery and the recovery time to allow the anesthesia to wear off.
Richardson said a procedure to fuse the fetlock joint – the ankle – was successful. A device called a locking compression plate, or LCP, was employed to stabilize the injured area, with 23 screws used on the 16-hole plate. A cast was then fitted on the leg, enclosing the hoof and running up to just below the hock.
"He got up from anesthesia without any injuries," Richardson said of Roy and Gretchen Jackson's colt, winner of the May 6 Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I). "The most important thing to emphasize is that this is just the absolute first step in any kind of case like this. Getting the horse up is a big step, but it is not the last step by any means."
He said horses with injuries such as Barbaro's are "susceptible to other problems, including infection at the site because of the severity of injury and the amount of metal put in the leg to fix it and that horses are very vulnerable to laminitis or problems in the opposite foot. These are all major concerns we have. At this moment, he is very comfortable in his leg. He practically jogged back to his stall. He pulled us back to his stall. Right now, he is very happy. He is eating. Things right now are good, but I've been doing this too long to know that day one is not the end of things."Richardson said one of his major concerns - that the blood flow in the areas of the injury had been cut off - was quickly dismissed when the doctors determined "he had good pulses in his feet, good warm periphery. When we did the procedure, he had good blood supply throughout."
"I feel much more relieved after I saw him walk to the stall than when I was loading him into the ambulance to come up here," he added. "That's for darn sure. It was an unknown area that we were going in. I feel much more confident now. At least I feel he has a chance. Last night, I didn't know what was going to go on."A sling and monorail system were used to lift and transport Barbaro before, during, and after the surgery. When the procedures were completed, he was lowered by the sling into a recovery pool.
The horse is lifted up in the sling he's been wearing the whole time, and put into a giant rubber raft that has legs in it," said Richardson, who noted the device is similar to a Zodiac raft except that it has four legs underneath that descend into the water. "The horse is in the raft, its leg are immersed down in the water, but it's staying dry because it's inside this raft. The horse then wakes completely up from anesthesia. The idea is that, if it struggles, it can't hurt itself because it is struggling against the resistance of the water (kept at about 97 degrees)."When he was ready to be taken out of the recovery pool, Barbaro was blindfolded, lifted out with the sling, and moved to another stall.Barbaro will remain at the New Bolton Center for "several weeks at the very least," Richardson said. "It's a long rehab."After that, if things go well, Barbaro would begin a very gradual return to exercise, beginning with closely controlled walking. "Even if everything went perfectly," he said, "that will be many months from now."Unbeaten and a serious contender for the Triple Crown, Barbaro broke down only a few hundred yards into the 1 3/16-mile Preakness. With his right leg flaring out grotesquely, the record crowd of 118,402 watched in shock as Barbaro veered sideways. Jockey Edgar Prado pulled the powerful colt to a halt, jumped off, and awaited medical assistance.
Barbaro was fitted with a stabilizing splint by the attending veterinarian, Dr. Nicholas Meittinis, and taken to the center, known as the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital New Bolton Center. Barbara Dallap, a clinician at the center, was present when Barbaro arrived Saturday night.

"When we unloaded him, he was placed in intensive care, and we stabilized him overnight," Dallap said. "He was very brave and well behaved under the situation and was comfortable overnight."

From: The Bloodhorse.com

ElonGrad1997
May. 22, 2006, 09:24 AM
I got to thinking about Barbaro last night and wondering what his quality of life wil be once he clears all of these hurdles. Initially, I thought they were saving him for breeding purposes, which would make sense. But can he breed a mare with these multiple injuries? Will his leg ever be able to hold his weight up in that situation? And what about turnout? You always see the TB stallions running and bucking...couldn't one bad step destroy everything?

I'm not asking these questions to be a pessimist, I want him to recover...and I'm sure doctors would not have operated if these things weren't possible. But I am asking for any of you who have had experience with fractures worse than a sesamoid.

As always, big jingles to the champion!!! And a big thanks to the team at New Bolton.

canyonoak
May. 22, 2006, 09:37 AM
Well, live cover of Tbs is not exactly 'natural', there are so many people present to 'help' the process.

Im assuming that Barbaro will wear some special kind of cast for all breeding duties, etc etc.

And either the bones will fuse or they will not.

I think way too early to even begin to discuss whether it wd have been better to just euthanize him.

How can one euthanize a creature with the courage and intelligence to figure out how to minimize the damage --,after his partner manages to stop his mad rush to oblivion -- and who then 'helps' the process to possible recovery?

romanschief
May. 22, 2006, 09:43 AM
Thanks VB for starting this thread. Way to early like Canyonoak said to even theorize about his breeding services. Only hope he comes thru the recovery process with flying colors.

If its anything like people, it will take a long long time to heal. Once it fuses, the leg can actually be much stronger than before. Postivie thoughts, prayers and jingles for Barbaro.

CuriosoJorge
May. 22, 2006, 10:56 AM
"I got to thinking about Barbaro last night and wondering what his quality of life wil be once he clears all of these hurdles. Initially, I thought they were saving him for breeding purposes, which would make sense. But can he breed a mare with these multiple injuries? Will his leg ever be able to hold his weight up in that situation? And what about turnout? You always see the TB stallions running and bucking...couldn't one bad step destroy everything?"

No. It's a bone to bone fusion. A healed broken bone is stronger in the place of the break because of the callous formation, and his ankle will essentially be a giant callous. Once it heals, he will be able to run, buck, and play. I can think of one prominent sporthorse breeding stallion with a fused ankle that was still ridden lightly. I would not think any kind of brace or support would be necessary for him to cover a mare - again, it's a solid piece of bone that after healing will probably stronger than it was before the injury from a biophysics standpoint.

ElonGrad1997
May. 22, 2006, 10:58 AM
You both are right, it is too early. I'm just so concerned for him. I hope this is a story book ending for the ages. I also hope that Barbaro paves the way for major advancements in equine medicine. A champion of champions.

Twinkletozzz
May. 22, 2006, 11:16 AM
bump

slp
May. 22, 2006, 12:01 PM
No. It's a bone to bone fusion. A healed broken bone is stronger in the place of the break because of the callous formation, and his ankle will essentially be a giant callous. Once it heals, he will be able to run, buck, and play. I can think of one prominent sporthorse breeding stallion with a fused ankle that was still ridden lightly. I would not think any kind of brace or support would be necessary for him to cover a mare - again, it's a solid piece of bone that after healing will probably stronger than it was before the injury from a biophysics standpoint.

I've not had a horse injured but we experienced this when my son shattered his collarbone, and amazingly enough it is true. The bone was broken in about 5 places and some parts were a good 1/2 inch + away from the part it was supposed to join. The orthopedic doctor told me that essentially a 'ball of bone' would form and it would all become one piece again. Sure enough, he has a permanant lump there but that collarbone probably has three times as much bone structure and strength now as the uninjured one. When I saw the original xrays of my kid I had a hard time believing that could happen, but it did.

I'm sure Barbaro's young age and fitness level will be to his advantage in the healing process, and am praying that it all turns out well.

Paks
May. 22, 2006, 12:10 PM
The plate they used had to be custom made right? Looking at it hard to think of it as a stock item. How did they know what shape to use length etc. Was it made before the surgery or during. Just curious but would be interesting to know. Can't be too flexible or manuable or it wouldn't work. But hard to believe it was forged in 18 hours.

Anyone know how they make those things?

Lookout
May. 22, 2006, 12:37 PM
There was some mention somewhere of fabricating the plate during the surgery, which is one reason it did take so long.

I am confused by this recovery pool - how can you dunk a casted leg with sutures into water?

horselovr121
May. 22, 2006, 12:42 PM
I'm assuming that the plate will stay in his ankle once it's healed, just to make it stronger. But does anyone know if the screws will be removed? I know it's not the same thing, but my friend broke her ankle and had to have screws in it, and the screws had to be removed once it healed. Just wondering.

yaya
May. 22, 2006, 12:45 PM
He doesn't go directly into the water.

Read the article - he got lowered into a raft that has legs in it. So he's in the raft, and the raft is in the water, he doesn't get wet.

Here's a pic of him being lifted out:
http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro/BARBARO1_lg.jpg

JER
May. 22, 2006, 12:54 PM
Way back in 1971 Hoist the Flag was the overwhelming favorite for the Kentucy Derby and the Triple Crown. I have some racing friends who swear he was the best horse they've ever seen. He was a gorgeous horse won by huge margins with absolute ease. Unfortunately, he broke a hind leg in the month before the Derby.

His situation was similar to Barbaro's -- innovative surgery followed by extensive lay-up, during which HTF nearly died from infection. He recovered remarkably well and went on to become a successful sire. This, of course, was 35 years ago.

Let's hope Barbaro has an easier reovery than HTF and equally good results.

jakeyboyjk
May. 22, 2006, 01:00 PM
It was just heartbreaking to see this happen. The emotions that the owners and Michael Matz are going through right now are heartwrenching. But on a hopefull note, as CuriousJorge stated the bone actually heals stronger than it was originaly.
My horse fractured a bone in his hock in turnout. Thankfully he was a very good patient and took to stall rest like a champion. Just standing like a perfect gentleman so as not to hurt or reinjure himself.
He actually came back to full work after a year, and went on to a successful show career in the adult amateur hunters.

VirginiaBred
May. 22, 2006, 01:47 PM
As lifted from the Tim Woolley Blog:



Edit 7: Dr. Richardson visited Barbaro at 5:30 am. He is hosting a press conference at 8 am. Seemingly all is well so far. He is comfortable, is eating well and did well through the night. One thing not picked up by the press yesterday, Barbaro literally dragged his handlers back to the stall after surgery yesterday. If attitude and disposition have anything to do with it ... All at Fair Hill are in a very sombre mood. We are hoping, keeping our fingers crossed etc. Keep the comments coming, I will make sure they get to Barbaro's team. (7:50 am)
Edit 6: The surgery has been considered a success, as reported in the Bloodhorse (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33671). The surgery is clearly the first step in a long road ahead for Barbaro, but it is great to hear that this first step has been successful. It appears that Dr. Richardson is more favourable about Barbaro's chances of recovery than was first thought (from reading the article, not from any other source). Dr. Richardson is quoted:

I feel much more relieved after I saw him walk to the stall than when I was loading him into the ambulance to come up here," he added. "That's for darn sure. It was an unknown area that we were going in. I feel much more confident now. At least I feel he has a chance. Last night, I didn't know what was going to go on.

Will blog once at Fair Hill and having talked to the vets here.
BTW, apologies for the site crashing late last night. This site had about 6 visitors per day before Barbaro won the Kentucky Derby. Yesterday, during one hour, early evening, we had 3,000 visitors. We ran out of bandwidth apparently. This has been fixed!

Barnfairy
May. 22, 2006, 02:04 PM
My mare sent Barbaro a picture suitable for pinning up in his stall to keep his spirits up. It's a photo I have of her grazing sexily, back when she was a hot little 3 yo TB filly. She signed it: "To Barbaro, Get well soon! XOXO, Paula's First."

:lol:

I also sent him a card myself. It's an imprint from a horse shoe that once belonged to my Irish sport horse / TB cross Foofie, for good luck. Foofie had ankle troubles of his own, but had 28 wonderful years.

I sent them out at the crack of dawn this morning to New Bolton Center, fingers crossed that Barbaro will continue on the road to recovery...

Paks
May. 22, 2006, 02:04 PM
I'm assuming that the plate will stay in his ankle once it's healed, just to make it stronger. But does anyone know if the screws will be removed? I know it's not the same thing, but my friend broke her ankle and had to have screws in it, and the screws had to be removed once it healed. Just wondering.
That all depends the Navy tried to keep my plate in but the compression difference between the plate and the bone made it too painful so they removed it. My ankle however has about 9 screws in it.

ElonGrad1997
May. 22, 2006, 02:10 PM
My mare sent Barbaro a picture suitable for pinning up in his stall to keep his spirits up. It's a photo I have of her grazing sexily, back when she was a hot little 3 yo TB filly. She signed it: "To Barbaro, Get well soon! XOXO, Paula's First."

:lol:


Obviuosly it must be too racy (pardon the pun) to place here? :D

Barnfairy
May. 22, 2006, 02:20 PM
And yes, definitely not suitable for family viewing!

saddlesurfer
May. 22, 2006, 02:34 PM
Just rec'd this from a good friend at SYNTHES N.A. headquartered in West Chester, PA, Thought I'd pass it on to this thread..



Subject: Barbaro gets the best possible care

As many of you have heard, the most heartbreaking story of the weekend was the breakdown of Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro in the Preakness horse race on Saturday. Fortunately due to the incredible care Barbaro has received since the injury, he has a chance to survive his devastating injury. And Synthes has played a role in this story.

The treating veterinary surgeon, Dr. Dean Richardson is a longtime AO Faculty member, Synthes friend and strong proponent of LCP plating for horses. His experience with LCP over the past year has shown his horse patients to be more comfortable after surgery with LCP. Consequently he now routinely plates with LCP and Barbaro is no exception.

Barbaro underwent a 5 hour procedure last night repair many severe fractures to his hind ankle. Dr. Richardson elected to fuse Barbaro's ankle joints using a 4.5mm Broad LCP using predominantly locking screws. It is still very earlier in the long road to recovery for Barbaro but it is reassuring to know he has the best care in the world at New Bolton Center and Synthes implants.

Boston Chicken
May. 22, 2006, 02:44 PM
I have a question about his rehab. IF he survives the initial days, weeks and months, and his leg stabilizes, would they potentially use water therapy for controlled exercise? I don't know anything about this, but have seen several photos recently showing horses working out in water. Just curious whether this might be an option?

Prayers continue.

War Admiral
May. 22, 2006, 02:45 PM
I would certainly think so. It worked great for mine.

saddlesurfer
May. 22, 2006, 02:59 PM
All the equine surgeons at N.B. are on faculty staff in the vet div. of SYNTHES and teach at the annual Columbus Ohio AO North America Large and Small Animal Vet courses. So they are quite familar with the materials & hardware used. Hopefully he will heal quickly before the implants are stressed to their limits though. The implants are load sharing devices, not weight bearing devices. But you can’t necessarily give instructions to the horse not to fully weight bear, as you can with humans. I’m sure they are doing all that can be done to protect the construction, but….

DMK
May. 22, 2006, 03:06 PM
In yesterday's press conference, somone asked about rehab/physical therapy, and Dr. Richardson made the very good point that the outcome of this surgery was not to return the leg to any range of motion/normalcy, but to fuse/decrease range of motion.

I don't have a clue of what or how they will handle rehab, but its probably worth remembering the end goal of this surgery is radically different from most surgeries...

Laurel&HollyFarm
May. 22, 2006, 03:08 PM
=<snip> . . .using predominantly locking screws. . .<snip>

Would this mean that the majority of the screws would not have to be removed? If so why not use all locking screws?

I am curious as another non racing stallion I know of with a similar injury developed an infection when the screws were removed. The infection could not be healed and he had to be put down after 5 month of recovery. I would love for this possibility to have been removed for Barbaro.

Ozzie
May. 22, 2006, 03:34 PM
A mare of mine broke her P2 into 3 pieces, repaired w. plates and fusion of P1 & P2 (a minimal-motion joint anyway). Was at Davis. After 3+ mo. she developed an infection and the plates were taken out and she was treated w. antibiotics. 10 yrs later she has a bigger and slightly stiff pastern but looks totally sound and can run with the rest of them. She chooses to drop out sooner than the uninjured tho. Broodmare only.
This was a 3 yr old big-boned Arabian who had spent her first 3 yrs confined in a small pen. I attribute the accident (freak step) to that lack of normal conditioning that produces bone density.

Lancaster9
May. 22, 2006, 04:02 PM
I hope this isn't a duplicate. The latest excerpted from bloodhorse.com:


"He got through the night very well, day one and into day two is going as well as expected," Dr. Corinne Sweeney, a veterinarian and the hospital's executive director, said Monday. "He is standing on the leg, and with the appropriate amount of weight on it. He also showed appropriate interest in the mares, which means he's acting like a young colt should."

Sweeney said there are two major concerns in the first days of recovery, the possibility of infection from the surgery and laminitis, a potentially fatal disease sometimes brought on by uneven weight balance.

"He's doing exactly what the doctor wants, but he's got a long road ahead," Sweeney added. "A lot of possible problems that could occur have not."


See the full article at www.bloodhorse.com - and accompanying slide show.

RAyers
May. 22, 2006, 04:29 PM
I'm assuming that the plate will stay in his ankle once it's healed, just to make it stronger. But does anyone know if the screws will be removed? I know it's not the same thing, but my friend broke her ankle and had to have screws in it, and the screws had to be removed once it healed. Just wondering.

The plate will have to removed after time due to a condition called stress shielding. Bone must have a load to grow and maintain itself. The plate changes the load path in the bone thus causing a shift in how the bones will "remodel." This is similar to why some hip implants fail in humans. Right now the plate is taking the entire load and it will fail around 2-3 million flexions (it is stainless steel as that is what Synthes makes). This comes out to about 1 year of walking around if the fractures fail to heal (non-union fracture). If the plate is left in, the surrounding bone will become weaker over time.

Also, the plate will fail on its own due to fatigue in its current position and its current configuration. The curve is a "stress concentrator" that will cause fatigue and micro fracturing in the plate over time. Hopefully the bones will be healed sufficiently to take the load when the plate goes.

The screws and plate will all go. Since the plate is held in place by the screws. In humans we do the same thing with intremedually nails when a person shatters their femur or tibia.

Reed

RAyers
May. 22, 2006, 04:35 PM
Would this mean that the majority of the screws would not have to be removed? If so why not use all locking screws?

I am curious as another non racing stallion I know of with a similar injury developed an infection when the screws were removed. The infection could not be healed and he had to be put down after 5 month of recovery. I would love for this possibility to have been removed for Barbaro.


Removing screws is no indicator of if an infection can or can not take hold. We face all sorts of possible infection inducing problems with implant materials because bateria are RAINING down from the air all of the time during surgery and it takes only a few in the surface pores (less than 1/100 the width of a human hair) of a screw to carry bateria into a wound. This is called a latent infection and can occur even with sterilized materials.

Locking bone screws are NOT like those we use in everyday life. They are meant to lock to the plate. They can only "lock" to the bone for a few weeks since bone itself will grow away from the surface of the the screws due to remodeling (the continuous reshaping of bone to adjust for loading environments and repair micro fractures). We usually see around 2% of bony contact lost annually in bone implants due to this. Thus there is no such thing as a "locking" screw. Clinicians use this term inappropriately.

Reed

Laurel&HollyFarm
May. 22, 2006, 04:46 PM
Thanks Reed!

Anne FS
May. 22, 2006, 05:40 PM
Some of this is repetitive but there's a couple new items in it. It's from www.philly.com:

Trainer Michael Matz won't ever forget how he last saw his horse at Pimlico Race Course. He expressed genuine wonder at how he saw his horse last night: Barbaro walking to his stall on four legs, then eating some hay.

"I felt a lot more relief when I saw him walk in the stall than I did when I loaded him in the ambulance [in Baltimore] to come up here," Matz said.

Dean Richardson, chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's school of veterinary medicine at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, performed yesterday's five-hour, 10-minute surgery on Barbaro's right hind leg. Richardson made it clear that the Kentucky Derby winner's chances for survival still are not better than 50-50.

"No one's going to want to hear this," Richardson said. "He's still a coin toss, even after everything went well."

But Richardson also said: "He practically jogged back to his stall."

Barbaro suffered the devastating injuries Saturday in the first furlong of the Preakness Stakes. "Most horses who receive this severe an injury are typically put down on the racetrack," Richardson had said before the surgery. "It's about as bad as it could be."

Barbaro had three fractures in his right hind leg, above and below the ankle. He also dislocated the ankle joint, doctors said. The pastern bone was in "probably 20-plus pieces," Richardson said afterward.

"Oh, my God," a Penn veterinary student said from the back of the room.

A metal plate was put in, 23 screws were inserted, and the ankle joint was fused, meaning it will not be a joint anymore if the fusion is successful. The process will take weeks.

"It is very unusual to have these three catastrophic injuries all piled into one," Richardson said before the surgery at the Chester County facility. "I've never tackled one exactly like this."

Barbaro, who will be at the facility for at least several weeks and possibly much longer, did pass another hurdle: Richardson found that the blood supply in the colt's leg remained good.

The blood was "almost oozing through the skin," Richardson said, but the skin had not broken.

As with other horses going into surgery at the New Bolton Center for Large Animals early yesterday afternoon, Barbaro was moved on a sling from intensive care, via a monorail, to the surgery table.

After the surgery, with the colt still in the sling, the monorail took him to a pool - "a fairly unique system," Richardson said.

The facility's pool recovery system allows horses to awaken from general anesthesia in a raft of sorts in the pool, still in the sling.

Richardson said he could tell he was dealing with an athlete. The horse tried to get out of the sling after being lifted from the pool, which was warmed to 97 degrees.

Speaking to about 75 members of the media at a 9:15 p.m. news conference, Matz said he had just spoken with owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson, who expressed their appreciation.

Richardson did not rule out Barbaro's having a future as a stallion, which certainly is an issue. The Kentucky Derby winner has an impressive pedigree and a proven ability to win on different surfaces at varied distances. His value could have been more than $30 million.

But Richardson explained all the complications that could still set in, such as infection or problems with the opposite foot.

"It is the first step, but not the last step by any means," the surgeon said, also talking about having to "manage his comfort."

Jockey Edgar Prado, who was credited by doctors for his quick action in pulling up the horse, said after the race that "he took a bad step and I can't really tell you what happened."

The jockey said he heard a noise and began pulling him up. Barbaro wobbled for an additional 100 yards on three legs, with the right rear hind leg up in the air, the ankle hanging at an unnatural angle.

Richardson estimated the medical costs would run into the tens of thousands of dollars. The Jacksons, who live just down the road from the front entrance to the clinic, have been major donors to New Bolton.

Gretchen Jackson is on the board of overseers of Penn's school of veterinary medicine. The Scott Equine Sports Medicine Clinic was dedicated June 29, 2002. It is named for Almira and Hardie Scott, Roy Jackson's mother and stepfather.

New Bolton, in the midst of a $60 million expansion and refurbishment, considers its seven-day-a-week, 24-hour critical care service the first of its kind in the nation. There are four hospital wards for 150 horses, with an isolation facility for infectious cases and a climate-controlled neonatal intensive care unit for sick foals.

Barbara Dallap, the critical-care specialist who first examined Barbaro on Saturday night when he was rushed from Pimlico, also described the colt's first hours at the facility: "He's been extremely... brave and well-behaved... . He's been comfortable all night."

The outpouring of public emotion was immediate. A number of well-wishers were allowed to stop in with gifts of support.

John Farrell said he drove from Lancaster with his 31/2-year-old son, Hank, and 2-year-old daughter, Jane Elizabeth.

"They wanted to bring Barbaro some apples and carrots," Farrell said. "Make him feel a little better."

Anne FS
May. 22, 2006, 05:57 PM
heehee. Just watched Comcast Sports on TV and they were talking about Barbaro. They were impressed with Dr. Richardson and one guy said, "There are guys who are players and guys who can be players AND coaches, which is rare. This guy is definitely a player who could also be a coach." They loved that he's a fantastic surgeon and that he also explains things so directly, honestly and well.

They also were amazed at the honesty of the reports-- they guessed because it was a horse. They got a kick out of the comment about the mares, and were imagining reports on injured ballplayers where the doctor would be happy with a patient's progress because 'he's taken an interest in the nurses and is chasing them around the room.'

hunterested
May. 22, 2006, 06:26 PM
Sedation Questions: How do they keep him from acting up too much and for how long can they use sedation as a means to control his activity? How long can you keep a horse calm so that they don't injure themselves? Eventually, they will have to move him so how do they and for how long can they use sedation medication?

War Admiral
May. 22, 2006, 06:31 PM
Supposedly an update on CBS momentarily. Anyone watching??

Laurel&HollyFarm
May. 22, 2006, 06:48 PM
I love having DVR :D. When I saw your post War Admiral I was able to rewind both coverages. Unfortunately nothing new.

The surgeon is doing a great job communicating with the media. He said that Barbaro was still nickering at the mares. The ABC correspondent asked if that meant he was flirting and the Doc said exactly.

CBS showed a horse that suffered a broken foreleg a few weeks ago that would allow the vet to pick up the opposing one. It was the vet that first saw Barbaro on the track.

Thouroughbred_lvr
May. 22, 2006, 06:53 PM
I hope everyone out there will join me. Today, I wore two ribbons looped together in Barbaro's racing colors. It shows everyone I come in contact with that I am supporting this great horse and his recovery. Said prayers as I hugged all the ex-racers on me farm.

War Admiral
May. 22, 2006, 06:56 PM
Hey, that's a great idea TBlvr!

And thanks for the update Laurel & Holly! No news is good news!!

Thouroughbred_lvr
May. 22, 2006, 07:01 PM
....and since I have a whole spool of this ribbon, if anyone out there would like a loop, email me @ treasurendoodle@aol.com and I will pop one in the mail for you!

Jingles for the big guy!

Seal Harbor
May. 22, 2006, 07:19 PM
On both the NBC10 site and the CBS3 site two Philly stations - you can share your thoughts and well wishes with the Jackson's and Michael Matz.

The NBC site says they will hand deliver the messages to Michael Matz and the Jackson's.

NBC10 (http://www.nbc10.com/news/9253557/detail.html)
CBS3 (http://cbs3.com/)

There are also videos with today's reports of how he is doing on both sites.

DMK
May. 22, 2006, 07:38 PM
Some of this is repetitive but there's a couple new items in it. It's from www.philly.com: (http://www.philly.com:)

Barbaro, who will be at the facility for at least several weeks and possibly much longer, did pass another hurdle: Richardson found that the blood supply in the colt's leg remained good.

The blood was "almost oozing through the skin," Richardson said, but the skin had not broken.

You can tell whoever watched the press conference was not terribly savvy at medical explanations or good about writing down what they heard!

First he clarified that the blood supply was better than expected and not compromised, then he talked about the general condition of the leg, to wit he explained that there was some serum oozing because of the severe bruising to the limb. Not so much with the uncompromised blood circulation oozing out the skin though... ;)

EqTrainer
May. 22, 2006, 08:23 PM
I know a horse that had a PI and P3 fracture, pretty bad ones. He was plated back together. He was lame for a long, long time... and now he's sound.

So it is possible that Barbaros quality of life will be acceptable, maybe even good.

Anne FS
May. 22, 2006, 09:56 PM
Just heard on Comcast Sports that Mr. & Mrs. Jackson are going to have an update for the press at 9:30am Eastern time on Tuesday.

VirginiaBred
May. 22, 2006, 10:01 PM
Thank you AnneFS!

MEP
May. 23, 2006, 04:45 AM
NPR ran an interview with Gretchen Jackson regarding Barbaro's recovery. You can listen to it at:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5423247

J. Turner
May. 23, 2006, 06:23 AM
He doesn't go directly into the water.

Read the article - he got lowered into a raft that has legs in it. So he's in the raft, and the raft is in the water, he doesn't get wet.

Here's a pic of him being lifted out:
http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro/BARBARO1_lg.jpg

Gotta love the duct tape! At least he has the force on his side!

But look at those perked ears!

J. Turner
May. 23, 2006, 06:34 AM
NPR ran an interview with Gretchen Jackson regarding Barbaro's recovery. You can listen to it at:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5423247

Thank you for posting that interview. I had no idea NPR was carrying the story so extensively.

Mrs. Jackson sounded so brave and caring and affectionately humorous and full of class during that interview. We've all heard she's a horseperson, but she did a wonderful job of explaining the the dangers of recovery. She added a couple of things not mentioned in the press conference with MM and the Doc. She did say that he had a special height shoe to match up with the casted height. She said the cast was above the hock. And a picture above matched that (the duct tape one :) . Whereas in the press conference I thought the Doc said it was below the hock? Hm.

Love that he's eating mints. My Nigel would be proud. I'll have to tell nycrider to feed Nigel extra mints in honor of Barbaro. Everyone! Feed your horse mints! Maybe we can start a mint fund for Barbaro.

I know the doctor did say the PT wasn't an issue, but I wonder if pool excercize would be a safe way for a stall rest horse to get off some of that energy without risk of reinjuring that leg. Even normal horses that aren't as fit as a racehorse have to have sedative to handwalk when on stall rest. Maybe it would take the edge off. Like with Royal Kaliber ... he was so fit and did not stand the stall rest stress. Maybe it would blow off some steam? I'm sure it would be awhile since the wounds would have to be healed because of infection that can get in from the pool (no matter how careful they are about sanitizing).

About germs, hospitals are crazy with infections. Malcolm picked up MRSA, pseudomonas, and seratia(sp) in the NICU which has every precaution against nosocomial infections. Sometimes I think he would've been better off in a barn ...

Boston Chicken
May. 23, 2006, 07:40 AM
Don't know if this has been posted elsewhere but the USEF sent an e-mail this morning with a special e-mail address for sending well wishes. It's matzbarbaro@usef.org. They will get all the e-mails to Michael.

I sent mine along.

lyrical
May. 23, 2006, 07:55 AM
I know the doctor did say the PT wasn't an issue, but I wonder if pool excercize would be a safe way for a stall rest horse to get off some of that energy without risk of reinjuring that leg. Even normal horses that aren't as fit as a racehorse have to have sedative to handwalk when on stall rest. Maybe it would take the edge off. Like with Royal Kaliber ... he was so fit and did not stand the stall rest stress. Maybe it would blow off some steam?

I agree with you on that one! I don't know if this is the case here or not, but vets often do not really know the function of a PT in rehab, maybe because in equine medicine, a lot of things are called "physical therapy" which are just low skill symptomatic treatments that anyone can perform with minimal training. The fact that the vet states PT would not be indicated because the ankle is going to be fused, makes me suspect he thinks PT would only apply to returning function to the horse's right hind leg. Generally, orthopedic PT is much more inclusive in human medicine.

A good orthopedic PT will design a program aimed at helping the total body deal with the major shift in body mechanics caused by the change in functional ability of a weight bearing limb. The idea is to prevent injury and reduce pain and tightness in compensating soft tissues, prevent or relieve contractures, and build strength in supporting and compensating areas while maintaining optimum protection for the surgical site. Planning controlled exercise designed to prevent the debilitating effects of inactivity as well as promote the healing in the injured site without risking damage is paramount. It goes without saying that a very thorough understanding of orthopedic pathology, anatomy, kinesiology and the particulars of the individuals surgery are critically important. It also goes without saying that the patient must be stabilized enough medically and orthopedically to tolerate activity.

To me, Barbaro would be a prime candidate for progressive PT, as soon as he could tolerate it. In human medicine, that can be pretty early on, though the initial treatments are easy and progress as the patient is able to tolerate activity.

OK, I'm going to go back to sitting by the phone because I'm sure the Barbaro team will be calling me at any moment to come treat him...

Rt66Kix
May. 23, 2006, 09:25 AM
The other thing I find interesting about the pic of him being lifted out of the pool is the guy closest to him is wearing a helmet. GREAT safety protocol!

Seahorsefarmtobe
May. 23, 2006, 09:34 AM
I noticed the helmet, too. Very smart!

Update:
Barbaro Continues to Improve Second Day After Surgery
Date Posted: 5/23/2006 9:21:18 AM
Last Updated: 5/23/2006 9:46:53 AM

"Barbaro is doing very well. He's actually better today than he was even yesterday, and he was pretty good yesterday," Dr. Dean Richardson reported in a Tuesday morning news briefing at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center, where the classic winner was resting two days after surgery to repair multiple fractures in his right hind leg suffered in Saturday's Preakness Stakes (gr. I) at Pimlico race course in Baltimore, Md.
"He's feeling very good," said Richardson, who led the surgical team through a lengthy procedure attempting to fuse Barbaro's ankle Sunday afternoon and evening. "He's walking very well on the limb. He's got absolutely normal vital signs today: his temperature, pulse, respiration attitude, and appetite. We have no shortage of volunteers to handpick him grass, so he's grazing at a distance. He's doing very well."

Richardson, who was joined at the New Bolton Center by Barbaro's breeders and owners, Roy and Gretchen Jackson, said he wanted to clarify one comment he made following Sunday's surgery about saving the horse for the breeding shed.

"I made a big point about the optimal outcome is that he'd be salvaged for breeding," Richardson said. "Some people are taking that the wrong way. I want everyone to know that if this horse were a gelding, these owners would have definitely done everything to save this horse's life. I've known the Jacksons a long time. This horse could have no reproductive value and they would saved this horse's life."

Richardson added that he mistakenly said 23 screws were used in the procedure to fuse the ankle. "I think my resident (assistant) told me there were 27," he said. "I kind of lost track."

Roy Jackson thanked many people for their efforts to save Barbaro, including Edgar Prado, outriders and other Pimlico staff, trainer Michael Matz and assistant Peter Brette, track veterinarians, in addition to Dr. Scott Palmer (who was attending the race as a spectator and "jumped in" to help), city and state police officers who provided an escort from Pimlico, and the staff of the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa.

"We've run through the gamut of emotions from the Kentucky Derby of euphoria to the devastation of the Preakness in our family and Gretchen and I," he said. "I think we've gone through our own personal feelings. I think the sad part is in Barbaro's case that the American public won't get a chance to see him continue his racing career.

"We hope all of you here will be able to see little Barbaros," he added.

Hundreds of well wishers have sent cards, flowers, apples, and carrots to New Bolton Center, and the hospital is establishing a link atits Web site for fans to send e-mails in care of Barbaro.


*****************************
And note that Prado was thanked!

Beverley
May. 23, 2006, 09:46 AM
Having read in this forum that some of the national news is less than good, this morning's Salt Lake Tribune has a good article on Barbaro and injuries in racing, interviewing local owners and a vet (they misspelled his name, but they got the facts straight). First page of sports section, www.sltrib.com (http://www.sltrib.com). Unusual because racing doesn't get much press coverage in these parts, with this year being an exception since Brother Derek was started at the Salt Lake Equestrian Center.

VirginiaBred
May. 23, 2006, 10:49 AM
Dear Equestrian Community,

We know there are hundreds of thousands, maybe even millions, of you out there who would like to send words of support to Barbaro and trainer Michael Matz. A special email account here at the USEF has been created for that purpose. The messages will be compiled and sent to Barbaro, Michael and owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson at the New Bolton clinic. The email address is matzbarbaro@usef.org.

Let's all join together to wish Barbaro a safe recovery.


United States Equestrian Federation, Inc. 4047 Iron Works Parkway, Lexington, KY 40511, 859-258-2472

Weatherford
May. 23, 2006, 11:14 AM
Sounds like they are reading our forum... ;)

The comment stating (which I had already known) that the Jackson's would have done the same had this been a gelding still brought tears to my eyes. :cry:

Let's hope lots can be learned through this!

lee.
May. 23, 2006, 11:15 AM
Penn Vet has a message board set up at their site now, as well as a 'Barbaro Fund' to benefit Friends of New Bolton Center: http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro.htm

Arado*TB
May. 23, 2006, 02:15 PM
I was curious about his meds.Dr. Richardson commented about his cath.
I am no vet by any stretch but was wondering about his antibiotics and pain regemine. Can any one enlighten me about this,I understand it won't be strictly based on his care.

StrawberryFelidos
May. 23, 2006, 02:40 PM
I was wondering what kind of tranquilizers he might be on to "limit friskiness" :winkgrin: so to speak. It is good that he is acting normally, but no one wants to see him get too frisky at this point.

DMK
May. 23, 2006, 02:55 PM
Oh so many years ago, post surgical regimin was IV tetracycline and bute. Wonder if that has changed?

Richardson did say the epidural cath was there if needed, but not that it was being used. I know we were very careful about striking the right balance between pain killers - enough to keep them comfortable, but not so much that they felt like cavorting about!

Of course this was back in the dark ages when we had to go out and harvest the Bute Tree and make our own. ;)

Dressage Art
May. 23, 2006, 03:13 PM
sending (((((HUGS))))) and healing thoughts. What a great horse - a bright shooting star!

lizathenag
May. 23, 2006, 04:02 PM
I listened to several reports on Wire to Wire today. They discussed the danger of laminitis at the 4-6 week mark. They said he would either be a stallion or not make it. Didn't seem to be anything in between.

Lord Helpus
May. 23, 2006, 05:04 PM
I myself am wondering about the report that Barbaro was "very interested in the mares near his stall" and "was acting apporpriately for a young stallion".

MARES NEAR HIS STALL???? What the fruitbat are they doing???I would hope that New Bolton is smart enough to move the friggin' mares away from his stall! OMG. Horses and men. They all think with their penises. It will be the downfall of them all.

SeaOat
May. 23, 2006, 06:53 PM
Some asked about tranqs & antibiotics.....too much of both create problems of their own. One causes the gut to slow (colic) and the other can lead to diahrea.
Putting so much hardwear in his leg, btw, will aid in the fusion.
He also felt weightbearing enough this afternooon to lift his left leg at 1/2 bluff attemt at a kick.
On another thread someone got excited (more so than the horse?) over mares being so close to him.....fillies pass by colts often at track & can even be in stalls backtoback or next door. If it gets to be too much of a problem, more than casual "how you doing?" out of him, obviously the sexes get moved around. All around him found his interest as a good sign. Kicking at someone in his stall even better.

Lass
May. 23, 2006, 06:55 PM
I just read this AP article. Here is an excerpt:

"We've run the gamut of emotions from the euphoria of the Kentucky Derby to the devastation of the Preakness," owner Roy Jackson said. "The sad part is that in Barbaro's case, that the American public won't get a chance to see him continue his racing career. Even though he ran so well in the Kentucky Derby, we probably didn't see his greatest race. But that's water over the dam. We're just glad we jumped a hurdle here so far."

Richardson added that the Jacksons' main concern was for the health of Barbaro, not for the millions of dollars the colt could make as a stallion if he recovers completely.

"If this horse were a gelding these owners would have done everything to save this horse's life," Richardson said. "I've known the Jacksons a long time. If this horse had no reproductive value they would have saved his life."

Gretchen Jackson added: "My hope for him is that he lives a painless life. Whether that means he'll be a stallion with little Barbaros, that would be the extreme hope for him."

The whole article can be found here: http://www.comcast.net/sports/index.jsp?cat=SPORTS&fn=/2006/05/23/398432.html (cute picture here as well)

*jumper*
May. 23, 2006, 07:29 PM
I know this has porbably been asked a million times already, but any way to contact Edgar Prado? He did such an amazing job.
Also...where would I send an actual letter to Barbaro? Obviosly to New Bolton but which address?

Thanks a bunch!!!

horsekpr
May. 23, 2006, 08:02 PM
You can send barbaro an email at

http://www.usef.org/

go to the website ,or just dash off an email to
matzbarbaro@usef.org
they will be going right to New Bolton.

merry98
May. 23, 2006, 08:04 PM
You can also go to Penn's website. Here is the link:
http://www.vet.upenn.edu/barbaro/

tntarab
May. 23, 2006, 08:08 PM
When my Arabian stallion fractured his hock in the early 90's, he was on stall rest and I had to grind up small pills...like 40 or so at a time to give him in his feed. The tran

tntarab
May. 23, 2006, 08:09 PM
Sorry about the split...hit a bad button..

anyway my stallion was semi sedate for a week at a time....

Anne FS
May. 23, 2006, 08:19 PM
MARES NEAR HIS STALL???? What the fruitbat are they doing???I would hope that New Bolton is smart enough to move the friggin' mares away from his stall! OMG.

He was in the INTENSIVE CARE UNIT. The mares were in the INTENSIVE CARE UNIT. The place is big, but how vast do you think it is?

A stallion knows when there's a mare in the same barn. It's not like they were parading mares in front of him. Good grief. These people know what they're doing.

VirginiaBred
May. 23, 2006, 08:38 PM
As posted on Tim Woolley's blog, from Fair Hill:

Edit 12: New Bolton Center's 3 pm press release confirms Barbaro is progressing well (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update5-23.htm). They will release a press release each day at 3pm, or when conditions warrant. We will blog them here. This press release also includes some links for donations (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/giving/giving_ways.html), and an e-mail form to send well wishes to Barbaro (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/barbaro). We do encourage you to add your comments and thoughts below. Sharing your thoughts and reading others' thoughts on this tragedy can be very helpful for all (and we will endevour to get them all to the Barbaro team.)

Summershyne7
May. 23, 2006, 10:09 PM
Please don't get me wrong, I thoroughly wish Barbaro all the best, as well as his owners; however, why the heck does there need to be a fund for a horse who won well over a million dollars and who is capable of earning a breeding fee of 25,000+ a pop when he recovers? Wouldn't a contribution to a fund for retired racehorses be, in general, more beneficial? Or hungry children in Africa even?

merry98
May. 23, 2006, 10:12 PM
I don't believe it's for him. It is in his name.

J. Turner
May. 23, 2006, 10:18 PM
I don't believe it's for him. It is in his name.

On the New Bolton webpage, it emphasizes it is in his name and honor. It is in no way FOR him or pays any of his bills. I believe a generous anonymous donor started the fund in his name according to the press conference with the doctor and owners today.

annikak
May. 23, 2006, 10:19 PM
its not for him, its in honor of him- and New Bolton can use the money- they are amazing about treating whatever comes their way, so perhaps this fund can help defray those costs.
In any event, this horse has touched more lives and hearts then I can ever remember any horse touching. He is something special- whatever that is, he has it. So, no matter what happens, there is some sort of tribute to him.
I sure hope to see little Barbaros!!!

Seal Harbor
May. 23, 2006, 10:20 PM
Please don't get me wrong, I thoroughly wish Barbaro all the best, as well as his owners; however, why the heck does there need to be a fund for a horse who won well over a million dollars and who is capable of earning a breeding fee of 25,000+ a pop when he recovers? Wouldn't a contribution to a fund for retired racehorses be, in general, more beneficial? Or hungry children in Africa even?

It's in his name to honor him. The funds will not be used for his care, he can pay his own way.

Ladybug Hill
May. 23, 2006, 10:53 PM
I had been curious about his shoeing. It was interesting to learn here about his special shoe, but I was a bit curious how they shod him? And what about the shoe on the bad leg--how did they get it off? Did all his shoes get pulled? Did they do it during surgery while he was out? How could they hold his bad leg stable enough to remove that shoes?

Anyone know the answers?

StrawberryFelidos
May. 23, 2006, 11:51 PM
Not sure if this has been posted on this thread already, but here's a link to today's (5/23's) interview with Richardson and the Jacksons. Just a notice, this interview is VERY long (30+ minutes) so get a snack and take a potty break before you watch :lol:
http://cbs3.com/topstories/local_story_143093240.html
All and all very interesting information, some of which I have not seen published anywhere.

catknsn
May. 24, 2006, 02:42 AM
Sorry, but I have to giggle. "Send Barbaro an e-mail" ??? What, is he getting internet installed during his stall rest so that he won't be bored ??? :D

Ladybug Hill
May. 24, 2006, 07:36 AM
Hey, I sent him an email. Don't make me feel like a complete fool! :D

BeastieSlave
May. 24, 2006, 07:37 AM
The Today show had an interview with Dr. Richardson from Barabro's stall (taken from yesterday?). He looked great! They showed the cast, Dr. R moved him around the stall, and the interviewer fed him carrots. The Dr. was really smiling and seemed well pleased with things to date :D

Matt Lauer said they'd have some stuff on the show's MSNBC site.

caffeinated
May. 24, 2006, 07:41 AM
Sorry, but I have to giggle. "Send Barbaro an e-mail" ??? What, is he getting internet installed during his stall rest so that he won't be bored ??? :D

Heard a blurb on NPR this morning, Dr. Richardson joking about how he's a bit upset about the email thing "because they don't have a keyboard set up in the stall yet"

heh.

War Admiral
May. 24, 2006, 08:27 AM
As those of us who own 'em can tell you, EVERY TB on stall rest expects to have his e-mails read out loud to him one by one. Preferably by a nurse who has karotten in the other hand.

While the cable and T3 line are being installed.

:D

Where'sMyWhite
May. 24, 2006, 09:14 AM
I caught the short video on The Today Show... Barbaro sure looks like he is moving well with the RH all things considered :D

I noticed a shaved area and maybe a bandage or sutures or I_couldn't_tell by his right hip. Any idea what hat might be? Maybe the "epidural" site?

Boston Chicken
May. 24, 2006, 09:58 AM
I can't find the video of him in his stall from the Today Show. But I did see the interview wirh Matz from yesterday. Heartbreaking.

SGray
May. 24, 2006, 10:26 AM
nice article in NYTimes today
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/23/sports/othersports/23leg.html?ex=1306036800&en=06254bfdffd16d87&ei=5089&partner=rssyahoo&emc=rss

I think they explained (for the layman)things pretty well

Velvet in disguise
May. 24, 2006, 10:34 AM
The hip suture is from a piece of his pelvis they had to take and use in the reconstruction surgery.

www.bloodhorse.com has some really good articles covering that.

KZ4Horses
May. 24, 2006, 11:05 AM
Just wanted to let you guys know that the video of him in his stall is up on msnbc. Just finished watching it, he looks good!! Heres the link.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12901493/from/RS.1/

Boston Chicken
May. 24, 2006, 11:18 AM
Ugh - waterworks again. He does look pretty good considering. Poor baby.

des
May. 24, 2006, 11:18 AM
Very nice tribute video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmgf-ocQFbc

Glimmerglass
May. 24, 2006, 11:27 AM
A news reporter's visit with Barbaro Tuesday

VIDEO NBC10 Philly Tuesday Visit by Jade McCarthy to Barbaro (http://www.nbc10.com/video/9264052/index.html)

It is pretty quick and with those pinned ears I don't think he's too keen on Ms. McCarthy :)

JumperDoc
May. 24, 2006, 11:27 AM
can someone post the link to the MIchael Matz interview. I'd love to see that.

Where'sMyWhite
May. 24, 2006, 12:30 PM
The hip suture is from a piece of his pelvis they had to take and use in the reconstruction surgery.

www.bloodhorse.com (http://www.bloodhorse.com) has some really good articles covering that.

Interesting... VID do you remember which article in specific? I've already read alot of what The Bloodhorse has had to say and dont remember seeing this...

Arado*TB
May. 24, 2006, 12:44 PM
Thanks for posting the link. You can hear the emotion in the Jackson's.I am so greatful they gave him a chance.He looks good.

StrawberryFelidos
May. 24, 2006, 01:32 PM
Awesome video of him in his stall- I was waiting to see one of those! Just gotta make sure that all the other newscasters don't try to flood the stall and kiss him without asking :winkgrin:

He's one stoned horse :yes: But that's for his own good.

Lookout
May. 24, 2006, 02:26 PM
From UPenn's website and the transcript of the press conference:

This is Stephanie Church at "The Horse." Please go ahead.

Stephanie Church: Dr. Richardson. What are you doing to try and prevent laminitis in the opposite limb? Is Barbaro wearing any special support shoes on the unaffected limb?

Dean Richardson: Horses have problems - we mentioned this previously. Horses do have problems with breaking down in the opposite foot, the foot that's bearing the most weight. As long as he's comfortable this is less likely to occur. In terms of what is being done to help prevent this, when he came in his racing shoes were removed altogether and he is - his left hind foot was shod with a special glue-on shoe that had special padding. It also raises his foot up a little bit so that his limb length is equivalent to the cast limb on the right hind. So he has a special shoe in place.


I had been curious about his shoeing. It was interesting to learn here about his special shoe, but I was a bit curious how they shod him? And what about the shoe on the bad leg--how did they get it off? Did all his shoes get pulled? Did they do it during surgery while he was out? How could they hold his bad leg stable enough to remove that shoes?

Anyone know the answers?

Levi's owner
May. 24, 2006, 06:39 PM
I can't help myself. I keep up to date and then call my best friend in Colorado to keep her up to date.
Video montage made me teary.....
Pictures of him in his glory make me teary....
Seeing the Jacksons getting choked up over wanting to see little Barbaros around makes me teary.....

Does someone have a case of tissues they could send me??

lelevic
May. 24, 2006, 07:12 PM
I know this is bad, but I think it is hilarious when Ms. Mccarty kisses Barbaro's head and he pins his ears even more! Just when you think those ears couldn't go back any further, he cranks 'em back even more! It just makes me laugh.

Levi's owner
May. 24, 2006, 07:30 PM
can someone post the link to the MIchael Matz interview. I'd love to see that.

See if this will work:

http://video.msn.com/v/us/v.htm

If not, it's on the top ten video highlights page on msn.

ASB Stars
May. 24, 2006, 07:49 PM
Maybe I missed something- I didn't see Michael on that one...of course, I turn it down and look away for the breakdown...

Is it on there- if so, I'll try again!

Levi's owner
May. 24, 2006, 08:01 PM
It is there. I don't know if it had the break down on it or not. I'm so used to immediately closing my eyes. The title has a gorgeous picture of him and it says "He sure did get a lot of support."
Michael's so sweet. Tears in his eyes.

Kahuna
May. 24, 2006, 09:02 PM
It is there. I don't know if it had the break down on it or not. I'm so used to immediately closing my eyes. The title has a gorgeous picture of him and it says "He sure did get a lot of support."
Michael's so sweet. Tears in his eyes.
I needed Kleenex after I watched that.:sadsmile:

VirginiaBred
May. 24, 2006, 09:18 PM
I have never been happier than to see that amazing, beautiful Barbaro moving around his stall, as well as he did.

Thank you everyone for the continued jingles!!!!!

Let's keep the positive mind set going in his direction!

Meadow36
May. 24, 2006, 09:31 PM
Wow. He was practically walking sound. He looks great. I'm really surprised, I didn't think he had a chance.

J. Turner
May. 24, 2006, 10:17 PM
I wish I could've seen it, but IE doesn't seem to want to play it. Neither does my Firefox. :(

Lady Counselor
May. 25, 2006, 05:52 AM
Link to photos of Barbaro at New Bolton, including before and after xrays. Wow!
http://www.upenn.edu/vet/newsandevents/news/BarbaroPhotos.htm

Gunnar
May. 25, 2006, 10:40 AM
I am thrilled to hear he is doing so well. I am always jingling like crazy and he will always be in my thoughts!:sadsmile:

Rock on Barbaro, we all love you, in fact the whole world loves you!:sadsmile: You are a shining star!:cool: :sadsmile:

ASB Stars
May. 25, 2006, 08:58 PM
I can't get my 'puter to play me the bit with MM in it...waaahh

Anyhow- I just wanted to say that everytime I look at the pictures of the BIG guy- Barbaro- I am struck by that HUGE, kind eye. This is a truly wonderfully kind horse, and so intelligent. I am amazed by this guy- he has been a superstar since he was born, by all accounts, and I am thrilled to hear more about his successful recovery each day.

AND, if I read one more nasty article that contains "it" as a pronoun, I am going to hunt those fools down. This colt was *probably* worth more dead than alive at the time of his injury- and these people stepped up for a colt that obviously has aheart as big as all outdoors (sorry, Phar Lap) and did the right thing.

I hope he lives to sire amazing creatures. Some that race, and some that just make their people happy.

Meadow36
May. 25, 2006, 09:03 PM
Just a note - I know some people were asking - his stable name is "Bobby". :winkgrin:

Boston Chicken
May. 25, 2006, 09:07 PM
Wasn't that Phar Lap's too? Or was that just what Tommy (I think) called him?

mvb
May. 25, 2006, 10:49 PM
Wasn't that Phar Lap's too? Or was that just what Tommy (I think) called him?


Tommy's name for him!

mvb
May. 25, 2006, 11:02 PM
Wasn't that Phar Lap's too? Or was that just what Tommy (I think) called him?


Tommy's name for him!

WarHorse
May. 26, 2006, 07:17 PM
des:

>>>Very nice tribute video.

Yes, it is. The tears flowed again.


Seahorsefarmtobe:


Roy Jackson thanked many people for their efforts to save Barbaro, including Edgar Prado, outriders and other Pimlico staff, trainer Michael Matz and assistant Peter Brette, track veterinarians, in addition to Dr. Scott Palmer (who was attending the race as a spectator and "jumped in" to help), city and state police officers who provided an escort from Pimlico, and the staff of the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa.

I had the name of the track vet who administered the inflatable cast to Barbaro, but can't find it now. He did a superb job under extraordinary circumstances.


Watching the video on MSNBC again, Gary Stevens agreed with Edgar: Barbaro broke better than he did in the Derby. And so enough with the conspiracy theory.

My thoughts and jingles (even without a curb chain) go out to Barbaro and his connections. Ruffian may have been our Pegasus, but Barbaro is our Adonis, and as such, we should continue to wish him our best over the long haul.

And my thanks go out to the COTHers, who continue to keep Barbaro in their prayers.

J. Turner
May. 26, 2006, 07:18 PM
He does have a big generous kind eye, doesn't he? I hope get to pat him someday.

Levi's owner
May. 27, 2006, 07:55 AM
You can just see his eye and know that he would put his head in your lap if he could. He's just stunning. Makes me wish I had a mare;-)
If you want to see some beautiful pics, look at the thread that says "Pictures of Barbaro." Breathtaking!
http://praha.planetsg.com/Forum/showthread.php?p=1634101#post1634101

SeaOat
May. 27, 2006, 08:41 AM
"I had the name of the track vet who administered the inflatable cast to Barbaro, but can't find it now. He did a superb job under extraordinary circumstances."

I didn't see Dr. Palmer arrive while Barbaro was being cared for after race.....they were trying to reach Dr. Palmer on his phone not knowing he was actually there. Dr Dan Dryfuss and his associate along with Dan's assistant Matt (?) were putting on the robert jones (NOT inflatable at all, tons of cotton & heavy tight pulling). Once Palmer was reached they decided where to ship the horse & he met them there.

VirginiaBred
May. 27, 2006, 09:26 PM
As taken from Tim Woolley's Racing Blog:

Edit 29: Adding a few more pictures of Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/). A few more will be added tomorrow (sunday). These were taken the tuesday before the Preakness by Jennifer Duffy.
Edit 28: The Jackson's visited Barbaro today (I think likely everyday actually) and then visited Michael Matz's barn. Peter (Brette) reports that they said how well Barbaro is doing, so today looks like another good day (saturday).
Edit 27: Barbaro had another good night last night (friday night). I spoke with Michael Matz and Kathy Anderson this morning. It seems Edgar Prado is planning to visit him tuesday next week, all being well. He received a visit from the President of the University of Pennsylvania yesterday (of course along with Peter, Kim, Eduardo and whoever else visited). New Bolton Center is part of UPenn.
update: 8:41 am Friday morning

stfatpony
May. 27, 2006, 10:09 PM
I think that Dr. Nick Meittinis was the vet that put the inflatable cast on Barbaro.

WarHorse
May. 27, 2006, 11:19 PM
stfatpony:


I think that Dr. Nick Meittinis was the vet that put the inflatable cast on Barbaro.
That's the one! Thank you.


SeaOat:


Dr Dan Dryfuss and his associate along with Dan's assistant Matt (?) were putting on the robert jones (NOT inflatable at all, tons of cotton & heavy tight pulling).
Thank you for the correction! Now I'll have to look that up. I guess inflatable casts would be prone to punctures, wouldn't they?

Fluffie
May. 27, 2006, 11:29 PM
AND, if I read one more nasty article that contains "it" as a pronoun, I am going to hunt those fools down.

Side note:

Before you crack out the ammo ;), using "it" to refer to an animal IS gramatically correct. Being the good little English teacher, that is what I use during regular business hours. Everywhere else, he or she. :winkgrin:

SeaOat
May. 28, 2006, 06:02 AM
Nick & Dan are associates in same practice. I saw more of Dan putting on robert jones (look it up, no it's *definately* not inflatable but would be much easier if it were!) but it really doesn't matter who did most of this or that. Everyone was in&out doing what was needed. As well, it's such a difficult bandage that one person could easily use help. It's exausting applying those R.Js actually & if you have a bad back....Nick is a little on the hefty side :) & I didn't see him sweatyhuffy&puffyredfaced so assumed Dan did most the work :)

jparkes
May. 28, 2006, 03:04 PM
VirginiaBred, thank you for the continued updates on Barbaro.

I know infection and blood flow have been a concern for him, does anybody know if there has been a "milestone met" so-to-speak in regards to those two issues? If infection were to set in, would it have shown up by now? As well as blood flow, wouldn't that have been an issue by now?

Praying like heck for him and all involved, including owners, trainers, and all those who have been entrusted with his care during recovery.

VirginiaBred
May. 28, 2006, 04:35 PM
Barbaro on Friday: His Condition Is Excellent

http://channels.bloodhorse.com/images/content/BarbaroShoeSm.jpg
Special shoe worn by Barbaro during recovery from surgery.
Photo: University of Pennsylvania Five days after undergoing surgery, Barbaro was in excellent condition, according to a report from the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center. "He looks good, everything is fine, and his appetite is particularly good today," said Dr. Dean Richardson, the chief of surgery at the hospital, in a statement issued at 11 a.m. (EDT) Friday.
Barbaro fractured his right hind leg above and below the ankle during the May 20 running of the Preakness Stakes (gr. I). The injuries to the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands winner were both career-ending and life-threatening.
The latest report about Barbaro's condition included information about a special three-part, glue-on horseshoe, designed and patented by the Farrier Service at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Veterinary Medicine, that was applied to the hoof on Barbaro's injured leg.
"One of the complications that can occur following leg fractures in horses is the risk of developing laminitis in the opposite foot from bearing extra weight," said New Bolton Center farrier Rob Sigafoos. "To reduce this risk, we applied a supportive shoe to Barbaro's left hind foot immediately following the surgery for the fracture of his right hind leg."

http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/images/BarbaroShoe.jpg

Sigafoos explained that the shoe is designed to reduce the risk of laminitis in several ways:
By supporting the sole of the left hind foot; By containing materials that minimize weakening and possible infection of the sole; By being built up to extend the length of the left hind foot, which compensates for the additional length of the right hind limb created by the cast.
Barbaro remains in intensive care at the George D. Widener hospital.

VirginiaBred
May. 28, 2006, 04:40 PM
From Tim Woolley Racing Blog:

Edit 30: Another good night (saturday night) for Barbaro. Spoke with Michael Matz this morning who had spoken with Dr. Dean Richardson. I also spoke with Michelle Matz, Michael's oldest daughter, who works for Michael. She visited Barbaro yesterday afternoon at about 3 pm and said how well he was doing. It has now been a week, lets keep hoping the news continues to be positive. It does still remain very much day to day at this point.
posted sunday, 8:20 am.

lizathenag
May. 28, 2006, 04:49 PM
[QUOTE=jparkes]I know infection and blood flow have been a concern for him, does anybody know if there has been a "milestone met" so-to-speak in regards to those two issues? QUOTE]

I can't address those two issues but I did hear on Wire to Wire that the danger on laminitis was greatest during weeks 4-6.

my fingers are crossed.

Sannois
May. 28, 2006, 05:45 PM
to hear that the big hansdome man is doing so well!! Thank you Virginia bred..for all your updates! Still jingling for the boy!!! :yes:

Showponymom Aefvue Mid Atlantic Division
May. 28, 2006, 06:09 PM
NBC blacksmith is the best out there for corrective and ortho work. He is in good hands!:yes:

VirginiaBred
May. 28, 2006, 06:27 PM
The Man Whose Job Is Saving Barbaro

By Mike Jensen

Inquirer Staff Writer

http://www.philly.com/images/philly/philly/14685/215655465125.jpg
JOAN FAIRMAN KANES / Inquirer
Dean Richardson, 52, is the chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's school of veterinary medicine at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square.

A sinus surgery lasted 2 1/2 hours. Four more were spent taking a bladder stone out of a show horse. Dean Richardson was still at a friend's equine hospital in Florida on May 20 as Barbaro, the Kentucky Derby winner, was saddled for the Preakness Stakes.
Post a Comment (http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/sports/14683315.htm#recent_comm) Richardson wasn't going to miss the race.
"He had blood all over him, and he was doing it in flip-flops, so we hosed him off," said Byron Reid, a veterinarian in Loxahatchee, Fla., just outside West Palm Beach.
The two men watched the Preakness on a six-inch screen in the hospital.
"You could see enough," Richardson said. "That's the sad thing. It was just crushing. My stomach started churning. As soon as I saw it, I knew it was a very bad injury. I knew which horse it was."
Richardson, 52, is the chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's school of veterinary medicine at New Bolton Center in Kennett Square. Though he had done quite a few surgeries over the years for Barbaro's trainer, Michael Matz, Richardson didn't get on the phone right away.
"I was waiting for my phone to ring," Richardson said. "The people on site have the work to do. Then the phone calls started coming."
Within 30 minutes of Barbaro's devastating right hind leg fractures in the first furlong in Maryland, a decision was made: Get him to New Bolton. That was his best chance for survival. Thirty minutes after the horse had "catastrophically" broken three bones, Barbaro's digital X-ray arrived in Richardson's e-mail.
"I knew it was going to be a bad fracture," the surgeon said. "When I saw the radiograph, it was worse than I had hoped. I tried to sleep, but didn't succeed real well."
By Monday evening, a national newscast had the words Saving Barbaro behind the anchorman's head. But few on Saturday evening had been convinced that saving the colt was even likely.
"Nobody was about to put this horse down at the racetrack without giving him a chance at a hospital," Richardson said. "It just wasn't going to happen."
All sorts of lightning-fast, high-stakes calculations had been made at Pimlico Race Course. Jockey Edgar Prado had pulled up the horse expertly. By all accounts, the veterinarians skillfully had applied a splint to the leg. Richardson also saw something else.
"The horse's tremendous athletic ability, to pull up," he said. "Look at that tape, and the horse literally galloped on three legs for a few strides. He didn't drive his bad leg into the ground hard. That saved his life."

There wasn't much question Richardson was performing the surgery. Never mind that he had worked on Matz's horses and gotten to know him well, or that co-owner Gretchen Jackson is on the board of overseers of Penn's veterinary school.
New Bolton's pool-recovery system made the place ideal for the surgery, and Richardson is one of a handful of surgeons, one former colleague said, equipped to tackle the catastrophic injuries suffered by Barbaro.
"I think all of us in this job who fix horses for a living know that Dean is somewhere in another space," said Patricia Hogan of the New Jersey Equine Clinic, who was his student researcher for a year.
In fact, he wrote the book on a lot of this stuff.
"All major textbooks that deal with equine-fracture repair, Dean is an author," said Alan Ruggles, a surgeon at Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Ky.
Roy and Gretchen Jackson offered immediately to rent a jet to get Richardson back to Pennsylvania, but he didn't think that was a necessary expense.
"That would be like grandstanding, I thought," Richardson said.
He got on a US Airways flight out of West Palm Beach bound for Philadelphia shortly before 8 a.m. last Sunday.
"I got the back-row seat, next to the toilet," Richardson said. "If you want a real news story, [the flight] was on time."
As long as the horse's condition didn't demand earlier intervention, the surgery wasn't going to be earlier than Sunday afternoon.
"One of the big mistakes we used to make in the past: It's not generally a good idea to take a very fit horse that just broke down on the racetrack, is extremely stressed, and take them into a hospital, a strange environment, place them under general anesthesia, and expect them to wake up and act like they're halfway sane," Richardson said. "That's just putting the horse through way too much trauma."
Given a chance, he said, "they start understanding that, 'Hey, you know what, I've only got three legs to walk on. Let me figure out how to deal with it.' Then their chance of waking up from anesthesia and not injuring themselves is quite a bit higher."
The night he arrived at New Bolton, a helicopter buzzing overhead, Barbaro had calmed down considerably. First-year resident Steven Zedler saw Barbaro lie down for two naps that first night, both for about 45 minutes. The horse made sure he put his good limb underneath him.
"Horses have to lay down in order to get REM sleep," Zedler said, referring to rapid-eye-movement stage of sleep. "One day, two days, it doesn't matter. Long term, they start to get really sleepy and stumble occasionally. For him, it was just perfect. Some horses won't do it."

A 1974 graduate of Dartmouth, Richardson showed up at New Bolton in 1979 for his internship right after graduating from Ohio State's veterinary school.
"I knew the day I met him he would be the best intern I ever had," said Midge Leitch, the surgeon in charge of Richardson's first rotation at New Bolton. "He was - he is - one of the smartest people I've ever known. He has a tremendous ability to recall and integrate information. I didn't know what kind of hands he had."
She said it was like finding a kindred spirit.
"We started arguing at 5,000 decibels," Leitch said, "to the extent, in his internship year, some of the students thought we hated each other because we argued so vehemently."
When Richardson was an intern, Leitch said, there were even staff members who were more comfortable when he wasn't around. It was a good thing, she said, that she had six years of experience on him.
"I think if I hadn't that much clinical experience, I would have been intimidated," Leitch said. "He is a powerful intellectual force, and it turns out he has magical hands."
He has a great sense of where the pieces go, she said, but what sets him apart is his grasp of a fourth dimension. He can see possibilities.
"He will work on cases that ordinarily would be unlikely to have successful outcomes," Leitch said.
Richardson was the reason she went into orthopedics, said Hogan, his former researcher, who got a lot of attention herself for treating Smarty Jones after his famous starting-gate injury in 2003. Hogan said Richardson's approval "still means so much" 16 years after working with him.
Now, Richardson lectures all over the world on equine orthopedics. His research on gene therapy and cartilage repair is considered cutting-edge.
"He's as tough on himself as on anybody else," Leitch said. "But he's a little tougher, so he can also take it better than anybody else. He's into the carrot and the stick. And if there isn't a carrot handy, by God, there's a stick."
There are some in his position who could - some who do - occasionally skip Grand Rounds, the weekly Thursday 8 a.m. hourlong get-together when students present their cases for critique. Richardson is there.
"The students fear his questions," said Corinne Sweeney, the associate dean for New Bolton Center and executive hospital director. "Some of them, you can see, are so delighted when they see he is out of the country. When there are no questions, somebody will say, 'Isn't Dean here?'... He even will critique their grammar."
He's renowned for remembering the name of every horse and every owner who comes through New Bolton. But they got him once, a year or two back. One of his buddies who is a surgeon made a referral, and somebody showed up with a lame horse. Richardson gave a full evaluation, but kept saying, "This looks like my horse." Finally, his residents and interns couldn't hold it together any longer and admitted it. It was his horse.
He rides his own horses, plays basketball once a week, gets angry at himself too easily on the golf course, is an avid bird photographer, and not a bad cook. His wife also is a veterinarian, in private practice. They live in Landenberg, Chester County, and have a son attending an Ivy League school.
Richardson is direct, if not always loud. On Thursday, during a relatively simple procedure to straighten the crooked legs of a newborn foal, he showed a first-year resident how to put wire under the head of a screw properly so it wouldn't slip.
"You have to make sure you pay attention to which way you twist it," he told her, speaking evenly. "Remember, it doesn't have to be terribly tight."
At the news conference just before his surgery on Barbaro, Richardson came off as kind of brash. Asked what time the surgery would begin, Richardson said, matter-of-factly, "As soon as you stop asking me questions."

By that time, Barbaro already was receiving anesthesia.
"I was pretty confident we were going to wake this horse up," Richardson said. "I would have said the only reason we would put this horse down - the [I]only reason, period - would have been if I'd taken the splint off and the foot was cold and there was an obvious loss of blood supply. I would have talked to the Jacksons at that point and discussed the possibility that it might not be fair to the horse to wake it up."
Before the first incision was made, he knew the foot was warm and there were strong pulses in there. The skin was very badly bruised. If it had broken, the risk of infection would have increased dramatically.
"There's serum literally kind of oozing through the surface of the skin," Richardson said. "That's very badly bruised. But the skin isn't broken. It's about as close as it could be to being broken."
The horse was under anesthesia for almost seven hours.
"He maintained his normal body temperature throughout," said the chief anesthesiologist, Bernd Driessen. "Most, over time, get cold... . Maybe we'll find out sometime that, like Secretariat, he has an unusually large and powerful heart."
The tricky part of the surgery was repairing the pastern bone, which had splintered into more than 20 pieces.
"It would be like if you broke a china bowl and you try to put it back together but you're missing a lot of pieces," Richardson said. "So you have to fill in those areas with a bone graft, which was taken from his pelvis."
He was putting screws into some pieces barely more than a centimeter wide.
"We ended up doing what we'd planned; it was just harder than I'd hoped," Richardson said. "He had rubbed a lot of the bones together [after the fractures]. There was a polishing of the bone. Instead of nice jagged pieces fitting together, they become smooth and you can't put it together well."
He put in 27 screws and a 16-hole steel plate, as seen the next morning in newspaper illustrations all over the country. Operating-room nurse Erin Fabre - who had been listening to the race via cell phone the day before in the OR - said of Barbaro's operation: "It was one of the calmest surgeries I've been in."
"Throughout this, it isn't Barbaro really there," Richardson said of the surgery. "It's really not Barbaro. It's a horse with a very difficult fracture. It's Barbaro when I'm talking to the media. It's Barbaro when you have to face the consequences if you screw something up. But, you know, it's still the same work."
The horse is doing well. There are still risks of infection and other problems, but the real hurdle - the one that caused Richardson to call the prognosis "a coin flip" right after the surgery - is what happens weeks from now when the cast is taken off for good. The Jacksons and Richardson agree that this horse has to be comfortable.
"In the long run, I think we all think it's a 50-50 shot," said Liberty Getman, one of the residents who assisted Richardson during the surgery, holding some of the smaller bone fragments while he inserted a screw.
The only good that has come out of this, a number of Richardson's colleagues around the country mentioned, is that a linchpin of their profession got some recognition.
Not that they intend to tell him that.
"I talked to him Monday morning," said Ruggles, the Kentucky surgeon who had trained under Richardson at New Bolton. "He's an extremely competitive golfer. I told him, 'I shot 76. What did you do this weekend?' "
Contact staff writer Mike Jensen at 215-854-4489 or mjensen@phillynews.com.

Boston Chicken
May. 28, 2006, 07:32 PM
Best article yet. Thanks for the post.

Buffyblue
May. 28, 2006, 07:34 PM
I agree, great article, and thank you so much for the update!

incentive
May. 28, 2006, 10:05 PM
Great article! Thanks so much for the posting!!

VirginiaBred
May. 29, 2006, 08:57 AM
From Tim Woolley's Racing Blog:

Edit 32: Another good night (sunday night) for Barbaro. Michael Matz heard from Dr. Richardson this morning. As Anne Kelly (one of Michael's exercise riders) said this am, he's truly amazing, truly truly amazing (or something like that, we were passing each other on the horsepath at Fair Hill).
posted monday, 7:10 am
Edit 31: Spoke to Peter Brette later today (sunday) and all looks good for the day. Just wanted to thank Michael Matz, Kathy Anderson, Chuck, Peter Brette, Kim Brette, Anne Kelly and Michelle Matz (and likely I have missed someone) who have been very willing, in these very tough times, to provide timely updates when I have called, met them on the horse path at Fair Hill, or met them by their truck as they are at other barns examining horses (vets). Their efforts to provide 'transparency' to this situation, which seems to have captured the imagination of many throughout the country, has been awesome. Only with their support, are we able to provide timely updates.

sporthorsefilly
May. 30, 2006, 09:39 AM
Thank you all for the continuing updates. Prayers and good wishes for Barbaro, and thanks to all of his connections. Dr. Dean Richardson you did a great job!

VirginiaBred
May. 30, 2006, 09:53 AM
Thanks again to Tim Woolley's Racing Blog:



Edit 37: Another good night (monday night) for Barbaro. I spoke briefly with Michael Matz this morning who had spoken with Dr. Dean Richardson. As I remarked how remarkable it is to another of his exercise riders, he commented how if any horse could pull through this, it would be Barbaro ... he mentioned he was like a 9 year old jumper in terms of his temperament, which obviously bodes well. It seems they may not remove and replace the cast today as previously thought, but this will be confirmed no doubt via the press conference scheduled later this morning. It seems he is doing so well at this point, it only makes sense to keep the cast on for a while longer. As we mentioned yesterday, Edgar Prado is on his way to visit Barbaro. While we won't be attending the press conference (of course) we will link to the media reports as soon as we see them.
udate 7:40 am, Fair Hill Clockers Stand.
Edit 36: Around the media: the following article from The Baltimore Sun: Journey longer than 1 3/16 miles (http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/horseracing/bal-sp.barbaro28may28,0,3109286.story?coll=bal-sports-horse) is a vivid description of the events that followed the Preakness through to Barbaro's surgery. It reminds me a little of Kathy Anderson's e-mail we published in edit 14 (below). The Daily Racing Form: Matz: 'I'm just sad for racing' (http://drf.com/news/article/74978.html) describes what we might have missed as a result of this tragic incident. It also covers the overwhelming response the Jackson's have received from well wishers everywhere (I know Peter Brette showed them a print out of this site); and a comment from an exercise rider at Fair Hill:

"He was shook up. He said, 'The Lord doesn't give you anything you can't handle.' Then he rode away a couple of strides, stopped, looked back and said, 'He must think you're an awfully tough guy.' "

Lastly Lisa Leach posted the following comment below:

From the Barbaro page at horsehats.com (http://www.horsehats.com/)
Dear Barbaro Fans and Supporters:As his owners we would like to be able to reply personally to each of you for your kind messages and thoughts. There have been so many good wishes that it is impossible for us to do so. We want you to know that your thoughts have been a strength to Barbaro, Michael Matz, Peter Brett, Edgar Prado, his groom, the whole vet staff that is caring for him, and ourselves. The out pouring has warmed all our hearts and we thank all of you. Please continue your thoughts and prayers for Barbaro as he continues to heal. Sincere thanks:, Gretchen & Roy Jackson

Edit 35: The Bloodhorse confirms what we have already reported: Prado Scheduled to Make First Visit to Barbaro; Horse Continues to do Well (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33775). They also note the planned removal of the cast this week:

Surgeon Dean Richardson expects this week to remove Barbaro's cast long enough to examine the colt's shattered right hind leg, which is being held together with a plate and 27 screws.
"Changing the cast ... is significant because then he'll be able to take a look at the leg and see how it's healing," said Gail Luciani, spokeswoman for the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school.

Edit 34: Peter Brette just called, and visited Barbaro this afternoon (monday afternoon). He reports that they remain very happy with Barbaro's progress at New Bolton. Peter says he is in really good form, and basically just everyone is really happy. The cast may or may not come off tomorrow (and be replaced). It seems there will be a press conference about 9 am tomorrow at New Bolton Center, coinciding with the visit of Edgar Prado.
Edit 33: We have added more Barbaro pictures (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/) all taken the tuesday before the Preakness, by Jennifer Duffy. As with any of the other images, feel free to take them if you like. I think these new pictures are the best we have. I spoke with Edgar Prado's agent this morning who confirmed Edgar's visit with Barbaro for tomorrow (tuesday).

excowgirlie
May. 30, 2006, 10:03 AM
I depend on coth for all my barbaro updates, and you guys never disappoint! Thanks for all the awesome information.

excowgirlie
May. 30, 2006, 10:03 AM
drrr...that post sounded like a cheesy commericial! sorry...

Goldylox
May. 30, 2006, 10:37 AM
That last set of pics with Barbaro(?)and rider in the woods on the road. Wow, that is great! I love all these pictures:)
Thanks again to everyone on the updates, articles and pictures. Without this site, I would know nothing! Lets keep jingling for Barbaro to have a good week:)

eggbutt
May. 30, 2006, 10:44 AM
:lol: Cheesy commercial or not, it's true!

Thank you a thousand times for all the wonderful updates! I was reading elsewhere this morning about all the theories of how the accident happened....gate staff problems, announcer, another horse's foot hit his leg. This is the only place I feel the information is correct and not embelleshed in any way. Thank you so very much!

annikak
May. 30, 2006, 11:13 AM
anyone see or know anything about the news conference? I thought it was at 9 for some reason, but the NB site has nothing- or at least HAD nothing at 10...

BBowen
May. 30, 2006, 11:15 AM
What a superb article on Dr. Richardson, not to mention the note of gratitude from the Jacksons. Truly all involved with Barbaro are the epitome of class.

Continuing prayers and jingles.

Gunnar
May. 30, 2006, 12:09 PM
Great article on Dr. Richardson! Thanks for all the updates and the pictures. I printed one out and put it on the wall at my desk. He is a beautiful horse!

I will keep jingling!:sadsmile:

Mali
May. 30, 2006, 12:37 PM
Surgeon: Barbaro had 'incredibly good week'
Derby winner progressing well from broken leg, gets visit from Prado

The Associated Press
Updated: 12:45 a.m. ET May 30, 2006


KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. - Kentucky Derby winner Babaro is progressing so well he might not have the cast on his severely injured right hind leg changed for several weeks.

Dr. Dean Richardson, the surgeon who repaired Barbaro’s shattered bones after the colt broke down at the Preakness Stakes on May 20, said Tuesday the prized patient has had an “incredibly good week — far better than I would have ever hoped so far, so far, so far.”

Richardson said the fiberglass cast on Barbaro’s will be assessed daily, but there’ no urgency for a change.

“Right now this horse is walking so well on his limb, walks around the stall, he’s very active,” Richardson said at a news conference at the University of Pennsylvania’s George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals. “If he continues to look as good as he does, he can wear this cast for several more weeks. It has been a surprisingly good fitting cast considering I thought there would be a loosening of it or swelling above it. Neither one has occurred, and that’s why we’re letting it stay in place.”

Meanwhile, jockey Edgar Prado paid his first visit to Barbaro since pulling up the colt early in the Preakness, and was relieved by what he saw.

“It was very emotional,” Prado said. “I was happy to see him doing so good., feeling so good, looking so bright. He’s not out of the woods yet, but it was really food to see him making progress.”

Following Barbaro’s five-hour plus surgery May 21, Richardson had said the prospects of recovery were “50-50.”

That has changed slightly:

“I was going to call a news conference to say it’s officially 51 percent,” Richardson said, smiling. “Seriously, every day that goes by is a big day, and in terms of some of the complications, some of them were more likely to rear their head in the earlier stages in the convalescence (such as infection within 10-14 days).

Laminitis, an often fatal foot disease, or failure of the injury to heal properly can occur later, Richardson said, “but things are definitely better eight days post op. But it’s still a long, long way from being discharged from the hospital.”

© 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

© 2006 MSNBC.com

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13036999/

War Admiral
May. 30, 2006, 12:39 PM
Great news!! Still jingling!!

Equine Connection
May. 30, 2006, 12:42 PM
Absolutely wonderful, encouraging news indeed! Godspeed Barbaro! :)

sporthorsefilly
May. 30, 2006, 12:51 PM
Great news, keeping Barbaro in my prayers. You are doing great big guy!

certifiedgirl
May. 30, 2006, 02:00 PM
Yeah! Glad to see some good news and thanks to everyone who is posting updates and links.

DancingHooves
May. 30, 2006, 03:30 PM
Yeah!!! Go Barbaro! Go Dr. Dean! Thanks for the update :) I had not heard anything for the last couple of days and was hoping that 'no news was good news' !!

VirginiaBred
May. 31, 2006, 10:53 AM
Today's Tim Woolley Racing Blog Update:



Update 41: Another good night for Barbaro (tuesday night). I galloped past Michael Matz on the track and asked him how Barbaro did last night, and he replied: "Everything is excellent".
update 7:40 am, Fair Hill Clockers Stand.
Update 40: Spoke with Peter Brette tonight (tuesday evening). He decided not to visit Barbaro today given how busy things were likely to be with Edgar's visit and the media conference. We chatted about the current state of Barbaro and the importance of remembering that while everything thus far has been very positive, it is still a 50 - 50 sitiuation (or 51 - 49 as noted in the press conference today.) Clearly the decision not to remove the cast today is very positive, but there is still along way to go. I also saw Peter on Barbaro's little half brother, by Quiet American, this morning on the horsepath coming back from the track.
Update 39: Photos of Edgar Prado with Barbaro (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/BarbaroPhotos.htm).(thanks Lisa) from his visit today (tuesday). Also, I keep meaning to add a link to the photos, taken by Barbara Livingston, of Barbaro training at Fair Hill (http://www.barbaralivingston.com/gallery/album161?page=1). We met Barbara during her brief visit to Fair Hill.
Update 38: The Bloodhorse (Steve Haskin) has an excellent update on his condition from today: Barbaro Recovering; Jockey Prado Visits (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33786). As we noted earlier, the cast has yet to be removed. From the Bloodhorse article:

Richardson said May 30 that the first nine days have gone incredibly well. "He's actually done far better than we could have ever hoped, so far," Richardson said. "He's perfectly comfortable and all his vital signs are normal. His blood work is good, and basically, at this moment, he could not look any better in terms of his medical condition. His prognosis is much better than it was, but he still has a long way to go.
"When we change his cast will literally be a day-by-day decision. Right now, this horse is walking so well on his limb, he willingly rests his left hind, and he he's very active walking around his stall. So, my inclination at this point is go day-by-day. There's no compelling reason to remove the cast. If he continues to look as good as he does he can continue to wear this cast for several more weeks. It has been a surprisingly good-fitting cast considering I felt there would be a little bit of loosening or swelling above the cast, neither of which occurred."
Originally, Richardson had stated that Barbaro's chances of recovery were 50-50. He jokingly said it is "now officially 51%. "Seriously, every day that goes by is a big day. In terms of some of the complications, certain ones are more likely to rear their head in the earlier stages of the convalescence, such as infection. Laminitis or failure to fixation both can occur at later dates. There's no question that things are much better now in terms of prognosis, but he's still a long, long way from being discharged from the hospital."

jparkes
May. 31, 2006, 12:46 PM
Barbaro is being quite the patient! He must be loving all the attention he's receiving, so that must be keeping him from getting bored and causing trouble.

Also, there was a segment on GMA this morning showing the footage of Prado's visit yesterday as well as the owners speaking about the volumes of get well wishers from all over. All looked well.

Rock on Barbaro!

eggbutt
May. 31, 2006, 03:03 PM
The photos of Barbaro at Fair Hill by Barbara Livingston are breathtaking! THANK YOU!

Gunnar
May. 31, 2006, 04:13 PM
I love the pictures of Edgar visiting Bobby! Thanks for the links and I am still jingling for him.

Rock on Bobby, you are a King in the Sport of Kings! :sadsmile:

Chief2
May. 31, 2006, 04:15 PM
Lots of jingles for Barbaro!

timedjumpoff
May. 31, 2006, 05:30 PM
More update on the latest update: From The Blood-Horse, www.BloodHorse.com.
by: Steve Haskin
May 2006 Article # 6996

BREAKING NEWS:
Barbaro may have been kicked during race!


Michael Matz said he was informed by Pimlico officials that a frame-by-frame study of the incident shows Barbaro being struck by Brother Derek just before the accident.

"The stewards and Dr. David Zipf, watched the slow motion replay," Matz said. "They said it looked like Brother Derek's right foot hit him in the pastern. The front foot was stuck way out and as soon as it happened he head went up. If he was struck, he suffered no cuts at all. They basically said they're 80% sure he was hit someplace where he went off balance. We thought the condylar fracture might have happened first, but maybe it was just the opposite where the pastern went first and then it went up to the condylar fracture."

Although Matz said he wasn't able to see it as clearly as Pimlico officials, Lou Raffetto, the track's president and chief operating officer, said it was "pretty conclusive."

"We didn't want to make a big deal of this, because what happened happened, and you can't change that," Raffetto said. "We're not trying to defend ourselves; we don't feel we have anything to defend. We just watched it and sent the DVD to Michael, and he hasn't had the time to really look at it carefully. You have to look at it frame by frame to really appreciate it, which is what we did. We watched the head-on, the pan, and the stills.

"It's clear that Barbaro is inside of Sweetnorthernsaint in the three path before they get to the shadow of the building. And then he's clearly behind him two jumps later, and you can see that he drifts out from the head-on. Then when you go to the pan, you can see Brother Derek two or three lengths behind him and running up to the field. He runs into a spot just as Barbaro drifts out into the same spot. As they come to where the shadow of the building crosses the track, near the eighth pole, you see Brother Derek reach out with his right front foot, and just when it appears to make contact with Barbaro's right hind, Barbaro's head goes up, and you see (Alex) Solis (on Brother Derek) pull out with his right shoulder. And when Barbaro's head goes up, you can see his right hind leg twist out sideways and he puts the leg down awkwardly.

"By putting all the pieces together and watching it as closely as we did, we're pretty confident that's what happened. If this were pro football, they'd probably say it was inconclusive. It's probably 80% so, but it doesn't change anything. We just sent it to Michael to let him form his own conclusions. You talk about the racing gods, if Barbaro doesn't drift out this never happens. If Brother Derek doesn't break slowly this never happens."

When asked about Pimlico's findings, Prado said, "It's a mystery no one will ever know for sure. There's nothing we can do about the past. We just have to look to the future."

Solis, however, refuted Pimlico's claim. "There's no way he could have struck Barbaro; I would have felt it," Solis said May 30. "We were close behind him, but not that close. Getting that close to him and going that speed, if I had struck him I would have gone down. It was just one of those things that happened. I could hear his leg snap, and thank God I had enough space and time to get out of there. Luckily I wasn't that close to him and I was able to react quickly. Horses are like any other athlete. You can have a basketball player going for a rebound and he twists or breaks his leg. And you've got skiers going over jumps and breaking bones. It happens."


As for Barbaro's mental condition, Richardson said the colt "couldn't look a whole lot better in that regard. He's very active in his stall, and when a horse walks by the outside window, he's peeking out there trying to see who it is. If you were to look at this horse, I believe an objective person would not believe that this horse looks depressed. Michael Matz and (owners) Roy and Gretchen Jackson have been here every day and have looked the horse over, and I think they'd agree that he's bright and happy."

Richardson also said it is possible for Barbaro to go two or three months and still not be completely healed. "There are multiple elements to this injury, and to be perfect he's got to fuse his fetlock joint and his pastern joint, and we have to make sure he has no major problems with infection, drainage from the site, and foundering from the other side. So those things still could go wrong even at two or three months out.

"It is possible for his bones to heal to the point where they're very, very strong. What won't function on him is that he won't have normal mobility. He will never be able to do a dressage test, and he won't be able to gallop strongly or jump. At the very best, he'll have a hitch in his giddy-up. He will not be quite right, but there are lots of horses who can walk, trot, canter, gallop, spin around, and somewhat importantly, mount a mare; those things that you use your hind legs for. Yes, it is possible he'll can be active enough to do all that, but we're not even close to being at that point yet."


Matz is amazed at the amount of support he and everyone connected with the horse has been getting, and the number of e-mails that have come pouring in to the horse from all around the world. "I'll bet we received more than a thousand e-mails, and letters are coming in all the time," he said.

"I might never get another horse as good as him," Matz said, "but I look at this way: I'm lucky enough to have had him when I did. It's tough, but we just have to go on, and hopefully, we'll get there again.


OOPS! I just noticed that there is a thread on Brother Derek with this story. But like me, perhaps
others won't realize that thread is connected to Barbaro so I'll let this one stand.

Bugs-n-Frodo
May. 31, 2006, 06:09 PM
Go Barbaro GO!!! Now THAT is the TB heart we all talk so lovingly about, even we sport horse folks. ;)

VirginiaBred
Jun. 1, 2006, 01:48 PM
Thanks, Tim Woolley!



Update 47: New Bolton Center's press release today (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-1.htm) confirms Barbaro's excellent condition:

Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro's condition is excellent today, according to Chief of Surgery Dean W. Richardson, "He looks great and everything is fine."

The press release also goes on to discuss his breeding prognosis if he does recover from this tragic accident. Many have asked if we plan to continue providing updates. The short answer is: absolutely. As long as we are able to get direct access to updates from those close to the situation, we will publish them as we know them.
Update 46: Barbaro had another good night last night (wednesday night.) Dr. Richardson called Michael Matz with the news as usual this morning.
update: 7:35 am thursday AM, Fair Hill Clockers Stand
Update 45: Neat video from NBC10.com (http://www.nbc10.com/sports/9299846/detail.html) that shows Barbaro moving around and his comfort putting weight on his injured leg. The article also discusses the "plans" for the cast:

Dr. Dean Richardson said Wednesday that he is continuing his daily assessment of Barbaro's cast on his right hind leg. Barbaro continues to do well, and his vital signs and appetite remain good.
Richardson will decide each morning whether to change the fiberglass cast that runs from Barbaro's right hock to hoof. It could happen soon, or in several weeks.

Update 44: Just spoke to Peter Brette and Barbaro continues to do very well. He visited him again this afternoon (wednesday afternoon) and said Barbaro is in great form, he looked really well and is very happy. He could not be doing better at this stage. Please continue to leave your thoughts, comments and wishes.
Update 43: We have added more Barbaro pictures (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/), taken the tuesday before the Preakness (Jennifer Duffy). I wanted to take this chance to thank Eliza at Olive Tree Media (http://www.olivetreemedia.co.uk/) for her work on this site. She designed the site, is supporting it while we are covering Barbaro (which has meant changing servers and other technical things while the traffic has increased substantially (http://www.sitemeter.com/?a=stats&s=sm6timwoolley&r=35)), and uploads all our images (way beyond the tech. capabilities of me). I also wanted to mention that ESPN was at Fair Hill this morning. I think they were doing some coverage on Barbaro's little brother, but certainly they were covering Michael Matz's string.
Update 42: Sheila asks (in the comments) when the recovery moves beyond a day-to-day situation. Part of answer seems to appear in the Daily racing Form's coverage of yesterday's visit of Edgar Prado (http://drf.com/news/article/75050.html).

"Catastrophic infections usually occur within 10 to 14 days," Richardson said. "Laminitis, or a failure of fixation, could occur at a later date. There's no question that things are much better, but he's still a long, long way from being discharged.
"To be perfect, you have to fuse the fetlock and pastern. There has to be no infection. All these bad things could still happen. But bone is the only tissue in the body that can heal and be truly stronger. He won't have normal mobility, but the bone will be very strong."

Thus it seems we are still in the former period (10 days post surgery) but with only a few days to go.

Bascule Baby
Jun. 1, 2006, 03:09 PM
Who is she?

VirginiaBred
Jun. 1, 2006, 07:58 PM
With thanks from Tim Woolley's Racing Blog:

Update 49: Spoke to Peter Brette late afternoon, and while he did not visit today, presumes all is well based on what he had heard for the day. There is a chance, all being well, I (Tim) may get to visit Barbaro tomorrow with Peter.
Last year I was in the starting gate schooling a horse, when the trainer of the horse I was riding (Chloe Carroll) turned to Michael Matz and asked him if he had any Derby horses. He said he might have a couple, a Fusaichi Pegasus and one running at Laurel that following weekend (November 19). Can you guess the latter ?
Update 48: A nice article about Peter Brette from the Thoroughbred Times: Visits with Barbaro good therapy for anguished Brette (http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/todaysnews/newsview.asp?recno=64173&subsec=1) (thanks Lisa). We have been fortunate to hear directly from Peter after his Barbaro visits. A couple of excerpts from the article:

Regular trips to the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center and Barbaro's continued progress on a long, perilous road to recovery have been therapeutic for Brette, whose attachment to the stable star grew stronger as they traveled on an extended road trip from their home base at Fair Hill Training Center in Elkton, Maryland to Southern Florida to Central Kentucky.

and...

"Hopefully, we have a happy ending," Brette said. "He certainly captured the hearts and imaginations of many people."

Where'sMyWhite
Jun. 2, 2006, 08:05 AM
Again, with thanks to Tim Woolley's page...

This is a great article on Barbaro's typical day now...

http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/sports/14718635.htm

One of the things I found most positive is they stopped antibiotics on Tuesday.

Go Barbaro!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:07 PM
With continued thanks from Tim Woolley:


Update 50: Great article from twincities.com: Derby winner is just a horse in a stall (http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/sports/14718635.htm) which includes a really interesting timeline to Barbaro's day (thanks Gloria). A quick excerpt:

9-11a: Visitors show up, including owners Gretchen and Roy Jackson, Matz and Brette. Prado visited Tuesday.
10 a.m. - Visual check.
11 a.m. - Grooming.
12 p.m.: Receives abbreviated exam - heart, lungs, GI tract, and legs checked ... walks around stall ... fresh straw and wood shavings put down in stall ... Antibiotics were given first two weeks, but were stopped Tuesday ... medications administered as needed.

It appears another milestone was reached on tuesday, ending the antibiotics.
We have also added a couple more Barbaro pictures (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/).



Update 51: Another good night last night (thursday night) for Barbaro. Spoke to Michael Matz and others in the barn this morning.
update: Friday 7:40 am, Fair Hill Clockers Stand



Update 52: Barbaro has clearly touched many people, you only need to read a few of the comments on this site to realize this (and please keep them coming). The following story is further testament to the reach of those who really care.
Kathy Anderson (Barbaro's Fair Hill vet) was visiting Barbaro on wedneday at New Bolton Center. As she was hanging out with him she heard an 'entourage' coming. It was two soldiers, from Fort Benning, GA (or at least that is where she thinks they were from) coming to present Barbaro with an American flag. This flag had been flown in Iraq for nine hours and eleven minutes. It was then flown over to the US for these soldiers to present to Barbaro: to honour the wounded warrior Barbaro!



Update 53: New Bolton Center's release today (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-2.htm) confirms Barbaro continues to do well:

Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro continues to improve daily as he recovers from a shattered hind leg sustained at the Preakness on May 20. "I'm very pleased with the progress Barbaro is making," said Chief of Surgery Dean W. Richardson. "Everything is fine."

They also include a q and a, with the following questions:

1. In addition to hay, what, if anything, is he being fed? Do you have a special diet for cases like his?
2. How do you keep water from entering the cast while a horse is awakening from anesthesia?
3. Can he be groomed, or would that be too stimulating?
4. What size is his stall?
5. If he survives this ordeal and it is eventually deemed safe for him to be in a paddock, how would his leg be protected and supported? Will his hoof touch the ground in the normal position?


Update 54: The Bloodhorse has a nice story on Dr. Dean Richardson: With Famous Equine Patient, Barbaro's Vet Gains Celebrity Status (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33829), while Delaware Online covers his Fair Hill vet, Dr. Kathy Anderson: Fair Hill vet pulls for Barbaro (http://www.delawareonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060601/SPORTS/606010346). A quote from each:
On Richardson:

He knew without asking that he would be the surgeon to repair Barbaro. He had worked before with trainer Michael Matz, who lives down the road, as do owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson. He also knew he didn't have to rush back.
"Roy Jackson offered to send a chartered jet to pick me up," he said. "I told him he didn't have to."
A suddenly lame horse needs time to figure out that something is wrong, so it doesn't panic after surgery when confronted with being unable to stand normally, Richardson said. He operated the next day.
Jackson credits Richardson with saving his horse's life.
"I just don't know if any other doctor could have done the same thing," Jackson said. "He's done a lot of good things over the years. He just didn't get this kind of recognition."

On Anderson:

Matz and Brette value Anderson's role in their racing operation.
"She is just very good and always on the same page with us," Matz said. "She takes care of all our horses and was wonderful with Barbaro."

Update 55: Just spoke with Peter Brette who visited Barbaro today (friday afternoon). He is still doing very well, they are all very pleased with him. He is in good form and had another bath today (which he enjoyed). I was hoping to go with Peter today (as noted earlier) but some things came up so hopefully sometime later next week.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:10 PM
Barbaro in 'Excellent' Condition; Use of Hind Leg in Breeding Explained
by Blood-Horse Staff Last Updated: 6/2/2006 2:20:48 PM
http://channels.bloodhorse.com/images/content/BarbaroHeadBDL.jpg Barbaro continues to make progress.
Photo: Barbara D. Livingston
Edited from New Bolton Center reports
Dr. Dean W. Richardson, chief of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., reported Thursday that Barbaro was in excellent condition. "He looks great and everything is fine," Richardson said of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) winner. Barbaro remains in intensive care at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's New Bolton Center. He continues to improve daily as he recovers from a shattered hind leg sustained at the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) on May 20.
Meanwhile, New Bolton Center reported it has received many inquiries about the importance of a stallion's hind leg in the reproduction process.
"To register offspring from Thoroughbred stallions, all breeding must be done by natural service," said Sue McDonnell, of the Equine Behavior Laboratory. "This means that artificial insemination and assisted reproductive techniques are not allowed."
McDonnell explained that mares must be mounted, which is a fairly athletic activity, requiring good hind-limb strength and agility. The stallion needs to be relatively fit and free from discomfort; therefore, after an injury heals, the stallion needs to re-build his cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness to the fullest extent possible.
"In a case such as Barbaro's, his medical team would plan and monitor physical therapy with breeding in mind," she said. "Amazing things have been done to accommodate disabled breeding stallions, from custom-built breeding ramps to supportive splints or casts, to medications that reduce the amount of effort required. But in most cases, simple old-fashioned careful attention to detail, such as highly skilled stallion and mare handlers who can allow the stallion to compensate for his limitations, good athletic surfaces, and a breeding schedule customized to the stallion's fitness and fertility, can help sports injured stallions enjoy remarkably normal and successful breeding careers."
New Bolton reported that it has been among the leaders in developing methods of assisting aging and disabled stallions to breed.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:15 PM
FAQs About Barbaro; Colt Continues Daily Improvement
by Blood-Horse Staff

New Bolton Center has received many inquiries about Barbaro; below are the answers to some of those most frequently asked.
1. In addition to hay, what, if anything, is he being fed? Do you have a special diet for cases like his?
He's being fed sweet feed (the same kind he ate while racing), three times a day. We do like to see cases like this gain or at least maintain their weight, so often we add corn oil to their diets, which Barbaro is getting in his grain. We also encourage him to eat alfalfa because it is high in calcium and helps with weight gain. Finally, he gets fresh grass several times daily, which we try to do for our horses that are stall-bound and can't get out to graze.
2. How do you keep water from entering the cast while a horse is awakening from anesthesia?
The horse is not actually "in" water; he is inside a rubber raft. His legs are placed into extensions that are at the bottom of the raft – like waders fishermen use. In addition to being protected inside these leg holes in the rubber raft, the injured leg is wrapped in a thick plastic bag (like a shower curtain), the air is removed from around it, and then the bag is sealed to the leg with duct tape. So, he actually is completely protected from the water.
3. Can he be groomed, or would that be too stimulating?
Barbaro is groomed from head to tail at least once a day, not to mention all the "scratching" sessions he gets. We try to give all of our stall-bound patients as much stimulation as possible to keep them from becoming too bored.
4. What size is his stall?
Approximately 12' X 13', complete with a 2' X 2' window.

5. If he survives this ordeal and it is eventually deemed safe for him to be in a paddock, how would his leg be protected and supported? Will his hoof touch the ground in the normal position?
Ideally, if he survives, he will need minimal if any extra support once his leg is fully healed. His foot should touch the ground as a normal horse's would, but the angle of his fetlock may be different.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:18 PM
With Famous Equine Patient, Barbaro's Vet Gains Celebrity Status
by The Associated Press
Date Posted: 6/2/2006 2:10:25 PM
Last Updated: 6/2/2006 2:18:49 PM
http://channels.bloodhorse.com/images/content/DeanRichardsonAP.jpg
Treating injured Kentucky Derby winner puts Dr. Dean Richardson in spotlight.
Photo: Associated Press
By Deborah Hastings, AP National Writer
The doctor who helped save Barbaro's life strides out of his office, plops into a chair and bangs his hands on the table in front of him.
"So," he begins, "what do you want me to say?" It is a strange and exhausting time for the cocky and self-confident Dean Richardson, head of surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, nestled near the Delaware state line where strip malls and multimillion-dollar horse farms live side-by-side but worlds apart.
He is one of the country's best horse surgeons. And he reconnected the pulverized right hind leg of Barbaro, a dark bay Thoroughbred who charged ahead by 6 1/2 lengths to win the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) -- only to break down seconds out of the gate at the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) in Baltimore, his foot flaring at gruesome angles before a gasping crowd at Pimlico Race Course and millions of television viewers.
Since the May 20 calamity, Richardson has become an instant celebrity. He is as blunt as his crewcut hair. He says exactly what he thinks -- in daily news conferences, on the morning talk-show circuit and during stand-ups on CNN. But his colleagues are not surprised that he is feisty and cracks wise.
"If he hadn't spoken directly, like the way he is, I would have wondered, 'Who is that man? And what has he done with Dean Richardson?"' said Dr. Corinne Sweeney, the hospital's executive director. She has known him since he walked in the hospital doors 27 years ago as a first-year intern.
What was he like then?
Sweeney laughs long and hard. "Much like he is now," she says. "Except he's mellowed." Then she lapses into more laughter. "As a surgeon, I would say he's the best, but then he'd smack me on the head and say, 'I'm not the only one who can do this'."
What Richardson did, in more than five hours of surgery, was fuse a jigsaw puzzle of bones and flesh with a metal plate and 27 screws. The horse's cannon bone, above the ankle, was broken. His sesamoid bone, behind the ankle, was snapped. The long pastern bone, below the ankle, was shattered into more than 20 pieces. His ankle was dislocated.
Richardson originally pronounced the now-beloved race horse's injuries the "most catastrophic" he'd ever tried to repair.

Most horses with such injuries, he warned, "would have been put down at the race track." Nearly two weeks out, Barbaro is not down. He improves daily, eats like a horse, nuzzles his visitors, astounds his doctor.
But Richardson remains unswayed by his patient's high spirits.
"The problems we face with these kinds of injuries don't always happen in the first five days or the first five weeks," Richardson said in a recent interview at his hospital. "I keep saying that."
Being direct is part of a plan conceived by medical center administrators.
"This is a huge risk for us to be so honest with the press. Because if it goes badly, we'll all look worse. But we made a decision to tell the story as straight as we could tell it," the 52-year-old surgeon said.
But after all his media appearances -- and the added burden of treating the most famous patient of his long career -- Richardson may have gotten more than he bargained for. He does not abide fools. Or what he deems foolish questions.
Asked what he thought when he first saw Barbaro's battered leg, Richardson replied, "I don't have X-ray vision, you know. I couldn't see inside his leg."
He is no less blunt in dealing with medical students, especially when conducting rounds, a process the more meek of heart find a terrifying ordeal, his colleagues said.
"His students are very intimidated. He expects a lot," says second-year intern David Levine, who assisted in Barbaro's surgery. "He's going to keep asking questions until you get one wrong," he said, and like Sweeney, started laughing.
Not a word was said about their patient's fame during surgery.
"We all knew who the horse was, obviously," Levine said. "That doesn't need to be said. Everyone who works here is at the top of their game. We get a lot of famous horses in here. We treat them all with the same level of skill and care."
Yet Richardson seems a bit baffled by the Barbaro limelight he has stepped into. And by the avalanche of flowers, apples, carrots and oranges from everyday people who also send along suggestions for treating Barbaro -- as if he were a human being.
"Every amateur thinks he's invented something when he suggests we put him in a wheelchair," Richardson says, shaking his head. "There is no such thing."
He has specialized in orthopedics since joining the staff after serving his internship and residency here. At the University of Ohio, he scrapped every plan he had for the future after he took a horse-riding class and felt the synch of beast and man while sitting in the saddle, and turned to veterinary sciences.
His wife also is a veterinarian. Their 21-year-old son wants to be a doctor -- a people doctor, as was Richardson's father.

The horse surgeon operates on other animals. He recently stitched up an injured gazelle for a private owner. He does consulting work for zoos on exotic animals such as lions and tigers; he also treats cows and sheep and goats.
Another reason the hospital has been so public about Barbaro's convalescence, he said, is to show how far medicine has come in putting animals back together.
"We're better at this than we were five years ago," he said. The improvements come from innovations as simple as building bigger operating tables to breakthroughs that have kept pace with human treatment -- safer anesthesia, better antibiotics, sophisticated monitors to meticulously track the functions of major organs.
Those advances were not available to brilliant horses such as Ruffian, who broke her leg in two places in a 1975 match race at New York's Belmont Park. She survived surgery, but thrashed so violently afterward, she shattered her cast and had to be euthanized. In 1990, the filly Go For Wand snapped her ankle at the Breeders' Cup Distaff, collapsed and was put down in front of the grandstand.
In Barbaro's case, one innovation that made a world of difference was a raft with legs, into which he was placed after surgery, while still sedated. The raft was lowered into a pool of 97-degree water. When the 3-year-old colt woke up, he couldn't thrash or bolt.
"Horses have two responses -- fight or flight," Richardson said. "Their response is going to be to get up and run away. You can't pat them on the back and say, 'Hey, calm down, Barbaro. You need some rest'."
He watched the Preakness in Florida, on a six-inch hospital television. He had just come from surgery on a horse when he saw Barbaro break down.
Richardson picked up the phone and called his office, told them what equipment to get ready, and then booked himself on a flight out at 7 a.m. the next day.
He knew without asking that he would be the surgeon to repair Barbaro. He had worked before with trainer Michael Matz, who lives down the road, as do owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson. He also knew he didn't have to rush back.
"Roy Jackson offered to send a chartered jet to pick me up," he said. "I told him he didn't have to."
A suddenly lame horse needs time to figure out that something is wrong, so it doesn't panic after surgery when confronted with being unable to stand normally, Richardson said. He operated the next day.
Jackson credits Richardson with saving his horse's life.

"I just don't know if any other doctor could have done the same thing," Jackson said. "He's done a lot of good things over the years. He just didn't get this kind of recognition."
Surgeon Midge Leitch has known Richardson, who also is fiercely competitive on the basketball court and on the golf course, for as long as Sweeney has -- but in a much different way.
Leitch supervised his first internship. She was six years his senior. Even so, they argued so loudly and so vehemently that "the students went to the head of surgery and said we should be separated because we hated each other," she said. The memory still amuses her. They still argue. "We shout. Neither of us is intimidated by a good argument."
But the good doctor is a dear friend, she said.
"He always wonders if he's made the right decision. He comes across as totally confident, but in fact I know that he worries a lot. He struggles. Anybody who doesn't appreciate that about him doesn't get it."

Boston Chicken
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:25 PM
Thank you, VirginiaBred, for the updates and articles. It's heartening to hear of his progress.

La Gringa
Jun. 2, 2006, 07:54 PM
Jingles to Barbaro. Thanks so much for all the updates. I have been facinated and really moved by all of this. He is a great horse.

War Admiral
Jun. 2, 2006, 08:12 PM
Yes, thank you so much, VirginiaBred!

Jingling for Barbaro.

NeuroticShowMom
Jun. 2, 2006, 08:15 PM
Thanks so much for the updates, and for the reminder thread in the H/J forum. The tragedy and triumph (so far, fingers crossed) of the story still move me to tears. The extraordinary talents of all involved, especially Barbaro himself, are inspiring!

Edited to add: And I am still jingling like crazy!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 2, 2006, 08:38 PM
I am so happy to do a little something for this brave horse. I have been so moved and touched by his story, and to help bring the recovery story, be it even in a small way, is a happy thing for me to do.

Keep the jingles and prayers coming everyone!

We can do this for him!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

justjay
Jun. 2, 2006, 11:26 PM
jingles for barbaro

Velvet in disguise
Jun. 2, 2006, 11:33 PM
I think it's wonderful that non-horse people are so attracted to the sport and to this horse. It's wonderful for horses around the world. If they can feel this way about a race horse (that I also think could probably have taken the Triple Crown) how much more will spill over to the other aspects of the horse world? This could help other horse sports, and it could easily help with people supporting the care of horses when their careers have come to an end. Look at what it's already doing for the research at New Bolton. Just redirect some more and let the rest spill over and hopefully we'll be able to save and help even more horses. Doing it in Barbaro's name is a wonderful tribute to a horse that helped show the world that horses aren't just mindless beasts, but that they have feelings and desires--that they are noble creatures.

2hsmommy
Jun. 3, 2006, 08:36 AM
Continuing jingles for Barbaro! Bless his vets, owners and trainer for giving him all they have. I know they have the entire horse community pulling for all of them and hoping for the best outcome.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 3, 2006, 10:22 AM
Saturday Morning Update, Tim Woolley Racing:

Update 56: Barbaro (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbaro) had another good night last night (friday night). I spoke to Michael Matz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Matz) who had heard from Dr. Dean Richardson this morning. It seems he is doing very well at this stage, and everyone is very happy with his progress.
update: 7:55 am, saturday morning

VirginiaBred
Jun. 3, 2006, 10:28 AM
Surgeon agrees Barbaro likely bumped during Preakness

BY DICK JERARDI

Philadelphia Daily News

PHILADELPHIA - Dr. Dean Richardson is much more interested in the now and the next than the then, but the surgeon who operated on Barbaro said, "My impression from the beginning was that the horse was bumped right before the injury."
While saying "I'm not a forensic scientist" and "This isn't `CSI: Pimlico,' " Richardson thinks Pimlico executive Lou Raffetto's theory that Barbaro's right rear hoof was inadvertently struck by Brother Derek's right front hoof during the first few hundred yards of the Preakness is "the most reasonable explanation."
Raffetto, after thoroughly scrutinizing the tapes, said in Tuesday's Philadelphia Daily News he is "80 percent certain" that the two hooves coming together might have caused Barbaro's foot to twist awkwardly, resulting in the three fractures Richardson repaired.
"I did not examine the tapes," Richardson said. "But if this helps dispel all the notions that he was lame going to the gate, that is a good thing."
Richardson understands that when something so unexpected happens, everybody wants an explanation, even one not terribly satisfying.
"It is just possible to have a catastrophic accident, and that is all there is," Richardson said.
Like trainer Michael Matz, Richardson, chief of surgery at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, where Barbaro continues his remarkable recovery, is much more interested in the recovery than the reasons for the accident.
"I completely agree with Michael that it is not important in terms of assigning any blame, but it might help lay to rest some of the concerns about the horse injuring it while breaking early from the gate," Richardson said. "The concept of just bad racing luck is difficult for some to grasp."
Richardson has seen enough races to know that "horses come together all the time." With 1,000-pound animals running 35 mph in tight spaces, this happens in races every day at every track.
Almost always, nothing more happens. This time, something terrible happened. That is the really bad news.
The really good news is that, according to Richardson, Barbaro continues to be "more comfortable than I had hoped" at this point of his recovery. And each day that goes by gives just a bit more hope that what looked so ominous on May 20 may very well have the happy ending everybody had hoped to see on a race track.

HorseMom3
Jun. 3, 2006, 12:43 PM
Thanks so much for keeping this updated, I check it on a daily basis to see what is going on. I'm so happy that Barbaro is progressing nicely, even though we all know he still has a long way to go.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 3, 2006, 08:45 PM
Update 58: Peter Brette visited Barbaro again today (saturday afternoon) and reports that he is doing very well.
It seems there have been three significant 'events / decisions' this week, Barbaro's second week post surgery:
1. He was taken off antibiotics early this week (reportedly tuesday).
2. The decision to remove his cast early this week has been postponed to a day-to-day situation. This is a positive sign.
3. He has had at least two baths this week!
We have added a couple more Barbaro pictures (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/), taken (by Jennifer Duffy) the saturday after the Kentucky Derby. They show Peter Brette observing Barbaro, after he had trained.
Update 57: A couple of recent stories touch on the impact Barbaro is having on many people. Author J Carson Black wrote this story: The Hero's Journey (http://www.jcarsonblack.com/index.php/?p=162) which starts with the story of the American soldiers delivering their flag to Barbaro which we reported in Update 52 (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_fair_hi.php#update52). Clearly that story has impressed many. The Hero's Journey includes the following excerpt:

Nothing was spared in saving this horse. People waited and watched and prayed and hoped and cried.
The story is far from over, but we are more hopeful every day. Why? Because this horse is creating a miracle with every day he lives and thrives. By being the individual he is, by accepting his fate with grace and a good nature, by taking care of himself.

This story is also included as one of the comments below.
Randy Moss, writing for the NTRA has a story: Barbaro injury reveals racing's heart (http://www.ntra.com/content.aspx?type=feature&id=18152&style=) that includes the following excerpt while trying to analyze the public's overwhelming response to Barbaro:

The outpouring of support for Barbaro has been dramatic and even perplexing to some.
One newspaper columnist wrote that Barbaro briefly became the world's most popular sports figure "who is not a female racecar driver named Danica."
Another theorized that Barbaro's plight resonated more powerfully than if Barry Bonds had stumbled and broken his leg while rounding the bases after hitting home run No. 715.

showmom07
Jun. 4, 2006, 08:26 AM
I've seen different information in several different stories on the composition of the plate & screws in Barbaro's leg. Some say stainless steel, some say titanium. I'm no expert on this stuff, so can someone clarify this form me?
Thanks.

Goldylox
Jun. 4, 2006, 12:48 PM
Glad to the Barbaro doing so well! :)
Are the owners' barn colors yellow with black lettering? Or is it pink with black lettering?
I'm trying to find out their barn colors and have seen pics off a lot of different colors...
The Kentucky Derby shows pink with black lettering, another exercise photo shoes yellow with black letters? Could someone tell me?
Thanks,
Goldylox

StrawberryFelidos
Jun. 4, 2006, 03:10 PM
As far as I know, the barn colors are the same as the jockey silks: green, blue and white. :)

VirginiaBred
Jun. 4, 2006, 08:01 PM
Compliments: Tim Woolley Racing



Update 61: The Bloodhorse has a nice article on Peter Brette: Assistant Trainer Brette Maintains His Composure in Triumph and Tragedy (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33862). The article discusses Peter's career before working for Michael Matz (via Dubai), and the special relationship he and Michael have developed. The following excerpt notes the story of the two soldiers who delivered the american flag to the wounded warrior, we mentioned in update 52 (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_fair_hi.php#update52) as well as the special relationship between Peter and Michael.

Brette still can't believe all the attention the colt's injury and recuperation has received around the world. "It's unbelievable how many people he's touched," he said. "Some soldiers came the other day with an American flag that was sent for him from Iraq. And that's over at New Bolton now. They flew 19 hours from Iraq and drove another three hours just so he could have this flag."
It is rare to find the kind of relationship Matz and Brette have had in only a little over a year together. During that time they have formed a special bond and trust that has enabled the soft-spoken and low-key Matz to go about his business with the serenity and peace of mind that befits his personality.

Update 60: No new news to report for sunday evening. Spoke to Peter and Kim Brette late afternoon, and they were busy painting their deck. They had not visited Barbaro today, but certainly would have heard something if there was different news to report. Two weeks have now passed since the surgery, lets hope things continue as they have done so thus far.
Update 59: Barbaro had another good night last night (saturday night). I spoke to Martine (exercise rider of Michael Matz) on the track this morning, who gave me the good news; that Michael had received another positive report from Dr. Richardson. I later saw Michael who confirmed the news.
update, sunday 8:10 am

Kenike
Jun. 5, 2006, 01:04 AM
I admit I've been lurking and not posting (probably something everyone's gald for HA!), but I'm also grateful for the updates. It's so heartening to know Barbaro is doing well at this point!

I still swear that any bump came from SNS, but I may also just be crazy. I'm not saying he was bumped, just that I'm not in the consensus that any such thing would've come from BD. Like I said, I may just be crazy. :)

Seal Harbor
Jun. 5, 2006, 01:45 AM
Glad to the Barbaro doing so well! :)
Are the owners' barn colors yellow with black lettering? Or is it pink with black lettering?
I'm trying to find out their barn colors and have seen pics off a lot of different colors...
The Kentucky Derby shows pink with black lettering, another exercise photo shoes yellow with black letters? Could someone tell me?
Thanks,
Goldylox
If you are talking aobut the saddle cloth that is the cloth for the number 8 slot in the gate. It's no ones colors. Their silks are their colors the Jackson's are Lael Stable, their silk colors are lime green, what looks like royal blue, with a white X. Michael Matz is Vintage Farm, which is the yellow saddle cloth with the VF you see in the Fair Hill pictures.http://www.horsehats.com/Barbaro.html This place sells hats and t-shirts with the Lael Stables colors and Barbaro's name on them.

showmom07
Jun. 5, 2006, 06:40 AM
I've seen different information in several different stories on the composition of the plate & screws in Barbaro's leg. Some say stainless steel, some say titanium. I'm no expert on this stuff, so can someone clarify this form me?
Thanks.

Also, what's the reason for the decision to use one over another? Is there a veterinary reason to use it v. what would be used in human medicine?

VirginiaBred
Jun. 5, 2006, 09:46 AM
Thanks, Tim Woolley!

Update 62: Barbaro continues to do well, he had another good night last night (sunday night). I met Michael Matz's 'set' coming back from the track this morning, and received the good news. On a (somewhat) unrelated note, as I was jogging by the 3/16ths of the main track first set (6:05 am) I saw a fox (vixen) and what appeared to be three cubs playing.
update: monday, 7:15 am

VirginiaBred
Jun. 5, 2006, 09:56 AM
Barbaro's X-ray after the operation

http://www.thesundaymail.com.au/extras/reviewmay28/barbarosxrayaftertheoperation.jpg
This handout x-ray image made following surgery of Kentucky Derby champion Barbaro shows the repairs made at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center 21 May 2006 in Kennett Square, PA. Barbaro suffered severe breaks above and below and ankle and a dislocated bone during the 20 May 2006 Preakness, second leg of the American Triple Crown series.



On Sunday, Barbaro underwent about four hours of surgery in an attempt to stabilize the extensive fractures. New Bolton Chief of Surgery Dean Richardson inserted a locking compression plate and about 27 titanium screws (Richardson told reporters Tuesday that he had misspoken Sunday when he said he used 23 screws).

captain
Jun. 5, 2006, 10:18 AM
thank you for the continuing updates, VirginiaBred. very much appreciated here!

showmom07
Jun. 5, 2006, 10:39 AM
I've read at least 20 articles about the surgery. Some say the screws are titanium, but only mention "metal" plate. Some say specifically the plate was stainless steel. Some say both were stainless. Some say both were titanium.

It seems most of the articles I found that mentioned a titanium plate turned out to be interviews with other vets who were simply discussing medical advances and what "probably" was implanted in Barbaro. But most of the articles which were specific to Richardson and Barbaro mentioned stainless, although not as a direct quote from the vet.

Just wondered if anyone knew for sure and why one would be used instead of the other, if it was species specific or anything like that ??

DMK? RAyers? Monstrpony?

VirginiaBred do any of your track contacts with the Matz team know for sure, rather than quoting one of the many articles?

Thanks


Barbaro's X-ray after the operation

http://www.thesundaymail.com.au/extras/reviewmay28/barbarosxrayaftertheoperation.jpg
This handout x-ray image made following surgery of Kentucky Derby champion Barbaro shows the repairs made at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center 21 May 2006 in Kennett Square, PA. Barbaro suffered severe breaks above and below and ankle and a dislocated bone during the 20 May 2006 Preakness, second leg of the American Triple Crown series.

On Sunday, Barbaro underwent about four hours of surgery in an attempt to stabilize the extensive fractures. New Bolton Chief of Surgery Dean Richardson inserted a locking compression plate and about 27 titanium screws (Richardson told reporters Tuesday that he had misspoken Sunday when he said he used 23 screws).

showmom07
Jun. 5, 2006, 10:50 AM
You'll find this article posted all over the net...
It specifies the plate implate is stainless steel specially formulated to facilitation toleration by the body....
This is by the manufacturer, so you'd think they would know.

Big Flats' Synthes plays role in Barbaro's healing
Company made plate used to repair champion race horse's broken leg.

May 24, 2006

The stainless steel bone plate used to repair Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro's right hind leg -- broken during Saturday's running of the Preakness -- was made at the Synthes plant in Big Flats......

The plant produced the locking compression plate used to repair the horse's right rear leg.

The plates and screws used on the thoroughbred are widely used in human hospitals around the world. The plate - made from stainless steel using a formula a body will tolerate -- used for Barbaro's ankle would be appropriate for a large adult's thigh bone, according to Christopher Scholl, the director of the company's Vet Division.

The goal of the operation was to have the bone fragments heal and fuse the horse's ankle in a fixed position.

In performing the operation, veterinarian Dr. Dean Richardson put back together as many of the large bone fragments as possible using the plate and individual screws, which were made in Synthes plants in Colorado and Switzerland. The plate now acts to carry the horse's weight while the bone heals.

The locking compression plate is a relatively new technology developed by Synthes and the AO ASIF surgeon group.

The novel feature of the implants are that the screws lock into the bone plate via threads in the screw head.

The process provides a rigid implant that can withstand larger weight loads.

It was introduced in 2000 for humans and Richardson was one of the first veterinary surgeons to try the new technology in horses, Scholl wrote.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 5, 2006, 07:39 PM
Update 64: Just spoke to Peter Brette, who visited Barbaro again today (monday afternoon). Another positive report, so it looks like another good day for Barbaro! This is good news for all of us, but specifically those who are finding it hard to focus on anything else ... even their pending wedding (Shannon: comment 139)
Update 63: The new Bolton Center press release confirms that Barbaro is continuing to do well (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-5.htm). The release also discusses gifts from unlikely sources:

Concern and support for Barbaro continues to pour in, often from unexpected sources. After seeing a photo of Barbaro lowered in our special equine recovery pool last month, the Notre Dame Masters Swim team --in support of a fellow athlete--made a donation for maintenance of the pool.

The release then goes on to discuss the importance of the recovery pool in the process of bringing a patient out of anesthesia without injury.
Yesterday, the Bloodhorse provided an update: Barbaro Walks Stall, Munches Huge Carrots (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33860) which included the following excerpt:

The colt remains on stall rest and spent parts of Sunday walking around the stall, peering out the window and eating carrots that were sent as a gift.
"Each carrot was almost equivalent to that small bag you buy in the grocery store," said Dr. Corinne Sweeney, executive director of the hospital.

Classic Melody
Jun. 5, 2006, 10:15 PM
Please continue to post updates, VirginiaBred. You're an awesome resource on all this. I know I am still thinking about Barbaro and his people just about every day. I'm so glad to hear he's doing all right, and seems to be handling stall rest well. Thanks so much!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 6, 2006, 02:54 PM
Compliments from Tim Woolley's Racing Blog:

Update 65: Another good night for Barbaro last night (monday night). Took me a while to get the update this morning, but thanks to Annie for helping me get it (from Michael, from Dr. Dean Richardson).
update tuesday, 8:35 am

Update 66: The Bloodhorse notes Belmont Patrons Can Sign 'World's Largest Get Well Card' for Barbaro (http://news.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33882). If you go to the Belmont I assume you will be signing the card. I had planned to go, but have since decided to stay at home. It seems Edgar Prado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Prado) will be kicking off the signing at 10 AM. In 'opinions' Joe Clancy (who is often seen at fair Hill) writes a wonderful piece: More Than We Know (http://opinions.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33880) (thanks Chris) which includes the following excerpt:

Thanks to Barbaro, they know more now. They realize the training center, situated within a 5,600-acre state property, houses Thoroughbreds worth millions. They also get why the training center succeeds. Who wouldn't want to live, work, and play at Fair Hill? Horse, human, deer, bird, groundhog, it doesn't matter. When Matz extolled the virtues of open fields, hills, and places for a Thoroughbred to train, a reporter asked if the workouts were timed.

It is certainly a great place to ride horses, and Joe forgot about the Foxes!
Annie (Michael Matz exercise rider) also left a comment last night, which included the following excerpt:

Life at the barn still goes on, but we wait every morning for the report from New Bolton. At around 6.30am Its always a welcome relief to hear he is doing so well. I know it makes my job a little easier knowing the Big Horse has gotten another night under his belt [so to speak].

Update 67: The Thoroughbred Times has an excellent article: Matz groom Orozco recalls harrowing moments at Preakness (http://thoroughbredtimes.com/todaysnews/newsview.asp?recno=64284&subsec=1) that highlights the immediate reactions of those at Pimlico at the time of the horrific incident. Clearly we make decisions in fleating moments that make have long term consequences, and perhaps Rafael Orozco's decision to get to Barbaro soonest may have helped significantly in the recovery process. The following is an excerpt:

"I want to help," Orozco said. "I see that when he passed in front of me that his rear right leg was broke and I said, 'Oh my God' and I [ran] out there.
"The jockey tried to pull him up, you know, and my only reaction was to help Barbaro. I don't want him to fall down and hurt his leg more or something."

People doing what they do because that is what they do.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 6, 2006, 03:52 PM
http://news.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33882

War Admiral
Jun. 6, 2006, 04:28 PM
Thanks for the updates!!!

Jingling for Barbaro.

Gunnar
Jun. 6, 2006, 10:51 PM
Yes, yes thanks for the updates. Bobby is always in my thoughts and I jinlge for him each day.:sadsmile: I printed out his picture and look at it each day. He gives me strength!:sadsmile:

BasqueMom
Jun. 7, 2006, 12:55 AM
Still jingling here in Texas and thank you so much for your updates!!!!
My two OTTB's are jingling also.

Bugs-n-Frodo
Jun. 7, 2006, 09:11 AM
I love this thread, I check it all of the time for updates. I am still jingling for Barbaro. Thank you so much for the updates!

certifiedgirl
Jun. 7, 2006, 09:39 AM
Me too! I check this everyday for news about Barbaro.

Fancy
Jun. 7, 2006, 11:58 AM
Thank you so much for taking the time to post these updates. As is the rule, the News services (Foxx, MSNBC, et al) dropped the story like a hot rock as soon as it was no longer news. THEY only want to report bad news....shame on me. Well, I guess it's a good thing that the Big Horse isn't news any more.

Fancy
Jun. 7, 2006, 11:59 AM
Thank you so much for taking the time to post these updates. As is the rule, the News services (Foxx, MSNBC, et al) dropped the story like a hot rock as soon as it was no longer news. THEY only want to report bad news....shame on me. Well, I guess it's a good thing that the Big Horse isn't news any more.

texang73
Jun. 7, 2006, 12:17 PM
Thanks for all the updates VirginiaBred. Quite informative and helpful.:yes:

I am thrilled Bobby seems to be doing well, and will keep jingling like mad!:)

Goldylox
Jun. 7, 2006, 12:27 PM
I would not be able to keep up with Barbaro's progress without this thread! Thanks so much to all that keep us updated. Do we have a poster of the year award on here?:)

annikak
Jun. 7, 2006, 02:24 PM
Adding my thanks to you, too- I appreciate it greatly!

BBowen
Jun. 7, 2006, 02:56 PM
VirginiaBred:

You don't know how much it means to us to have their wonderful updates from you. This is the first board I check each day, then The Blood Horse, to see how Barbaro is doing. Continue to send prayers and jingles for his continued progress.

Thank you so much for the time you take to share this information. Hugs.

At Liberty
Jun. 7, 2006, 04:20 PM
Thank you for the great updates, I check this thread often.

fastpace
Jun. 7, 2006, 07:26 PM
VirginiaBred-- Thank you so much for the updates! I am so glad Barbaro is doing well. I think about him often!:sadsmile:

VirginiaBred
Jun. 7, 2006, 08:05 PM
Update 71: Spoke to Peter Brette this afternoon, and while he was unable to visit, the reports seem to remain the same (very positive at this early stage). He plans to visit tomorrow, as does Pennsylvania Gov. Ed. Rendell (http://news.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33902). Received a cool 'slide show to music' file (not sure how best to describe it) of Barbaro. Will attempt to post it online in the next day or so.
Update 70: I caught up with Dr. Kathy Anderson (Barbaro's Fair Hill vet) this morning and quizzed her on the cast situation. I was curious to know the 'risks' to the cast replacement and when it was likely to happen, as well as the rationale for leaving it on for this length of time. This is what I learned from our conversation:
a. its great the cast has been on so long, it enables the healing process, so the longer he can remain in this cast the better, but its likely that after about 3 weeks it may need changing.
b. the risks to the change in cast include the need for the second cast to be an exact fit, thus allowing the current healing process to continue, and avoiding the potential for rub marks appearing (if the fit is not good) which may in turn cause infection.
Kathy also mentioned that Fox News will be doing a story on Barbaro this friday, 5:45 eastern. Kathy will be interviewed for that story.
The following Mercury News story: Barbaro's injuries are deja vu for one Kentucky veterinarian (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/14755142.htm) notes Nureyev's paddock accident which was similarly catastrophic. Dr. J.D. Howard, the surgeon for Nureyev, discusses many of the issues they needed to overcome as he discussed the recovery of Nureyev, the following is an excerpt:

But as Howard knows all too well, Barbaro's journey will be a long and trying one. He just hopes the colt's connections can witness the same miraculous comeback he was a part of some 19 years ago.
"It's going to be a long deal and hopefully there won't be any setbacks," Howard said of Barbaro. "One day you think you've got it beat and the day after, you want to vomit. You just never know what the next day will bring.
"Hopefully, this horse won't have to experience that."

Update 69: Another good night for 'Bobby' last night (tuesday night). I called over to Michael Matz's barn this morning as I was leaving our barn and Annie gave the thumbs up. Barbaro continues to do well.
update: wednesday, 8:35 am
Update 68: Spoke to Peter Brette, after he had just finished evening feed. He was unable to visit Barbaro today but spoke to Michael earlier and things seem to remain positive. Its been a week since they stopped the antibiotics, which seems to be very positive. I saw Kim (Brette, Peter's wife) in the local shop this morning (Prizzios) and while we discussed how positive things are to this point, we also concluded that there really is still a very long way to go. Lets hope things continue as they have progressed thus far!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 7, 2006, 08:11 PM
Barbaro to be Featured in Belmont Telecast
by Esther Marr
Date Posted: 6/7/2006 3:42:19 PM
Last Updated: 6/7/2006 5:53:52 PM
Coverage of the Belmont Stakes (gr. I) on ESPN networks and ABC Sports June 8-10 will include more footage than ever before of the details surrounding a horse that will not be present for the third leg of the Triple Crown. Barbaro, winner of the May 6 Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I), who was seriously injured during the running of the May 20 Preakness Stakes (gr. I), has been a top news subject ever since.
"Barbaro is still the biggest story right now--the public is hungry to hear about that," said Dave Miller, coordinating producer of ESPN/ABC during a Belmont related conference call June 7.
The Belmont returns to ABC for the first time since 2000, and its two-hour coverage is longer than any previous Triple Crown race featured on a major network.
Details of the Barbaro's surgery, recovery updates, and medical advancements from which he has benefited will be discussed during segments of ESPN's eight-hour coverage over the three-day period. ABC will focus on the colt at the beginning of its segment, which will air from 5 to 7 p.m. on Belmont Day June 10.
In addition, the networks will offer stories on John Velazquez's quick recovery and return to racing, as well as the Todd Pletcher-trained duo of Bluegrass Cat and Sunriver, currently the respective top two morning line favorites in the classic race.
"What we've seen over the last few weeks with the interest in Barbaro shows true commitment to the sport of horse racing," said retired Hall of Fame jockey Jerry Bailey, who will serve as an analyst during the networks' coverage.
Bailey's commentary will include a step-by-step demonstration from the starting gate to engage fans in the inner-workings of how the race is set up and how the jockeys prepare.
"I prepare for a telecast very similarly to how I prepared for races," Bailey said. "I try and analyze from the standpoint of what a horse may do. The key is to educate the public to understand the sport more so they tune in to it more."

VirginiaBred
Jun. 7, 2006, 08:47 PM
AP Blog: Zito Happy With Barbaro Progress

By The Associated Press
Wednesday, June 7, 2006; 7:49 PM
-- With the race for the Triple Crown underway, AP writers will be filing periodic, behind-the-scenes reports from all the important tracks across the country.

WEDNESDAY, June 7:

Trainer Nick Zito smiles as he looks out of the Preakness Stakes barn during workouts at Pimlico Race Course in this May 18, 2006, file photo in Baltimore. Zito is pleased with the progress that injured Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro is making.
[/URL][URL="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/images/triangle2.gif"] (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/05/23/DI2006052301326.html)While Zito is getting ready to send out Hemingway's Key in Saturday's Belmont Stakes, the Hall of Famer has been keeping tabs on Barbaro's health through media reports.

"That's what I wanted ... as a racing fan, that's what you had to do ... you had to show them," Zito said. "There are a lot of horse lovers out there besides racetrackers, and they want to see the well being of the horse."
And now that Barbaro seems to be recuperating well from three shattered bones in his right hind leg, Zito thinks interest is growing for the Belmont. It's been nearly three weeks since Barbaro broke down at the start of the Preakness.

"Once the well-being of the horse was shown to the world, racing healed," Zito said. "And now I think you got a little buzz for this race."

AP Racing Writer Richard Rosenblatt

Kenike
Jun. 7, 2006, 09:10 PM
I can just see it now...I'll be in labor, both at home at hospital, watching this stuff, and telling people to be sure to stay out of the way so I can watch! LOL

Great to see, VB, Thanks for the continued updates!!!

NeuroticShowMom
Jun. 7, 2006, 09:50 PM
Fox news is an oxymoron. But I will definitely try to catch the ESPN coverage!

showmom07
Jun. 8, 2006, 08:54 AM
Fox news is an oxymoron. But I will definitely try to catch the ESPN coverage!

Yeah, like they're going to politicize a story on Barbaro...right. Neurotic about says it all.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 8, 2006, 09:43 AM
Update 73: Another good night for Barbaro (wednesday night). Spoke to Michael Matz this morning, who then had to check his messages to see if Dean (Dr. Richardson) had called. With the visit of Ed Rendell today, Fox News coverage tomorrow and the Belmont on saturday, I am sure there will be plenty of (mainstream) media updates, which we will aggregate and post here (as well as reports from Peter etc.) Just a quick 'reminder' about our new Barbaro Multimedia page (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_multime.php). Debra Lopez's work has already solicited five comments, including this:

OMG, that was so beautiful. I had to watch it twice, since the first time I had so many tears I couldn't see it.I was wondering who sings that song, it's so touching and says everything we are feeling.

update thursday, 8:38 am
Update 72: We have added a Barbaro 'multi media' page (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_multime.php). We hope to include a variety of media about Barbaro on this page, created by his fans. Thanks Debra Lopez (Wisconsin) for the first solicitation.

moonriverfarm
Jun. 8, 2006, 10:29 AM
Wow. That was a tearjerker for sure, and so beautiful!
I think the song is a duet with a female (?) and Andre Bocelli (probably misspelled!) called Let This Be Our Prayer.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 8, 2006, 03:32 PM
Update 75: Some new pictures of Barbaro (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/BarbaroPhotos.htm) from the Governor Ed. Rendell visit. A nice article from The Kennett Paper: Barbaro has brought worldwide attention to New Bolton Center (http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16756757&BRD=2250&PAG=461&dept_id=451990&rfi=6) notes the impact Barbaro has had at New Bolton and the overwhelming response he is receiving worldwide:

"I don't think we've ever seen or imagined having a patient that the whole world cared about in such a unique way, and I don't think we'll ever see it again,' said Corinne R. Sweeney, associate dean for the New Bolton Center and the hospital's executive director.

The article notes the types of gifts Barbaro has received, and also the openness to sharing his recovery updates, that has been the approach adopted by his owners Roy and Gretchen Jackson. (We certainly appreciate that!)
Update 74: I know many of us have been waiting for the official word from New Bolton, here is their latest release, June 8 (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-8.htm), confirming what we heard this morning. The following is an excerpt:

Barbaro's medical team reported that the colt is doing extremely well, and has been especially frisky today, displaying interest in nearby mares that are also at the Hospital.

The release also includes information about his special visitor (Ed Rendell) and a gift:

Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell stopped by this morning to give Barbaro his good wishes and to personally present Jim Riepe, president of the University of Pennsylvania Board of Trustees, with a check for $13.5 million for the New Bolton Center. The funds will be used toward the completion of new medical facilities at the Center, including a new isolation building, a colic barn and a chemical digestion facility.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 8, 2006, 06:38 PM
With the Belmont Stakes almost here, thoroughbred racing is still reeling from two recent heart-wrenching moments: the life-threatening injuries to Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro at the Preakness, and the fatal breakdown of a top European colt in the English Derby.When a dozen 3-year-old horses spring from the starting gate in Saturday’s final race of the Triple Crown, a roar from the crowd will go up. What won’t be heard are all the hopes and wishes for a safe 1½-mile journey around Belmont Park.
“It’s never good for the game when a horse gets injured, or one has to be put down,” says Dan Peitz, the trainer of Belmont starter Steppenwolfer. “We always keep our fingers crossed on Triple Crown days, on Breeders’ Cup days, on any big event days where you have a lot of exposure, that everybody gets around there and comes back in one piece.”



While Barbaro is recovering at a hospital in Pennsylvania from three shattered bones in his right hind leg, the colt Horatio Nelson was not as fortunate. The 3-year-old broke a front leg during the one of Europe’s premier races last Saturday and was euthanized.
Breakdowns in racing are nothing new. They can happen in the third race at a small track and few know about it, or they can happen in front of a national TV audience and everyone is stunned.
“Within the industry, I don’t think the awareness is a whole lot different but in the broader scope a lot more people are looking at it,” says trainer Todd Pletcher, who has the two favorites for the Belmont in Bluegrass Cat and Sunriver. “Unfortunately, there are going to be injuries, just like in any sport.”
Even as the industry pours millions of dollars into research trying to make the sport safer, death on the racetrack remains a fact of life. It happens every day — nearly twice a day in the United States and Canada if you go by Dr. David Nunamaker’s assessment.
Nunamaker, a professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Pennsylvania and the chairman of clinical studies at New Bolton Center where Barbaro is recovering, said fatal muscle and bone injuries occur 1.5 times per 1,000 starts.
When Nunamaker’s numbers are taken further, the fatality rate really hits home:
Last year, 57,495 races were run in the United States and Canada for a total of 469,644 starts, according to statistics compiled by the Jockey Club. Using Nunamaker’s figure, that means about 704 horses died while racing in 2005 in the United States and Canada, about 1.93 fatalities per day.
“Almost two a day? I think that’s an awful lot, don’t you?” says Nunamaker. “And that doesn’t count a whole group that break down in training.”http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/msnbc/Components/Art/SPORTS/060608/AP_HORSE_FATALITIES.gif
The 1.5 per 1,000 rate is not definitive, but is accepted by many in racing as a working figure on fatalities during races.
Since thoroughbred racing does not keep national statistics on fatalities, Nunamaker’s figures are based on studies of annual reports from state racing agencies, such as the New York Racing Association (NYRA), the California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) and the Kentucky Horse Racing Authority (KHRA).
Figures provided by several state racing groups show a variety of rates. The numbers fluctuate because of different methods used to collect and interpret data.
According to NYRA, which operates Belmont, Saratoga and Aqueduct, there were 25 fatalities from 17,973 starts in 2005 for a rate of 1.4 per 1,000.
The CHRB reported that its major thoroughbred tracks, including Santa Anita, Hollywood Park and Del Mar, had 104 fatalities from 29,257 starts in 2005. That’s about 3.5 per 1,000.
The Maryland Racing Commission said there were 20 fatalities from 14,560 starts last year at its major tracks, including Laurel and Pimlico. That’s a rate of about 1.37 per 1,000.
The KHRA said there were 39 fatalities last year, and Equibase — the industry’s official database for racing information — lists 22,140 starters. That’s about 1.76 per 1,000.
“There’s no way you can sugarcoat it and put a happy face on the statistics of the horses we lose,” Dr. Rick Arthur, a veterinarian who treats horses at Santa Anita and acts as a spokesman for the American Association of Equine Practitioners. “It’s too many and we need to remedy the situation.”
Racing is no different from any other sport, though. Injuries are part of the game, and when it comes to thoroughbreds and their legs, there’s always a danger because of physics.
“It’s nearly impossible to eliminate injuries to horses because the animal itself is a fairly frail structure,” says Bob Elliston, president of Turfway Park in Florence, Ky. “You’ve got 1,300-pound horses on ankles that aren’t that much bigger than a human’s, running 40 mph with 10 other horses in close quarters. Things can happen — they can bump into other horses, whatever.”



Horses are always going to have less chance to survive when compared to human injuries for a simple reason: Horses need to stand while recovering; humans can heal with bed rest or by using crutches.
Medical and technological advancements over the years now give horses a better chance to survive if they are injured and also helps in the early detection of injuries.
The case of Barbaro focused attention on the improvements in equine care, from specially designed ambulances that can lift a horse into the vehicle and prevent jostling, to improved diagnostic methods and medication and to better equipped hospitals able to handle the most serious injuries.



“Barbaro was a tragedy, but if it comes out well it can actually turn out to be a positive,” Arthur said. “It shows if you have everything in place you can actually save and recover horses. I tried unsuccessfully to operate on a fracture like that years ago, but today we have knowledge about implants and the recovery process. Twenty-five years ago, this was unfeasible.”
Of course, there are economic issues faced by owners, who must weigh the cost of trying to save their racehorse. In the case of Barbaro, that was not a problem for wealthy owners Gretchen and Roy Jackson, who will spend tens of thousands of dollars, if not more, on Barbaro’s recovery.
“It’s important to find out what you can do to save animals when people have the desire to save their lives,” says Dean Richardson, the surgeon who repaired Barbaro’s broken bones with a titanium plate and 27 screws. “Again, it’s not always about money, but sometimes it is. Every case we do, we learn something from and when you start to tackle cases that are particularly difficult you’re going to learn even more.”
With research being funded by several racing organizations, including the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation, perhaps the biggest safety improvement in years may have arrived in the form of Polytrack.
The synthetic mixture of wax-coated polypropylene fibers, recycled rubber and fine sand was installed at Turfway Park with dramatic results. From September 2004 through April 2005, there were 24 catastrophic breakdowns on the harder dirt track. With Polytrack, there were only three this past season, a drop of nearly 90 percent.
Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky., already has a new Polytrack training oval, and is switching its main track to the artificial surface as well. Tapeta, another synthetic surface, developed by trainer Michael Dickinson, is being installed at the Fair Hill Training Center in Elkton, Md., Barbaro’s home base.
“I’d say Polytrack has been the biggest advance in safety in several decades because of the decreased number we’re seeing in breakdowns,” says Nancy Davis, a state vet in Kentucky. “It looks like it’s going to be the answer for the future.”



California tracks are turning to synthetic surfaces, too. After addressing the fatality rate at its tracks, the CHRB recently required Santa Anita, Del Mar and Hollywood Park to install synthetic tracks by Jan. 1, 2008.
“We have a serious problem hitting us over the head and it’s getting worse,” Arthur said. “That’s why California is taking a pro-active step by insisting on Polytrack.”
Racing historian Ed Bowen, president of the Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation, says five private foundations have provided more than $23 million in the past 10 years to fund about 350 equine research projects and workshops, including health, safety and track surface issues.
“We haven’t been able to eliminate injuries, so we put a high priority on research that will enable vets to better cope with problems that do come up,” says Bowen. “We look for projects that will enable the industry to reduce (fatal injuries) as dramatically as possible.”
The bottom line, says D.G. Van Clief Jr., commissioner of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association and president of the Breeders’ Cup, is to keep finding new ways to make racing safer.
“The sport is well aware that danger is always there,” he said. “As an industry, we are always taking steps to be prepared and in the worst case scenario responding appropriately.”

VirginiaBred
Jun. 9, 2006, 07:24 AM
Update 76: Just spoke to Peter Brette who visited Barbaro after work today (and thus after Ed Rendell). He reports Barbaro is in great shape, Dr. Richardson is very happy with him, and apparently he performed very well for the cameras earlier in the day. Another good day in a long journey.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 9, 2006, 07:29 AM
What's the Attraction? It's Still Barbaro


By JOE DRAPE (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/d/joe_drape/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: June 9, 2006

Barbaro (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/b/barbaro_race_horse/index.html?inline=nyt-classifier), the Kentucky Derby champion, is healing in a 12-by-12-foot stall at a state-of-the-art hospital in Pennsylvania. The Preakness champion, Bernardini, is resting until late summer. So how does one promote the 138th running of New York's signature race, the Belmont Stakes?
The New York Racing Association and ABC/ESPN Sports are counting on affection for Barbaro, the world's most famous equine patient, and some momentum from soccer's World Cup.
Barbaro, the colt who is recovering from surgery in which 27 screws were used to repair a right hind leg that was shattered in the opening yards of the Preakness, will never race again. But he will hardly be forgotten tomorrow when the mile-and-a-half Belmont, the finale of horse racing's Triple Crown, will be contested among a likely field of 12 and broadcast on ABC.
One of the race's major attractions will be the 62-foot-wide and 7-foot-high "Get Well Soon" card, which will feature four life-size images of Barbaro. Fans will be able to sign the card beginning at 10 a.m. after Barbaro's jockey, Edgar Prado, does so.
ABC/ESPN Sports, which is kicking off a seven-year contract to broadcast the Belmont, will deal with Barbaro's absence early and often on its networks. ABC/ESPN hopes that his absence will be offset by what it calls a marquee day of sports broadcasting.
The networks' advertising has focused on the wide-open nature of the race, which may not have star power for the casual fan but does offer the Derby's second-, third- and fourth-place finishers — Bluegrass Cat, Steppenwolfer and Jazil.
But Tag Garson, the senior director for programming and acquisitions for ABC/ESPN Sports, said the network would be able to drive viewers to the Belmont with frequent promotions during its other programming tomorrow.
ABC will televise the World Cup match between England and Paraguay at 9 a.m. Eastern time, followed by Trinidad and Tobago against Sweden at noon. At 2 p.m., ABC will switch to its third-round coverage of the PGA Tour's Barclays Classic at Westchester Country Club.
On ESPN, from noon to 5 p.m., the Belmont Stakes will be analyzed and its story lines given feature treatment. It will also broadcast three of the stakes races on the undercard.
"In six of the last nine years, the Belmont has had the Triple Crown on the line," Garson said. "We knew going into this that was rarely going to be the case. But Saturday is a big day in sports, and we believe we are uniquely positioned to drive viewers into watching what is an important Triple Crown race."
At 5 p.m., ABC will kick off its two-hour Belmont Stakes show with a feature on the recovery of Barbaro, including a live update with Jeremy Schaap at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals at the New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., where Barbaro is being treated.
While veterinarians at the hospital say that Barbaro is doing well, they add that it will take months for them to know if he will be able to return to a pain-free life.
Barbaro's convalescence has not only meant publicity for the University of Pennsylvania's (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_pennsylvania/index.html?inline=nyt-org) veterinarian school, it has paid financial dividends. On Thursday, the state's governor, Edward G. Rendell (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/r/edward_g_rendell/index.html?inline=nyt-per), visited the center and delivered a check for $13.5 million to expand the facility. According to the center's Web site, Rendell said that "our Derby champion is in the best place he can be for the road to recovery."
New York racing officials have tried to put a positive spin on their efforts to position the Belmont as a big event for New York City. But they are not expecting a crowd comparable to the more than 120,000 people who came to Belmont in 2004 to see Smarty Jones's bid to become the 12th Triple Crown champion.
Still, more than 60,000 people turned out last year for a race that had no Triple Crown implications. It did have Afleet Alex, who captured the nation's imagination by recovering from a stumble at the top of the stretch to win the Preakness.
Bill Nader, the senior vice president of NYRA, points to the 2000 Belmont, which drew more than 60,000 people despite the fact that neither Fusaichi Pegasus, the Derby winner, nor Red Bullet, the Preakness victor, were part of the field.
"You can't point to one horse in this field that has box-office appeal, but we've built this day into a big event in a city that embraces big events," Nader said. "We are not a weak sister to anything else in sports here anymore. The day and the event has grown to the point where there are a lot of people who come out on Belmont Stakes day who usually do not go to the races."
For the horsemen who are trying to capture the Belmont, the absences of Barbaro and Bernardini are an unfortunate part of an unpredictable game.
"Ten years from now, nobody is going to remember who is not here," said Dan Peitz, who trains Steppenwolfer. "It's still a big race, worth a million dollars, and has a place in history: It's the third leg of the Triple Crown. I do think people are interested in it."

Kenike
Jun. 9, 2006, 01:23 PM
Okay, what time is the FoxNews special tonight? I've checked my listings on DTV, but I can't seem to find anything other than their regular programming. I'd really like to watch, if I can...but I need to know when!

TIA!!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 9, 2006, 02:44 PM
Update 79: New Bolton's press release today (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-9.htm) confirms Barbaro's continuing good progress (its good to know no news this AM did mean good news). It begins:

Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro continues to please veterinarians at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals with his progress on this day before the running of the finale of horse racing's triple crown.

The release also notes that TV coverage of the Belmont tomorrow will include footage of Barbaro recuperating in his stall at New Bolton.
On another note, I was talking to a friend this afternoon who noted that Barclay Tagg (Funny Cide fame, also trainer for the Jackson's, past exercise rider of Ruffian in her very early career) mentioned, shortly after seeing Barbaro win his first stakes race in Maryland, that he considered it the best performance he had seen since Secretariat!
Update 78: Just spoke to Kathy Anderson (Barbaro's Fair Hill vet.) She had not heard anything yet today (Dean Richardson is away) but she is visiting this afternoon, so I will call her again later (Kathy assumes all is well). She did mention a few things of interest:
a. Barbaro was actually rearing up during the Pennsylvania Governor's visit yesterday (the cast must really work!)
b. The gift yesterday was a gift that was in the works, but certainly Barbaro's presence helped 'close' the transaction
c. There is whisper of another gift, thanks to Barbaro (need to explore this)
The Fox News piece is still planned for later today (5:45 pm east coast) but Kathy is no longer being interviewed for the piece.
Update 77: No official update yet this morning. I spoke to Michael and others, and we suspect Dean (Richardson) may actually be away for a couple of days, hence the reason he did not call. As Anne Kelly said, we are assuming no news is good news. (Obviously cannot confirm that). Will update once I hear something more definitive. On another note, more than a few people at fair Hill were excited to see the Barbaro piece by Debra Lopez : Our Prayer for Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_multime.php#debra). Anne and I were discussing it as we were walking to the track (she loved it); Penny (Tim Woolley's wife) asked me if I could imagine what it was like watching four women cry (she was viewing it from her office I think). Tim was very impressed (should this not be on TV ?) and Kim (Brette) left a comment after watching it with her family. Thanks Debra, your work has touched many people.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 9, 2006, 06:40 PM
Update 80: Just saw the Fox News piece, which turned out to be an interview with Michael Matz. The most important aspect of the interview (I think) was the first question ... how is Barbaro doing ? The answer: looks good, appropriate weight on the injured leg, vital signs good etc. (so that is our most recent update). I think Michael did a great job, especially the answer to the question of whether a horse other than Barbaro would have received the same treatment. It was a short interview, but glad to get the update!
Other quick things: the Bloodhorse has an article: Dr. Bramlage Looks Back on Barbaro's Preakness (http://tcm.bloodhorse.com/viewstory.asp?id=33947) that notes the importance of keeping people up to date with the news as it unfolds, which has been an ongoing aspect to this entire story:

"I think our ontrack vet program worked great that day," Bramlage noted. "The worse thing for viewers is not to have any information. I think we were accurate, gave the best information we had, and made people as comfortable as possible. It was a bad injury and we had to tell people that.

Finally TimesUnion.com has a story:
Barbaro still on Prado's mind (http://timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=489914&category=SPORTS&newsdate=6/9/2006) that highlight's Edgar Prado's 'state of mind' as he rides the Belmont:

"When I am in the jockeys' room before the Belmont, my thoughts will be with Barbaro," Prado said. "But when I go out and do my business, he will stay here, in the jocks' room. After the race I will think about him again."

Kenike
Jun. 9, 2006, 06:45 PM
Thanks, Virginiabred....I missed it :( Ah, well, sometimes they reair a few hours later

Seal Harbor
Jun. 9, 2006, 06:54 PM
Thanks for doing this VB.

msj
Jun. 10, 2006, 05:24 PM
Virginia Bred, you are a peach for keeping us all updated on Barbaro's progress. I used to come to the board (and rarely the racing forum) every couple of days until the accident at the Preakness. Now I check in here every day just to see your posts! Mucho many thanks! :) :) :)

ParisHillEC
Jun. 10, 2006, 05:47 PM
Thanks for all the updates!

Barbaro looked good on the coverage that they are showing before the Belmont. I still cant help but get all teary eyed everytime they show the Preakness.

annikak
Jun. 10, 2006, 06:01 PM
VB- I really appreciate all your updates, as well as Tim Woollwys site- its such a relief...you are so kind to keep us updated.:yes:
I hope (and I have never felt this way before) I get to meet Barbaro- he has touched so many hearts, but only being able to speak to my own, he has infiltrated my soul, too. What a boy...and in his recovery, he continues to show his outstanding nature.

Beethoven
Jun. 10, 2006, 07:04 PM
I liked that in the footage of him today, they showed him turn and itch his side and he put all of his weight on his bad leg and lifted his good one. That made me so happy! He looks like he is a very nice stallion. I wish I had enough money to get a baby out of my mare from him.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 10, 2006, 07:48 PM
Thanks again, Tim!!!

Update 85: Peter Brette decided not to visit Barbaro today given all the media at New Bolton. We, of course, have benefited from the media coverage thanks to ESPN and ABC. He looks great today!
Update 84: If you can, tune into the Belmont TV coverage (ESPN and then ABC), they are doing a fantastic job of providing Barbaro updates. Some great shots of him today, rolling in his stall, getting a bath and more. I am sure they will repeat this later. The horse does look great.
Update 83: The ESPN 2 broadcast yesterday included a story on Hoist The Flag, and comparisons to Barbaro. The story noted Hoist The Flag's spectacular early career (undefeated, his jockey Jean Cruguet noting he was the best he had ridden, and he rode Seattle Slew) and horrific accident, prior to the triple crown. His injuries appear to be similar to Barbaro's catastrophic injuries, and the decision to try to save the horse was going to involve the need for truly ground breaking work. He went on to become a (very) successful sire. The following article (thanks Lynette): The Dream Lives On (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8925-2002Jun6.html) notes the story in the context of War Emblem's preparation for the Belmont (2002). The following are excerpts:

In March 1971, thoroughbred racing was preparing for a coronation. A magnificent colt named Hoist the Flag was blazing toward the Kentucky Derby, conjuring up images of his grandsire, Triple Crown winner War Admiral. "I don't think he'll ever get beat," raved his jockey, Jean Cruguet, "unless he falls down." As Hoist the Flag scorched through workouts at Belmont Park, onlookers watched with giddy anticipation.

and

Jenny and Reed had done the impossible. Hoist the Flag survived. He would become an exceptional sire, bequeathing his talent to generations of offspring.

Update 82: Belmont Day which obviously reminds us all of the horrific accident of three weeks ago. Lets hope the Belmont afternoon is great racing without incident. I am sure there will be plenty of Barbaro coverage this afternoon on ESPN and ABC so we will keep an eye out for it. If anyone reading this is attending Belmont today, it would be great to post your 'reports' in the comments section, especially surrounding the get well card and other Barbaro stuff. While Fair Hill is not represented in the big race, Miraculous Miss, trained by Steve Klesaris, is running in the Acorn, so we will be rooting for her.
Peter Brette is planning to visit Barbaro this afternoon so we will try to catch up with an update later. (Note, Kathy Anderson did not end up visiting yesterday, hence no 'report', although she did talk to someone who did visit Barbaro, and he was fine.)
`
Update 81: Another good night last night for Barbaro (friday night). Just spoke to Michael Matz who had just received word. More updates later, but have to run and get on two more horses and (hopefully) watch england win our first world cup game!
update: saturday, 8:40 am

VirginiaBred
Jun. 11, 2006, 10:28 AM
Update 86: No official update this morning (I was not able to catch up with the Matz's barn this AM). I will catch up with Peter Brette later, so should have something later in the day. He did look great yesterday on TV. He appeared bright, happy, and not lame as he was moving about. I really think the coverage of Barbaro yesterday was very good.
We are now looking at three weeks since the horrific accident, and it seems all has gone exceptionally well in those three weeks. I was talking with Kathy Anderson yesterday about the critical issues going forward. It seems the next critical 'event' to consider is the changing of the cast, which will likely be in the next week or so (my guess based on our conversation). This will allow the vets a closer look at the healing process, and will also create some risks itself (replacing the cast; Barbaro will need to be anethetized etc.) So perhaps we should celebrate the progress of the three weeks, but wait cautiously for the cast replacement process.
As far as I am aware, Miraculous Miss is on her way back to Fair Hill. Some scrapes and bruises are known, but it may be a few days before they really know if there are any ill effects from the gate incident in the Acorn.
update, Sunday, 9:25 AM

VirginiaBred
Jun. 11, 2006, 08:22 PM
Update 88: Just spoke to Peter Brette and he reported Michael (Matz) visited Barbaro today (sunday) and all remains well. Another good day.
Update 87: Great article from mercurynews: A tough day for Barbaro's inner circle and followers (http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/sports/14790711.htm) that offers great details of Barbaro's status and routine, his cast, fondness for his neighbour, and some skin abrasions caused by the sling used in the surgery process. A few excerpts:

Three weeks after the catastrophic injuries to Barbaro's right hind ankle during the first furlong of the Preakness Stakes, the medical team at New Bolton is aware of potential setbacks, knowing that decisions on his future will be made only after his cast comes off for good. But the mood of the place, while still cautious, indicates that Barbaro keeps clearing every hurdle.
"He continues to make remarkable improvement, walking in his stall with his cast," co-owner Gretchen Jackson said last week.

and

"He's using his cast really well," Adams said. "We're all really thrilled with that. It's dry. It's not cracked. It's not worn through at the bottom. All of the staining you see is purely superficial, because it's about 7 or 8 millimeters thick. Nothing's gotten through."

and

Roy and Gretchen Jackson, who live just down the road in West Grove, come by each day to see the horse, as does Matz, who arrived after running a horse at Delaware Park on Saturday afternoon.
"I changed a bandage in there, groomed him up a little," said Matz, standing just outside the ICU. "It's something that makes him happy."
And that can work both ways. Matz does some grooming each day.
"He was good to us," Matz said, "and we're just trying to return the favor."

VirginiaBred
Jun. 12, 2006, 08:17 PM
Update 93: Just spoke to Peter Brette, who visited Barbaro today (monday). Barbaro is doing well, so his status remains the same. I asked Peter if he could investigate the source of the blanket Barbaro was wearing (when filmed on ESPN / ABC) with the signatures etc. It is a blanket from the Kentucky Derby. It has printed on it: 132 Kentucky Derby Winner Barbaro. It includes signatures from many people working at Churchill Downs.
To answer a couple of questions that have come up in the comments lately:
a. We will continue to provide updates as we have them, we hope that is at least once a day
b. Barbaro will not be returning to Fair Hill, simply because Fair Hill is a training center for horses that are running races etc. While I am not privy to plans for the future, it would not make sense to return to a place like Fair Hill. It makes better sense to return to the owner's farm, and then hopefully to a 'stallion station'.
Update 92: Added links to the 'sidebar': Barbaro Photo Album (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/BarbaroPhotos.htm), which includes the latest photos from New Bolton, taken on Saturday (June 10); and Good luck, Barbaro! (Barbara Livingston) (http://www.barbaralivingston.com/gallery/album161), many shots from Fair Hill, some simply great photographs.
Update 91: The following Thoroughbed Times article: Barbaro adjusting to life of constant attention at New Bolton (http://www.thoroughbredtimes.com/todaysnews/newsview.asp?recno=64340&subsec=1) does a good job of illustrating how at ease Barbaro is with his injured leg and supporting cast. We know about the early ear scratching episode, we have heard about him rearing up for the state Govenor, but it also appears he likes to buck too:

"He's got a big personality, he's feisty," said George D. Widener Hospital Executive Director Corinne Sweeney, D.V.M. "I saw him in the stall [Thursday morning] with Dr. Richardson [chief surgeon at Penn's veterinary school] and he actually was bucking for fun--you know those kind of horses--and he is moving around his stall all the time.

ESPN has an article : After Triple Crown, Barbaro is still the one to beat (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=horse&id=2479704) (thanks Lisa) where the connections of the Preakness and Belmont winners presume Barbaro remains the number one three year old, excerpt:

The day after saddling Jazil to victory in the Belmont Stakes, trainer Kiaran McLaughlin believes the injured Kentucky Derby winner most likely will end up the 3-year-old champion.
And Tom Albertrani, who trains Preakness winner Bernardini, agrees -- at least for now.
"Barbaro didn't do anything wrong," McLaughlin said Sunday after watching several promising 2-year-olds train over Belmont Park's main track. "He's undefeated except for one race. It would be hard to top him, but we'll give it our best."

We, of course, would agree!
Update 90: New Bolton's release notes: Beginning today, updates on Barbaro's condition will be made weekly, unless there is a significant change to report. (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-12.htm) The release also speculates as to why Barbaro has attracted so much public attention, the following is an excerpt:

Why do heroic animals inspire such intense emotions? Partly, I think, because they perform their acts of heroism for us, and not of their own volition. While we may feel intense admiration and concern for human warriors and athletes who put themselves at risk of injury or death, our sympathy is always tempered by the belief that they were aware of the risks and were willing to face them. With animals we cannot shelter realistically behind this assumption.

We will continue to provide updates as we have them from people visiting etc.
Update 89: Much like update 77 (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_fair_hi.php#update77) we have no official word yet this morning re: Barbaro, but presume that since we have not heard anything that things are OK. (I asked Michael Matz and his team this morning and as of 7:30 am they had not heard anything.) Would rather post this than not post anything, but will endevour to find at least one update per day going forward, as things progress.
updated: monday, 8:45 am

Laurel&HollyFarm
Jun. 12, 2006, 10:20 PM
It is so nice to be able to get all the news from one spot. Hope all continues to go well for him.

AnnikaK I did not know you were as interested in Barbaro as I am. Bill says I am obsessed. I too hope to meet him one day. Perhaps he will stand at 3 Chimneys when he makes it thorough all this and we can go see him during Rolex :D .

rescuemom
Jun. 13, 2006, 11:23 AM
VB, my thanks as well, for the updates.:)

Where'sMyWhite
Jun. 13, 2006, 12:06 PM
Latest update...

Update 95: The cast replacement did happen today. A friend called who had just spoken to Kathy Anderson, who confirmed that Barbaro had the cast replacement this morning. Everything looks good (radiographs, skin etc.) and he is now in the recovery pool, where they will wait for him to come out of the anesthesia.
update 11:30 am

StrawberryFelidos
Jun. 13, 2006, 01:19 PM
Good swim in the pool, Barbaro! :yes:

War Admiral
Jun. 13, 2006, 01:35 PM
Jingling in GA that everything goes OK.

A Splash of Color
Jun. 13, 2006, 03:02 PM
Thanks to Tim Wooley Racing (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_fair_hi.php):

"Update 96: Out of the Pool! New Bolton's Press Release: Doctors change Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro's cast (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-13.htm) notes the procedure Barbaro endured today. The following is an excerpt:

Today Chief of Surgery Dean W. Richardson replaced the cast that had been on Barbaro's hind leg since surgery on May 21. "His leg looks excellent," said Dr. Richardson. "The incision has healed well and judging by the radiographs, the graft is opacifying ("taking"). Callus is forming nicely, and all of the implants (plate and screws) look unchanged." The cast was replaced under general anesthesia, and Barbaro had a very smooth pool recovery.
(thanks Edie!)

To "celebrate", we have just posted a new "movie" Beautiful Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/barbaro.php) on our Fan Media page (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_multime.php). Thanks Jayne!"

certifiedgirl
Jun. 13, 2006, 03:28 PM
That is great news, and I loved the new movie! Beautiful!!

Boston Chicken
Jun. 13, 2006, 03:41 PM
More good news on his progress. Hoping for many more good days to come.

BBowen
Jun. 13, 2006, 03:55 PM
Congratulations, Barbaro on one more step to your recovery. Continuing to send prayers and jingles for this magnificent horse. Thank you for the continued updates.

annikak
Jun. 13, 2006, 04:06 PM
It is so nice to be able to get all the news from one spot. Hope all continues to go well for him.

AnnikaK I did not know you were as interested in Barbaro as I am. Bill says I am obsessed. I too hope to meet him one day. Perhaps he will stand at 3 Chimneys when he makes it thorough all this and we can go see him during Rolex :D .

obsessed is a good word for it- and we have a date!:yes:

MHM
Jun. 13, 2006, 04:31 PM
Another thanks for keeping us updated. Hope all continues to go well!!

VirginiaBred
Jun. 13, 2006, 06:48 PM
Update 97: "Slightly groggy, but happy", as Kathy Anderson said to me in a brief call this afternoon. As far as everyone is concerned, today has gone as well as could be hoped for. Kathy visited with Barbaro this afternoon, and she gave him a good scratch (he was apparently a little itchy). She also viewed the radiographs etc. and as noted in the press release earlier things are starting to do whatever it is they are supposed to do (I am not a vet)!
Update 96: Out of the Pool! New Bolton's Press Release: Doctors change Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro's cast (http://www.vet.upenn.edu/newsandevents/news/Barbaro_Update6-13.htm) notes the procedure Barbaro endured today. The following is an excerpt:

Today Chief of Surgery Dean W. Richardson replaced the cast that had been on Barbaro's hind leg since surgery on May 21. "His leg looks excellent," said Dr. Richardson. "The incision has healed well and judging by the radiographs, the graft is opacifying ("taking"). Callus is forming nicely, and all of the implants (plate and screws) look unchanged." The cast was replaced under general anesthesia, and Barbaro had a very smooth pool recovery.
(thanks Edie!)
To "celebrate", we have just posted a new "movie" Beautiful Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/barbaro.php) on our Fan Media page (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/news/2006/05/barbaro_multime.php). Thanks Jayne!
Update 95: The cast replacement did happen today. A friend called who had just spoken to Kathy Anderson, who confirmed that Barbaro had the cast replacement this morning. Everything looks good (radiographs, skin etc.) and he is now in the recovery pool, where they will wait for him to come out of the anesthesia.
update 11:30 am
Update 94: It looks like today (tuesday) might be the day they are planning to replace Barbaro's cast. A couple of people close to Barbaro have mentioned this, and given the timeline (3+ weeks) it makes sense given previous conversations. Lets keep our fingers crossed for this process, as we know there are potential risks with this necessary step in the recovery process (the need for anesthesia, the exact fit of the new cast etc). The process will also allow the vets a much closer look at the healing process.
update: 7:50 am, tuesday

VirginiaBred
Jun. 13, 2006, 07:08 PM
Home (http://news.bostonherald.com/) > Sports (http://sports.bostonherald.com/sports.bg) > Other Sports News (http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports) > http://news.bostonherald.com/siteImages/icons/xml_sm.gif (http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports/rss.xml) RSS Feed (http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports/rss.xml)

http://www.bostonherald.com/siteImages/icons/email.gif E-mail article (http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports/view.bg?articleid=143551&format=email) http://www.bostonherald.com/siteImages/icons/printer.gif Printable version (http://sports.bostonherald.com/otherSports/view.bg?articleid=143551&format=text) http://www.bostonherald.com/siteImages/icons/popular.gif Most popular (http://news.bostonherald.com/mostPopular.bg) Barbaro has cast replaced on shattered right hind leg
By Associated Press
Tuesday, June 13, 2006 - Updated: 04:46 PM EST

KENNETT SQUARE, Pa. - Barbaro had the cast replaced on his shattered right hind leg Tuesday, another huge stride in the recovery of the Kentucky Derby winner who suffered a life-threatening injury at the Preakness.
Barbaro’s cast was replaced under general anesthesia, and the 3-year-old bay colt had a very smooth pool recovery, the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine’s New Bolton Center said in a statement.
Dean Richardson, the chief of surgery at the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, replaced the cast he first put on Barbaro’s leg during surgery May 21.
‘‘His leg looks excellent,” Richardson said in the statement. ‘‘The incision has healed well and judging by the radiographs, the graft is opacifying (taking). Callus is forming nicely, and all of the implants look unchanged.”
Barbaro remains in intensive care at the New Bolton Center, where he underwent five hours of surgery one day after he broke a few hundred yards from the starting gate at Pimlico Race Course.

incentive
Jun. 13, 2006, 07:37 PM
Thank you for the continued updates, VB! Still jingling for Barbaro here in Virginia!!!

Lancaster9
Jun. 13, 2006, 07:45 PM
Echoing the thanks for the updates! Did anyone else have to watch that video more than once because tears made it impossible to see halfway through?? I'm such a sap...

hijumpin1
Jun. 13, 2006, 08:57 PM
Jingles and hang in there, Barbaro!

excowgirlie
Jun. 13, 2006, 09:06 PM
geeze, why do I cry everytime I see a vignette of that horse? Every single time...it is embarrassing! I have one of his pictures on my desktop at work and at home and I just love that boy!

ASB Stars
Jun. 13, 2006, 09:26 PM
OHmigod, I just watched the video- how bloody wonderful is THAT!!!

Bringing the entire country together- different horse folks, and just folks, who appreciate a great spirit....

GO BARBARO!!!!!!

msj
Jun. 14, 2006, 10:02 AM
Well, I'm not surprised to see that others also teared up at the video!

My only concern in the pictures I've seen of Michael Matz is that I've never seen him wearing a helmet. :( Either a baseball cap or hunt cap. But then again, I'm a helmet nazi....

teal tea
Jun. 14, 2006, 11:23 AM
Thanks for the updates. :) I haven't been able to keep up w/ anything for the past several days and I didn't know Barbaro had his cast changed. I'm also still jingling.

VirginiaBred
Jun. 14, 2006, 12:11 PM
Again, many, many thanks to Tim Woolley:



Update 100: The following philly.com article: Barbaro gets new cast on shattered leg (http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/sports/14811599.htm) provides a little more detail on the cast change of yesterday (thanks Lisa). It includes the following excerpt:

Richardson decided to change the cast yesterday, he said, because Barbaro's temperature had risen "half a degree" and the horse was showing signs that the cast was causing itchiness. It turned out Barbaro had two very small rubs on his heel, which wasn't surprising, Richardson said, because he has been so active in his stall. The rubs aren't "of any consequence," the surgeon said.
Barbaro's overall prognosis remains the same. There is optimism at New Bolton, but the crucial indicator is whether the horse can walk pain-free when the cast comes off for good, probably several months down the road.

Caught up with Kim Brette in the local shop this morning. We talked about the relief of yesterday's process. While all visible and outward indicators were positive prior to yesterday's removal of the cast, problems could have been revealed once the cast was removed. This was not the case of course.
Update 99: No new news yet this morning at Fair Hill, so like other mornings without news we are assuming no news is good news. Peter Brette may get to go and visit Barbaro later today, so if that happens I will get an update from Peter. Miraculous Miss (flipped in the gate in the Acorn) is back at Fair Hill and recovering. It does not appear she sustained any long term physical damage, but a few cuts and bruises.
update wednesday, 10:10 am
Update 98: Given the focus on Barbaro today, with his cast replacement, I thought I would highlight this article on Dr. Richardson who has clearly been in the spotlight lately: New Bolton's Dr. Fix-It (http://www.dailylocal.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=16780279&BRD=1671&PAG=461&dept_id=17782&rfi=6) (thanks Daphne). A short excerpt:

"He knew it was a very bad injury and he knew immediately it was Barbaro," Reid said. "The feeling was indescribable. Being so far away from New Bolton, that bothered Dean. He knew the horse was coming his way."
Calls to Richardson's cell phone flooded in. First the equine vets at Pimlico, then Roy and Gretchen Jackson.

Here is an excerpt of a comment from Erica re: the 'power' of Barbaro:

I was so upset, wondering how I'm going to keep from getting depressed and how I was going to be ready for my marathon. Then... I thought of Barbaro and his great spirit. I thought of how well he has adjusted to a new life, a life of no racing. I thought of the messages that have been posted on this site describing how Barbaro's attitude has been such a big plus for his recovery. Thinking about this made me less sad and less upset.

Finally just to "re highlight" two of the "movies" created by you: Our Prayer for Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/movies/Our%20Prayer%20For%20Barbaro.wmv) and Beautiful Barbaro (http://www.timwoolleyracing.com/gallery/barbaro.php).

tradewind
Jun. 14, 2006, 12:49 PM
thanks for all the continued updates...i know everyone really appreciates it

ponymom64
Jun. 14, 2006, 12:54 PM
Thanks VB for keeping us all up to date on Barbaro's progress.