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Bopper
Mar. 29, 2013, 06:51 PM
Anyone watch the show? Anyone agree or disagree that anarchy is approaching?

I have a friend that has an arsenal (I have weapons and ammo but this person has an arsenal that would rival some small countries). This person has all of these plans about what to do if the country collapses but there are serious holes in the plan.

Anyone else know any doomsday preppers?

clanter
Mar. 29, 2013, 07:54 PM
Anyone agree or disagree that anarchy is approaching?

might want to ask that question in Cyprus, Greece and coming to Spain and Italy

The reason our stock market is going through the roof isn't how great we are doing but has become a save heaven for the Europeans who are concerned about funds they once thought as save.

Lin
Mar. 29, 2013, 08:05 PM
I've been thinking about this. From childhood I have been a doomsday prepper. Mostly I plot how to release farm animals from their stalls and pastures so they have at least a small chance of survival when 95% of the human population dies in a maufactured viral apocolypse

skydy
Mar. 29, 2013, 08:17 PM
I remember "doomsday" "end of days" "apocalypse".. preppers from the early 1980s!
Sure is taking a long time! :lol::lol::lol:

gdolapp
Mar. 30, 2013, 01:03 AM
Actually I kinda do it. We have guns and ammo, I also have stocked canned goods, done a ton of canning from my garden, have toilet paper stocked batteries, flashlights and candles. I have prepared my house for mother nature outages such as power ect... and I also am prepared for long term outages or anything else. Three of the horses I have at my place are trainned to drive we have one cart and one wagon so have transportation if needed.
I truelly feel that it isn't "IF" something will happen it is when something will happen.

Riverotter
Mar. 30, 2013, 03:22 AM
Well, I'm not worried about Doomsday - but I lived in Fl for 8 years, where there are hurricanes. A hurricane season actually, so you'd think people would realize.

But no, every storm warning brought a frantic rush to the stores, to buy bread and milk and TP and batteries, generators, bottled water and canned goods!
It was crazy! Had these people no memory of last year, when the same things happened? And the year before that? I actually knew people who would sell their generator in Dec, after there hadn't been any storm warnings for a while - only to frantically rush to the store next Aug with the first tropical storm warning to buy one!

I don't live in Fl anymore. But here, I know to expect a heatwave in summer, an ice storm in winter, some strong wind to bring my powerline down once a year or so and for my car to break down at any time.
So I've chosen to make sure that none of these things are emergencies, and I'm never the one desperately dashing to the store for TP, batteries to run the flashlight, or creamed corn. Having 2 weeks worth of food on hand and an extra 6 pack of Charmin is as easy and sensible as keeping a spare tire in your car.

Frank B
Mar. 30, 2013, 08:35 AM
When we lived near the coast, we were "preppers" because of hurricanes. Now that we're in the mountains, it's because of ice storms.

We've had problems on the ham radio bands because of them buying ham equipment and not licensing it, then getting on the air. A few will make the effort to get a license (the entry level license exam is very easy to pass), but they carry on like citizen banders and are promptly chastised. I guess they figure when the zombie apocalypse happens, licenses won't make any difference.

Bopper
Mar. 30, 2013, 11:45 AM
I am all for being prepared for natural disasters, for us it is hurricanes. But I am talking about people preparing for the collapse of society, government, etc. Some of the things they state are, IMO, not very well thought out. For example:

1. 'I will grow my own food.' - Have you ever gardened before? It takes time to prepare the soil, then you need seeds, then you have to wait until the garden produces. This is not something you can just do at a moments notice.

2. 'I have a stream on my property so I have an unending source of water.' Do you have an unending source of either water purification tablets or fuel for fire to boil the water?


I agree that the world is becoming more and more of a scary place but I am not sure that it is possible to fully prepare for the ultimate doomsday.

UlysMom
Mar. 30, 2013, 11:48 AM
As someone who lives in EQ, fire, flood and mudslide country, emergency preparedness is a personal responsibility and one you really owe your family.

Having evacuated home and horses, both personally many times, and assisting coordination of communities as part of my job, I can tell you that you must be prepared and responsible for your own household to a certain degree. Plan for your family, including pets, have supplies, food, medication, etc. In a large scale event, there is only so much government and NGO's can do. Immediate life/safety issues will always take precedence over anything else.

Now, that being said...some of those folks on DP might be a little "extreme". :D

Do your research. Have a plan. Be prepared for known disasters in your local area.

Stepping down off my soap box now. Have a lovely holiday weekend!

Louise
Mar. 30, 2013, 01:07 PM
If, and I think it's a practically non-existent if, doomsday does happen, in any of the many forms it could take, I wonder if these people realize that it's not going to be doomsday for weeks, or even months, it's going to be years, maybe their entire lifetime. There's no way anyone could stockpile enough to last that long, and, if you have an extensive stockpile, there will always be someone bigger and stronger ready to take it all away.

I have always hoped that, if doomsday happens, I kick the bucket quickly and don't have to worry about surviving in some kind of primitive hell.

Common disasters are a different story. We have Winter here. I am always prepared for the possibility of being cut off for a week or two.

saultgirl
Mar. 30, 2013, 01:22 PM
I am all for being prepared for natural disasters, for us it is hurricanes. But I am talking about people preparing for the collapse of society, government, etc. Some of the things they state are, IMO, not very well thought out. For example:

1. 'I will grow my own food.' - Have you ever gardened before? It takes time to prepare the soil, then you need seeds, then you have to wait until the garden produces. This is not something you can just do at a moments notice.

2. 'I have a stream on my property so I have an unending source of water.' Do you have an unending source of either water purification tablets or fuel for fire to boil the water?


I agree that the world is becoming more and more of a scary place but I am not sure that it is possible to fully prepare for the ultimate doomsday.


I think you are underestimating most "preppers". They like that. They hope a great many people will have this attitude and thus die out quickly in a real disaster, freeing up resources for those who are prepared enough to hold on a little longer.

I have the "prepper" mentality in that I see it as my responsibility to be prepared enough for short-term problems (storms, power outages, perhaps a loss of income). However, I require prescription meds to survive long term so if society collapses I'm a goner :(. That's ok though; frees up closet space.

S1969
Mar. 30, 2013, 02:33 PM
I think you are underestimating most "preppers". They like that. They hope a great many people will have this attitude and thus die out quickly in a real disaster, freeing up resources for those who are prepared enough to hold on a little longer.

I have the "prepper" mentality in that I see it as my responsibility to be prepared enough for short-term problems (storms, power outages, perhaps a loss of income). However, I require prescription meds to survive long term so if society collapses I'm a goner :(. That's ok though; frees up closet space.

Yep. I am not a "prepper" - just a wannabe prepper. :) I seem to only own the animals that require feeding, not provide food. However, I know quite a few people who would be quite prepared for a long term disaster - weather, economic, fuel shortage, etc. They sort of hope it will happen and look forward to power outages to test it out.

I think the show is a bit melodramatic, but there really are people out there who are *prepared*. My good friend has a new rule that every home improvement MUST make them more self-sufficient or it doesn't get done - I am adopting that myself this year. I am hoping to build an outdoor oven and some 3+ season gardening via cold frames and good planning. Maybe get a root cellar dug as well.

I'll still have to BBQ my horses if the SHTF, but I have already figured out which ones will go first. ;)

LauraKY
Mar. 30, 2013, 04:19 PM
During the Cuban missile crisis, my Dad always said we would drive towards the light. That's my idea of prep.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 30, 2013, 04:25 PM
I also think that show is over the top but I know a number of serious preppers and the vast majority of them just want to be independent and ready if something does happen. Most are homesteader types and very self reliant...pretty much the sort of folks that built this country from virgin forest.

I am not a serious prepper but the more I watch world news and what is going one in Europe and the Middle East and cringe at the stupidity and shortsightedness of our leaders, the more I want to hoard food and supplies. I already raise a great deal of my food..meat, eggs and veggies...probably 80+%...and sell what we don't need as our business. I'm having a great time with this business and eating the best I have ever eaten. Assuming we could stay on our farm and not lose it due to mortgage default in another great depression, we'd do OK. We also are armed and know how to defend ourselves...both hubby and I are ex military...so I won't sit back helpless while someone takes what we have. I also have a number of close friends who are invited to come and stay with us if it gets "stupid" and with some help, we'll be OK here I think..or at least have a better chance.

I tell everyone who is interested that now is the time to become more self sufficient...have a garden, get some chickens, put a feeder calf out there with your horses. I do believe some harder times are coming...almost inevitable at this point...so rather than hope everyone else starves and leaves me more, I'm trying to help folks who sincerely want to be less dependent on the supermarkets and the gov't and become resilient. I even have given classes to people on chicken slaughtering and processing...informal and no cost...just show up and pitch in.

I see no harm in anyone having a couple months supply of dried or canned food on hand...these times now are some of the only times in human history that we have depended on someone else to bring our food. Not so long ago, everyone canned and preserved food, smoked meats, had a root cellar, etc...so it's not exactly a concept that is whacked out. Most of us can do a lot more than we are doing and there is no harm in it. Digging foxholes on your property and building bunkers is probably a bit over the top though.

Alagirl
Mar. 30, 2013, 04:40 PM
I think a lot of those people on the TV show have a screw lose.

and of course there are those who cash in on it.

And then I remind myself that it is not 'reality' no matter how much they bill it like that.

Yes, I think a lot of these folks have a big whole in their thinking. Not unlike the couponers hoarding their treasures...

But at least preppers don't think it's gonna work to rely on the infrastructure to keep your frozen dinners at peak condition...:lol:

many parts of the US are prime location for natural disasters, so you have to have some preparedness...but that storage shed is probably not going to do it when that tornado comes through, or that flood wave...


I think they watched too much bad TV, really, because when the poop hits the fan, the majority of people will pull together and help one another out and not turn on each other like a pack of wolves.
Yes, some scumbags to exist, but they are few and far between.

We saw that two years ago, when the tornadoes ripped through Alabama...

saultgirl
Mar. 30, 2013, 05:40 PM
I think they watched too much bad TV, really, because when the poop hits the fan, the majority of people will pull together and help one another out and not turn on each other like a pack of wolves.
:lol::lol::lol:

:no:

lawndart
Mar. 30, 2013, 06:23 PM
We don't own a TV, so I've not watched the show.

All anyone needs to do is read the book One Second After by William Forstchen to open your eyes to how quickly everything can go to sh*t. Yes, I know it is fiction, but the book makes you think about things that never occur to the average american.

I've always lived in the Country, and my Mom always had food canned, dried, etc. I've taken after her since we often have power outages here.

Frankly, anyone who doesn't have at least a weeks worth of food in their house is an idiot. It doesn't have to be a disaster of world proportions, it can be a personal illness, accident, or job loss. Don't forget to provide for the animals too.

Riverotter
Mar. 30, 2013, 08:30 PM
I am all for being prepared for natural disasters, for us it is hurricanes. But I am talking about people preparing for the collapse of society, government, etc. Some of the things they state are, IMO, not very well thought out.

Oh, lol, those.

The edge of crazy folks with their apocalyptic, Mad Max fantasies.... If the dreaded Zombie Apocolypse actually occurs, I actually would think that those folks would be among the first to snuff themselves.

For one thing, yup, you have a point - what are they going to eat while they wait months for their gardens to produce - assuming that their ancient, stockpiled seeds sprout and they manage to beat the elements for the very first time ever (where is the water for these gardens coming from??)

For another, they all see themselves as these leaders or loners. No one who isn't looking for a fast road to a short life is going to want to follow a leader who can't do anything, and loners won't be welcome many places.

Which leads us to the ever popular "living off the land" fantasy. :roll eyes:
LOL, this came up as dinner conversation at a get-together once, and every last person was confident they could live off the land - until I said "Ok - quick!! Look out the window and name 3 edible plants!!"
And - what if it's, say, winter?

I don't think of myself as a prepper, but I DO know how to milk an animal, and then turn that milk into cheese and butter. I can take a wheat seed through a crop and then to bread, and I've raised pigs from every stage of the game from A.I. to stir fry. None of these things take The End Of The World As We Know It to learn- and if I was really worried about Doomsday, I'd be more busy learnign that and other skills (brewing!! You'd need whiskey, for, uh, medicinal purposes :D yeah .. that's it) then I would be stockpiling dry beans and wheat berries that I have no idea how to turn into decent food - or, growing into next years food.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 30, 2013, 08:38 PM
We don't own a TV, so I've not watched the show.

All anyone needs to do is read the book One Second After by William Forstchen to open your eyes to how quickly everything can go to sh*t. Yes, I know it is fiction, but the book makes you think about things that never occur to the average american.


I agree. That is a very good book...it really explains just how bad it can get quickly if we ever have a disruption in basic services. It will make you think.

gdolapp
Mar. 31, 2013, 01:41 AM
As I mentioned before I do can produce from my garden, we have apple and pear trees so I can apples and pears, I also stock up on canned goods at the store to but only stuff that I haven't canned myself and need. I go to a bulk foods store and buy sugar, flour salt, corn starch and baking coco in bulk along with cream of wheat and quick oats. I have a huge plastic tote that has candles, flash lights and first aide items along with toilet paper and batteries and a weather/a.m/f.m radio, I have three duffle bags in my laundry room with three changes of clothes sleeping bag and pillow in each one. I always swap out batteries twice a year to keep them fresh and replace anything that we use from first aide if we need too. I also have put paper plates, paper bowls, can opener in the tote too I have to smaller totes with canned goods, crackers, granola bars, sugar, salt, instant coffee instant milk and tin coffee mugs with tin coffee pot in each tote I have a baggie with matches and lighters. in the bottem of each tote are a few boxes of amo along with three pocket knifes.
Yes call me crazy but I live about 60 - 70 miles to the north west of a working nuclear power plant.
With what is going on over seas and with our own government I am prepared for three people for awhile. If we stay at our home we can survive for over a year with what I have stocked, if we leave we would have enough for ten days. All of this stock also gives me comfort if my husband would loose his job knowing we can survive that long.
I wouldn't exactly say I am a doomsday prepper but I am ready when something happens.

wendy
Mar. 31, 2013, 06:56 AM
I think most of those preppers are just Hoarders giving their madness an excuse.

I don't see how you can prepare for "the worst"- who knows what form it will take? if it's a horrible illness what you would need would be very different than an invasion of aliens.

Stay healthy and alert and acquire skills instead of hoarding food and weapons.

Daydream Believer
Mar. 31, 2013, 07:27 AM
Regardless of what form an emergency takes there are some things that apply to all emergencies. No matter if it's a hurricane, a sun storm blowing the power grid, or a collapse of essential services in the US due to who knows what, you HAVE to eat. Grocery stores typically have a THREE day supply of food. Just look at how quickly they sell out when people rush to the store to stock up for a crisis now. What if that crisis was going to last longer than a day or two? A month? Three or six months? Get it? We all need food...it's critical and the vast vast majority of Americans depend on the grocery for their food and have very little on hand. In the book One Second After, a EMP terrorist attack perpetrated by setting three nukes off in the atmosphere over the US (very real scenario particularly considering who has nukes now) people started starving to death in the US in one month and 80% of our population will be dead in 3 months if something were to happen to disrupt our ability to transport food. EMP shuts down all electronics from your car to your cell phone. Most of the food items in the grocery store travel 1500 miles on average to get there. See a problem with that?

The second need is Water and it might be more important than food in many ways. Can you get water if your tap stops working? Will it be contaminated? What if your generator won't work because it's circuits are fried? EMP can happen due to sun storms also and has before. What if the Red Cross doesn't come and bring you fresh water? You'll die faster from lack of water than lack of food.

Another big one is medications. Lots of Americans are alive or "healthy" due to prescription meds and some of those meds are perishable like insulin. Think what might happen if someone can't get their prescription refilled. I know I'll be miserable without my allergy meds.

So even though we can't know what will happen, there are some pretty basic needs we all have.

S1969
Mar. 31, 2013, 07:45 AM
I don't see how you can prepare for "the worst"- who knows what form it will take? if it's a horrible illness what you would need would be very different than an invasion of aliens.

You must not know any preppers, then. ;) People take this very seriously - it's not a game to them, and they have prepared for numerous scenarios.

Most of them don't simply hoard food, although having ready access to food is important.

I agree with DDB - Clean water, food ready to eat, a way to acquire more food (gardens, livestock, etc.), a way heat your home/cook, protection of your supplies (which, living close to a medium sized city and two hours from NYC, is one of my biggest fears - even if we were prepared to the hilt, could we protect ourselves from the unprepared?) -- and these apply to just about any scenario from a 3 day power outage, to a fuel shortage, or an economic collapse. Most preppers probably aren't prepared for a lifetime of living off the land, but if something happens that makes that a possibility (e.g. EMP like One Second After), they will outlive the unprepared and resources will become more available.

Most real preppers don't prepare for a zombie apocalypse, that's just for TV.

wendy
Mar. 31, 2013, 09:41 AM
Grocery stores typically have a THREE day supply of food. Just look at how quickly they sell out when people rush to the store to stock up for a crisis now. What if that crisis was going to last longer than a day or two? A month? Three or six months?

well, I sort of know how to "live off the land"- I have on hand a book of local edible plants, complete with nice pictures and how to prepare them; I know how to snare rabbits and net birds and catch fish and how to cook them; and there are tons of very tame deer around that it really wouldn't be that hard to catch and eat. Plenty of water, and lots of wood to make fires.
BUT there are so many people who live here that they'd quickly overwhelm the land- no way we could all live off the land.

WildBlue
Mar. 31, 2013, 09:47 AM
BUT there are so many people who live here that they'd quickly overwhelm the land- no way we could all live off the land.

I have prepper relatives. Indefensible suburban house with no way to heat or cook without electricity. Deep well that relies on an electric pump for water, no surface water nearby. Extremely poor-quality soil for growing anything and limited game. But they have a year's-worth of food on hand and lots of ammo.

Their health is such that keeping an acre or two of lawn mowed with a riding mower is a hardship and they've never hunted wild game, so I suspect they won't have to worry about outliving their food stash.

ETA: I forgot to add why I included the quote, which is that all the preppers I've met seem to assume they'll be among the survivors of whatever-it-is. Hate to say it, but if you currently survive only thanks to modern medicine and a first-world lifestyle, your odds aren't looking too good. Just sayin'

Alagirl
Mar. 31, 2013, 10:42 AM
I have prepper relatives. Indefensible suburban house with no way to heat or cook without electricity. Deep well that relies on an electric pump for water, no surface water nearby. Extremely poor-quality soil for growing anything and limited game. But they have a year's-worth of food on hand and lots of ammo.

Their health is such that keeping an acre or two of lawn mowed with a riding mower is a hardship and they've never hunted wild game, so I suspect they won't have to worry about outliving their food stash.

:lol:

alterhorse
Mar. 31, 2013, 11:05 AM
might want to ask that question in Cyprus, Greece and coming to Spain and Italy

The reason our stock market is going through the roof isn't how great we are doing but has become a save heaven for the Europeans who are concerned about funds they once thought as save.

That plus also, the the devaluation of the US dollar as a method of diluting debt, means it now takes more US dollars to represent the actual value of a share of stock.

alabama
Mar. 31, 2013, 11:11 AM
I have a well. That will get my horses/cats and me water. I also have some food put away. Nothing major but it can't hurt.

I resent that the media and TV as made being a "prepper" into a bad thing. Since when is being prepared to take care of yourself bad??? If I want to be a "prepper" (prepared person), so what?

Hell, my employer is moving three states away, eventually. I might not have a job. So if I'm a prepper, I might be able to eat.

Alagirl
Mar. 31, 2013, 11:34 AM
I have a well. That will get my horses/cats and me water. I also have some food put away. Nothing major but it can't hurt.

I resent that the media and TV as made being a "prepper" into a bad thing. Since when is being prepared to take care of yourself bad??? If I want to be a "prepper" (prepared person), so what?

Hell, my employer is moving three states away, eventually. I might not have a job. So if I'm a prepper, I might be able to eat.

well, it's all in the label:

being prepared is one thing....going off the deep end calls for ridicule.

alittlegray
Mar. 31, 2013, 12:06 PM
Whenever I see my chubbier-than-I'd-like self in the mirror, I remind my self esteem that I'm storing fat for leaner times, like an apocalypse! I will make it at least a month longer than my skinny cousin, you know. Plus, once the supply of cinnamon raisin bread and girl scout cookies are gone, I don't want to live anymore anyway.

Seriously though, looking at my shortcomings I see my terrible eyesight that requires contacts for astigmatism. I am sick enough to need repeated, frequent hospital intervention and skilled nursing care. Day to day I take multiple medications. I am not outliving the collapse of infrastructure in our society. Once I can no longer obtain contacts and I break that last pair of glasses, well, I am super vulnerable if I can't see. That is assuming I am living anyway without all my medications.

I do like how about 90% of the people assume they are not part of the 80% die off from whatever doomsday scenario happens. :)

Alagirl
Mar. 31, 2013, 12:32 PM
Whenever I see my chubbier-than-I'd-like self in the mirror, I remind my self esteem that I'm storing fat for leaner times, like an apocalypse! I will make it at least a month longer than my skinny cousin, you know. Plus, once the supply of cinnamon raisin bread and girl scout cookies are gone, I don't want to live anymore anyway.

Seriously though, looking at my shortcomings I see my terrible eyesight that requires contacts for astigmatism. I am sick enough to need repeated, frequent hospital intervention and skilled nursing care. Day to day I take multiple medications. I am not outliving the collapse of infrastructure in our society. Once I can no longer obtain contacts and I break that last pair of glasses, well, I am super vulnerable if I can't see. That is assuming I am living anyway without all my medications.

I do like how about 90% of the people assume they are not part of the 80% die off from whatever doomsday scenario happens. :)

LOL, I think it's closer to 99% :)


but this prepping thing is like the Y2K hype...

I just hope the hardcore preppers remember to rotate their inventory, and use some of those provisions up before they go bad....:)

carolprudm
Mar. 31, 2013, 12:42 PM
The prescription med issue is serious, more for Mr P than for me. And I'm not sure our generator and deep well would survive an EMP but I do try to keep at least 6 months of mostly freeze dried and vacuum packed food on hand. I'm not that all interested in rebuilding after an all out nuclear war but I would like to survive a pandemic not to mention the next hurricane or ice storm

carolprudm
Mar. 31, 2013, 12:46 PM
LOL, I think it's closer to 99% :)


but this prepping thing is like the Y2K hype...

I just hope the hardcore preppers remember to rotate their inventory, and use some of those provisions up before they go bad....:)
Much of the Y2K hype didn't happen because of people like me who were testing systems for months before and were at our desks, stone cold sober and not hung over at 8 AM Jan 1 2000.

Interestingly I do know of one instance where a data base program was seriously messed up when some users were doing an automatic update when some of their systems reset for daylight savings time and others did not

S1969
Mar. 31, 2013, 12:49 PM
I just hope the hardcore preppers remember to rotate their inventory, and use some of those provisions up before they go bad....:)

Seriously, you guys really should lurk on some actual Prepping/Survivalist boards. Having to say something like "rotate your provisions" to people who actually consider themselves "real preppers" is like going on COTH and saying "I hope you've thought about how you're going to feed that horse." ;)

I doubt 99% of people who have ever *really* thought about preparing for a disaster situation would consider themselves the survivors. For me this is a fun *hobby*; I have read a lot, I have a variety of prepper "handbooks" and a lot of equipment & supplies that other people don't own, more "homesteading" supplies than most, and still think we'd be in big trouble.

Alagirl
Mar. 31, 2013, 01:05 PM
Seriously, you guys really should lurk on some actual Prepping/Survivalist boards. Having to say something like "rotate your provisions" to people who actually consider themselves "real preppers" is like going on COTH and saying "I hope you've thought about how you're going to feed that horse." ;)

I doubt 99% of people who have ever *really* thought about preparing for a disaster situation would consider themselves the survivors. For me this is a fun *hobby*; I have read a lot, I have a variety of prepper "handbooks" and a lot of equipment & supplies that other people don't own, more "homesteading" supplies than most, and still think we'd be in big trouble.


heck, I sometimes wonder if the COTHers have thought about how to feed that horse....but that's neither here nor there.

There is prepping and there is going off the deep end, like the government takeover scenario...fueled by bad movies.

We all know it's corporate America we need to worry about, an they make more money when things run smooth!

But natural disasters are real.

But I do question the wisdom of some: They got a great deal on 2000 can't of Tuna (whether or not anybody but the cat eats is is not the point) and only paid a quarter a can, but now they have t build a 3000 dollar shed to store it.
Which BTW could be blown away in the next tornado....

I am a DIYer by heart. I want to know how things are done. I know how a lot of things are done.

But I am not going to go crazy over it.

if you enjoy yourself doing this, hey, have a go at it.

But - and I do understand it's TV, not real - some take it too far!

And some take those to the cleaners....ah, had to love the one guy selling shelters....his guys had the small storm shelter installed the wrong way, it flooded....he used that opportunity to upsell his services..... :lol:

mht
Mar. 31, 2013, 01:12 PM
I think most of those preppers are just Hoarders giving their madness an excuse.

I don't see how you can prepare for "the worst"- who knows what form it will take? if it's a horrible illness what you would need would be very different than an invasion of aliens.

Stay healthy and alert and acquire skills instead of hoarding food and weapons.

Funny you should say that about being hoarders. My daughter just helped with makeup for a small independent film that was being made north of Toronto. They filmed in this fellow's bunker that consists of 42 buses buried underground. Her biggest comment was that all of the property looked as if these people were hoarders, from the appearance of their garage and house.

S1969
Mar. 31, 2013, 01:38 PM
if you enjoy yourself doing this, hey, have a go at it.

But - and I do understand it's TV, not real - some take it too far!

Believe me, I think the show is bizarre, although I've only seen it once. This couple was interviewing people to share their "bug out" homestead with them, and simulated an actual disaster "bug out" so they could watch them and see if they were good enough. All I could think of was "why don't you invite your FRIENDS to join you in the bunker?" but they probably don't have any friends anymore!

WildBlue
Mar. 31, 2013, 04:41 PM
I just hope the hardcore preppers remember to rotate their inventory, and use some of those provisions up before they go bad....:)

I actually asked that question (and, seriously, how do you rotate #10 cans of dried beans and potatoes?) and was smugly informed that rotation is not necessary since everything will last at least 30 years in the cans. Since the same person informed me that honey can be used to treat most medical problems, I decided not to argue about the nutritional value of foodstuffs that has sat on a shelf for decades. Or ask if they thought to invest in a pallet of Kotex.

Alagirl
Mar. 31, 2013, 04:42 PM
I actually asked that question (and, seriously, how do you rotate #10 cans of dried beans and potatoes?) and was smugly informed that rotation is not necessary since everything will last at least 30 years in the cans. Since the same person informed me that honey can be used to treat most medical problems, I decided not to argue about the nutritional value of foodstuffs that has sat on a shelf for decades. Or ask if they thought to invest in a pallet of Kotex.

:lol:

wendy
Mar. 31, 2013, 07:36 PM
and still think we'd be in big trouble.
yeah, the last time we had an apocalypse- the black plague in Europe- most people were quite self-sufficient and had good skills at taking care of themselves, and the medically challenged all just died anyway long before the plague came along. Nowadays, not so much. Do you know how to make soap? tan leather? weave cloth? take care of livestock? plow and plant and harvest and save seeds for next year? hunt and butcher? make a tool or a weapon? ride a horse? build a fire? chop firewood? construct a simple building?
how about a pot to boil water in- know how to make a pot out of things you find outside?
answer is a big fat NO to all for most people.
If something does happen, we're in trouble. And I don't think hoarding food and weapons is going to help much.
I started (fairly recently) trying to learn how to live off the land just in case the economy tanked even more and my financial situation got even worse. So if necessary I could just go live in the wilderness sans money. It's kind of fun to acquire such skills. Much more fun than hoarding food.

S1969
Mar. 31, 2013, 09:13 PM
Do you know how to make soap? tan leather? weave cloth? take care of livestock? plow and plant and harvest and save seeds for next year? hunt and butcher? make a tool or a weapon? ride a horse? build a fire? chop firewood? construct a simple building?

Yes. But I have not actually tanned leather.


how about a pot to boil water in- know how to make a pot out of things you find outside? answer is a big fat NO to all for most people.
I agree, but doubt we'll really have to start throwing pots anytime soon.



If something does happen, we're in trouble. And I don't think hoarding food and weapons is going to help much.
I started (fairly recently) trying to learn how to live off the land just in case the economy tanked even more and my financial situation got even worse. So if necessary I could just go live in the wilderness sans money. It's kind of fun to acquire such skills. Much more fun than hoarding food.

Well, I'd like to agree but I can't. Weapons will be what people use to protect the supplies, equipment, and skills that they have acquired. Unfortunately, some people specifically plan to usurp others' provisions in a time of crisis, but more people would just be desperate and dangerous.

Living "off the land" is possible, but it's a lot easier with some planning involved - shelter, tools, livestock and clean water. One of my interests and goals for the year is to actually harvest wild herbs for medicinal purposes. I am fairly good at identifying the plants, but have not really practiced the methods to actually utilize the medicinal qualities of plants (e.g. tinctures). It's complicated stuff! But fascinating!

gdolapp
Mar. 31, 2013, 11:04 PM
I live in a four season state: We have severe thunderstorms, tornado's, heat waves, drought, floods, blizzards, ice storms and yes Illinois has had earth quakes too. I am in a rural area, for thoose that don't seem to know what that is I live in the country on a gravel road miles from any town.
I have lost power for days and have been prepared for it. If anything would go wrong such as war on US soil, economic collapse, ect. I am one that does not have to worry about getting to town to obtain items to survive. The stores would already be empty before my horse and wagon could get me there.
We have two running water sources to obtain water from one is a creek and the other is a natural spring.
For thoose that don't realize this : It isn't about hoarding it is about survival. Thoose that survive are the ones that will be and are ready for something to happen. Thoose that aren't and think it isn't neccassary well gues what you will be the ones that are begging for help from whom ever is prepared.
As far as meds: a person can only get the amount prescribed for prescriptions and yes in a crisis that can be fatel however if you know what you can substitute for thoose prescription meds and you have the substitutes then a person can survive longer with health problems. For instance my husband is on blood thinner he takes warfrin, however asprin is also a blood thinner so I have a butt load of thoose, I suffer with chronic pain day and night. I only take my major pain meds when I absolutely have to I also have a stock pile of IBU, and tylanol.
It gives me comfort knowing my family can survive without having to leave our property or depend on others.