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View Full Version : Just discovered The Incredible Dr Pol.



CVPeg
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:11 AM
Anybody else watch this?

Large/small animal vet in Michigan. Really interesting show on National Geographic Channel.

My new Saturday fix! :lol:

Pony Fixer
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:21 AM
He's been cited, and IIRC had his license suspended for some of his practices. He sets veterinary medicine back more than a few decades. He's no one to admire.

supershorty628
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:22 AM
I hate to be the burster of the bubble, but he is a terrible vet with some really awful practices. There have been multiple petitions to Nat Geo to cancel that show. I believe his license was even suspended last year.

Sorry to be Debbie Downer, but... :no:

CVPeg
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:32 AM
Googled and found the one action for the practice failing in a ultrasound reading of a dog ready to deliver. Then again, I wouldn't have gone to a mixed practice for my dogs' deliveries, and figured with that many years, not that unusual to have some action, I suppose.

Oh, well. I appreciated his work ethic and straight forwardness. And watching both the large and small animal procedures.

supershorty628
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:41 AM
Um... it was a lot more serious than that.
http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dvm/Veterinary+news/Dr-Pol-reality-TV-veterinarian-fined-and-placed-on/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/791615

He also, IIRC, has gotten in trouble for not using proper pain management for his patients.

He is an embarrassment to the veterinary community.

SarahKing
Feb. 24, 2013, 11:22 AM
Performing an FHO on a non-intubated dog in an unsterile environment and offering no pain meds afterwards; one of his associates performing a c-section in her dirty scrubs without proper aspetic technique or any visible patient monitoring in an exam room with the owners assisting the surgery ... he and his practice are an embarrassment to the modern veterinary community.

You can see the c-section here http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/wild/the-incredible-dr-pol/videos/bulldog-breeders-birthing-dilemma/?videoDetect=t%252Ct

CVPeg
Feb. 24, 2013, 11:54 AM
Oh, well...

Winter's almost done with anyway. Need to wean myself from the tube.

hastyreply
Feb. 24, 2013, 12:24 PM
Dr Pol is much like the vet in our small town. He's always packed, he is reasonable and realistic about out comes. There are many things he does not do, doesn't have an x-ray machine, but then there are many other vets not far away who do have all these services and the prices to go with it. This was a rural farm community that has been encroached upon by the "big city". There are still many rural local people around.

Dr Pol started with a dairy practice. Demand has caused him to enlarge his practice to pets. How many vets would do what he does, at the prices he charges. Not berating the clients for waiting to long etc. I see him doing things that my DH had to do himself when he ran a dairy because there were no vets to come out to do it. He obviously fills a niche in his community.

The person I can't stand is his son Charles! What a douche! I don't know if he's really that stupid or just lets himself look that way for the show. I understand he's the impetuous for the show. Maybe the show is Dr Pol's retirement plan.

PaintPony
Feb. 24, 2013, 12:53 PM
I've watched it and have always been grossed out by how un-sterile everything seems to be.

And I don't know anything about cows, but is birthing calves always so brutal?

carolprudm
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:00 PM
I've watched it and have always been grossed out by how un-sterile everything seems to be.

And I don't know anything about cows, but is birthing calves always so brutal?
Keep in mind that you are only seeing the problem deliveries.

With my goats I've had lots of uncomplicated deliveries....and 3 bad ones. One I had to have the vet out....dead kid wedged sideways, one with one leg back that I was able to resolve fairly easily and one with a dead kid with both legs back. The vet was 2 hours away. I was able to get the kid out myself but it wasn't pretty

LauraKY
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:44 PM
It's still not sterile in his "operating room"...which is the first thing I noticed.

leaf
Feb. 24, 2013, 02:45 PM
I've worked in small animal practices (one mixed) for nigh on 33 years.
Dr. Pol's practices are somewhat old-school, in some cases, but they get it done.
I've seen many changes over the years. There have been many improvements, but sometimes I think we've gone too far in some ways. Meaning that vets could fix your animal and not charge a billion dollars.

You know, after 33 years in veterinary practices, I've noticed that sterilty can sometimes be a bit of a laugh. A very experienced veterinary surgeon recently said to us ( two young vets and me ), clip it, spit on it, wipe the mud off, and spritz with alcohol.

Pony Fixer
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:00 PM
[QUOTE=leaf;6856868
A very experienced veterinary surgeon recently said to us ( two young vets and me ), clip it, spit on it, wipe the mud off, and spritz with alcohol.[/QUOTE]

I can tell you I practice very COMPETENT veterinary medicine without some of the bigger bells/whistles (digital rads, ultrasound in house, etc.). I do not charge a million dollars, either, but rather a very reasonable price. What you are describing above is not only stupid, in my opinion it's CRIMINAL. Obviously gelding a colt in a field is not "sterile", but you can be darn sure my equipment was all autoclaved, my gloves were sterile, and I scrubbed the bejesus out of each and every incision site. To not do so is BELOW THE WRITTEN STANDARD OF CARE and is punishable by censure and license loss. I find these "old timey" docs (and I've been out 15 years, I'm no newbie) to be very cavalier with the health and welfare of their patients. Just because they've "gotten away with it"--until they don't--doesn't mean it was right to start.

You can do it right, not cost exorbitant money, and still make a decent living.

Jumperrider55
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:15 PM
I've watched it and have always been grossed out by how un-sterile everything seems to be.

And I don't know anything about cows, but is birthing calves always so brutal?

No no its not! Most births happen out in a field while mom's grazing and then when its time to bring the girls in for milking the farmer notices Bailey didn't come in. He then Sends his wife out with a halter and a wheelbarrow. Half and hour and a lot of swear words later the calf is in the wheelbarrow and Bailey is plodding Down the road towards the barn.

Sannois
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:24 PM
I've watched it and have always been grossed out by how un-sterile everything seems to be.

And I don't know anything about cows, but is birthing calves always so brutal?
Yes it can be especially with big bull calves!

Sannois
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:25 PM
No no its not! Most births happen out in a field while mom's grazing and then when its time to bring the girls in for milking the farmer notices Bailey didn't come in. He then Sends his wife out with a halter and a wheelbarrow. Half and hour and a lot of swear words later the calf is in the wheelbarrow and Bailey is plodding Down the road towards the barn.
Not on huge commercial dairy farms~ Or were you being tongue in Cheek??:winkgrin:

Gestalt
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:31 PM
When calving goes wrong it is ugly. In my area cattle are not given pain meds. I sat in my pickup and cried while waiting for the vet to finish digging around in a cows shoulder. Geezus, she was screaming in pain, my horse was literally shaking inside the trailer, I was sobbing and the vet and cow owner were acting like this was a daily event. And it probably is.

I don't know about other areas, but here it seems as brutal today as when I was a kid.

leaf
Feb. 24, 2013, 06:05 PM
Hey Ponyfixer, You and I are really on the same page :) Autoclaved, gloved, and "scrub the be-jeesus out of it" is absolutely the standard of care. The practice I work at does have the bells and whistles. Anesthesia, monitors, ultra-sound, digital rads. Nowadays we also have veterinary critical care and referral hospitals very close by, with board certified internal medicine and surgeons. That wasn't always the case a few years back.

Some clients simply can't afford those guys. But they love their animals.

And so the older, been there, done that vets often save the day.
I wrote "clip. spit and wipe" as an example of stuff I hear right often.

I do like watching the Dr. Pol show. Sometimes I shake my head, but if a client can have an FHO on their dog without spending the bank, then I'm okay.

danceronice
Feb. 24, 2013, 08:56 PM
Never had any problems with him (except no one in the practice really does exotic birds, ie parrots, but welcome to the world of owning birds. Even in DC I had to drive halfway across NoVa to get to an exotics practice.) He's a lot more affordable than even the "reasonable" vets around here. And a lot of the patients up there just wouldn't bother with the vet if they had to pay for the 'act like it's a human' practices. (I like to joke about the clinic I used in MA, but with as many animals as I have now I'd never go there. I can replace a cat for $20 at the local shelter, I'm not spending $3000 on treatment I'd consider carefully for MYSELF.) Plus if a spay/neuter is only $50-75, you really have no excuse not to do it (as people seem to down here, as I discovered doing the staggering number of non-altered animals at the vaccination clinic today. I get it's not cheap, I've had a cat and a dog spayed down here and it was too much money for cheap animals, but given the license fees, more than double than they are for fixed animals, add up one would think you'd just bite the bullet.)

As for the cows, apparently birth is really easy or really hard. Our neighbor across the road (another client, fwiw-used to be dairy, now he's in meat cattle) had one cow get loose, come over to our property, have her calf, and get up and walk home, leaving the calf. Cow was fine, calf was okay after our old dog found it hidden in the grass. Cow calved and left. OTOH, I know they can go pretty painfully wrong, meaning I was always nervous about the "born at the fair" calves. I don't remember that ever going wrong but it seems like it could potentially be a bad thing.

And this weekend's episode couldn't begin to convey how miserably hot the weather was this summer. No pasture left, feeding out hay because the grass was crap, river down ridiculously low, and awful flies.

Cracked me up the horse owners didn't see it was an abscess. I knew what farrier he was going to recommend, too (Jody's good, she finally got Lucky's feet a little better. I didn't realize how much the farrier at the boarding barn was going with 'TB's feet are just like that'.)

Pony Fixer
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:32 PM
Good for you. Why even bother vaccinating your cats when you can replace them for pennies?

To some extent, you get what you pay for. If your pet is worthless to you, by all means cheap it out, they clearly don't have much meaning for you. I would not hesitate to spend $3000 on either of my cats if the prognosis was good and the treatment tolerable (and in fact spent more on the new one after having him 6 weeks). I am a friggin' DOCTOR and I chose to act like one--I'm damn proud to say I could stand toe to toe with most MDs. I work in an area that is not affluent. We make lots of compromises on treatments and tests, but NEVER the basics. Your surgery will be fully monitored, they will be on fluids, etc. I will skip X-rays when I can feel drawer and am confident in a CCL tear. I don't need to u/s a mass in an older pet if I can feel it and the rest of the PE points to cancer.

Dr. Pol gives my profession a bad name. Period.

happymom
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:41 PM
Come on Fixer, this is America, home of rewarding bad behavior. Just look at Dr. Drew, Dr. Phil and the Kardashians.....