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View Full Version : Trendy new baby names-- keep me in the loop



mvp
Feb. 22, 2013, 11:45 PM
You know how this works. In the early 1970s, a whole bunch of people, all separately, decided that Jennifer was a great and underused name.

So what are the Jennifers of today?

rustbreeches
Feb. 22, 2013, 11:55 PM
DD will be ten in a couple weeks. She has come in contact with more Madisons, some variation of Kylie, Carlie, Keylee, and Jordans than I can shake a stick at.

We are searching baby names right now and Bella and Katniss are really popular girl names for babies being born.

Lots of creative spelling, which I am not a fan of. "EE" on the end of a name instead of "Y" is cute when they are little, but is is almost like you are wishing your daughter to be a stripper when she grows up.

For boys Braden, Jaden, Kaden are in abundance in the under 6 set

Windsor1
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:00 AM
DD will be ten in a couple weeks. She has come in contact with more Madisons, some variation of Kylie, Carlie, Keylee, and Jordans than I can shake a stick at.

Lots of creative spelling, which I am not a fan of. "EE" on the end of a name instead of "Y" is cute when they are little, but is is almost like you are wishing your daughter to be a stripper when she grows up.

For boys Braden, Jaden, Kaden are in abundance in the under 6 set

Gag reflex stimulated!

randomequine
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:37 AM
I still cannot believe people would name their child Bella or Katniss after book characters..... I liked the name Edward for a middle name....now DH and I are rethinking it (not that we currently have a reason...but down the line)....don't want to be associated with the Twihards....

grey_pony
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:14 AM
The Braydens, Jaydens, Haydens, Kaydens, Aidens, Zaydens... aghh! Almost every friend or acquaintance of mine with young boys has one of these! My daughter's daycare has a ton of "-dens" with their various spellings... Kayden, Kaden, Kaiden. Lots of Kylee, Kyleigh, Rylee, Ashleigh, Trinitee. The worst I heard was a girl named Memory... which seems like bad juju to me. I gave my kid a wierd name but at least people can spell it easily.

Luseride
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:56 AM
Mckenzie, Makenzie, and all the other variations. Madison, Madisen, Madyson, yes I teach all three of those this semester in sixth grade.

Also, lots of girls with traditional boy names and weird spellings.

clanter
Feb. 23, 2013, 07:53 AM
I still cannot believe people would name their child Bella or Katniss after book characters..... I liked the name Edward for a middle name....now DH and I are rethinking it (not that we currently have a reason...but down the line)....don't want to be associated with the Twihards....


my wife works in a paediatric's office.... the baby's names... often it appears it was chosen while walking through the grocery store I keep waiting for the day when she tells me some one has named the kid Fruit Loops

Blue Yonder
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:01 AM
I quite like the (somewhat smaller?) trend of naming girls old old names, as in search your family tree - Grace, Poppy, Violet, Hazel, Hannah, Hope, etc. I wish that would continue. :) Maybe it would crowd out the Neveah's, Trinity's, and all 64 iterations of Madison/Kailey/anything ending is "eeeee".

At least we don't see so many Tiffanii's and Britanii's. My generation had classrooms full.

[Ahem...no offense wished upon anyone with such a name!]

Mickey the Marcher
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:21 AM
The Braydens, Jaydens, Haydens, Kaydens, Aidens, Zaydens... aghh! Almost every friend or acquaintance of mine with young boys has one of these! My daughter's daycare has a ton of "-dens" with their various spellings...

Why would you lump Aidan in with those others? It's a ancient name and has been used continuously for centuries. There is nothing obscure, new fangled or trendy about it.

I've never been a fan of surnames being converted into first names, and always found that annoying. But I have come to understand there is actually a tradition of this in parts of the south, where a child is given the mother's maiden name. I think it works alright with many anglo/English surnames, but often doesn't come off with names from other backgrounds/cultures.

It's also a bit annoying when names get taken from other cultures, at least the spelling does, but the pronunciation doesn't make the transition. That can be jarring to the ears if you are familiar with the original pronunciation. Caitlin would be a prime example.

Pookah
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:50 AM
You absolutely must read the Freakonomics study on this - it was my favorite chapter of the book. They did a study that traces names through socioeconomic paths over the years and traces their origins (i.e. the movie "Splash" came out in 1984; following that, "Madison" became a popular name for girls born into wealthy families, and then was gradually popularized as it was selected by parents of girls in increasingly lower socioeconomic families. It is really fascinating and was one of my favorite chapters of the book, although in the book (which came out in 2005), they predicted the top names of 2015 based on statistics, and so far I think those are not on track to come true (very disappointing as my name was one of them :)). Anyway, it's a really fascinating way to look at it, and will add a whole new dimension of stress to selecting a name :)

BeaSting
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:59 AM
Quick survey of pre-school thru 1st grades at my school - There are at least six little girls named Taylor - three of them are clustered in one classroom. Also popular are Olivia and Trinity. Amina/Ameena, Amaya, Amira. The more popular boy names are Brody/Cody/Brady, Kaden, Jalen and Gabriel. Madison seems to be going out - most of the Madisons at this school are clustered in 2nd and 3rd grade. There are also plenty of kids with punctuation in their names. Am'briya, La'Trell, Le'Vonn.

lovey1121
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:04 AM
I've met 2 Jaxs, a few Matteos, and a couple Hunters. My nephew was named Shane (his Dad always wanted to name his son Shane, and who is Sis to argue?)

That said, my 2 current favorite names come from watching college football.

Munchie LeGeaux - Cincinnati QB

Silverberry Mouhon - also Cincinnati -DL

I just like how they roll off my tongue:)

Mickey the Marcher
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:11 AM
Mateo is just the Spanish version of Matthew. Hardly unusual, or trendy. Hunter has been around forever as a first name. Shane is plain jane as it gets.
Jax is a bit odd, and is more than likely a bastardization of Jackson.
But the other three, what is weird or trendy about those names?

Calvincrowe
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:12 AM
You know, you can choose whatever name you like for your child...but do the world and your child a favor and spell it in a normal way. Perhaps following the Standard Rules for English? After 20 years in the classroom, I've seen some real doozies-- the child named Kattie comes to mind first. That spells Catty, anyway you slice it, right? Um no. That's Katy. After she got angry with me for mispronouncing her name, I tried to explain doubling the consonant and softening the vowel...to no avail. Jermy (missing that crucial second syllable).

Shithead was the worst I've come across. Yeah, you laughed didn't you? It was pronounced Sha-theed. Poor little girl:no:

The Kaden, Aiden trend is strong, as are Bella, Olivia, Taylor. Some are beginning to mine the bible for Old Testament names. Please don't name your kid Uriah...oh, wait, somebody did! Bleh!

mswillie
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:13 AM
I've met 2 Jaxs, a few Matteos, and a couple Hunters. My nephew was named Shane (his Dad always wanted to name his son Shane, and who is Sis to argue?)


What is wrong with Jackson (as opposed to Jaxin)? I despise the spelling Jax. To me Jax is a tasty, non-nutritive cheesy snack that is nothing but air and fluff and stains your fingers orange.

http://www.taquitos.net/cheese_puffs/Jax

I couldn't be a teacher. I would probably form negative stereotypes about kids based on the names their parents decided to call them and that would be very unfair.

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:19 AM
I know two sets of parents preparing to call their sons Jackson this year. Well, one Jackson, and the other Jaxon. (Jaxon's soon-to-be-mother is one of my mom's colleagues. Apparently mom-to-be is now regretting the agreement she made with her husband that Mom would name first child and Dad would name second child. Their first child's name is Sophia Elizabeth.)

fordtraktor
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:23 AM
There is no "Jennifer" of today. Parents are choosing a wider variety of names and so there are fewer kids with even the most popular names -- not as often 3 to a class like there used to be. While there are a couple of repeats (Abigail, Evie, Sophia, Jackson, Henry, Max, Liam) in DS' entire friend circle, there have been no repeats in his actual classes so far.

"Old timey" names are also coming back. Both our sons have relatively rare but Victorian-ish classic names. No weird spelling.

LauraKY
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:28 AM
True story, I tutored a high schooler in reading with an unusual name. Tiwanis. I asked her if it was a family name. She laughed and said no, her mother was drunk and passed out while she was pregnant and when she woke up she saw the Kiwanis Club sign and thought is was a sign from God...except she thought the K was a T. Very sad, but completely true.

lovey1121
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:38 AM
Shithead was the worst I've come across. Yeah, you laughed didn't you? It was pronounced Sha-theed. Poor little girl!

WOW. I had a dog named Shithead. Actually, her name was Tipper, but she, um, became Shithead. Hehehe

mswillie
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:39 AM
I know two sets of parents preparing to call their sons Jackson this year. Well, one Jackson, and the other Jaxon. (Jaxon's soon-to-be-mother is one of my mom's colleagues. Apparently mom-to-be is now regretting the agreement she made with her husband that Mom would name first child and Dad would name second child. Their first child's name is Sophia Elizabeth.)

Maybe mom could negotiate on the spelling. Go get a bag of JAX and ask dad if he really wants his son's name associated with a snack food as opposed to say, Andrew Jackson, or even Jackson Browne. (might want to gloss over the whole Michael Jackson thing though).

lovey1121
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:42 AM
But the other three, what is weird or trendy about those names?

Never said weird. No negative connotations in my post. Sheesh.

Villager
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:50 AM
Just heard on radio that some if them old fashion names coming back.
Examples :- Norah, Oliver , Hazel,Ursula, Oscar , Charles....
I actually have a grand niece and nephew named Hazel & Oscar. Mother namd them as her first child , Ava , was overly popular.
I called her to say the later names coming into style... She was not thrilled... Just when she thought she was being original.

JanM
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:50 AM
When I was in school there were tons of Debbie's, and Susan's. So many of them that they mostly went by nicknames or their last name. I don't know what happened to them all either, they disappeared like the dinosaurs.

During the late 90's and early 2000's there were all variations of Brittany, Britney, Brittany, etc, and tons of various spellings of Tiffany.

If you go to televisionwithout pity, click on All Forums, under the Forum tab at the top, and go to Candid Reality, click on the Toddlers & Tiaras show thread to see al of the variations of Mckenzie, Mckayla, Ashley, etc. It's very entertaining.

tja789
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:58 AM
Why would you lump Aidan in with those others? It's a ancient name and has been used continuously for centuries. There is nothing obscure, new fangled or trendy about it.

I've never been a fan of surnames being converted into first names, and always found that annoying. But I have come to understand there is actually a tradition of this in parts of the south, where a child is given the mother's maiden name. I think it works alright with many anglo/English surnames, but often doesn't come off with names from other backgrounds/cultures.

It's also a bit annoying when names get taken from other cultures, at least the spelling does, but the pronunciation doesn't make the transition. That can be jarring to the ears if you are familiar with the original pronunciation. Caitlin would be a prime example.

There's nothing really wrong with Aiden but it's definitely trendy having been at the top of the popularity list for the last few years.

http://www.babycenter.com/top-baby-names-2012

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:58 AM
Maybe mom could negotiate on the spelling. Go get a bag of JAX and ask dad if he really wants his son's name associated with a snack food as opposed to say, Andrew Jackson, or even Jackson Browne. (might want to gloss over the whole Michael Jackson thing though).

Mom has tried... I gather that Dad's family has a bit of a tradition about naming sons with the letter X in the name. Xavier was promptly suggested but the boy will be named Jaxon and called Jack.

I would not be surprised to see a bunch of little girls called Khaleesi running around in a year or two, either. I rank that one as worse than Katniss; Katniss at least can insist on being called Kat like every other Katherine I meet. But funny enough, Hermione and Ginevra don't seem to have caught on...

lovey1121
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:11 AM
Due to a new puppy in training, I've realized that I really like the name Georgia. I just love saying it:)

dappled
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:20 AM
I kind of like the fact that more old fashioned names are making a comeback. I really detest all these cutsie names that seem to have been popular over the past few years.

However, I doubt that (if and when) I ever have children, I would consult the top baby names to help me choose one. I'll probably go with a family name, but that's just me.

Pony Fixer
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:22 AM
We went with the older names trend with my daughter--Ruby. Violet and Hazel were also in contention.

There are 2 girls named Avery in my daughter's class, as well as all the now popular -dens. ;)

Interestingly, Ruby doesn't even make the top 100 names in the US, but is in the top 5 in the UK.

talkofthetown
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:17 PM
I still cannot believe people would name their child Bella or Katniss after book characters..... I liked the name Edward for a middle name....now DH and I are rethinking it (not that we currently have a reason...but down the line)....don't want to be associated with the Twihards....
Ditto. Seriously. We're not there either, but were recently discussing this same thing. Used to love Edward as a middle name (and it's DH's middle name). Want to hear sick? I used to want the name Jacob Edward Lastname. Nope. Couldn't do that to my kid, no matter how well it fits.


Why would you lump Aidan in with those others?

'Cause it rythmes? :confused::lol:

talkofthetown
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:18 PM
Forgot to add, there was a family that I never met, but some friends of mine knew them. They had twins, a boy and a girl. They were BOTH named Hunter.

rustbreeches
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:21 PM
I like that a lot of older names are making comebacks. I am seeing more names like Ella, Sophie, Abigail.

I admit to using my mother's maiden name for my daughter's first name, but in a hypocritical twist, I detest random last names for first names. It comes of as pretentious to me, but there were a whole generation of Kennedys and MacKenzies after me.

As for 'boy' names being used now, lets not forget that a couple generations ago Kimberly, Beverly, Shirley, Ashley, Vivian and others were boy names.

Also, DH and I have probably agreed on a gender neutral name for # 3, who is a girl, but what is everybody's opinion on Mary Lee for a first name. I heard it a couple months ago and can't get it out of my head

laskiblue
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:34 PM
I teach college classes and it's becoming more common for students with some of these excessively fanciful or oddly spelled names to make different choices for themselves, either by using a middle name or nickname instead, or, in the case, of one young woman last semester, quietly informing me after class that even though her name on the roster is <bizarrely spelled version of a common trendy name of mid-1990s>, she prefers and uses the common spelling, and could I please change it on the sign out sheet. Apparently the poor kiddo was embarrassed by the weird spelling of her name and didn't want others to see it.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:36 PM
Mickey is your real name Jennifer? LOL I think you need to look up the definition of "trendy". You're very defensive for some reason.

I think that Abby is the Jennifer of lately. And I love the name Abby, it's a family name, but I wouldn't use it. We lived in a part of Montana that people moved to to fulfill their Montana Mecca Dream and there happened to be a Madison River there and OMG the Madisons. Dogs, cats, kids, boys, girls, horses, everything was named Madison. And the Bridger Mountains were there too so we had Bridgers everywhere.

Aiden is too trendy, it blew up after the Legends of the Fall movie with Brad Pitt years ago.

Anything named after pop culture just makes my skin crawl. My daughter's name is Aralyn and her paternal grandfather STILL calls her Ariel sometimes and it ticks me off. I named her that after a family name four generations back and I'm going to not be happy if it creeps out into pop culture somehow. I wanted her to have a unique name but nothing too "out there".

I have a friend named Verity and I think it's the coolest name ever. I really lean to unique names....

rustbreeches
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:42 PM
or, in the case, of one young woman last semester, quietly informing me after class that even though her name on the roster is <bizarrely spelled version of a common trendy name of mid-1990s>, she prefers and uses the common spelling, and could I please change it on the sign out sheet. Apparently the poor kiddo was embarrassed by the weird spelling of her name and didn't want others to see it.
That is so sad. Parents need to remember that the moniker with which they bless or curse their children is something that child will have to deal with until they can legally change it!

PhoenixFarm
Feb. 23, 2013, 12:58 PM
This is the list from my sons preschool:

Aiden, Anthony, Avery (boy), Ella, Elsa, Garrison, Harper(girl), Leo, Liam, Luca (boy), Maddie, Mason, Michael, Nolan, Olivia, Riley (boy), Simone, and Taylor (boy).

I would say in general you can't swing a dead cat without hitting an under 8yo named Aiden, Liam, Skyler (both sexes), Jordan (both sexes), Olivia, and Taylor (both sexes). Also Sierra and a billion permutations of Madison or Maddie.

I went old school and named my son Wesley after my much beloved grandfather, and so far we haven't met another one. My first name was one of those "rare and exotic names" when it was given to me and there were five of us in my high school graduation class of 76 students, lol. I'm "lucky" enough to also have had my name immortalized in a cult classic film, which also added to the popularity--that's right, I'm a Heather. ;)

stolen virtue
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:00 PM
Our rule for names was it had to be something strong for both of my children. A name that an attorney could have. My own name which a few people know is a bastardized version of another name and I hate it, always have to say "Yes, that is my real name". My mother when I asked her about it said, "Yes I should have named you the proper name". Thanks Mom...

WindyIsles
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:03 PM
My mother wanted to name my littlest brother Liam when he was born (12 years ago). But decided not to because she thought everyone would think it's short for William.

So Liam became his middle name and he got a family name as his first name.

Now?

Everyone is named Liam and I tease her about not naming him the name she wanted.

(Poor child was born and the family was arguing over about 5 names: Brendan, Liam, Thomas, Joseph etc. Ended up pulling his name out of a cup at the hosptail - 5 times in a row! So he was destined to be named what he ended up being named).

Though I do tease my family that everyone else got proper Irish names and I got stuck with a very 'American' name as I was the oldest of the first generation kids in America.

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:04 PM
I just learned here, people, about a dating website for people who want to have extramarrital affairs. It's called AshleyMadison.

Those names suggest white, upper class, discreet, not slutty to look at (but of course slutty enough to be your cheater). But by the time a name does the "trickle down" to this level, it no longer has the uppity connotations the parents may have wished.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:06 PM
I thought that about the names too, picture it on a doctor's ID badge. I didn't want to name to have a long e ending either, it's the diminutive of so many names I didn't want her to be stuck with something that sounds too cute. I grew up Mandy but changed to Amanda in college. And really detest how many other people have my name, it's been in the top 10 or 20 for a century I think. Mom picked it on a whim but I have to admit it was better than Penelope like my grandpa wanted!

rustbreeches
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:08 PM
I just learned here, people, about a dating website for people who want to have extramarrital affairs. It's called AshleyMadison.

Those names suggest white, upper class, discreet, not slutty to look at (but of course slutty enough to be your cheater). But by the time a name does the "trickle down" to this level, it no longer has the uppity connotations the parents may have wished.

The founder named it after the two most popular girl names the year he founded the company

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:11 PM
I thought that about the names too, picture it on a doctor's ID badge. I didn't want to name to have a long e ending either, it's the diminutive of so many names I didn't want her to be stuck with something that sounds too cute. I grew up Mandy but changed to Amanda in college. And really detest how many other people have my name, it's been in the top 10 or 20 for a century I think. Mom picked it on a whim but I have to admit it was better than Penelope like my grandpa wanted!

I agree.

Isn't there a natural law that makes it impossible for woman who has a diminutive kiddie name to become a Supreme Court Justice?

clanter
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:15 PM
Jax is a bit odd, and is more than likely a bastardization of Jackson.
?

humm... may have been were the conception took place... Jacksonville International Airport (JAX)

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:16 PM
The founder named it after the two most popular girl names the year he founded the company

Exactly! Demographics at work. The names would have huge cache for men of his age and interests. But you can only do that once. Now that Ashley and Madison have been given this connotation, they don't work the same way. Great for marketing, bad for the lifetimes of the women given these names.

Perhaps parents need to divine when the names they like are "worn out" enough that they are on the cusp of dropping down a social class or two.

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:18 PM
I thought that about the names too, picture it on a doctor's ID badge. I didn't want to name to have a long e ending either, it's the diminutive of so many names I didn't want her to be stuck with something that sounds too cute.

That is one of the biggest problems I have with my given name.

I go by Renn. I'm in the process of getting my name formally changed. Renn is is a nickname I acquired at an early age that stuck very well, and it has an uncommon Latin long-form, closely related to Renee, which happens to be very similar to my late grandmother's name. (I used this excuse to short-circuit some wailing from my aunt, who thought it incredibly disrespectful that I would so dislike the name my mother had given me. That was a fun Thanksgiving.) My given name is a long e sound and though isn't commonly used as such, it is properly a diminutive- think along the lines of Callie- and it was the only thing my parents could agree on. Had I been a boy I would have been Justin, and I don't see why they couldn't have just called me Justine.

I was one of three people with my given name in kindergarten. All names falsified to protect the innocent, except the middle names, and the last names all have the same initial as the real ones. Callie Peabody, Callie Grover, and Callie something else. At first the teacher tried middle names but as it turns out Callie Peabody and Callie Goldberg both had the middle name Lynn. So we ended up as Callie P., Callie G., and Callie Marie. I am sure you can see the problem. :lol: Sadly, my parents didn't learn. My sister is Katherine- Katie.

But at least we aren't like some of the children she teaches. Mom teaches at a school that has an interesting cultural mix of Orthodox and Conservative Jews and inner-city kids with a variety of ethnic names and pronunciations. She sees a lot of "creative" spellings. But I think the winner is still a girl she had a few years ago. Girl went by L.J., but when in the course of a conference Mom called the girl L.J. to her parents, the girl's mother went ballistic. "My daughter's name is not L.J. My daughter's name is Biblical! You will call her by the name she was given- Little John!"

Coreene
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:20 PM
Hazel? Poor kid. Mr. B's cleaning lady.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:30 PM
Julia Roberts gave Hazel some leverage!

Renn I think I would do the same thing; I considered changing mine at one point too but knew it would be a mess, my family couldn't even do the Mandy/Amanda transition!

I really like the name Renn. That's the sort of name I like, not off the wall, easy to read and say, just unique.

Rooty
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:37 PM
It is interesting how names gain and lose popularity. I work with seniors, and some have unusual names for their generation. One is Laura, she's in her 80's and for her generation it is an unusual name. Unlike my generation when I could count a number of Lauras and Jennifers in any given class. I am the opposite, I am Ruth and not a senior. The only time I ever was around a lot of Ruths was when I worked in the Jewish community. Never liked my name but as I have gotten older I appreciate it more for not making me one of a crowd without it being weird or cutesy. My sister is Julie, that also works.
An unusual older name is Eleith - this name belongs to someone who is in her 80's, and I've seen Alithe as well in the same generation. I like it.
We see a lot of Annes, Judiths, Ellens, Marjories, Violets, Hazels, Margarets, Elizabeths. For men Jack and John, Ross, Russell, of course David, William, James, Michael. These male names have stood the test of time and I know many young people with these names. Ronald and Donald seem to be less popular now.
Some names I think are nice which have fallen out of popularity are Mark, Alice and Elaine. Other names such as Olive, Gertrude or Myra should maybe not be resurrected.
How about the custom of the first-born child being given the mother's maiden name as the first name?
If one more friend of mine calls a child Sarah I think I'll scream though, lol. It is a nice name, but getting a little over-used. I think Sarah is probably the Jennifer for the generation which is currently in their teens to early twenties.

lovey1121
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:42 PM
My great grandmother was named Minnie, born around 1873, and I've heard of other Minnies from the late 19th-early 20th century. Another name best left to that generation.

I just heard this week that Martha Stewart's grandchildren are named Truman (boy) and Jude (girl). Dam is Martha's daughter Alexis. I found that worth noting. Never heard Truman except from the Jim Carrey movie, and Jude from Sir Paul.

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 01:48 PM
Julia Roberts gave Hazel some leverage!

Renn I think I would do the same thing; I considered changing mine at one point too but knew it would be a mess, my family couldn't even do the Mandy/Amanda transition!

I really like the name Renn. That's the sort of name I like, not off the wall, easy to read and say, just unique.

Thank you. :) I'd never go out of my way to name a child Renn, but got settled upon me by accident and it suits me. (I like more classic names with history behind them- Charlotte, Victoria, Rachel, Justin, and yes, dammit, Aidan and Liam, both grand old names.)

(But all of them sensible, everyday names, Mr. Eliot.)


How about the custom of the first-born child being given the mother's maiden name as the first name?

I like that tradition... to a point. I'd have been called Schreiber if it had been applied for me. :lol: Instead we got the old Jewish tradition of names that commemorate someone in the family who died. In consequence of my grandfather Louis passing shortly before two of my cousins and I were born, we have Louis Andrew (goes by Andrew,) Julia Louise, and yours truly, original middle name Lynn. But maiden-name-as-first-name is part of the reason that so many surnames made the jump to first names, and male names made the jump to female names. A lot more to it than that, but that's part of it.

Calico
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:02 PM
I thought that about the names too, picture it on a doctor's ID badge. I didn't want to name to have a long e ending either, it's the diminutive of so many names I didn't want her to be stuck with something that sounds too cute. I grew up Mandy but changed to Amanda in college. And really detest how many other people have my name, it's been in the top 10 or 20 for a century I think. Mom picked it on a whim but I have to admit it was better than Penelope like my grandpa wanted!

It's really great that you choose names that you think will help your kids be successful- best of luck to them!

My name is a flagrant foul according to your naming principles, but despite those insurmountable odds, I have a successful career, with ID badges and everythin' Thank gods my parents realized that the individual makes the name, not the other way around.

Windsor1
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:04 PM
Ditto. Seriously. We're not there either, but were recently discussing this same thing. Used to love Edward as a middle name (and it's DH's middle name). Want to hear sick? I used to want the name Jacob Edward Lastname. Nope. Couldn't do that to my kid, no matter how well it fits.

Did I miss something?Aside from the fact that "Jacob" (a name I feel sort of neutral about) has become ridiculously popular, that seems like a fine name to me!

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:05 PM
Hey, I didn't make sweeping judgments, I said it was what *I* liked. My opinion and what came into play when I named MY child based on my experiences and opinions. It's ok if you don't share. :yes: I didn't say it was for everyone.

I could have named my kid Doctor Aralyn Lastname for all the good it will do in making her successful! LOL I just said it was something I thought of when I picked a name.

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:08 PM
Did I miss something?Aside from the fact that "Jacob" (a name I feel sort of neutral about) has become ridiculously popular, that seems like a fine name to me!

Jacob and Edward, both fine names. Jacob Edward or Edward Jacob makes it look like someone in the family is a rabid Twilight junkie who wishes her name were Bella and that her husband would roll in glitter (or fursplode on occasion.) Give it 5 years.

Highflyer
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:13 PM
Did I miss something?Aside from the fact that "Jacob" (a name I feel sort of neutral about) has become ridiculously popular, that seems like a fine name to me!

You must not have seen/ read the Twilight series-- the two main male characters (the rivals for Bella's love) are Edward and Jacob. I like all three names-- but I would be embarrassed to have people think I named a kid (or even a pet) after those characters. I love Katniss in The Hunger Games but I'd never inflict it on a child.

Speaking of dated names-- my dad's parents are Harold and Edith. You don't see them much anymore!

Calico
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:14 PM
fursplode! :lol:

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:17 PM
My grandma hated her name Ethel so much she went by Mike her whole life! LOL

bits619
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:32 PM
I don't mind surnames as first names provided the name has some relevance to the family tree. I don't care for the patronymic surnames on girls (-son names, and the Mc and Macs). They're of course hugely popular, as well as many traditionally male names going to the girls. I spend more time than I should on Nameberry, and there are often people mentioning names like Luca as being girly(?! Fruitbats) and Charlie being a girl's name (another wtf, but likely due to the trend of Charlottes being called Charlie for short. I love the name Charlotte but would probably pick the more old fashioned nickname of Lottie anyhow).
For boys, i agree it's the -aden names, still being trendy, set off by Aiden's rise first.
Others have also mentioned the throwback names, following the hundred year trend, and i have to say I love most of them. Olive, Pearl, Ruby, Ruth, Audrey.... love them all!

furlong47
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:57 PM
I think a lot of people saddle little babies with names that will be cute when they are tiny, but become silly or embarrassing when they are a college student or then a doctor, lawyer, business owner, etc. Remember that every baby grows up into an adult someday. If I were going to give my kid a cutesy name, I would at least pick a traditional type of middle name so they can always choose to go by Michael or John or Elizabeth or Mary in the professional world.

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 02:59 PM
fursplode! :lol:

Credit to the marvelous Cleolinda Jones (http://cleolinda.livejournal.com/) for that one. On topic- not her real name. ;)

MunchingonHay
Feb. 23, 2013, 03:17 PM
I have a very uncommon name to the point that if you looked it up and did research on it, it's height of popularity was in the hundreds of years ago, and even then there were only few hundred of us.

I was going to change my name when I turned 18, I was tired of correcting people, having it spelled incorrectly or having people look at me like I had 3 heads when I told them my name.

I was going to change it to my middle name, then I realized that my middle name is just as bad as my first. Coupled with my last name and one would think I just got off the boat!

So I just kept it and have been correcting people ever since.:D:lol:

Coreene
Feb. 23, 2013, 04:05 PM
I'm guessing that Julia Roberts left more people with a big WTF when they heard she saddled the child with Hazel.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 04:09 PM
Pales in comparison to Apple though...

stolen virtue
Feb. 23, 2013, 04:18 PM
and Blue Ivy....

danceronice
Feb. 23, 2013, 04:33 PM
I like that tradition... to a point. I'd have been called Schreiber if it had been applied for me.

I was going to say, there's a reason that doesn't really work in Eastern Europe...

I'm a Jennifer, but by coincidence, not trend. My mother named me after the title character in Eunice Young Smith's Jennifer books that she read when she was little (the books were written in the Forties/Fifties and set in the late 19th/early 20th century. In them, Jennifer moves to the country, is animal-crazy, dances, and ultimately gets a horse. Coincidence?) Despite what she says I would not be surprised if Laura, Vicki, and Cherry were all on the short list, too.

bits619
Feb. 23, 2013, 04:44 PM
I think a lot of people saddle little babies with names that will be cute when they are tiny, but become silly or embarrassing when they are a college student or then a doctor, lawyer, business owner, etc. Remember that every baby grows up into an adult someday. If I were going to give my kid a cutesy name, I would at least pick a traditional type of middle name so they can always choose to go by Michael or John or Elizabeth or Mary in the professional world.

Definitely! I really don't like cutesy names as given names, or ones that sound like/traditionally are nicknames. We're adults (hopefully) much longer than we are children, and i think parents sometimes imagine naming a bitty baby or toddler with bows, not naming a future teen, young adult, budding professional, etc.
One name with the cutesy feel that gets love on Nameberry is Arabella. Ooof, i can't imagine naming someone that. Aside from the association in my mind of it being a smoosh of Arabian + falabella miniature horses, it just doesn't sound like the name of an adult woman. Arabella. So sugary.

But Hazel is a wonderful name in my opinion :-) then again, I recognize it isn't a typical name, is dated, and many may not like it as I do. Fine with me :-) I did hear it as a dog's name a few years ago, so it does make me think of a Bull Terrier first, but i still like it! Lol

Windsor1
Feb. 23, 2013, 05:04 PM
You must not have seen/ read the Twilight series-- the two main male characters (the rivals for Bella's love) are Edward and Jacob. I like all three names-- but I would be embarrassed to have people think I named a kid (or even a pet) after those characters. I love Katniss in The Hunger Games but I'd never inflict it on a child.

Ah, that's why it didn't make sense to me. I knew about Edward and Bella but that's it. Thanks for clueing me in. :)

My first great neice was born last month--an Isabella. They're calling her "Izzy." :no:

OTV
Feb. 23, 2013, 05:32 PM
Hopefully not a trend but I've met a few kids named "Dax" "Zaid" "Paradise" "Tedo"

My friends are also naming kids western themed names (and most of them aren't horsey people). Tyson, Jace, Chase, and...Wyatt.

OTV
Feb. 23, 2013, 05:38 PM
...As for 'boy' names being used now, lets not forget that a couple generations ago Kimberly, Beverly, Shirley, Ashley, Vivian and others were boy names...

I'm a female but was named after my grandpa's dad and brother...it's a name that runs in our family but I'm the first girl to be named it. It's now more common as a girl's name but I still think it's neat I'm carrying on the tradition.

c'est moi
Feb. 23, 2013, 05:59 PM
I once heard that if you're considering giving your child an unusual name (or spelling) you should give that name as your own while ordering food, or interacting with customer services reps, to get a sense of what your child will face with that name in the real world. Clearly, it isn't a good idea to go around giving potential acquaintances a fake name, but I think it's fine if you're just ordering coffee at Starbucks.

Blugal
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:39 PM
I'm a female but was named after my grandpa's dad and brother...it's a name that runs in our family but I'm the first girl to be named it. It's now more common as a girl's name but I still think it's neat I'm carrying on the tradition.

I'm the first female in my family named Jamie (at family gatherings I go by Jaimie 3). For whatever reason my parents chose to spell it weirdly and I have often had issues with it - but nothing too horrible! My cousin now has a Jaime 4, another girl.

I was surprised in 8th grade to be in a class with two others - Jaymee and Jaimee.

rustbreeches
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:51 PM
I'm a female but was named after my grandpa's dad and brother...it's a name that runs in our family but I'm the first girl to be named it. It's now more common as a girl's name but I still think it's neat I'm carrying on the tradition.

I have what 100 years ago was a male name. I was born in the late 70's, right before it took off as a girl name, and was actually named for a boy my mom knew in the 60's. My middle name is after my father and grandfather, Marion, which I love as being a little more unusual than Marian. I bequeathed it to my firstborn, a daughter, as her second middle name as a way of keeping it alive in the fourth generation. My son's second middle name is sadly, Harold. My husband was the third generation in his family to carry it and wanted to keep it going. Hoping it ends with my son!

MsM
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:53 PM
As a teacher for over twenty years, I sure have seen the ebb and flow of names!
I do feel that some parents give their kids names that are too cutesy to be taken seriously as a professional. I wish they would use that idea a a nickname that the child could use or not when older.
And my personal issue are names that are spelled creatively and then not pronounced phonetically. :uhoh: I understand that some ethnic names have different pronunciation rules, but when you are making it up, why make it so difficult?

Blugal
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:55 PM
And my personal issue are names that are spelled creatively and then not pronounced phonetically [...] but when you are making it up, why make it so difficult?

Couldn't agree more!

Calvincrowe
Feb. 23, 2013, 06:59 PM
I had a Pixie (her given name) last year--can you imagine that as a professional name? I've got a Heaven this year--she self selected to be called "Scout" instead, much to her parent's disgust. I hate the name "Nevaeh", too.

Parents also need to consider the first and last name being said together: I had a Destiny Dick in my class 12 years ago! I kid you not. Poor, sweet thing--all I could imagine is that would make a hell of an exotic dancer moniker when she turned 18!

I have a young man of color this year who is named for a French brandy--but not spelled that way. Silly.

Blugal
Feb. 23, 2013, 07:21 PM
First and last names... oh boy. There were several in my town. Justin Case and Justin Quiring were two. I had one in my class who had really hippy parents - Shiney Birchwater. He was a great kid, but what a name!

KateMcCall
Feb. 23, 2013, 07:45 PM
When I was in Highschool, I didn't even respond to my name (Katelyn) in the halls because of how often it was. I had at least one other Katelyn in almost EVERY one of my classes. So annoying. I think Kiley and Kaylie are really popular for my age group too.

As for baby names, I'm hearing a lot of Paisley and Oakley for girls, and a lot of Bentley for boys. Don't like any of those names. :/

I keep quiet about my plans for future kid names because the last time I told someone what I wanted to name my future son, 2 people named their kids that. (including my sister)

rustbreeches
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:03 PM
I actually know someone in UT that named their baby girl Paizlee.

Coreene
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:09 PM
A friend of a friend named her daughter Felix.

Now some of my fellow COTHers above a certain age will have an earworm...

terasa
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:24 PM
As my user name would suggest, my parents did the 'normal' name but different spelling thing. And yes, I was teased as a kid because they really were going for the Mother Teresa pronounciation. And no, we're not Catholic. I just go by Teresa, much easier. Due to various clerical errors over the years, my drivers license and medical info are spelled that way anyhow. Except on COTH where my real name wasn't taken as a user name! I don't overly hate it, but I will be sure to give my kids normal names without weird spelling changes.

Milocalwinnings
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:43 PM
I knew someone who named their daughter Nixie.

Personally, I really like the names William, Gabriel (Gabe), and Jude for a boy and Lenore/Nora/Elenore (Lenny or Nora) for a girl :)


My roommate is pregnant with a boy and has been through several names. Hunter, Easton, Elijah, Greyson, back to Easton, and how it's Harrison. She got Harrison monogramed on everything so I hope she sticks with that one now.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 08:55 PM
I like the name Hazel though reading Watership Down has made me see it as a boy's name, which is odd...

I have an online friend whose "handle" is Felix so that sounds just fine to me! LOL

I knew a realtor named Pixie. She called me "Hon" in a very patronizing tone... Not a fan of the name or the person.

Perfect10
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:40 PM
My first great neice was born last month--an Isabella. They're calling her "Izzy." :no:

At least it's not Bella, like every other girl born in the past 2 years.

Bristol Bay
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:41 PM
I teach in an urban mostly Latino school. I have a girl named Sincerely.

Last year the teacher in the next room was named Mr. Castro. One day a student returned from school after an absence, so I took him next door to take a test. The kid was named Stalin. So I actually got to say, "Stalin, this is Castro."

A friend of mine is named Donna Susan Blank, but she was always called Susie. Imagine an entire life of having to correct teachers, cops, etc. So when she adopted a baby girl, what did she do? Named her Ana Isabella, and they call her Bella.

Kryswyn
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:50 PM
You know how this works. In the early 1970s, a whole bunch of people, all separately, decided that Jennifer was a great and underused name.

So what are the Jennifers of today?
The explosion of Jennifer was due to the incredibly popular movie (from the book) Love Story with Ryan O'Neal and Ali McGraw. 9 years later I had not one or two but FIVE Jennifers in ONE riding lesson. All the other lessons had at least one, but the 1:00 was all Jennifers.

As to where they are today? Taking care of all their daughters named Caitlin, Caytlyn, Kaytlynn, Katelyn, and Ashley. ;)

Perfect10
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:54 PM
I grew up with Sarahs, Katherines, and Laurens. I am Laura. I am still often called Lauren, and it gets old fast.

Kryswyn
Feb. 23, 2013, 09:59 PM
You know, you can choose whatever name you like for your child...but do the world and your child a favor and spell it in a normal way. Perhaps following the Standard Rules for English? After 20 years in the classroom, I've seen some real doozies-- the child named Kattie comes to mind first. That spells Catty, anyway you slice it, right? Um no. That's Katy. After she got angry with me for mispronouncing her name, I tried to explain doubling the consonant and softening the vowel...to no avail. Jermy (missing that crucial second syllable).

Shithead was the worst I've come across. Yeah, you laughed didn't you? It was pronounced Sha-theed. Poor little girl:no:

The Kaden, Aiden trend is strong, as are Bella, Olivia, Taylor. Some are beginning to mine the bible for Old Testament names. Please don't name your kid Uriah...oh, wait, somebody did! Bleh!

Back in '85 a mail clerk at our office named Yvette, gave birth to a little girl she named after herself and her favorite tv show, Dynasty. Yes, she called her baby Dinette (as in 'set') LOL

Kryswyn
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:11 PM
Also, DH and I have probably agreed on a gender neutral name for # 3, who is a girl, but what is everybody's opinion on Mary Lee for a first name. I heard it a couple months ago and can't get it out of my head

Nothing if you don't care that "merrily we roll along" comes to mind. Your other choices are better, in my very humble opinion :)

Kryswyn
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:27 PM
Bella, Arabella, Isabelle, Isabella are entirely overused.

Muriel is an old name that hasn't yet resurfaced. I heartily recommend it. Elsa is another one. Still not fond of Mabel.

Rustbreeches, did you know that Shennandoah means daughter of the stars?

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:39 PM
I've got a Heaven this year--she self selected to be called "Scout" instead, much to her parent's disgust. I hate the name "Nevaeh", too.

Parents also need to consider the first and last name being said together: I had a Destiny Dick in my class 12 years ago! I kid you not. Poor, sweet thing--all I could imagine is that would make a hell of an exotic dancer moniker when she turned 18!

I have a young man of color this year who is named for a French brandy--but not spelled that way. Silly.

I believe I have met a girl with the given name Scout.

And yes, there are common-sense rules about naming... which get disregarded.

1. You can't make your kid's first name the same as your last name, e.g. William Williams.

2. A funky speling of a common name is half-a$$ed originality. When push comes to shove, folks will hear the name and only give the parents credit for picking the common one. The kid, however, will spend a lifetime correcting the spelling... with very little pay-off.
My buddy Tiphanie knows what I'm talking about.

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:42 PM
The explosion of Jennifer was due to the incredibly popular movie (from the book) Love Story with Ryan O'Neal and Ali McGraw.

Did not know that! Thanks for the historical clue.

And I think Kate has been the nickname for Catherine that has said "Watch out!" since Shakespeare's character in The Taming Of The Shrew. You can chill that out with Katie.

cowboymom
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:49 PM
Rustbreeches, I think I went to Verity after reading MaryLee for a reason...

Villager
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:49 PM
[QUOTE=JanM;6854275]When I was in school there were tons of Debbie's, and Susan's. So many of them that they mostly went by nicknames or their last name. I don't know what happened to them all either, they disappeared like the dinosaurs.

No Jan M !! Us "Debbies" are alive and kicking in our late 50's and 60's. there are so many around we have to go as Deb D. Or Deb R.. We laugh that no one uses the name either. .. I think "Debbie Does Dallas" killed it for future Debs

I like Jane and Mary which are coming back .never hearof any of the "een" names which I disliked- Doreen,Colleen, Irene Eileen etc. no Hilda's or Gertrude's yet...

danceronice
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:54 PM
The explosion of Jennifer was due to the incredibly popular movie (from the book) Love Story with Ryan O'Neal and Ali McGraw. 9 years later I had not one or two but FIVE Jennifers in ONE riding lesson. All the other lessons had at least one, but the 1:00 was all Jennifers.

You know, on some level I realize that character had to have a name, but I've honestly never known it. I know the names of the actors, the name of the author, that Al Gore claimed to have inspired the book, the 2002 pairs program by Sale and Pelltier to the soundtrack, and "Ali McGraw's Disease" as coined by Roger Ebert is a reference to the film (a movie illness in which the only symptom is the victim grows more beautiful as death approaches). But I haven't got the slightest idea what the characters are called. (That's one of those books/movies where my mother has told me "You wouldn't like it" and she's generally right about these things.)

Renn/aissance
Feb. 23, 2013, 10:55 PM
I believe I have met a girl with the given name Scout.

And yes, there are common-sense rules about naming... which get disregarded.

1. You can't make your kid's first name the same as your last name, e.g. William Williams.

2. A funky speling of a common name is half-a$$ed originality. When push comes to shove, folks will hear the name and only give the parents credit for picking the common one. The kid, however, will spend a lifetime correcting the spelling... with very little pay-off.
My buddy Tiphanie knows what I'm talking about.

Name changed to protect the innocent since he was a patient where I was working...

Donald David Donalds. Always knew who was calling, after the first time. "Hello, my name is Donalds."

I also have a buddy named Tiphanie, which I frankly always thought of as a misspelling of the French variant Tiphaine. That one is a pretty name... which inevitably most people would think of as "that crazy momma misspelled Tiffany."

loshad
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:00 PM
I'm just thankful that there hasn't been a rash of "Renesmes."


Half of the little girls I run into seem to be some variant of Sophie/Sophia. I pretty name, but getting overused.

On another horse board, someone was talking about how they planned to name their daughter Rowdy. I suggested that maybe they might want to avoid naming their little girl a dog's name. Several other people chimed in that they knew lots of Rowdys. :eek: Maybe it's me, but that doesn't exactly scream "high powered attorney" so much as it does "stripper."

randomequine
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:04 PM
Spelling my husband's name is always fun.....it's said Trevor, but the way it's spelled looks like it should rhyme with 'beaver'..... We are *always* asked if that's how is name is actually spelled....

Ainsley688
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:38 PM
People have a REALLY hard time with my name...so much so, I make up names when ordering food, lol. I usually go with a weird mans name, just to amuse myself. They also cannot say it, or replace the "n" with an "m" for some reason? I still have yet to fIgure that one out...

My sisters name is Susannah, I have cousins Siobhan, Kiran, and Callum, Kirsten, Astrid, and Daron. I don't hear those too frequently. I've only met a handful of "Ainsley's" in my life. I do know a girl name Aoife, ( A faa) which is very pretty, and she has the pronunciation thing worse than me, haha.

mvp
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:44 PM
I also have a buddy named Tiphanie, which I frankly always thought of as a misspelling of the French variant Tiphaine. That one is a pretty name... which inevitably most people would think of as "that crazy momma misspelled Tiffany."

I had no idea that there was a french variant. I assume Tiffany came from the family name of the jeweler/stained glass people.

RedMare01
Feb. 24, 2013, 12:07 AM
DH and I are going to start trying to get prego soon, so this has been a topic on my mind lately...we both like Cameron for a boy...thoughts? Objections? :) My first choice is actually Cooper, but DH doesn't like. Middle name would likely be Nicholas after my dad.

Girl names are harder for me and DH and I can come to no consensus at all. His always sound like stripper names, and he says the ones I like are too old fashioned. I like Anabell, Charlotte, Avery, and Harper, but all of those are pretty popular. Also Nell, Quinn, Elinor or Elin, and Rosalie (NOT from Twilight. My grandmother is Rosemary). Not in love with any at the moment. Suggestions welcome. Criteria are: somewhat traditional, not extremely popular, not stripperish, no odd spellings.

I'm Caitlin, and I've never minded it. It's spelled correctly and I'm a bit older than the huge swarm of Katelyn/Catelynn/Katlins that came around in the 90s.

Let'sTalkAboutHorses
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:00 AM
Girl names are harder for me and DH and I can come to no consensus at all. His always sound like stripper names, and he says the ones I like are too old fashioned. I like Anabell, Charlotte, Avery, and Harper, but all of those are pretty popular. Also Nell, Quinn, Elinor or Elin, and Rosalie (NOT from Twilight. My grandmother is Rosemary). Not in love with any at the moment. Suggestions welcome. Criteria are: somewhat traditional, not extremely popular, not stripperish, no odd spellings.
.

I just have to respond to this post because it hits close to home!

I have two female sugar bears (Annabelle Brooke and Charlotte Olivia), a great uncle (Avery) and my name is Rosalie.

I don't dislike my name at all, but I can tell you from experience that if you name your daughter Rosalie, she will be set for lots of mispellings and mispronuciations.

I live in an area where Lee is a relatively common last name. You would not believe how many people (who until they see my name in print), think my full name is Rosa Lee.

shakeytails
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:04 AM
DH and I are going to start trying to get prego soon, so this has been a topic on my mind lately...we both like Cameron for a boy...thoughts? Objections? :) My first choice is actually Cooper, but DH doesn't like. Middle name would likely be Nicholas after my dad.

Girl names are harder for me and DH and I can come to no consensus at all. His always sound like stripper names, and he says the ones I like are too old fashioned. I like Anabell, Charlotte, Avery, and Harper, but all of those are pretty popular. Also Nell, Quinn, Elinor or Elin, and Rosalie (NOT from Twilight. My grandmother is Rosemary). Not in love with any at the moment. Suggestions welcome. Criteria are: somewhat traditional, not extremely popular, not stripperish, no odd spellings.

Cameron's a little on the trendy side. I like Cooper.

How 'bout something like Catherine Elizabeth for a girl? Very traditional, yet leaves tons of possibilities for nicknames. Also suitable for a doctor or lawyer. In my mind, Elin/Elinor are odd spellings, and Anabelle reminds me of the calf in the Christmas movie "Anabelle's Wish".

RedMare01
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:17 AM
I just have to respond to this post because it hits close to home!

I have two female sugar bears (Annabelle Brooke and Charlotte Olivia), a great uncle (Avery) and my name is Rosalie.

I don't dislike my name at all, but I can tell you from experience that if you name your daughter Rosalie, she will be set for lots of mispellings and mispronuciations.

I live in an area where Lee is a relatively common last name. You would not believe how many people (who until they see my name in print), think my full name is Rosa Lee.

Great minds! ;)

I like all of those names, just not sure if I love them enough to name a child any of them. My fav girl name used to be Olivia (Liv for short)...but that was before everybody and their brother decided to name their daughters that.


Cameron's a little on the trendy side. I like Cooper.

How 'bout something like Catherine Elizabeth for a girl? Very traditional, yet leaves tons of possibilities for nicknames. Also suitable for a doctor or lawyer. In my mind, Elin/Elinor are odd spellings, and Anabelle reminds me of the calf in the Christmas movie "Anabelle's Wish".

My other grandmother is Elizabeth, so I definitely want to incorporate either that or Rose into the name, probably as a middle name. I'm not big on Catherine, but I do like Cady for a girl.

Elinor is an old spelling of Eleanor and Elin is Swedish. Pronounced E-Lin not Ellen.

FalseImpression
Feb. 24, 2013, 01:33 AM
One name with the cutesy feel that gets love on Nameberry is Arabella. Ooof, i can't imagine naming someone that. Aside from the association in my mind of it being a smoosh of Arabian + falabella miniature horses, it just doesn't sound like the name of an adult woman. Arabella. So sugary.



Sigh... My second grand daughter born one month ago is named Arabella... believe me, even though I have known the name since September, I seem to always "excuse" it when I tell people! My DIL is so Disney fanatic, but she swears it has nothing to do with it... sure! Baby's second name is Sylvie (her maternal grandmother) and my husband refers to the baby as Sylvie!! Luckily, we are several hours away so I think he is safe.

First granddaughter is Amalia and I do love her name. Second name is Anne (my name).

When my kids were born, I had to find names that fit both in English and in French, either same name or a nice translation. So my son is Matthew/Mathieu, but now goes by Matt! My daughter is Emily, but she legally changed her name to Emilie a few years ago! She liked the French spelling better and we had always used it.
But Arabella... I find the "r" hard... she will end up "Bella"...

About the older names: I really hate Charles, Eugene, Joseph for babies. They will work later, but babies? In France, there has been a trend to use old names too : Arthur?? yuck... I like Victor, but again not for a baby! oh, and when "Dallas" was popular in France... there was a Sue-Ellen in every classroom!

SAcres
Feb. 24, 2013, 08:25 AM
I've always liked the name Arabella. "Ari" for short. But then again I never want kids so it doesn't really matter. ;)

I've always liked Cooper, Jacob, Gabriel, Maxwell, Gideon for boys.

Arabella, Evelyn, Charlotte, Emma, Avery for girls.

I love the trend of kids getting "old fashioned" names like Augustus (actually I really like that name too) and Catherine. Can't stand naming kids after a book, Katniss...really? At least Isabella is more traditional...

clanter
Feb. 24, 2013, 08:45 AM
My family surname isn't very common; there is only about 1,000 families in the US with the name.... it appears somewhere along the way there is is an unwritten pack that we will all use the same names for our kids.

It is almost like being in the witness protection program as it is kind of hard to determine who did what when

up-at-5
Feb. 24, 2013, 08:51 AM
I know of a kid named Qwentin. That spelling makes me cringe every time I see it.

Hunter Mom
Feb. 24, 2013, 08:59 AM
Best ever name of a kid in school - Bumpy. Yes, that's his legal first name. Thank God his mama gave him two normal middle names to go by.


ETA - DD's name is native American, and not a 'normal" name. It fits her well. But she was lamenting the other day that she cannot ever find anything with her name on it in stores. :( Bet Bumpy can't either.

fordtraktor
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:55 AM
Even if you don't like a name, I think it's basic decency to keep your opinions to yourself in person (I don't mind vague threads like this, of course -- just in-person "I think the name you chose for your child is awful!" garbage).

My DH made the mistake of telling my ILs our baby's name before birth (which is old-fashioned, as I mentioned, but there has been a Supreme Court justice with the name so I suppose it passes that test). It led to ridiculous drama which I won't get into, and they felt free to make suggestions which were all basically "Jennifer"-esque. Honestly, I haven't completely forgiven them yet as it was beyond a blowup and I don't *do* drama.

If they refuse to call the baby by his name when he gets here next month, they can stay the eff away from us until they get over it. I am too tired to deal with that kind of toxicity.

clanter
Feb. 24, 2013, 10:02 AM
they felt free to make suggestions which were all basically "Jennifer"-esque. Honestly, I haven't completely forgiven them yet as it was beyond a blowup and I don't *do* drama.

If they refuse to call the baby by his name when he gets here next month, they can stay the eff away from us until they get over it. I am too tired to deal with that kind of toxicity.


I knew a guy named Shirly but never have run into one named Jennifier, but it is OK with me.

fordtraktor
Feb. 24, 2013, 10:11 AM
:) They were fine names, just very popular 1980's names is what I meant. Not something I want to name this baby. Darn it, I want to name him the name we've already picked, and we will despite the fuss.

pony grandma
Feb. 24, 2013, 10:27 AM
I suggest trying out a name by yelling it out the back door! (like real life)

That's how I nixed the name Luke :D We had a Matthew and a Mark - no way if we had another boy was it going to get saddled with LUUUU- UKE!

I prefer a name that stays dignified in adulthood and would stand up professionally. And one that can convey tone when used as parent to child! Something short and strong.

I have a little used name for the day - Joan. Interestingly I was in a boarding barn back in the 70's and there were 5 Joans all with German last names, go figure that one. :lol:

I like the name Audrey, don't know why. Didn't have enough kids to get to use it. Stopped while I was smart.

FalseImpression
Feb. 24, 2013, 12:39 PM
There is a WONDERFUL French movie (I can't find an English trailer though) that I saw last year. It is called Le Prénom (the First Name). It is hilarious and it all starts when the expecting couple announces the name chosen for their baby: Adolphe!!!
http://pretemoiparis.com/2012/05/27/le-prenom-fantastic-french-movie/

CDE Driver
Feb. 24, 2013, 02:55 PM
A friend has a new granddaughter named Ellajane. I think that's a nice name. I like the trend towards old fashioned names.

I knew folks years ago with the last name of Schlerf. They named their son, and not just a nickname, Buck. Buck Schlerf. That sounds like something you tell someone NOT to do to you.

My husband is always coming in an regaling me with names of professional sports players or the people that end up on those courtroom TV shows. I don't mean to sound racist, I'm not, but what is up with all those crazy names?!?! I'm sure everyone has heard the one about La-A...pronounced ladasha.

I have a difficult name for people. My Mother is a native Hawaiian so we all have Hawaiian names.

bits619
Feb. 24, 2013, 03:24 PM
Redmare, I popped over to name berry and this thread was at the top of the forums. Thought it might have some suggestions that go along with your taste in girls names http://nameberry.com/nametalk/threads/120003-Traditional-Girls-Names

tarynls
Feb. 24, 2013, 04:36 PM
I'm surprised my name hasn't come up, it did go through a trendy period in the late 80's(?). My first name is Taryn, middle name Lorraine.

I absolutely hated my name as a kid, was always called Tara, Karen or Sharon. Got in trouble in kindergarden for correcting the teacher (yet again) and actually spelling my name out loud for her.

I'm in my mid-30's now and I actually like having a somewhat unique name, although I'm still getting called Karen and Tara!

Foxtrot's
Feb. 24, 2013, 05:32 PM
My Mum(1912) was named Doris which she did not like so she re-named herself Bobbie and lived with that her whole life.

William, Kate and Catherine are destined to be popular - so I would definitely stay away from them - seems like Frankenomics in action.

My grndson Bruno had his own headline in the Zurich newspaper - being the only Bruno born in Zurich that year.

My own name is spelled unconventionally and pronounced unconventionally - it is like having a spelling mistake for a name. It has been a pain all my life.


I do like names with family meanings - after a grandparent, or a family surname, etc. - as a first or second name.

mswillie
Feb. 24, 2013, 05:38 PM
I'm surprised my name hasn't come up, it did go through a trendy period in the late 80's(?). My first name is Taryn, middle name Lorraine.

I absolutely hated my name as a kid, was always called Tara, Karen or Sharon. Got in trouble in kindergarden for correcting the teacher (yet again) and actually spelling my name out loud for her.

I'm in my mid-30's now and I actually like having a somewhat unique name, although I'm still getting called Karen and Tara!

My boss's name is Taryn. She was definitely born well before the late 80's though. You're only the second person I've ever "met" with that name.

mvp
Feb. 24, 2013, 05:45 PM
I do like names with family meanings - after a grandparent, or a family surname, etc. - as a first or second name.

My mom had a rule for this:

Daughters received a middle name from the mother's side of the family. That was because women (in her generation and those before) lost their maiden name when they got married. She was all about keeping the matrilineal line alive.

When my parents split up, my father's side of the family was kinda excommunicated. For that reason, if I ever had a kid, especially a son, he would have a middle name from my father's side of the family.

If my partner wanted his own family inserted in there, we'd just haul off and give our spawn 4 names. Everyone could be representin' and the kid would have the very ornate option of being 3 initials plus his/her last name.

IMO, reserving the middle name for family markers lets you honor any ties you'd like, while giving you freedom to be trendy or creative with the kid's first name.

FalseImpression
Feb. 24, 2013, 06:02 PM
I have two middle names and one is a composed name too.. Danielle and Marie-Pierre (my godparents were Marie and Pierre).
My son has his grandmother's maiden name as a middle name, just because I always liked it: Brett.
My DD got the traditional Anne as second name and my mom's first name Jacqueline...My firs granddaughter is Amalie Anne Colette (her great grandmother on her mom's side)... we do like long names and her last name is both of her parents, since in Qc, women do not take their husbands' names.

cowboymom
Feb. 24, 2013, 07:14 PM
I know two 12 year old Taryns. One is a sister to a Ty and a Brand; the family is very western/cowboy and make their living with horses, I always wonder if the mom knew what she did the the whole "tie and brand" the critter sound.

I went to school with a guy named Cort, it was a cool name and suited him well as a strong/silent type of nice guy.

Mara
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:15 PM
I freaking hate my name because my parents did not run tests on it first. I know it's supposed to be a sign of bad self-esteem to hate your own name, but this one is a PITA. No one can spell it correctly (my SIL can't even consistently MISSPELL it), pronounce it on the first introduction (usually four or five tries, by which point I find I'm speaking very slowly and practically shouting as if the other person is deaf), or read it off the page properly.

I was supposed to be "Jill". Nice and simple. Dad came up with my irritating moniker at the last minute. I actually considered changing my name to my alter a couple of years ago, but it'd be an uphill climb as I'm in my early 40s.

Googling my name shows me that there are others out there. They all seem to be African-American, which for some reason just cracks me up.

sparky6
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:16 PM
I am a huge fan of The Chronicles of Narnia and so I would love to name a son Edmund someday, which is fitting because my dad is named Edd (goes by his middle name, Tate). DH, however, strongly vetoes Edmund and says he would get seriously teased. I can kind of see where he's coming from. My counter argument is that we will obviously just need to move to England ;)

tarynls
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:18 PM
My boss's name is Taryn. She was definitely born well before the late 80's though. You're only the second person I've ever "met" with that name.

There's not too many of us around! My mom saw the actor Taryn Power in The Count of Monte Cristo, 1975, and really liked the name.

Mara - I hear you about the misspelling. My husband's family constantly addresses cards, etc to "Taren" or "Tayrn". They've only known me for ten years. :)

However - I just have to mention this: I know two little girls, both 4 years old, named Addison. The parents of one of the girls call her "Addie", not sure about the other family. Every time I hear their name I think of Addison's disease! Having worked in a vet clinic, I can't help it!

Mara
Feb. 24, 2013, 09:28 PM
One of my favorite guy names is Elliott. Not because of SVU - I've always liked it. Unfortunately I keep thinking about that John Cusack line from "The Sure Thing", when Daphne Zuniga's character is pretending to be pregnant so they can hitch a ride:
"Elliott? Elliott? Elliott is the fat kid who eats paste!"

hastyreply
Feb. 24, 2013, 10:47 PM
I like using family names, which can get confusing when everyone gets together. We are going on a family vacation with 2 Deanas , a Dean and a Nina. My name is a family name and have a niece and a now deceased Aunt with the same name. I have a great nephew name Xavier ( with"X" proununced) and his sister is Clarissa Jae. Problem is no one really uses her name. She was Hootie in utero. Most of us call her that but she's getting called CJ a lot more. It will interesting to see what name she chooses when she is older.

My daughter is a teacher and she says every name gets ruined pretty quick so it's easier to choose names from the family.

RugBug
Feb. 25, 2013, 12:31 AM
Definitely! I really don't like cutesy names as given names, or ones that sound like/traditionally are nicknames. We're adults (hopefully) much longer than we are children, and i think parents sometimes imagine naming a bitty baby or toddler with bows, not naming a future teen, young adult, budding professional, etc.


I had major fears when my best friends had their first baby, calling him Bubba. He was that until about 4-ish...when they thankfully went back to his given name..the very popular Josh.

They also have three girls: Lucy, Grace and Lily. There's the old fashioned thing. Lily was tied with Ruby for a while, but Ruby lost the game.


The explosion of Jennifer was due to the incredibly popular movie (from the book) Love Story with Ryan O'Neal and Ali McGraw. 9 years later I had not one or two but FIVE Jennifers in ONE riding lesson. All the other lessons had at least one, but the 1:00 was all Jennifers.


This is going out to all the Jennifers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nN_5kkYR6k


Still not fond of Mabel.


I love Mabel...and mostly because it was the name of one a jet black mare in the barn I rode at as a kid.



ETA - DD's name is native American, and not a 'normal" name. It fits her well. But she was lamenting the other day that she cannot ever find anything with her name on it in stores. :( Bet Bumpy can't either.

I could never find my name either. Well, I could find it, but it was never spelled "correctly." I hated that. To this day, I rarely find people that spell my name right the first time...and sometimes even for years. Oddly, I have a step SIL with the same name and spelling. We also have two Bonnie's in the family (and two Peggy's...although I know a lot of other Peggy's as well).





I have a difficult name for people. My Mother is a native Hawaiian so we all have Hawaiian names.

I have a high school friend with the same name. It's funny, 'cause I saw your name and never thought it could be the same pronunciation, but I do believe it is.


One of my favorite guy names is Elliott. Not because of SVU - I've always liked it. Unfortunately I keep thinking about that John Cusack line from "The Sure Thing", when Daphne Zuniga's character is pretending to be pregnant so they can hitch a ride:
"Elliott? Elliott? Elliott is the fat kid who eats paste!"

:teehee: I do like Elliott, though, on a count of "Scrubs".


I'm never going to have kids, so my names don't really matter anymore...although one is getting popular and I would've had a DD with one of "those" names...Quinn. I've always wanted to name a boy Seamus, but seeing that I'm only the tiniest smidges of Irish...it felt wrong.

Kryswyn
Feb. 25, 2013, 02:26 AM
You know, on some level I realize that character had to have a name, but I've honestly never known it. I know the names of the actors, the name of the author, that Al Gore claimed to have inspired the book, the 2002 pairs program by Sale and Pelltier to the soundtrack, and "Ali McGraw's Disease" as coined by Roger Ebert is a reference to the film (a movie illness in which the only symptom is the victim grows more beautiful as death approaches). But I haven't got the slightest idea what the characters are called. (That's one of those books/movies where my mother has told me "You wouldn't like it" and she's generally right about these things.)

Had to laugh when I read this because I had to really think what Ryan O'Neals characters name was. Oliver. Lots of horses and dogs benefited from that one, but not a lot of baby boys. :D

Frizzle
Feb. 25, 2013, 03:07 AM
Girl names are harder for me and DH and I can come to no consensus at all. His always sound like stripper names, and he says the ones I like are too old fashioned. I like Anabell, Charlotte, Avery, and Harper, but all of those are pretty popular. Also Nell, Quinn, Elinor or Elin, and Rosalie (NOT from Twilight. My grandmother is Rosemary). Not in love with any at the moment. Suggestions welcome. Criteria are: somewhat traditional, not extremely popular, not stripperish, no odd spellings.



What about Hadley? That's a pretty old-fashioned name that isn't popular at the moment. I recently read The Paris Wife, which is about Ernest Hemingway's first wife Hadley, and I really started liking the name.

I'm not having kids any time soon, but I really want either a female mini-donk or dog that I can name Aria (which would have been perfect for my last Huskey who was named Sasha, because she loved to sing in a high pitch :lol:).

Mukluk
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:18 AM
It's so much more fun to name pets. For example, I have a kitty named Stinkerbelle- it is the perfect name for her. What I can't stand is
1. Anyone with the exact same name as their mama or papa. "Is Joe there?" "Which one?"
2. very long names. Especially if the last name is long, make the first name short. Imagine being named Dominique Elizabeth. Would hate to fill out all those little bubbles on test sheets.
3. First and last names that could both be first names such as John James.
4. Really plain names like Linda and Mary.

If I had a child to name I would pick a name that I liked that was NOT popular and classy.

That said, my mom (born in 1930) picked out her future daughter's name (me) when she was a kid and at the time it was an uncommon name. When I was born (1963), it was a popular name. My mom struggled with naming me a popular name but she loved the name so I got it. I actually like my name so it all worked out.

Mukluk
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:21 AM
It's so much more fun to name pets. For example, I have a kitty named Stinkerbelle- it is the perfect name for her. What I can't stand is
1. Anyone with the exact same name as their mama or papa. "Is Joe there?" "Which one?"
2. very long names. Especially if the last name is long, make the first name short. Imagine being named Dominique Elizabeth. Would hate to fill out all those little bubbles on test sheets.
3. First and last names that could both be first names such as John James.
4. Really plain names like Linda, Fred, Mary, John.

If I had a child to name I would pick a name that I liked that was classy and NOT popular.

That said, my mom (born in 1930) picked out her future daughter's name (me) when she was a kid and at the time it was an uncommon name. When I was born (1963), it was a popular name. My mom struggled with naming me a popular name but she loved the name so I got it. I actually like my name so it all worked out.

vineyridge
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:26 AM
I'm old. To me, Jax is the name of a defunct (or is it?) New Orleans beer.

ReeseTheBeast
Apr. 1, 2013, 08:55 AM
I'm Megan, and was born in 1982. I've very rarely come across any other Megans, and when I have/do; the spelling of their name includes a lot of extra letters (Meaghan, Meghean, etc.).

I've met maybe one or two others with the name "Megan," spelled the plain way.

I knew exactly one girl with my middle name, we met when I was in high school. "Rose." We were both shocked when we found out, because that is a pretty rare name for anybody to have (first or last); at any age.

My favorite riding instructor (who is also one of my best friends) gave her daughter the middle name of "Rose" in my honor. And that made me feel pretty damn special.

But besides that, I doubt that her daughter will come across many [if any!] other girls her age with that same middle name.

I always found it annoying when I was growing up that I couldn't find keychains and such with my first name on them (or with the right spelling), but as I've gotten older, I've definitely come to appreciate it. It's different, without being ridiculous. It's relatively uncommon, but not unknown. And I like that I could invent my very own tagline based on the spelling of my first name: "putting the G in Mean since 1982."

(G being "Gangster," of couse) :winkgrin:

My friends are all starting families now, and some of the names they've chosen for their kids are awesome: Jasper, Cash, and Harper being among my favorites. I'm kind of saddened to hear that Harper is now becoming more of a 'known'/popular name, though. Her parents put a lot of thought into picking that name (To Kill a Mockingbird is their favorite book of all time; and I think that was the book they were studying when they met in school/began dating). Johnny Cash was the inspiration of my friends to name their son "Cash," which I think is incredibly cool... I like the names that are representative of something important, inspirational, or sacred to the parents. I'm not a fan of the names that at least 2+ other kids in a class are going to have. (Madison, Cameron, Gage, etc...)

I am unable to have kids of my own, so I don't know what I would have named any; if my fate were different. I absolutely LOVE the name Grace. And like others who have posted on this thread, am drawn to the very old names. I guess as time goes on and I collect more cats, I will explore what 'new old' names are out there that intrigue me ;) :D

rustbreeches
Apr. 1, 2013, 09:54 AM
What about Hadley? That's a pretty old-fashioned name that isn't popular at the moment. I recently read The Paris Wife, which is about Ernest Hemingway's first wife Hadley, and I really started liking the name..

I absolutely love the name Hadley and would use it in a heartbeat, except we live like 2 miles from PRCA announcer Hadley Barrett and his Daughter in Law was my daughter's soccer coach. I think it would just come off odd in our community

E D
Apr. 1, 2013, 10:09 AM
My name happens to be a common late 40's early 50's name. While in school I knew many others. We all had our first name in common, but also had last names which were (male) first names as well. So we went through school calling each other by our last names - no confusion and actually grew to like it.

I delivered the birth certificate information to the maternity floor desk when my first child was born in 1972. "What? Not Jennifer?" was the question asked by the stunned staffer who took the paperwork. My daughter was named Julia, after my mother. Everyone assumed that I had named her after the character Julie in the current tv show "Mod Squad". Her middle name, however, is Michelle, named after the Beatles tune.

In naming my second daughter, DH really wanted to go with Kathy, Susan, Debbie or Linda. It was obvious he wasn't going to contribute much to the naming. I don't know where it came from, but we ended up with the name Jessica. She was cutting edge apparently, as an avalanche of Jessicas erupted in the 80's. Turns out there was an elder cousin on his side of the family with the name "Jessamine", so his family accepted it. I really wanted Alexis, named for a beautiful kindergarten friend of mine, but DH would have none of it, stating the nickname would be "Lexi" and he just couldn't handle that. Turns out, DH was huge with nicknames - Muley Julie and Messy Jessie were teased often.

RolyPolyPony
Apr. 1, 2013, 10:46 AM
I'm Megan, and was born in 1982. I've very rarely come across any other Megans, and when I have/do; the spelling of their name includes a lot of extra letters (Meaghan, Meghean, etc.).

I've met maybe one or two others with the name "Megan," spelled the plain way.


I think maybe you're just a few years too young for the name - I was born in 1976 (and I'm a Jennifer! Whee! I was ALMOST "Dawn" so I happily accept Jennifer!) and I have...4 close friends my age named Megan. I need more fingers than I have to count all the Megans I know!

kateh
Apr. 1, 2013, 10:48 AM
My full name is Kate, which separates me a little bit from the billion of Katherines, Caitlins, and Kathleens that I grew up with. But it does mean that I'm VERY against being called Katie. My parents did the President test for names. Each name they thought of had to sound good announced as "And the President of the United States....Kate Last Name." I graduated with a Brittnee who hated it because she thought it made her look like a flake. On the other hand, I know a Summer Rain who loves it.

Both of my sisters went old school for girl names (Josephine/Josie, Annabelle) and classic for boy names (Ryan, Benjamin).

My four year old niece has a girl in her class named Chastity. Um, that'll be awkward some day.

JLD
Apr. 1, 2013, 01:04 PM
The worst I heard was a girl named Memory... which seems like bad juju to me.

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

FineAlready
Apr. 1, 2013, 01:17 PM
I've noticed a lot of older or unusual names lately - Evelyn, Grayson, Elsie, Georgia, Zelda...

Years ago, a girl that I knew in high school got pregnant and named the child Malachi from "The Children of the Corn." I thought that was quite sad.

A cousin of mine gave her son our family surname as his first name. The child has the surname of his father, and my cousin has her husband's surname now too...but my surname is still the same as my cousin's kid's first name. It's quite weird, honestly. So this kid comes to our M____ Family Reunion, and his first name is M____. I feel like that has to be somewhat odd for him. I mean, I like the name, and in fact kept it as my last name when I got married...but still.

kasjordan
Apr. 1, 2013, 01:37 PM
When I named my daughter, I had never heard of another kid named "Skyler", she will be 14 this summer. Now, I hear alot of Schuyler's (pronounced Skyler) and they mostly seem to be boys.... I'm still in love with her name though. I used my maternal grandmother's maiden name as her middle name, Moran....I think it goes so well together Skyler Moran, and it means something to me. I love the idea of incorporating family names into a child's name, but also agree to keep the spelling normal LOL.

charismaryllis
Apr. 1, 2013, 01:49 PM
my former editor had a (female) Skylar...

one of the guys upstairs just named his son Ryder. all i can think is, while the kid's little he's going to think it's TOTALLY cool that there are big yellow trucks with his name on them. but what happens when he gets older? in school?

i am still scratching my head over the marketing coordinator who named her daughter 'Millage.' i realize i'm old and everything, but the millage rate is a method for calculating property tax... what am i missing here? :confused:

Renn/aissance
Apr. 1, 2013, 01:54 PM
I'm Megan, and was born in 1982. I've very rarely come across any other Megans, and when I have/do; the spelling of their name includes a lot of extra letters (Meaghan, Meghean, etc.).

I've met maybe one or two others with the name "Megan," spelled the plain way.

I agree with RolyPolyPony that you may be just a few years off the popularity curve for Megan- but I'm going in the other direction. Two of my closest friends growing up were Megans born in '88 and '89 (one Megan, one Meaghan, and as her last name was unpronounceably Polish, this was a bad choice on her mother's part) and my sister born in '94 also has several Megans (a couple of Megans and a Meghan.)

FineAlready, I love the name Malakai, but I wouldn't inflict it on a kid (Children of the Corn aside)... the obvious nickname is Mal, and yes, River Tam, that does mean "bad."

mvp
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:04 PM
Megan, I know plenty of Megans but I think they are of all ages. No "puttin' the G into Mean since 1982," though. That's your own cool line!

Oh, and I think Jessica means "wealthy daughter" or similar. Of course there were lots of those in the 1980s! I knew plenty of 'em.

Donkerbruin
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:07 PM
I can't stand the strangely spelled names trend. Maddelyn comes to mind. What's wrong with Madeline? I also have a (distant) relative who named her daughter Mysteri. She has no chance of not being a stripper one day.

I don't have much room to talk, though...I'm Holli. Named after my grandfather, Hollis. Mom & Dad wanted to make it girly.

rustbreeches
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:11 PM
I can't stand the strangely spelled names trend. Maddelyn comes to mind. What's wrong with Madeline? I also have a (distant) relative who named her daughter Mysteri. She has no chance of not being a stripper one day.

.

My friend and I were discussing the odd or misspelled names that people give children. She has 2 cousins named Bambi and Candi, yes, their given names. They both make their living as strippers.

222orchids
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:15 PM
In our barn we have 5 teenage girls within a few years of each other all named with some variation of "Ally, Alex, Alle", "Allie", etc., all stemming from "Alexandra" or "Allessandra". We cannot keep them all straight.

These days to be "unique" I think you need to go back to formerly common names like Steven or David! I personally would choose Henry or Phillip if I were in the market for a boy's name today.

I was born in 1955 and half the girls I went to high shool wth were named Debbie (after Debbie Reynolds, no doubt). As for my daughter, there was no way she would not be named "Meg", "Beth" "Jo" or "Amy". You now know what my favorite book is. I used "Amy".

Snowflake
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:16 PM
I love Mabel...and mostly because it was the name of one a jet black mare in the barn I rode at as a kid.

My parents were going to name me Mabel but my last name is Marble. So I would have been Mabel Marble. F'reals. They were going to give me the middle name of Aggie which is a type of toy/gaming marble. They thought they were really funny.

Instead, I got two first names. One was chosen by my mom but needed "enhancement" because she wanted Nicole but there were already seven other Nicky's in the family. So, my dad chose the first part of my name which came from a stripper who danced with snakes that he dated before he met my mom. She found this out when I was twelve. She was not happy.

Jaideux
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:19 PM
I've met a few girls named Alexia. What a lovely name.

Until you get to the part where alexia is the medical condition related to brain damage that leaves you unable to read.

Belleaphant
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:28 PM
I am 34weeks pregnant. DH and I bicker about names when it is brought up.. so lateley we don't talk about them. Plus- My mother is sending me a list of names a day (which has caused many fights.. she won't leave us alone!! Grr). I like the more unique names, where as he likes the plain traditional ones.

We both kinda sorta like Landon. It's the only name we mention that doesn't make one of us scream "Hell NO!". Which is probably what junior will be named (unless I go into labor and not tell him until after baby is here and named.. hehe). One criteria for me- I refuse to name my kid after someone I know. Not after friends, relatives, tv characters, etc. I do not know another Landon. I was kind of upset when looking at "popular names of 2013" and Landon is really high up there. Oh well... middle name is another story. I may be able to compromise and do Joseph since it is both DH and my fathers middle names. But it's not really my favorite. I have friends with recent babies with names like Conner, Kayden/Caeden, Liam, Aiden, Caleb, Logan and all the other new trendy names of 2013..I liked some of those a few years back.. I'd never name my kid them now, too popular! I guess you can't win.
Wish me luck that we can agree on a name before this lil' one arrives!!

mvp
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:41 PM
^^ But you have the Michael Landon problem. For all of the "pretty" family and slightly Christian tv shows he produced, the guy was apparently a bit hard on the child stars with whom he worked.

Belleaphant
Apr. 1, 2013, 02:58 PM
MVP- I had to google him... lol Before my time I guess.:D

For the record I hate the name Michael... Several family members and friends, are named Michael. Come to think of it.. they are all annoying or a PITA! :yes:

pcwertb
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:15 PM
For the first one, I went for family names with a twist. My middle name is Ann, so is MIL. But that is kinda boring. When daughter #1 was born, only 5.3 and left hospital at 4.12, we knew that "little Ann" was a good fit. We chose the Scandinavian spelling of Anneke.

I lost two between D#1 and D#2 and during the 4th pregnancy my husband found the Gaelic name Brylie, which means strong, courageous. We thought that was a fitting name in the circumstances.

There is a bit of weirdness we didn't think about, Alan (hubby) and Anneke are both August babies and Bryle and I (Beth) both in April. Then add to that our birthdays are unbelievably 19, 20, 21 and 22.

Not sure how the hell that happened!

Renn/aissance
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:18 PM
Oh, and I think Jessica means "wealthy daughter" or similar. Of course there were lots of those in the 1980s! I knew plenty of 'em.

Actually, if you accept that Jessica derives from the Hebrew Iskah, it means "clairvoyant"- sometimes "god sees." "Wealthy" is often quoted but I'm not sure where it came from; it ain't from the Hebrew, which is probably where Shakespeare got it from (Iskah, which I think was rendered as Jeskah or something like that in translation, was a minor Biblical character.)

I used to be really really really into etymology. I have all this random name meaning crap stored in my brain where I should have things like "where are my car keys?"

Belleaphant
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:19 PM
Brylie was the #1 name I wanted for a girl (#2 is Ryan)... too funny. DH is lucky we are having a boy or I'm sure I would sneak away and have the baby and not tell him ;)

DH was born may 4th but was due mid may... I'm due mid may! I think it would be crazy if I went on the same day!

MsRidiculous
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:27 PM
I'm Megan, and was born in 1982. I've very rarely come across any other Megans, and when I have/do; the spelling of their name includes a lot of extra letters (Meaghan, Meghean, etc.).

I've met maybe one or two others with the name "Megan," spelled the plain way.

I knew exactly one girl with my middle name, we met when I was in high school. "Rose." We were both shocked when we found out, because that is a pretty rare name for anybody to have (first or last); at any age.


Too funny - I'm a 1983 and my middle name is Megan, and one of my good friends' middle name is Rose. :)

Alibhai's Alibar
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:31 PM
I once heard that if you're considering giving your child an unusual name (or spelling) you should give that name as your own while ordering food, or interacting with customer services reps, to get a sense of what your child will face with that name in the real world. Clearly, it isn't a good idea to go around giving potential acquaintances a fake name, but I think it's fine if you're just ordering coffee at Starbucks.

Then again, my name is very traditional (Sarah), and you should see some of the names that end up on my Starbucks cups :lol: Sahara, Serra, and my favorite, SheRa (which makes me think of She-Ra, Princess of Power).

Far_North_Equestrian
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:37 PM
I didn't read this whole thread, but need to chime in.

I'm a Renee. In english Canada, this is not a super common name, though it can be unisex if you drop the last e. the closest I ever met in school or as a kid was girl a few years younger then me named Rainee.

My sister is an Erin. we're mid-80's kids, and there were 4 other Erin's in her brownie troop. Also loads of Sarahs & Katlin/Katie's - most often seen as a sister pair (I knew 2 sarah/katie pairs). Stephanie is another over used girls name from our age group.

I've had every boys name on earth ruined for me unfortunately - if I have a son I'm going to have to name him Logan, it's the only name I can come up with that i don't hate.

Lynnwood
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:37 PM
My daughter is in 1st grade and there is a girl in her class named Hades not a shortened spelling. There are two Genasis's , an Amelia , and a Zarquise.

Her name is Kailynn Nichole, I defied a direct order and broke the tradition of using Louise as every girls middle name on my mothers side.

Renn/aissance
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:38 PM
Then again, my name is very traditional (Sarah), and you should see some of the names that end up on my Starbucks cups :lol: Sahara, Serra, and my favorite, SheRa (which makes me think of She-Ra, Princess of Power).

If I had She-Ra show up on my Starbucks cup, I would consider myself to have just had a really good day. :lol:


My daughter is in 1st grade and their is a girl in her class named Hades not a shortened spelling.

Mom's gonna have some 'splainin' to do when they get to the Greek mythology unit in school. (Tell me they still teach that.) I wonder if it was a comment about the kid or the father? Not sure which would be sadder.

Alibhai's Alibar
Apr. 1, 2013, 03:54 PM
If I had She-Ra show up on my Starbucks cup, I would consider myself to have just had a really good day. :lol:

:lol:
She-ra, She-ra!
I am Adora, He-man's twin sister, and defender of the Crystal Castle.
This is Spirit, my beloved steed.
Fabulous secrets were revealed to me the day I held aloft my sword and said: "For the Honor of Greyskull!"
She-ra, She-ra . . . She-ra . . . She-ra, She-ra . . . I am She-ra!
Only a few others share this secret. Among them are Lightfoot, Madame Razz, and Kowl.
Together, we and my friends of the Great Rebellion strive to free Esteria from the evil forces of Horde!
She-ra, She-ra!

Belleaphant
Apr. 1, 2013, 04:00 PM
My cousin had a friend named... no joke... Gonorrhia.... pronounced "Ganor(like elenor)-e-uh". Poor poor kid.

I went to school with a Stormy Sky, and a Rainbow clouds...

vineyridge
Apr. 1, 2013, 04:20 PM
I had a friend from a large 1950's family. Names?
Martha, Jane, Sarah, Peter and Charles. There must have been a run on Martha's back then, because I know several who were all in the same class in school.

Far_North_Equestrian
Apr. 1, 2013, 04:33 PM
The ones I can remember recently that stick out in my mind is I met a man who is about 20 who's first name is Atreyu (and yes, he is named after The Neverending Story).

Same place, a young lady about the same age named Arian (Pronounced Ari-Anne) apperently this is derived from astrological terminology and has something to do with the sign of Aries - however I can't get it out of my mind "arian" as in the tern the Nazi's used to designated the blonde-blue eyed ideal they were after....

cowboymom
Apr. 2, 2013, 12:32 PM
Just noticed one of my daughter's friend's name is Feryn which I thought was pretty.

Anne FS
Apr. 2, 2013, 02:58 PM
^^ But you have the Michael Landon problem.

Not anymore. Nobody under 35 knows who he is.

mvp
Apr. 2, 2013, 03:25 PM
Not anymore. Nobody under 35 knows who he is.

Haha. It's all cool...

So can we also start naming kids Nixon yet? You know, Jaxon but with a twist.

HillnDale
Apr. 2, 2013, 04:14 PM
Well, I just lost an hour of my life on the Social Security site thanks to this thread
http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/index.html
Unfortunately, it's not possible to search for "rhymes with Aiden" or "contains misplaced Y's," but still very interesting.

Names around me this year and last: Jonah, Max, Jax, Clover, Sky, Shane, Matteo.

HillnDale
Apr. 2, 2013, 04:15 PM
Well, I just lost an hour of my life on the Social Security site thanks to this thread
http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/index.html
Unfortunately, it's not possible to search for "rhymes with Aiden" or "contains misplaced Y's," but still very interesting.

Names around me this year and last: Jonah, Max, Jax, Clover, Sky, Shane, Matteo.

ybiaw
Apr. 2, 2013, 04:46 PM
My grandma hated her name Ethel so much she went by Mike her whole life! LOL

I have a Great-Aunt Myrtle who goes by Tim!

SuperAlter
Apr. 2, 2013, 04:52 PM
I had a dream last night that we named our future child Paisley. IDK kinda cute, but I cant really decide.

Many moons ago, if it was a girl Grace was already chosen.

Boy names seem to not come as easily, Liam and Lincoln are in the mix but since we are talking future child, its just for the sake of conversation.

mvp
Apr. 2, 2013, 04:57 PM
Many moons ago, if it was a girl Grace was already chosen.

I knew many Asian girls named Grace when I was a kid in school.

shayaalliard
Apr. 2, 2013, 05:07 PM
Some are beginning to mine the bible for Old Testament names. Please don't name your kid Uriah...oh, wait, somebody did! Bleh!

UGH My niece is Hedya (heh-dye-ah) and her mommy is due this month with Enoch

SuperAlter
Apr. 2, 2013, 05:14 PM
Grace seems to be timeless. Its classy if you ask me.

FalseImpression
Apr. 2, 2013, 06:11 PM
I know two Grace, both under the age of 3!

mvp
Apr. 2, 2013, 06:13 PM
I think Grace is very nice, too.

But the grade-school-feminist in me still wonders if that name was chosen by parents who valued understatedness for their girls above all else.

And by the way, the Asian woman named Grace I knew in college could drink, study, laugh and sleep with various men with the best of 'em.

Hunter Mom
Apr. 2, 2013, 06:18 PM
My all time favorite name... Bumpy. Yes, Bumpy. His sister is Beauty. Guess Beauty & Beast might have been too cruel.

RedMare01
Apr. 2, 2013, 09:17 PM
I love old fashioned names. Hate the K and Y trends...ugh. DH and I are currently TTC, and we've tentatively decided on Caroline for a girl and Bennett for a boy. Not complicated or unknown, but not hugely popular either.

cowboymom
Apr. 2, 2013, 09:24 PM
I know a kid named Bremmer after the creek that his parents lived on when he was born. It's a good name.

Justmyluck
Apr. 2, 2013, 10:29 PM
Grace seems to be timeless. Its classy if you ask me.

Awe that's my name I've never met another Grace my age they are either WAY younger or WAY old. I'm almost 24.

wcporter
Apr. 2, 2013, 11:01 PM
I like my name: Allison. I dont hear that many around. My mother's maiden name is Halsey, and she decided she would name her second child this, whether is was a boy or a girl. And I got a brother. I'm pretty sure he is one of very few guys who can successfully pull this off, which he does quiet well. :)

I really like the name Thalia, even though it could be hard for people to say/spell correctly. I also like Coryna.

wcporter
Apr. 2, 2013, 11:02 PM
Oh and my SO went to school with a girl named Lasagna. Pronounced just like it should be. I wish I was joking.

PhoenixFarm
Apr. 3, 2013, 12:54 AM
I was thinking of this thread yesterday while watching the birthday show on the Sprout channel. (If you are a parent-to- be and don't know Sprout, don't worry, you will). It has become morning entertainment for DH and I to see the names of all the birthday boys and girls (my son just likes watching Chica the chicken). You want to put your finger on the pulse of how out of control the name situation has gotten, check out Sprout's Birthday Show.

Recent highlights: Kammeryn, Tawquira, Aynnibylle, t'Kira, Russhell, Volan.