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Isabeau Z Solace
Nov. 17, 2012, 08:08 PM
https://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=4471922550635

So has anyone been to this place? The Oregon Horse Center? This is the 3rd video I've seen of one of these competitions and they look very cool! I am wondering if they set this all up for the competitions only. Or is it that way all the time?

paulaedwina
Nov. 17, 2012, 09:10 PM
I've never seen that before, but that was really cool! Man, we'd fail fail fail :lol:

Paula

CDE Driver
Nov. 17, 2012, 09:26 PM
I've been there for a couple of events and they didn't have the course set up. But that was several years ago though, so it may have changed.

I can ask someone that is very involved in it if you like.

BayRoan
Nov. 18, 2012, 11:20 AM
OHC holds 3 big trail competitions per year (1 in May, 2 in November), 2 clinics (October and April) and a smaller "wrap up" show and clinic in December. The big, championship course from the November shows is left up until the first week of December and riders can haul in to practice on the course for $25/hour. The rest of the year, it's a normal arena that holds all sorts of breed shows and competitions. It takes them about a week to build the big November courses. I think they do the Spring course in less than a week.

Oregon Horse Center has a Facebook page. On it, they have several albums of course construction.

mvp
Nov. 18, 2012, 01:53 PM
Been there.

It is a good idea, but it has evolved into a giant walking obstacle course, so far as I can tell. You can even show over it in-hand. It has become hugely popular here.

andylover
Nov. 18, 2012, 04:14 PM
If I am seeing this correctly, it appears horse is being ridden without a bridle. Does anyone else see that? I have seen this course ridden without a bridle and I always find it awe-inspiring. Nope, just saw the bridle/bit.

mvp
Nov. 18, 2012, 05:59 PM
Like all similar indoor versions of the outdoors, I think it has gotten overblown.

With more people getting into it, and even some pros building home courses and clientele interested in this, the standard of performance is high.... but not like anything you'd actually care about outside.

The best of 'em seem to be able to control every footfall. I'll grant that that's good in a scary situation, but otherwise, who cares? And once you have your horse desensitized to everything, what left is there to prove?

If I'm missing something, I hope someone will correct me.

ReSomething
Nov. 18, 2012, 07:18 PM
See, I disagree mvp. I just think the control and trust is so cool to watch. Plus the course is a lot of work to put up, and if they'll do all that in an arena then they ought to be able to carry it to real trails (although I was taught to never let go of the gate,the rider shoving it so it clangs behind her, ummm, that could mean loose cows later)
Dressage at the higher levels is sorta pointless too, I mean what is the real world application besides circus horse? Many people enjoy the Zen of it, the beauty and perfection, but for others paint drying has more appeal.

paulaedwina
Nov. 18, 2012, 09:53 PM
See, I disagree mvp. I just think the control and trust is so cool to watch. Plus the course is a lot of work to put up, and if they'll do all that in an arena then they ought to be able to carry it to real trails (although I was taught to never let go of the gate,the rider shoving it so it clangs behind her, ummm, that could mean loose cows later)
Dressage at the higher levels is sorta pointless too, I mean what is the real world application besides circus horse? Many people enjoy the Zen of it, the beauty and perfection, but for others paint drying has more appeal.

Well said and I couldn't agree more.

Paula

sunny59
Nov. 19, 2012, 12:00 AM
Like all similar indoor versions of the outdoors, I think it has gotten overblown.

With more people getting into it, and even some pros building home courses and clientele interested in this, the standard of performance is high.... but not like anything you'd actually care about outside.

The best of 'em seem to be able to control every footfall. I'll grant that that's good in a scary situation, but otherwise, who cares? And once you have your horse desensitized to everything, what left is there to prove?

If I'm missing something, I hope someone will correct me.

It's not just all about desensitization. It's about trust, relaxation, finesse.... I've done the OHC course and a few others out there. It is a different challenge than some of the other competitive riding things I've done, but it IS a challenge. You need a well trained horse and a steady good rider to do well.

is it unnatural? Well, yeah...it is in an arena....but it has a lot of challenges that are more real that traditional trail classes.

I have had a blast doing it and it's good for the horse too.

sunny59
Nov. 19, 2012, 12:01 AM
See, I disagree mvp. I just think the control and trust is so cool to watch. Plus the course is a lot of work to put up, and if they'll do all that in an arena then they ought to be able to carry it to real trails (although I was taught to never let go of the gate,the rider shoving it so it clangs behind her, ummm, that could mean loose cows later)
Dressage at the higher levels is sorta pointless too, I mean what is the real world application besides circus horse? Many people enjoy the Zen of it, the beauty and perfection, but for others paint drying has more appeal.

She would lose a lot of points for doing the gate that way. It was not correct.

BayRoan
Nov. 19, 2012, 01:15 AM
The rider in this video is doing the Timed and Judged class. She lost points on the obstacle for not completely closing the gate, but probably made up the points in shaved time. If you'll also notice, the hose is loping between many of the obstacles. Timed and Judged is a special evening class. Most of the classes are judged only and the horses rarely ever leave a walk and proper execution of the obstacles is imperative to do well.

BayRoan
Nov. 19, 2012, 01:23 AM
On another note, I started doing the mountain trail clinics and competitions at OHC because it was something competitive that I could do, and train for, at home. I ride primarily outside on trails, as I have no arena. The standard of performance at OHC has gotten quite high, but I know for me, and others who do a lot of trail riding, tackling those crazy obstacles has made us braver outside.

There are still some obstacles that I wouldn't ride over if I was 6 miles from home up in the mountains, as I don't think they're really safe. However, if my horse can step into a water box with floating, perforated plywood that sinks under his feet, he can certainly handle a drainage ditch in a field. The crazy obstacles also require quite a bit of trust. It's very difficult to go in there with a new horse and do well, even if the horse is well trained.

It's one of those things that looks pretty simple, but like all competitions, has a lot of complexity and requires a lot of finesse to do it well. It's not a trail ride, it's a horse show.

foggybok
Nov. 19, 2012, 09:15 PM
On another note, I started doing the mountain trail clinics and competitions at OHC because it was something competitive that I could do, and train for, at home. I ride primarily outside on trails, as I have no arena. The standard of performance at OHC has gotten quite high, but I know for me, and others who do a lot of trail riding, tackling those crazy obstacles has made us braver outside.

There are still some obstacles that I wouldn't ride over if I was 6 miles from home up in the mountains, as I don't think they're really safe. However, if my horse can step into a water box with floating, perforated plywood that sinks under his feet, he can certainly handle a drainage ditch in a field. The crazy obstacles also require quite a bit of trust. It's very difficult to go in there with a new horse and do well, even if the horse is well trained.

It's one of those things that looks pretty simple, but like all competitions, has a lot of complexity and requires a lot of finesse to do it well. It's not a trail ride, it's a horse show.

Years ago, when I showed AQHA, I ran into the water box at a couple of shows. it was always one of the deciding obstacles for the class.... After a while, they banned it as being too dangerous. I thought it was interesting that they added it to the OHC obstacles. I missed this year as I had another engagement, but I heard from a friend that the water box caused some problems. Once they learn about it, I think they are fine, but I've sure seen horses panic about it!

crescentvalley
Nov. 10, 2014, 01:08 AM
OHC holds 3 big trail competitions per year (1 in May, 2 in November), 2 clinics (October and April) and a smaller "wrap up" show and clinic in December. The big, championship course from the November shows is left up until the first week of December and riders can haul in to practice on the course for $25/hour. The rest of the year, it's a normal arena that holds all sorts of breed shows and competitions. It takes them about a week to build the big November courses. I think they do the Spring course in less than a week.

Oregon Horse Center has a Facebook page. On it, they have several albums of course construction.

Hi, I can't seem to find the complex on face book. Can you help me locate it. I would love to check it out. Thanks :)

crescentvalley
Nov. 10, 2014, 01:09 AM
Thanks. I have just found the Oregon Horse centre on face book :)

kewpalace
Nov. 10, 2014, 10:54 AM
Years ago, when I showed AQHA, I ran into the water box at a couple of shows. it was always one of the deciding obstacles for the class.... After a while, they banned it as being too dangerous. I thought it was interesting that they added it to the OHC obstacles.

Just for clarification, per AQHA Rule SHW468, water boxes with floating/moving parts are banned and per Rule SHW 467, no slick or metal bottom boxes can be used. A water box with a "non-skid" bottom is still an acceptable obstacle.

trubandloki
Nov. 10, 2014, 11:25 AM
That is some impressive maneuvering. I do not know how they remember the course. Wow.

Obsidian Fire
Nov. 10, 2014, 11:49 AM
Would LOVE to have a horse that responsive!! :yes:

beau159
Nov. 10, 2014, 03:47 PM
For the record, "man made" water obstacles are EXTREMELY difficult.

I have no problem sending my horse through water outside in the real world. But when you set up a fake "box" they have to step down into, in my neck of the woods, there are only a handful of horses that will do it.

Just goes to show indeed what a GOOD horse is in the video in question.

Daisyesq
Nov. 25, 2014, 03:02 PM
That was wonderful to watch. I watched it twice and I'd love to try something like that.

I would love to have that kind of trust and partnership. My pretty-boy dressage horse would definitely NOT walk backwards into water! But he'd be okay with the cute bunny ears!

Daisyesq
Nov. 25, 2014, 03:04 PM
Oh, dang. I contributed to a zombie thread and didn't know it. Sorry!