PDA

View Full Version : does this make you cringe?



ViewParadise
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:21 PM
Let me say that I am NOT a Clinton hater!! I saw this pic (gray horse jumping) and though 'accident waiting to happen'...
Am I being sensitive? Would you do this?
http://academyhorse.com/Pricing.aspx

Nike13
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:36 PM
Ack! Scary! I'm not a CA hater either, but his jumping photos are getting ridiculous. I got a catalogue in the mail last week. The cover was a picture of him lunging a weanling up a 2ft cross country bank. Why? These people are lunging horses over stuff that an eventer would take seriously and never send a weanling or inexperienced jumper at. Seems like a lot of showing off at the horse's expense.

Petstorejunkie
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:39 PM
Why would you want to teach a horse to hump giant rocks?

AliCat518
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:41 PM
Oh lord. That doesn't look like it would end well.

VaqueroToro
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:45 PM
Owww, skinned gaskins anyone?! Shaved underbelly? I can only hope that the horse is just supposed to step up on it and not actually try to jump the thing.

Even the most gnarly of eventing jumps are designed to break or collapse when a horse can't properly clear them (except for maybe the tables, but those are wood at least).

hundredacres
Oct. 16, 2012, 10:51 PM
I can't see how that moment ended safely. Was this the picture just before, or after her slid off the giant stone.

Horses aren't dogs - the stupid tricks serve no purpose and hardly look safe.

And FWIW, I'm not a "hater", but he does grate on my nerves with some of the stupid, idiotic things he says....I have no real respect for his methods.

Cindyg
Oct. 16, 2012, 11:34 PM
Yeah, I think it's an accident that DID happen. I don't see how the horse got out of that without scraping something sensitive!

ETA: That obstacle course looks awesome.

Plumcreek
Oct. 17, 2012, 01:14 AM
Besides jumping rocks, over $4,700 for 6 Weeks? And trained by a student? You 'get' to spend One Day with your horse and the student trainer?

kookicat
Nov. 4, 2012, 06:24 PM
Owww, skinned gaskins anyone?! Shaved underbelly? I can only hope that the horse is just supposed to step up on it and not actually try to jump the thing.

Even the most gnarly of eventing jumps are designed to break or collapse when a horse can't properly clear them (except for maybe the tables, but those are wood at least).

No, most of them are solid and stay put if they're hit. We're starting to get frangible pins and styrofoam logs, but they're the exception, not the rule. :)

Photo is stupid though- not even sure what they're trying to show.

starrunner
Nov. 4, 2012, 08:05 PM
I am not sure that there would be many trainers worth that amount for starting my horse for 6 weeks. It is a bit concerning to me that they say girth galls are common and that you cannot visit or observe the horse being worked.

I have never galled a horse that I have kept up properly (even in heavy work), except for one mare that was very thin skinned and reacted badly to the neoprene, but in a nice mohair she was comfy.

Same with the rock thing. I think it's great to work with horses with many obstacles and develop confidence, etc, but I am not sure what the goal there besides possibly injuring the horse? Anyone seen this obstacle in person and can comment on it?

Tee
Nov. 4, 2012, 11:21 PM
Good lord - what the heck is the purpose in that?? Seems like they want to show horses doing more and more dangerous stuff 'willingly' to promote their programs.

No thank you.

Remudamom
Nov. 5, 2012, 02:19 AM
Eeks. I've used his methods to start around 20 horses with good results, but that pic is over the top. Why risk something like that?

I know of a local girl who has had her horse at CA's for a session, maybe two. She sent the gelding because he's nuts and she wants to keep him. He's still nuts.

Graureiter
Nov. 5, 2012, 07:44 AM
Yes, that made me cringe.

I would prefer to be trained with my horse, not just have one day.

VaqueroToro
Nov. 5, 2012, 12:11 PM
No, most of them are solid and stay put if they're hit. We're starting to get frangible pins and styrofoam logs, but they're the exception, not the rule. :)


Then you guys are more nuts than I originally thought! :eek: I mean that in a completely that-takes-guts sort of way.

Appsolute
Nov. 5, 2012, 12:34 PM
YES! It makes me cringe! All I can think of oooohhh his stiffles!

That and what a crappy shoeing job, if you are going to spend that much on a clinic, how about splurging for a decent farrier.

psb
Nov. 5, 2012, 01:05 PM
I supposed it's not photoshopped? I was looking at the trainer's hand. After a few rope burns, I wear gloves. I agree with some of the other posters on the price also. woweeee....

big_red_ottb
Nov. 5, 2012, 01:42 PM
There's another picture down below that has two handlers on either side of a bank, lunging two horses over said bank at the SAME time....wtf??? You couldn't pay ME to put my horse somewhere that thinks jumping over huge rocks and jumping two horses over an obstacle at the same time is okay. :eek:

HPFarmette
Nov. 5, 2012, 02:21 PM
Throughout the training session period you can expect to receive a telephone call from your Clinician approximately every two (2) weeks to update you and discuss your horse’s progress.

Great, huh?

kookicat
Nov. 5, 2012, 04:24 PM
Then you guys are more nuts than I originally thought! :eek: I mean that in a completely that-takes-guts sort of way.

Oh, yep. I think all eventers are a little bit nuts. :D

JFJ
Nov. 5, 2012, 11:20 PM
After a few rope burns, I wear gloves.

I am usually one to always wear gloves when lunging, but I have to say, I've started using CA's method and its a very different way of lunging. I've never needed gloves, never even got close to a rope burn. Before I started my pinto with his method, I always needed a chain over the nose to lead him and I would only lunge him in a bridle. His prices aren't cheap but it is quality stuff. If I had the money I'd send a horse there in a heart beat. His farm looks amazing.
The picture with the rock ...not the best photo choice.

mvp
Nov. 11, 2012, 04:02 PM
There's another picture down below that has two handlers on either side of a bank, lunging two horses over said bank at the SAME time....wtf??? You couldn't pay ME to put my horse somewhere that thinks jumping over huge rocks and jumping two horses over an obstacle at the same time is okay. :eek:


Well, that happens at the end of pair competition in hunter paces. Both horses are under saddle and the obstacle is always wide enough for two horses.

mvp
Nov. 11, 2012, 04:04 PM
Meh. I'll bet if the horse hit the rock, he'd roll off it.

Now this horse really isn't jumping it well and I'd be concerned this horse doesn't have the scope it takes to clear this wide rock from the slow canter I think the human at the end of the lunge could create.

In fact, I don't see the purpose of teaching a horse how to jump in hand this way. Is it about some special kind of obedience? Can any CA afficionados explain?

Arab_Mare
Nov. 11, 2012, 09:26 PM
I find his methods pretty "rough", so although I'm not a hater, I'm not a supporter either.

Seems like he's getting all caught up in the hype of "Who's the best "natural horsemanship" trainer. By lunging horses over rocks. -facepalm-

Lori
Nov. 13, 2012, 11:04 PM
Why would you want to teach a horse to hump giant rocks?

That was my first impression! LOL

ACMEeventing
Nov. 23, 2012, 09:39 PM
Where do I sign up for the program where the horse gets to the lunge the human over the giant rock?

Now THAT I'd pay to watch.

Appsolute
Nov. 29, 2012, 12:07 PM
Hahahaha – CA supporter must have found this thread – and went through and “thumbs downed” every comment that criticized the photo – funny.

Hope you feel better now! Have fun rock crawling with your horse (I have friends really into rock crawling, but they use jeeps).

Lori
Nov. 29, 2012, 12:30 PM
Hahahaha – CA supporter must have found this thread – and went through and “thumbs downed” every comment that criticized the photo – funny.

Hope you feel better now! Have fun rock crawling with your horse (I have friends really into rock crawling, but they use jeeps).

Good to know my opinion wasn't the only one thumbed down. Good grief.

wcporter
Nov. 29, 2012, 01:13 PM
I am really starting to loath the "thumbs down"

kookicat
Nov. 29, 2012, 03:45 PM
No, most of them are solid and stay put if they're hit. We're starting to get frangible pins and styrofoam logs, but they're the exception, not the rule. :)

Photo is stupid though- not even sure what they're trying to show.

Who disliked this? :confused:

Appsolute
Nov. 29, 2012, 04:00 PM
^^^ the same CA supporter that thumbs down every post not praising CA (and my post pointing that out) would be my guess! Lets see if this gets thumbs down - are you following this tread thumb happy?

Please tell, what is the benefit of horse rock crawling?

kookicat
Nov. 29, 2012, 04:27 PM
Pretty childish to dislike something then not even own up to it. :no:

big_red_ottb
Nov. 29, 2012, 07:04 PM
I was wondering why a post I made two weeks ago got thumbed down...then I realized everyone had been thumbed down. Grow up, people! :rolleyes:

AliCat518
Nov. 29, 2012, 09:51 PM
Hah I was got thumbs downed too on this thread then noticed that there was one thumbs down on each comment. Hahaah at least own up to it.

CA supporter, please explain the reasoning behind lunging your horse over rocks.

ViewParadise
Nov. 29, 2012, 10:12 PM
wow... hadn't even noticed the thumbs down till it was pointed out!!! As the OP of this thread, I was commenting on the photo, NOT CA or his methods!! WOW, someone out there (who doesn't have the guts to step up BTW) is REALLLLLLY sensitive....

fluffy_pony
Nov. 29, 2012, 10:21 PM
hard to watch indeed

GypsyQ
Nov. 30, 2012, 03:16 PM
someone has gone through and "Thumbs Downed" all the posts on the bit hobbles thread, too. Someone just likes little red thumbs and has a lot of time on their hands.

Skyedragon
Nov. 30, 2012, 04:11 PM
I am not sure that there would be many trainers worth that amount for starting my horse for 6 weeks. It is a bit concerning to me that they say girth galls are common and that you cannot visit or observe the horse being worked.

I have never galled a horse that I have kept up properly (even in heavy work), except for one mare that was very thin skinned and reacted badly to the neoprene, but in a nice mohair she was comfy.

Same with the rock thing. I think it's great to work with horses with many obstacles and develop confidence, etc, but I am not sure what the goal there besides possibly injuring the horse? Anyone seen this obstacle in person and can comment on it?

Where did you see that? I did notice after I got over the shock of the picture that the poor horse looked like it had a pretty sore looking rub mark right where the girth would go.

I can't even imagine that that effort turned out at all safe. I am even more amazed that the horse even attempted to do something like that. Most horses that I have met seem to at least have some sense of self preservation when it comes to something they know they can't clear....

I am not a fan of natural horsemanship simply because I have seen it do a lot more harm than good in the hands of an amatuer.

As to the thumbs down, I have gotten a thumbs down on the most random of posts, even posts that were putting a posistive spin on a certain product. *shrug* I just chalked it up to a spammer.

Mukluk
Dec. 1, 2012, 02:22 AM
Why would you want to teach a horse to hump giant rocks?

Yeah, I'm not sure that thing can be impregnated either. Extremely goofy. What where they thinking?!?!?!?

Retropony
Dec. 1, 2012, 01:02 PM
So you pay $4,714 for one of his students to gain training experience? I used to be a big fan of CA, even rode with him for a time. But that was back when he drove around in an old beater El Camino and was lucky to have 5 riders show up! I just can't understand all the rushing around and bracing. I can take hold of a leadrope and know if a horse has been trained following "The Method". Yuck, its all about the poor things escaping pressure and staying ahead of the "spank" and not a bit of feel. Couldnt pay me enough to even sit through one of his TV shows!

Mtn trails
Dec. 1, 2012, 03:29 PM
That horse in the photo in question looks so beaten down he'd do anything asked just to get it over with. No life or interest in his face at all. Poor guy.

Shine
Dec. 4, 2012, 08:12 AM
Who disliked this? :confused:

Wasn't me! I gave the "positive" finger.:)

Lindsey-Rider
Dec. 4, 2012, 10:02 AM
...........right up there with a picture of the rider standing on the horse's back to try and sell him.

Here's your sign..........................

fluffy_pony
Dec. 4, 2012, 02:54 PM
Good to know my opinion wasn't the only one thumbed down. Good grief.

yep, we all got one, even me and my 4 words comment...

starrunner
Dec. 4, 2012, 10:05 PM
From the Q&A page



Q: A:
I’ve heard that horses that aren’t used to being worked every day often develop girth gall. Is this true? And if so, what exactly is girth gall?
It’s common for horses to develop girth gall – sores from the girth rubbing behind their elbow because they haven’t been ridden very much. When colts are started at the ranch, seven out of ten of them on average will develop girth gall. The area behind the horse’s elbow is soft and tender like a baby’s bottom, so oftentimes when the horse gets girthed up and really worked, they get sore. It’s not a major problem, in most cases you can put Vetericyn and Corona on it and it’ll heal just fine. In more severe cases, the horse will have to be off work for a week or two to let the sore heal. In both cases, when the horse is back to full health, they very rarely develop girth gall again because the area has toughened up. It’s kind of like if you are an office worker and one day you’re asked to dig ditches. Your hands would be blistered within an hour from handling the shovel because they’re not used to manual labor – they’re soft and tender. But after a few weeks of digging ditches, your hands will be covered in calluses and not be bothered by handling the shovel at all because they’ve toughened up.

WildBlue
Dec. 6, 2012, 09:22 AM
Now this horse really isn't jumping it well and I'd be concerned this horse doesn't have the scope it takes to clear this wide rock from the slow canter I think the human at the end of the lunge could create.

In fact, I don't see the purpose of teaching a horse how to jump in hand this way. Is it about some special kind of obedience? Can any CA afficionados explain?

That's what concerned me when I saw the photo--it didn't look like the horse could clear the rock as presented. Which, IMO, makes that particular exercise a poor choice to *do* and an even poorer choice to hold up as a good example.

As someone else mentioned, in hunter paces and just riding with people/horses who know each other well, I've jumped stirrup-to-stirrup with another rider. Not something dangerous like head-on over the same jump, but both horses going the same direction, at the same speed, over the same (wide enough) jump is NBD. I have also gotten myself and a horse into tight places where I basically had to dismount, lead him or her by the reins, and ask for a hop over ditch, log, or bit of fence since that was the safest way to get us both out. So, yes, a properly-intalled 'forward' button can be very useful, but that photo shows taking it to an extreme for the sole purpose of grandstanding and selling 'product'. No thanks.

equinekingdom
Feb. 14, 2013, 04:07 PM
ouch, that doesn't look good.....