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the_other_mother
Jul. 30, 2012, 07:04 PM
:eek: So apparently my neighbors roosters like my place better than theirs and have decided to patrol my paddocks and fencelines. That was okay with me until this afternoon when I found them up around my barn and hay sheds---I dont know a thing about roosters but should I be concerned? Other than them roosting in my barn and pooping all over everything, what other harm could they do? Do they carry any disease that my horses could get sick from? :confused:

Samotis
Jul. 30, 2012, 07:21 PM
I have a rooster and hens around my barn and they don't cause harm to the horses.

Their poop is gross, but great for the garden! :lol:

Dance_To_Oblivion
Jul. 30, 2012, 07:42 PM
Just watch them because sometimes you have to put a Rooster in his place. Periodically mine will decide I shouldnt be so close to him or his hens and he'll try to attack me. Usually a bit of yelling at him and chasing him reminds him whose in charge. So, if you find one fluttering at your leg do not be shy about saying that's not okay!

asb2517
Jul. 30, 2012, 07:53 PM
He'll peck your eyes out!! Just kidding.

back in the saddle
Jul. 30, 2012, 08:11 PM
My rooster decided to attack me one day. The second I turned my back he went for my legs. I had a feed bucket in my hand so I went bowling for roosters and got a strike. Sent him rolling head over heals. He hasn't tried it since. So if he goes for you... seriously put him in his place! They can spur you pretty good so don't be shy about sending a can of woop aass his way.

Bacardi1
Jul. 30, 2012, 08:12 PM
No worries really with stray roosters. In fact, they'll make a major impact re: insect control. The only problems with roosters is if you have hens & they then want to start a harem. Then they may start to see you as an intruder - that's when rooster/human problems start. But other than that, I'd welcome a stray rooster.

In fact, my hay/feed supplier in town has recently had a lovely solitary rooster show up when they're doing grain. I've seen him & he's quite lovely & definitely of an uncommon breed - I'm thinking a Spangled Hamburg. No one knows where he came from or if he even has a permanent home. But this is in the middle to town & right by the railroad tracks, so Lord only knows where he comes from.

Bluey
Jul. 30, 2012, 09:23 PM
I have heard people with resident roosters walk around with a tennis racket at the ready.:p

chism
Jul. 30, 2012, 10:25 PM
I have heard people with resident roosters walk around with a tennis racket at the ready.:p

Tennis racket, feed bucket or tub, trash can lid, rake.... whatever is close at hand to hit the little bastids with. ;)

JSwan
Jul. 31, 2012, 06:43 AM
I have heard people with resident roosters walk around with a tennis racket at the ready.:p


:D

I still have that racket. You never know when a rooster will be up for a game of badminton. :lol:

goodhors
Jul. 31, 2012, 10:12 PM
:D

I still have that racket. You never know when a rooster will be up for a game of badminton. :lol:

NOW I know why they call that shuttlecock a birdie!

Probably had the same Rooster issue develop in Golf, which also has a birdie. No groomed courses back when it started and kilts didn't offer much leg protection from a spurring Rooster! Ha Ha

Samotis
Jul. 31, 2012, 10:22 PM
I have a blue plastic baseball bat! ;)

Mine has got me on my legs twice. Huge blood blisters and a little blood. Butthead.

I have to be on my game around him!

witherbee
Aug. 1, 2012, 01:11 PM
Enjoy them as long as they are not attack roosters. We always have one on our farm to get rid of the ticks - they are super for that!

Sonesta
Aug. 1, 2012, 03:06 PM
No worries really with stray roosters. In fact, they'll make a major impact re: insect control. The only problems with roosters is if you have hens & they then want to start a harem. Then they may start to see you as an intruder - that's when rooster/human problems start. But other than that, I'd welcome a stray rooster.


I beg to differ. A solitary stray rooster can become an attack rooster just as easily as one with a harem.

Ask me how I know.....

Bluey
Aug. 1, 2012, 03:13 PM
I beg to differ. A solitary stray rooster can become an attack rooster just as easily as one with a harem.

Ask me how I know.....

:lol:

Roosters are roosters, few are sweet little pets once grown and mature.
That is why most end up as friers when young.:eek:

Bacardi1
Aug. 1, 2012, 03:22 PM
I beg to differ. A solitary stray rooster can become an attack rooster just as easily as one with a harem.

Ask me how I know.....

That may very well be, but every bird is an INDIVIDUAL.

I've had several that grew up to be sweet lovable PETS - with harems & without. You never know, & can't generalize.

fivehorses
Aug. 1, 2012, 06:08 PM
Having roosters and chickens almost as long as owning horses(45+years), I have encounterd only 1 really nasty rooster. It was in my early years of chicken farming,and he was used as a soccer ball,etc because he would attack.

WHat I have found is they enjoy the engagement...they like the reprote, sorry about the botched spelling. They like the fight. You attack, and you get their attention.

My last rooster, I did not engage him, but would hold my ground, finally he gave up since I was no fun. I tried that on a few before him...the ones I nailed if they attacked me were more encouraged to attack, and the ones I just held my ground got bored.

Anyhow, I am partial to roosters. I do like them.

Sonesta
Aug. 1, 2012, 11:05 PM
Holding your ground is all well and good, but when the b*st*rds sneak up on you and attack from behind, all bets are off.

twotrudoc
Aug. 1, 2012, 11:52 PM
I have heard people with resident roosters walk around with a tennis racket at the ready.:p

Who was it that posted about lobbing the rooster a few years back???:lol::lol::lol:

twotrudoc
Aug. 1, 2012, 11:53 PM
Was that you JSwan???? Where is that thread!?

Riverotter
Aug. 2, 2012, 12:13 AM
Wow, I can't believe so many of you have mean roosters!

As far as the strays, I'd welcome them. I keep a bunch more roosters then I need as they are great bug control, and eye candy. I've got, oh, I think 5 full grown roosters right now, and probably as many hatched this year running about (it was a good year for hatching pullets)

I've never had a mean rooster. I'd guess it's how I raise them, as I get them from all over, in addition to hatching my own. Of course, I also eat chicken, so any that live to maturity are the ones who never fail to give me a respectful 5 foot berth (aka, hard to catch ;) )

Bluey
Aug. 2, 2012, 07:25 AM
Wow, I can't believe so many of you have mean roosters!

As far as the strays, I'd welcome them. I keep a bunch more roosters then I need as they are great bug control, and eye candy. I've got, oh, I think 5 full grown roosters right now, and probably as many hatched this year running about (it was a good year for hatching pullets)

I've never had a mean rooster. I'd guess it's how I raise them, as I get them from all over, in addition to hatching my own. Of course, I also eat chicken, so any that live to maturity are the ones who never fail to give me a respectful 5 foot berth (aka, hard to catch ;) )

:lol:

Good way to sort them out for temperament.;)

Megaladon
Aug. 2, 2012, 09:34 AM
I have 3 mean roosters, and they're all Silkies (noted for being great pets for children LOL). Even though they are mean, I still enjoy them quite a bit and find their sassiness funny.

I would be surprised if a stray rooster would attack. I would never say never, but I would be more apprehensive if he had a flock of hens with him.

threedogpack
Aug. 2, 2012, 10:52 AM
I've never had a mean rooster. I'd guess it's how I raise them, as I get them from all over, in addition to hatching my own.

and how would you raise them to be nice?

Riverotter
Aug. 2, 2012, 12:42 PM
and how would you raise them to be nice?

Actually, the opposite of how most people do it. Most folks say to leave them alone, any intact male anything you don't want to handle, it will think you're one of them and get pushy, blah, blah.

We handle them a bunch in the brooder (lol, aka rubbermaid tote) You can often tell the little roo chicks right off as they are the boldest and hold themselves high.

Any chick that is "rude" jumping at you with it's feet or pecking at you when you go to feed, gets flicked back with a finger. Hard enough to make them jump, but not hard enough to harm. Once is usually all it takes. And they get a good bit of gentle handling. DD's favorite chick is ALWAYS a rooster chick and gets carried around and cuddled, fed by hand, etc.

At about a month, they go into a bigger outside pen and aren't messed with as much. But anything that charges up to you aggressively gets scooped up and "luved" on.
As in; "Oh! Who thinks he's a big tough rooster! Wook at teh big tuff wooster boy!" as he gets baby carried and petted and feathers scritched and petted.
This naturally doesn't hurt them one little bit, save for the massive, life-long wound to their pride. That's generally the last time they get within 5 feet of you.

Around 3 to 4 months, they start getting to freerange for at least part of the day with the big birds. Most of our boys who are getting culled are culled around then, though I keep 2x as many as I want to end up with, as it's an ongoing process.
From then on, any acting "cocky" are thoroughly stomped by the senior roos. (Always have more then one rooster, if they want to scrap, they can argue with each other)

Ongoing, I cull any that are mean to chicks, rough on hens, that look out for themselves and not the ladies and anyone that looks at me cross-eyed. Though none that even look at me funny have really ever made it to that stage. I actually end up giving away a lot of very sweet roosters to people who want a good, gentle one.

My hens get penned up, but unless I catch a rooster and toss him in for breeding, they live almost feral. They are everywhere and I never worry about them, or my kids being around them. The vast majority of them, once I turn them out to range, unless I run one down and catch him I will never touch him again, they won't even get close enough to eat from a pan if you're holding it.
They know that I am way, way bigger then they are.
And every once in a while one will decide dignity be damned, he likes the attention and make a big pet of himself. We are still mourning Patrick, taken by an owl, and currently have Sonny Boy, who will jump in an open window to visit.

Bacardi1
Aug. 2, 2012, 01:02 PM
I agree with Riverotter completely. Chicks that are handled gently on a daily basis grow up to be wonderfully friendly chickens - regardless of whether they're hens or roosters. All my hand-raised rooster chicks grew up to be absolutely wonderful. The only mean one I ever had was a Rhode Island Red that came to me several months old with a few pullets (he was supposed to be a pullet as well). He was so nasty, that I eventually re-homed him to a nice police officer who wanted a handsome rooster (& he was that!) for his new flock. I DID give said officer all pertinent info to the rooster's personality problems, but he still wanted him, so off he went. I could swear that my hens & my other rooster thanked me profusely afterwards.

threedogpack
Aug. 2, 2012, 01:07 PM
Not being a "bird person" but knowing a bit about training and learning association(s), I would have thought that teaching the Roos, good things happen when you are polite would create a respectful bird. But again, not having .any. practical experience, I could have been totally wrong as well.

Riverotter
Aug. 2, 2012, 01:27 PM
Well, roosters being polite to each other stay away from each other.
I don't know if I explained it well, but we really do love on them a lot as chicks. As they grow and decide they are male, it's like cuddling a 12 year old boy. He ate it up at 4, at 12 it's like a punishment, he'll just keep his dignity intact over there, thank-you-very-much. And it echoes how older roosters treat youngster roosters. If the young rooster gets too close, older rooster chases him down and pecks him or jumps on him and sits on him. I pick him up and hold him like a baby instead. Young rooster learns to keep a respectful distance from both older roosters and me.

My roosters get treats, but they get them tossed on the ground in front of them. They like this, as then they can call their favorite hens to come share. They don't charge my feet, because they know from teeny chicks that I am very big, and there is nothing there for them.

The hens, on the other hand. Sigh. Every day when I go out to feed, it is like that scene when Ace Ventura call all his pets out of hiding. I have to tip-toe through them, there is on one each shoulder, one perched on the bucket, 3 riding the goat who has to be part of the parade... The roosters stay at the edge, and alert.
My friendly hens are all over me. My friendly roosters act like gentlemen, they want my company in a polite way. They would rather I approach them and give them attention, and will put themselves where I will notice them and do that, or they will dance or sing to me like they would a hen, but they won't approach me because in rooster that is rude.

I had one very friendly Buff Orpington who would croon sweetly as he showed me all the wonderful safe places where he would guard me if I were inclined to crawl in and lay an egg. He knew I wasn't a hen, but it's how he said I love you, same as he would to his ladies.

2DogsFarm
Aug. 2, 2012, 03:29 PM
I have heard people with resident roosters walk around with a tennis racket at the ready.:p

Nah - that's Old Hat.
I have my Patented RoosterBeater:
an old rake that lost its fan.
Perfect for teaching the nasty little PITA how to fly backwards & upside down.

Seriously - if you have a fiesty roo make sure you blunt his spurs.
My little asshat tore through a pair of heavy sweats and broke the skin when he ambushed me!

Riverotter:
I wish I knew your secret.
Believe me, my rooster was 2 days old when I got him and another chick. Both were supposed to be pullets so it was around 3 months before I got suspicious that one was not a She.
Before & after that they got treated the same - picked up in spite of their protests and handled as much as possible so I could check things if needed.
They were integrated into my mini-flock of 5 2yo hens and everyone got along fine until Roosterboy hit puberty.
The older hens take no crap from him - his little wingdance does not impress them and they have, on occasion, refused to mate with him.
I've even seen a couple of them chestbump him when he gets too annoying.
He does his job, watches for predators, etc - but in a kind of ADD way: he'll find a tidbit & call the girls over, but then he eats it!
Jerk.
90% of the time he makes way for me, but every now & then I'll see him ruff up and go low and that's when I reach for the Roosterbeater.
If we have a CTJ he'll steer clear for a couple weeks, but I always keep an eye on him.
Pick up & carry is not an option unless he's upside down - he pecks!
Any suggestions besides the stewpot?

StillHorseCrazy
Aug. 2, 2012, 03:40 PM
I had one very friendly Buff Orpington who would croon sweetly as he showed me all the wonderful safe places where he would guard me if I were inclined to crawl in and lay an egg. He knew I wasn't a hen, but it's how he said I love you, same as he would to his ladies.

That's adorable. And I really like the way you describe all of the rooster and hen dynamics.

Riverotter
Aug. 2, 2012, 04:09 PM
Sorry 2DogsFarm, I've no idea how to rehab one, besides keeping a second rooster. If you have more then one, and one still wants to scuffle with you, into the crockpot he goes, keep the nicer one.

But if you're close to NE Arkansas, I'd give you one. Every year I give away several too sweet to eat roosters. I don't need all 5 of the ones I've got running around now, and there are a couple of rooster chicks who will likely be staying on account of their good looks and manners. I just really enjoy having them around. A good rooster is handsome, gentlemanly and useful.

One of my current favorites;
http://s249.photobucket.com/albums/gg210/ArrowsFlight/?action=view&current=IMAG0137.jpg

tradewind
Aug. 2, 2012, 05:56 PM
I have had roosters with my hens for a number of years and have never had a problem. I think it varies and perhaps some breeds are more aggresive than others. I love my roosters. If any of them got agressive they would be gone in a heartbeat though. An agressive rooster is a bad thing.

susanne
Aug. 2, 2012, 08:59 PM
We've had two roosters, one was mean as sin, the other sweet as sugar.

The mean one was handled from chickhood and treated as a pet. The sweet one received no special treatment and was rarely handled.

Not that two roosters counts as a lifetime of experience, but from them I would venture that it all depends upon the individual bird.

Russell Crowe is such a character and so friendly, I swear he's part Labrador Retriever.

Mel Tormé was so vicious I swear he was part incubus.

With Mel, I found the longe whip to be quite handy.

2DogsFarm
Aug. 3, 2012, 06:49 AM
If you have more then one, and one still wants to scuffle with you, into the crockpot he goes, keep the nicer one.

But if you're close to NE Arkansas, I'd give you one.
One of my current favorites;
http://s249.photobucket.com/albums/gg210/ArrowsFlight/?action=view&current=IMAG0137.jpg

Handsome rooster!
My Evil Spawn is a redhead too - deep rust colored with buff tailfeathers - his looks are helping keep him from being renamed Coq au Vin :mad:
I have no idea what breed he is - the friend I got the chicks from has mostly Wyandottes and Isa Browns plus some Barred Rocks. He's some sort of mutt.

Sigh...I have just 6 hens, and 2 roosters would be too much lovin' for the girls.
Otherwise I'd be tempted to take you up on that offer.

As it is I'll be going to my County Fair this weekend and may ask around if anyone wants a handsome cranky rooster.
Or if they know of anyone who'll process him for me.

SaturdayNightLive
Aug. 3, 2012, 10:47 AM
Chicks that are handled gently on a daily basis grow up to be wonderfully friendly chickens - regardless of whether they're hens or roosters.

My BO's chickens were all handled daily, loved on as pets, and even lived in the house for several months. The rooster is the meanest critter I've ever met. He sees me get out of my car from across the property and runs over as fast as he can to attack me. He also likes to sneak attack from behind. I've taken to carrying a plastic pitchfork around with me to whack him with - it's the only way I've found that will discourage him.

JSwan
Aug. 3, 2012, 07:51 PM
Was that you JSwan???? Where is that thread!?



Yes, that was me. :D

All my birds are hand raised. That doesnt mean a rooster isn't going to act according to his nature. Hens with chicks can be aggressive no matter how well they are raised,and a sitting hen can peck hard enough to draw blood. there is variation in temperament among breeds as well.

They're chickens. It's normal behavior for the species. Unfortunately. :lol: