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View Full Version : Dump cart for farm....EZGO, Cushman, GAS vs. elec?



florida foxhunter
Jul. 28, 2012, 12:31 PM
My Mule has had it.......and I'm considering getting a (hopefully used) dump golf cart. I've seen the EZGO WorkHorse advertised........
I know most farms have some sort of vehicle like this......
Preferences?
Gas vs electric (I think Gas for as much as I drive, plus I'd forget to charge it!)

EZGO vs. Cushman or C lub Car???

I want two seats or a straight seat, a windshield, roof, and dump bed.
What is your preference. Other than Craigslist, where can I find a used one?

Over the Hill
Jul. 28, 2012, 01:54 PM
I have an EZGo Workhorse (gasoline engine) with an electric dump bed. I love it and could not imagine trying to do all that must be done without it. Fits in the center aisle of the barn for mucking and for feed and hay delivery. Very easy on the gasoline, very little maintenance. I hope this helps!:)

carolprudm
Jul. 28, 2012, 03:32 PM
I have an EZGo Workhorse (gasoline engine) with an electric dump bed. I love it and could not imagine trying to do all that must be done without it. Fits in the center aisle of the barn for mucking and for feed and hay delivery. Very easy on the gasoline, very little maintenance. I hope this helps!:)

I have http://www.clubcar.com/commercialbusiness/utility4x4/pages/carryall295.aspx
. It has 4/all wheel drive and a bigger (and lower) dump bed than most gators. It hauls my large Newer Spreader and can carry 3 bales of hay or 4 manure tubs

veezee
Jul. 28, 2012, 03:56 PM
I use my John Deere gator with my newer spreader. My gator is my lifesaver to be able to haul and pull so many things around here. Love the newer spreader too!

GotMyPony
Jul. 28, 2012, 07:40 PM
We've had three golf carts and one thing I know for sure is that if you have an electric golf cart the batteries will go dead at the furthest point from home, barn, wherever you want to be. And you won't have a clue until it happens. Gas models may cost more initially but they are well worth it.
FWIW happy to see the EZ-Go Workhorse love - that's what we have.

mroades
Jul. 28, 2012, 08:23 PM
I did my farm with an EZ-GO gas Workhorse for 6 years, it was awesome!

Badger
Jul. 28, 2012, 08:31 PM
I have the EZGO Workhorse 48 volt electric and it's great. We had the choice of gas or electric and chose electric as you don't have to worry about keeping gas around or mess with the gas smell around the barn, it's quieter, no transmission to repair, etc. It's WAY quieter. The charge lasts quite a long time: I charge it about every other week or when I need to drag pastures. It runs around the neighborhood without taking any sort of dent out of the charge, pulls the Newer Spreader and spreads manure, hauls hay, has electric dump, etc. The only time the battery really gets used is when I'm dragging the pastures, especially the ones that have some slope. I can get two pastures dragged on a full charge, so 4 or 5 acres. I see the battery light go gradually down as it works to pull the drag. Other than that one chore, I hardly seem to make a dent in the batteries. If you are going to use this for farm work, do get the 48V and not the smaller 36V, our neighbor with the 36V wishes he has the extra boost of our 48V. You do have to replace the batteries about every 5 years, but husband would rather do that than have the constant maintenance of keeping gas around and keeping a gasoline engine up. Pricewise, the replacement cost of batteries is about on par with five years of gasoline. When we were shopping a year ago, we looked at all kinds of stuff in both gas and electric (gators, mules, workhorses, golf carts, bulldogs, etc.) and ended up with this and have been happy with it. All the longtime Workhorse owners we came across had nothing but good things to say.

In a year of use, I've never had the battery run out and strand me. Ours has a very clear battery light that shows how much power has been used and how much is left, plus it starts blinking when it gets very low. I run it until it starts blinking, then finished what I'm doing and head back to the barn to recharge. Even if I'm at the farthest point of our 13 acre property and downhill when it starts blinking, I have more than enough battery to take the drag back up the hill, unhook it by the equipment shed and take the cart to the barn to recharge.