PDA

View Full Version : Footing to use outside in/out stall into paddock?



Loves to ride
Jul. 26, 2012, 08:48 PM
I have a 2 stall barn, each stall opens to the paddock. The horses go in and out and in and out and... You get the picture.

I currently have a footing called Roma pack outside the stall and in the paddock but I have deep holes just outside the stalls where the horses step out.

What footing would hold up? So far the Roma pack and stone dust haven't and I don't really have a budget to keep replacing it. :(

I actually thought of a cement ramp but I am concerned with it getting slippery when wet.

I'd love suggestions!

Thanks in advance....

JB
Jul. 26, 2012, 08:57 PM
What do you mean by "deep holes"?

If the footing is disappearing by getting punched lower and lower into the sub-soil then dig it out, lay down some geotextile fabric, and put the good/draining stuff back on top.

Definitely no concrete there for the reason you mentioned :)

Even then, where they are constantly walking on top of, the footing will get a bit packed and depressed, so while it won't be going anywhere, you may have to fluff it yearly or so

Calvincrowe
Jul. 26, 2012, 09:50 PM
Without a physical barrier (geotextile cloth or plastic grid) no matter what you put down, it will disappear into the soil over time.

I put down geo cloth, and covered it with 5/8- and topped it with screenings/pea gravel. It has been down now for 5 years, with 2-3 horses going in and out with no "holing" going on.

Also, if you have a 4 foot stall door, opening to a paddock, you are really going to have to build up the area before putting in cloth/gravel.

Geo cloth is not expensive, thank goodness.

TheOtherHorse
Jul. 27, 2012, 06:47 AM
Plastic grid would work well. It will still drain well and not get slippery like a mat would.

I love geotextile fabric under stone dust, but in my set up I do have to add more stonedust in low areas periodically (near gates, or favorite pawing/rolling spot). I am thinking about adding one piece of plastic grid outside each dutch door to protect that high traffic area.

trubandloki
Jul. 27, 2012, 07:21 AM
Is that area covered?

My barn has in and out stalls too, the area outside the stalls is covered.
We put a stone base and regular stall mats there. Installed with a slight slope away from the barn so if rain is blown under the overhang it does not pool by the barn.

Paddys Mom
Jul. 27, 2012, 10:01 AM
Similar set up here and I did the dig out/geotextile/compacted limsteone screenings. Every 2 years I had to add stone and compact it. Ugh!

I finally put a concrete pad outside the stalls and I love it.
Rough surface, so it is not slippery.
The only downside I have experienced is that my horse cannot go without shoes anymore (he used to get the winter off of shoes) because the rough concrete wears them down too much.
They do drag bedding out still, even over a high threshhold, but with the concrete, I can sweep it up and shovel it back in the stalls!

grullablue
Jul. 27, 2012, 02:14 PM
I use limestone screenings inside and outside my barn. I have only had to fill in areas every...oh, 3 years or so. And even that, I could save by putting a gutter across the west side of my barn. It's an attached lean to, and the rain falls there and eventually some gets worn away. Someday I'll get those gutters! My barn floor is made of this too, but would be hard to lay on of course, so rubber mats in stalls would be a good idea!

jetsmom
Jul. 27, 2012, 03:21 PM
I use limestone screenings inside and outside my barn. I have only had to fill in areas every...oh, 3 years or so. And even that, I could save by putting a gutter across the west side of my barn. It's an attached lean to, and the rain falls there and eventually some gets worn away. Someday I'll get those gutters! My barn floor is made of this too, but would be hard to lay on of course, so rubber mats in stalls would be a good idea!

Limestone screenings work great. The dust compresses into a harder material, and the screenings sit on top, so it doesn't get muddy or deep.

Loves to ride
Jul. 28, 2012, 09:29 AM
Thanks for the replies!

There is an 8' overhang over the entrance and yes, JB, a 4' stall door so movement is restricted to a single path which does make it worse.

As far as "depression", let's just say right now, my 16.2h tb looks like a 14.2h pony when he's standing at the entrance. :eek:

So I definitely have to do something, soon, before he becomes a mini. :D

Paddy's Mom, hum, my horses are barefoot and I really don't want to get into having to put shoes on them so you've raised a good point to consider about concrete. Given my TB is in constant motion, I could see that being a potential issue. Thanks for the insight.

I have no idea where to even find geo cloth in my area (Massachusetts).

Off to start another thread on that.

Thanks!

KnKShowmom
Jul. 28, 2012, 09:45 PM
We have stalls that open to paddocks with an over hang -

When we built the barn there was already a slope there but we started with larger rocks (think rail road track gravel), then #57s, and the top layer is stone dust. No holes, great drainage and 4 out of five of our guys are bare foot, including King Tenderfoot TB.

If you have the larger gravel underneath, it will support your stone dust so you don't have holes.

lorilu
Jul. 29, 2012, 10:28 AM
I use those 4x6 rubber mats with holes in them around my gates and water trough. (Unfortunately, the gate is in an area that gets a great deal of runoff.) Works great, even when it seems to be buried in the ground (it gets about 1 inch of dirt over it over time, but is easily pulled up if I need to move it - like when I move the water trough). Water drains through, grass will grow up through it (at least by the water trough).

I would put down some sort of fill (maybe screenings) and then the mats over it. You could even put a mat just on the inside of the stall at the door as well.

bdj
Jul. 30, 2012, 07:27 PM
I've got the same thing as lorilu (rubber mat with holes in it - "high density rubber ring mat" is what the place I bought it from calls them) outside one of my exterior stall doors, and I love it. I don't have an overhang, just an eave, and that spot was getting pretty pockmarked. I'll admit, I caught it early and didn't do any "site prep", just raked the area clean and flat, and it's held up really well - just sort of sunk into the ground a bit (the grass grew right through it) and just seems to have stabilized the surface.