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whbar158
Jul. 24, 2012, 11:25 PM
I am working on planning out my horses area on my property (yay!) I could possibly fence in an area as large as 100' by 100', but smaller would be easier (leveling ground, as well a cost) and I am curious what people out west (I am in AZ) have for paddocks. I just have one horse but would want to have it big enough for 2 if I needed another (ie my horse doesn't do being alone). Obviously grazing is not an issue, I am just talking physical space. I know tons of horses live in stalls or small corrals (ie 12X24) 24/7 but since he currently lives at a place where his stall is that size and has a huge pasture I would rather have bigger ;). Ideas?

PeteyPie
Jul. 24, 2012, 11:48 PM
I would make it at least 50'x100' since you have the space, but I would prefer larger if I had two in one paddock. That way when they are being silly and bucking and dashing around, they have room to get by each other. Bigger is better, IMO.

Calvincrowe
Jul. 25, 2012, 01:38 AM
At least 24 feet wide and as long as you can make it. Bigger is better, go for as large a space as you can handle. Don't forget to pick poop everyday, especially in a smaller space, but I'm sure you know that! I have a sacrifice paddock that is roughly 40 x 70. I use it in the wet season (okay--about 8 months of the year) to keep horses out of the mud and my pastures from getting ruined.

showidaho
Jul. 25, 2012, 08:59 AM
I have five horses and three all-weather turnouts...I noticed you were asking what people out west do, and I am certainly not out west, but I think the principle is the same. One turnout is 100x100, one 90x80 and one 50x60. I keep two horses in both the larger ones. We also have a multitude of grass turnouts, but I don't use them when it's wet. I would be happy to take a photo for you, if you want to see what horses look like in each of the sizes, to get visual idea of turnout size with horses in them. Also, I have special footing in mine so I have special feed tubs for hay, rubber mats around those feed tubs, and I pick the turnouts ever single day. It's a lot of work, but I've never had so much rain that I can't do turnout.

JB
Jul. 25, 2012, 10:07 AM
Make it as large as you and the space can afford. You can always cross-fence for smaller paddocks if the need arises.

Bluey
Jul. 25, 2012, 10:38 AM
I would say, in such small spaces, since the horses are right by each other, it may be safer all around to just make two paddocks.
They won't fight, each will eat what you feed it, not one will hog food and they still have the other horse right there for company.

If you have gates on the ends of the middle fence, if you ever have two really compatible horses, you can leave them open and have it all be one larger paddock.
You also have a way to keep them separated.

Remember also that any kind of enclosure doesn't has to be square, you can have lines that follow the contours of the land, as long as, if you will have more than one horse in there, there are no narrow spots a horse can corner another and run it over the fence.

I think for your situation, a somewhat 100'x100' perimeter fence cross fenced whatever way works best for management would make sense.

netg
Jul. 25, 2012, 11:24 AM
I am working on planning out my horses area on my property (yay!) I could possibly fence in an area as large as 100' by 100', but smaller would be easier (leveling ground, as well a cost) and I am curious what people out west (I am in AZ) have for paddocks. I just have one horse but would want to have it big enough for 2 if I needed another (ie my horse doesn't do being alone). Obviously grazing is not an issue, I am just talking physical space. I know tons of horses live in stalls or small corrals (ie 12X24) 24/7 but since he currently lives at a place where his stall is that size and has a huge pasture I would rather have bigger ;). Ideas?

We're in Tucson and have just a bit over 2 acres in the barn/run area. The smallest run off a stall is 24x80 which is perfect for my mom's Friesian cross who almost never voluntarily breaks a walk. My TB is actually in the next size pen - it's 80' wide by maybe 300' long. My rescue mare is in the biggest which is just over an acre - a little over 116' wide by 336' long. We essentially fenced the entire area from the driveway to the end of the property with the required 30' distance from the edge of the property. As others have noted, we can divide it up as we want, too. Since I'm looking for a young prospect we'll probably make the biggest one 36' shorter to create an 80'x36' run off one of the stalls on the same side of the barn.

Most people in AZ don't even seem to see why your horse should have space at all. I just know that the horses have better toplines and movement, less tension and seem happier with more space.

We also didn't clear out all the vegetation. We checked for poisonous plants and removed all the cactus except a saguaro which the horses know to leave alone, but left the trees, there are gulleys from runoff which the horses enjoy jumping, etc. Our creosote bushes and mesquites are starting to get chewed down now, but we only really worry about making sure there aren't enough mesquite beans around to cause colic issues - everything else is fairly non-noxious for them.

whbar158
Jul. 25, 2012, 05:04 PM
Netg-What type of fencing do you have? I really want to do pipe rail with no climb fence, but the quote I got recently was a little pricey.

I am considering doing one paddock for now with room for a second (with a gate already in place) my horse is fairly easy going, he has lived in everything from a small dry lot (probably not bigger than a normal round pen) to large pastures and has thrived everywhere. I have only ever seen him run around with a herd, on his own rarely has he wanted to do much more than eat....haha. Thanks for all the ideas!

netg
Jul. 26, 2012, 03:07 AM
We have pipe and no climb. This was before the barn was totally finished, but after the horses were here....

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7192/6887063257_1b23402232.jpg

whbar158
Jul. 26, 2012, 10:11 AM
Would you mind telling me what company you used? You can PM it to me if you would like.

netg
Jul. 26, 2012, 10:46 AM
Would you mind telling me what company you used? You can PM it to me if you would like.

I didn't pay for the fencing and would have gone with a company who would have charged less to install... we had a handyman and his crew do it. But our deal was mom paid/arranged everything and I am her retirement plan, as she didn't have enough to retire. And she wouldn't shop around/make anyone stick to bid prices. American Fence I think is the name of the company who mostly seems to have least expensive prices for installation.

I can try to find the name of the company from whom we got the fencing - they're in CO and were FAR less expensive than any other source we found for purchasing; I suspect they're the main manufacturer and the other places all buy from them. I've seen them mentioned on the boards, so if someone else knows who I'm talking about feel free to chime in. The only similarly priced fencing we'd seen was far lower quality.

whbar158
Jul. 26, 2012, 01:16 PM
The quote I got was for fence plus installation (I think) so maybe it isn't as high as I was thinking. Thanks for all the information guys!

RiverBendPol
Jul. 26, 2012, 01:37 PM
I'm not Out West but I'd say smaller is always better. I hate it when they get running in a big space (hence our last 4 months rehabbing a tendon). Make 6 small, electrified paddocks and let everyone have their own space within easy view of each other.

netg
Jul. 26, 2012, 04:25 PM
I'm not Out West but I'd say smaller is always better. I hate it when they get running in a big space (hence our last 4 months rehabbing a tendon). Make 6 small, electrified paddocks and let everyone have their own space within easy view of each other.

I'm opposite, in that I think they should always have room to run and it's better for them...

UrbanHennery
Jul. 26, 2012, 04:57 PM
My sacrifice paddock (used at night in summer and most days in winter) is 35'x80'. I've kept up to 3 horses in there for daytime turnout and never had any injuries other than a bite mark here and there. That said, if I could make it twice that size I certainly would, but it's what fit between the barn, the property line, and the other sheds. And, realistically, is all we really wanted to have to gravel (mud is an issue here).

CHT
Jul. 26, 2012, 05:02 PM
I would make 1 small pen, and two medium pens that can be joined. The small pen may be useful if your horse gets hurt and needs to be on "stall" rest out in the fresh air.

PeteyPie
Jul. 26, 2012, 07:44 PM
I would make 1 small pen, and two medium pens that can be joined. The small pen may be useful if your horse gets hurt and needs to be on "stall" rest out in the fresh air.

That's a good idea. I'm going to change steal part of your idea and change my own recommendation to one big paddock and at least one small catch pen. I have a catch pen on my large paddock/small pasture (300'x180') and I use it all the time, for removing a horse without worrying about the others squeezing through a gate before I can close it, for farrier visits, for vet care and stall rest when I fill it with shavings and use it like a stall.

Another good thing in hot places is if you have a bigger paddock, you can plant trees in addition to your shade structure so that there is always shade somewhere, no matter what direction or angle the sun. Sometimes there is more of a breeze at one end than another and they can choose the more comfortable spot.