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TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 23, 2012, 05:35 PM
Had to start a clean thread. After 3+ years of looking and attempting to buy, we are under contract for an acreage! Just under 9 acres, about 3.5 acres of which is currently in alfalfa. Off the oil road, 2 miles to work, mature shelter belt to the west and north and a 4 bedroom 2 bathroom home that I'm itching to start redoing.

Of course we still have to get through the appraisal and home inspection, both of which I'm worried about (of course I am a worrier, so that's to be expected).

I also get to tear down a barb-wire fence. Will be starting from scratch for the equine-side, but the house is first.

I'm so happy I'm completely exhausted....lol.

fordtraktor
Jul. 23, 2012, 05:39 PM
Congratulations, that's great news!

HPFarmette
Jul. 23, 2012, 05:41 PM
Very exciting! Congrats.....

Teacup
Jul. 23, 2012, 06:24 PM
Congratulations! Fingers crossed that the inspection and appraisal go well for you!

Calvincrowe
Jul. 23, 2012, 06:57 PM
Yay for you!!! How exciting, and my the appraisal/inspections go smoothly. Barbed wire..ugh..been there, bear the scars from that. :no:

Buy the best leather gloves you can find, coil it into manageable lengths, tie and take to the metal recycle place. So much easier to handle when it is coiled up.

JB
Jul. 23, 2012, 08:09 PM
This is the fixer-upper (sort of) that you tried to get, didn't, and they came back to you offering your first offer? Cool! It was obviously meant to be :)

Now the real work begins :lol:

I'm not sure which is worse - re-doing, or starting from scratch!

skippy60
Jul. 23, 2012, 08:12 PM
Make sure to get before and after pictures- and then post them on COTH!!

And wow, 2 miles to work... i think you scored a good one...

JanM
Jul. 23, 2012, 09:00 PM
Congratulations!

Now the real fun begins. I think we all have the dream of having a house that is exactly tailored to what we want, and now you have the chance to do that.

I'm sure you already know this, but here's my list on how to save. To save on windows single hung double pane, not double hung.
Flat latex paint works for all rooms. Porcelain tile, not ceramic (the big box stores sell out about every two years on most lines, so you can get great deals-and if they don't have bull nose, then tile half way up the bath wall and use a nice moulding on the top and it looks great).
Click Bamboo (they make nice medium and darks now too if you don't like the light) is a value add for houses, where laminate adds no value.
For window treatments I like to find an independent custom blind company that includes install-until then you can use the temporary paper ones for privacy.
For kitchen cabinets you can save big by using the big warehouse outlet stores, or IKEA-usually you assemble them yourselves, but it's easy and a big savings. Or get an actual kitchen set up from a kitchen/bath store that they are selling off, and you just get fill in cabinets made or ordered for the extras you need.
To save on kitchen appliances either buy the entire suite at one place, or go to a big appliance outlet that buys by the truckload-you can save so much money that way. And for a downstairs, casual family room or guest room carpet tiles come in great patterns and colors, and you can put them in yourself, and they are easy to replace if necessary. For closet organizers you get wire or laminate ones from the big box store, assemble by yourself, and you have a custom look for very little compared to having an organizer come in, charge a fortune for the cabinet hardware, and installation. I've put together a bunch of these, and they are really easy, double the space, and it gives so much storage space. I don't know who came up with the idea of closet organizers, but they were a real genius. Or get a closet company that does the wire type closets and save a lot over the custom, upscale ones.

A friend had a funny thing happened when they were doing demo on their house. They had all of the plans ready and prioritized, had everything arranged, and then brought all of the tools over to start the demo. Then they found out the wheelbarrows they had were too big to fit through the doors. Plan B worked better.

Forte
Jul. 23, 2012, 09:47 PM
Yay! Keeping my fingers crossed for you that this place works out. We just got posession of our little farm last week and my hubby is busily working on renovating the house as well. Just bear in mind, renos always take longer and cost more than you think they are going to!

ChocoMare
Jul. 23, 2012, 10:05 PM
Yay!!! Seeeeee we told you soooooo.! ;)

walknsound
Jul. 23, 2012, 10:09 PM
Congrats in order! Yay!

msj
Jul. 23, 2012, 10:10 PM
Congratulations and good luck. Hope the appraisal and home inspection go well. :)

Think about doing most, if not all, the house renovations before you start on the barn and fencing and ring etc for the horses because you'll never find time or money to go back to the house. Somehow the horses seem to take priority.

seabreeze
Jul. 23, 2012, 11:10 PM
"LIKE"

:)

ReSomething
Jul. 23, 2012, 11:23 PM
And the journey begins! Good luck!

NoDQhere
Jul. 24, 2012, 10:46 AM
Wonderful!!! Now the "fun" starts!

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 24, 2012, 10:56 AM
Really, flat paint in every room? I don't like the shiny stuff particularly, but I can wipe the Kong ball scuffs off that and not the flat. Maybe eggshell?

So we are tearing out all the carpet and we are scraping the ceilings and having them retextured for sure, but what to do about the years of HEAVY cigarette smoking on the walls? Should I wash them with bleach water and then prime, or can I just wash and then paint?

We are going to keep the cabinets and kitchen for now and I'm going to paint them (I do know how horrid/labor intensive that is and how to do it--I've refinished furniture before and my grandma basically did it for a living). All I need to buy for now in the kitchen is a microwave and fridge.

I will totally take before and after pictures once it is ours.

JB
Jul. 24, 2012, 11:00 AM
I don't like flat paint either - just too hard to clean compared to even a satin finish.

Kilz will be your BFF. You might even just paint it on and leave it for a few months before putting the finishing coat(s) on top. I have no idea how much a bleach wash will help with the smell - someone here might know, or talk with someone at a paint specialty store.

I can't wait to see how this progresses!

Guin
Jul. 24, 2012, 11:52 AM
Yes, you'll need Kilz to kill the smoking stink.

A guy who writes a good handyman column always recommends scrubbing the walls, ceiling, woodwork etc with Spic n Span powder (not the liquid) after you've sanded but before you start priming/painting. Something particular about it gets rid of lots of crud and makes the painting smoother.

http://spicnspan.com/en/Products.aspx

(http://spicnspan.com/en/Products.aspx)

FineDesign08
Jul. 24, 2012, 12:26 PM
Congrats! We also are under contract for a place which is going to be a fixer upper. The horse area will also be starting from scratch.. starting by taking down barb wire fence!

fordtraktor
Jul. 24, 2012, 12:37 PM
Really, flat paint in every room? I don't like the shiny stuff particularly, but I can wipe the Kong ball scuffs off that and not the flat. Maybe eggshell?

So we are tearing out all the carpet and we are scraping the ceilings and having them retextured for sure, but what to do about the years of HEAVY cigarette smoking on the walls? Should I wash them with bleach water and then prime, or can I just wash and then paint?

We are going to keep the cabinets and kitchen for now and I'm going to paint them (I do know how horrid/labor intensive that is and how to do it--I've refinished furniture before and my grandma basically did it for a living). All I need to buy for now in the kitchen is a microwave and fridge.

I will totally take before and after pictures once it is ours.

BM and Sherwin Williams both have a Matte finish, has a tiny sheen, that you can still clean but hides imperfections. Use satin for trimwork. Shine = see every imperfection.

I honestly believe that you save $$ by buying the highest quality paint you can find. It requires fewer coats, looks better and overall the cost evens out. Cheap paint is a corner you don't want to cut.

Replacing the flooring and painting will do a ton for the smoke smell. Kilz won't hurt but the paint itself will trap in the odor. If you can, run an ozonator in it for a few days, that will really help kill all the musties.

trubandloki
Jul. 24, 2012, 12:48 PM
Congratulations!


To save on windows single hung double pane, not double hung.

Not worth the savings if you like to open your windows.

With a double hung window you can open the top. I prefer this because I have dogs. That safety issue aside, being able to open both the top and bottom works well for circulation.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 24, 2012, 01:22 PM
BM and Sherwin Williams both have a Matte finish, has a tiny sheen, that you can still clean but hides imperfections. Use satin for trimwork. Shine = see every imperfection.

I honestly believe that you save $$ by buying the highest quality paint you can find. It requires fewer coats, looks better and overall the cost evens out. Cheap paint is a corner you don't want to cut.

Replacing the flooring and painting will do a ton for the smoke smell. Kilz won't hurt but the paint itself will trap in the odor. If you can, run an ozonator in it for a few days, that will really help kill all the musties.

I used Behr paint in our current house (with the exception of one Ralph Lauren faux wall) and have been very happy with it. It is usually ranked number one by Consumer Reports. I have friends that are huge Sherman Williams fans. But I agree about getting the best paint you can.

I'm not familiar with an ozonator--will have to check that out. Thanks.

I will buy lots of powdered spic and span!

JanM
Jul. 24, 2012, 01:42 PM
Trub-I never open the top, so the single hung windows work for me. However, I have been told by a window pro that double pane works well, but triple pane doesn't add enough value to be worth the cost.

trubandloki
Jul. 24, 2012, 01:45 PM
Trub-I never open the top, so the single hung windows work for me. However, I have been told by a window pro that double pane works well, but triple pane doesn't add enough value to be worth the cost.

Keeping my dog(s) safely inside my house is worth the cost to me.
Shrug.

(I have never had a dog go thru a screen so do not think I have unruly dogs, it is just not something I felt was worth risking.)


I admit, when I had windows replaced in my old house the salesman was very shocked that I cared if my top sash opened or not.
It is an older house and the bottom sill of all the first floor windows was below my knees. That is when I developed the habit of opening the top sash not the bottom.

msj
Jul. 24, 2012, 01:49 PM
Trub-I never open the top, so the single hung windows work for me. However, I have been told by a window pro that double pane works well, but triple pane doesn't add enough value to be worth the cost.

When I lived in a ranch condo, I used to open the top rather than the bottom. I figured if someone wanted to break in, they would have to climb up to the top to get in and would probably go next door where the neighbors opened the bottom and they could get in easier. That was the ONLY way I felt secure and it was a good neighborhood too. :sigh:

Now I have casement windows and have a raised ranch. Still one floor living (mostly) but I feel safe leaving ALL the windows wide open and going to sleep. :) Course my next door neighbor is a retired member of the county's sheriff dept. :D

JanM
Jul. 24, 2012, 01:49 PM
I can see that would be better with the dogs, or with kids also.

And the low VOC paint that doesn't smell is fairly common, but I think there is a way (a few drops of real vanilla extract maybe?) to keep the paint smell down.

The 'in' thing for all walls is latex, because the quality of the paint is so good now. The major way to get rid of cigarette smoke is the carpet removal, and popcorn ceiling will absorb it also, so I'm glad you're removing that. And I wouldn't be surprised to find out that wall paper absorbs it too. I would also consider removing the attic insulation and getting blown in ground newspaper with the fireproof borax solution. It is unattractive to insects, a great insulator, and it will make rewiring and such easier. And it is a good insulation, when the original might not be clean or effective any longer.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 24, 2012, 03:28 PM
I can see that would be better with the dogs, or with kids also.

And the low VOC paint that doesn't smell is fairly common, but I think there is a way (a few drops of real vanilla extract maybe?) to keep the paint smell down.

The 'in' thing for all walls is latex, because the quality of the paint is so good now. The major way to get rid of cigarette smoke is the carpet removal, and popcorn ceiling will absorb it also, so I'm glad you're removing that. And I wouldn't be surprised to find out that wall paper absorbs it too. I would also consider removing the attic insulation and getting blown in ground newspaper with the fireproof borax solution. It is unattractive to insects, a great insulator, and it will make rewiring and such easier. And it is a good insulation, when the original might not be clean or effective any longer.


Any ballpark idea what redoing insulation in an attic costs? Attic footprint is probably 1500 sq feet. Our current home had been redone by the previous owners, so I have no idea. Just curious.

JanM
Jul. 24, 2012, 03:55 PM
When they put extra in mine (it is a new house, and already had some) it costs about $1.50 a square foot, but it might cost more for a total depth without the layer I already had under it. It was worth every penny. If you have puffy stuff already the insulation people can reverse the big blower and turn it into a vacuum device and suck the current stuff out. My last house had an attic fire, and the pink shredded stuff was removed, then after the drywall was screwed in (much older drywall on the ceiling is nailed not screwed in), and the popcorn scraped, the insulation was sprayed up there. It looked like a wonderful, fluffy cloud and was so great. It not only was a great insulator, but the bugs hated it (and that's a real plus in Alabama). The pest control people did the extra insulation in my current house, and they did a wonderful job. Ask about the possibility of asbetos in the ceiling popcorn too. If it's little styrofoam bubbles it probably isn't, but if it's anything else it could be.

If you could get a good deal on wallboard and installation, then you might consider removing the wallboard. I say that because with the age of the house any wallboard or paneling, either painted, regular paneling or wallpaper I suspect it will be polluted with smoke. It would also make upgrading the electric and plumbing really easy. Plus that way you can secure the ceiling board properly, get rid of the smoke and mold (if thre is any), and avoid doing the popcorn removal too.

Make sure you have double sets of video coax cable and telephone jacks together, and where you'll put the tv and computer. It is necessary to do this for cable modem/digital telephone, and with VOIP type you need a phone jack near the computer also, so you can plug in the modem line for the phone to the house jack so you have phone all over the house. If you have a separate office area you need a phone and cable jack in there also.

I would absolutely get rid of old attic insulation, because if it's original it's the age of the house, and full of smoke, dirt, and probably bugs. If it's the old pink stuff it should be easy to remove-just open a vent or window right over the dumpster, and dump it out the window.

I'm assuming since the roof is fairly new that it doesn't have turbine vents, because they are seriously awful when they age. On my previous house I had to get the roof and carpets redone, and the night before the carpet guys and roofers came we had a rain storm, and the turbine must have rusted open, because it was dripping in the middle of the living room. It's the only time that didn't bother me at all, because it was only for one day-the dog sure got a kick out of it.

TheJenners
Jul. 24, 2012, 04:30 PM
Ditto scraping the ceiling. Man that popcorn holds stenches horribly, and not to mention ages the house.

FWIW, I used Sherwin Williams for all my paint needs when I repainted my pink (interior) house. Awesome coverage, and they hold crazy sales a couple times a year. Generally 30 percent. But I just bought ALL the paint for the outside to get painted at 40 percent off yesterday, only cost $440 for 10 gallons of body and three gallons of trim, talk about a savings! And I went with the one a step below Duration, which is what I painted inside. One coat, smooth coverage (over horrid dark colors), looks fantastic.

HydroPHILE
Jul. 24, 2012, 04:58 PM
So we are tearing out all the carpet and we are scraping the ceilings and having them retextured for sure, but what to do about the years of HEAVY cigarette smoking on the walls? Should I wash them with bleach water and then prime, or can I just wash and then paint?

Hey look! I know what to do!

You go to the hardware store or home improvement store, and you buy a large box of TSP cleaner. It's a powder, and it's found in the paint section with thinners, etc.

You mix up the solution, and you use it to get the tar and crud off your wall. Allow it to dry, and then paint with Kilz odor-blocker and stain-blocker primer, and then paint your new color.

Want to know how I know?

Stupid, irresponsible former tenants that lived downstairs. No wonder they always had dim lighting in their apartment. It's not JUST the smell you have to worry about. It's also the tar and other residues left on the walls. If not scrubbed properly, the primer and paint will not stick to the walls. No matter what quality paint you have, within a few years, it will peel.

I went back and scrubbed it one final time which isn't shown in the first picture, but you get the idea:

http://i1064.photobucket.com/albums/u361/farmliving/Downstairs/wallprogress.jpg

Before TSP:

http://i1064.photobucket.com/albums/u361/farmliving/Downstairs/wall3-1.jpg

ReSomething
Jul. 24, 2012, 06:57 PM
I remember scrubbing for what seemed like days to get the ceiling prepped in an old doublewide. Wasn't a whole lot we could do about the faux wood paneling except tear it off and put up new, which was deemed too pricey. Get rid of the carpet, the window coverings and wash or wash and repaint every surface. Hydrophile, those pics are :eek:.

Ozonator huh? I need to check one of those out.

Heinz 57
Jul. 24, 2012, 10:12 PM
Yay! Congrats!!

We just closed last week on our place, nearly a month past what it was originally set to be, $4000 more down than anticipated, but with a fabulous 3.75% rate. We're looking forward to getting our keys next week when the seller moves out.

Good luck!

HydroPHILE
Jul. 25, 2012, 09:24 AM
Hydrophile, those pics are :eek:.



There are so many more that are equally as disgusting including the fluorescent light fixture literally FILLED with dead bugs. There are benefits to a "hands-off" landlord (one that collects rent and has a handyman come out and do repairs but never stops by) and then, obviously, there are some serious issues to a "hands-off" landlord.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 25, 2012, 11:32 AM
I already have a box of TSP!

TSP vs Spic and Span. Mmmm. Maybe both!

China Doll
Jul. 25, 2012, 02:29 PM
Any ballpark idea what redoing insulation in an attic costs? Attic footprint is probably 1500 sq feet. Our current home had been redone by the previous owners, so I have no idea. Just curious.

Anything you do like this for energy efficiancy check with utility company 1st. They offer rebates on many items but sometimes need to inspect before replacing things like insulation to see that it wasn't enough.

As someone asked before is this the place that didn't accept your offer and then came back later?

Guin
Jul. 25, 2012, 03:08 PM
Where I live, NSTAR (the utility company) will come to your house for free and do an "energy audit." They look at things like appliances, water heaters, windows, your attic, etc., and give you a free evaluation of what you can do to improve your house's energy efficiency.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jul. 25, 2012, 03:10 PM
As someone asked before is this the place that didn't accept your offer and then came back later?

Yes, this is an acreage we offered on end of May and then again on after our house sold in June. The seller's agent approached ours last week. Which was great because we WERE going to buy a house in town last Sat. We weren't able to find anything to rent with 2 dobermans.

Calamber
Jul. 26, 2012, 06:06 PM
I already have a box of TSP!

TSP vs Spic and Span. Mmmm. Maybe both!

TSP kills mold and mildew too. Very important.

Congratulations, I hope you love every minute of it, well all except the inspection and loan portion. If you love worrying, you will find plenty.