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Mosey_2003
Jul. 19, 2012, 12:19 PM
So, my beautiful alfalfa we put up Monday is wet :mad: Not all of it, but around 1/4 of the bales were packed too tight and heavy. Can I salvage this in any way? One of my truckers (farmer) suggested throwing salt on it to make it dry faster, would that actually work? Could it dry out without molding if I cut them open and fanned the flakes out? I'm *not* pleased. It's not the money really as the guy I bought it from isn't a bad guy and will reimburse me, it's the fact that I'm not sure I can find more hay of decent quality and using cubes isn't going to be any fun at all if I have to do that...

Tamara? Anybody?

D Taylor
Jul. 19, 2012, 12:27 PM
Not really. Salting after baling is a poor preservative.

Acid as it is going thru the baler helps.

If not too many of them cut open and spread out a bit

TrueColours
Jul. 19, 2012, 12:43 PM
My vote is no as well :(

For the wet(ter) bales as we are unloading, they get put aside and broken open and spread in 1 or 2 empty stalls and used up first. Ive had 20-30-40 bales that Ive done that with and as long as they are totally shaken and fluffed, there is very little to no wastage as the air can get to every part of them

If I run out of room, I bring the remaining bales into the barn, break open every single string and allow them to "relax" and aerate in the barn. I may lose some of the bales, but they wont heat and be at risk of combusting

Good luck - with hay being short the way it is, the last thing on earth you want to do is throw away ANYTHING!

Mosey_2003
Jul. 19, 2012, 12:52 PM
Luckily I did set most of the heavier ones aside as I'm not in great shape and didn't want to throw them up to the third tier. I have enough room so that if it really is just 10 or 15 I should be able to spread them out open. I gotta say, I'm more than a little heartbroken :(

Tamara in TN
Jul. 19, 2012, 03:42 PM
I'm *not* pleased. It's not the money really as the guy I bought it from isn't a bad guy and will reimburse me, it's the fact that I'm not sure I can find more hay of decent quality and using cubes isn't going to be any fun at all if I have to do that...

Tamara? Anybody?

just find a concrete type pad in the sun,if you have one and crack them open...you can prob give them a little toss and get it dried out fair enough to feed...then sweep it into/onto a commercial tarp and feed it from there....salt will not speed with the sun can do.

Tamara

buck22
Jul. 19, 2012, 04:13 PM
[QUOTE=TrueColours;6446073
For the wet(ter) bales as we are unloading, they get put aside and broken open and spread in 1 or 2 empty stalls and used up first. Ive had 20-30-40 bales that Ive done that with and as long as they are totally shaken and fluffed, there is very little to no wastage as the air can get to every part of them[/QUOTE]
this is my experience as well, just get them opened and shook out as fast as you can and feed them first.

Mosey_2003
Jul. 19, 2012, 04:20 PM
Thanks!

Ambitious Kate
Jul. 19, 2012, 05:17 PM
Good luck. I feel for you. I hope you can spread it out on concrete or tarmac and get the most use out of it.

nashfad
Jul. 19, 2012, 11:28 PM
Man, I'd be opening those up right away and allowing them to dry on out. Then feed them first. I did that a few yrs ago when a big local grass bale field got drenched. I bought 75 bales for .50 each and I opened them and they dried and it was hay heaven around here for awhile. Better that than to loose it.

Mosey_2003
Jul. 20, 2012, 08:15 AM
Last night I got ALL of them spread out the best I could and sat cut ends up and the greenest/wet ones busted open, so here's hopin! Think I should start hunting for some more old nice grass hay too though, I didn't think this stuff was gonna be so rich! Gonna be a mix-y match-y kind of winter I think ;)

DesignerLabel
Jul. 20, 2012, 10:08 AM
I remember "back in the day" I had 100 or so bales to stack in the barn. Someone had told me to scatter salt on the ground before stacking it. That was the only year that the bottom layer had no mustiness to it. I always stack on pallets, but it seems that the bottom row is never as fresh as those higher up.

Thinking I may go back to scattering salt under the pallets...

Claddagh
Jul. 20, 2012, 10:33 AM
You could try taking the hay out into the sun and standing the bales so that the hay stems are vertical to the ground. Put salt on top and under them. No guarantees that it would make them safe to be fed but worth a shot anyway. I guess it would depend on how much moisture is in the bales.

Again, I don't know if this would do any good in your case. It may be better to open them, spread them out in the sun to dry and air out. It may or may not work. You may just have to chuck those bales altogether.

Mtn trails
Jul. 20, 2012, 06:11 PM
I remember "back in the day" I had 100 or so bales to stack in the barn. Someone had told me to scatter salt on the ground before stacking it. That was the only year that the bottom layer had no mustiness to it. I always stack on pallets, but it seems that the bottom row is never as fresh as those higher up.

Thinking I may go back to scattering salt under the pallets...

I also heard that and scattering rock salt between layers in your stack as well as on top. The salt won't hurt the horses and your hay stays fresh. However, the kind of moisture the OP is talking about I don't think salt will cure.