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View Full Version : The Perfect Eventing College Search Begins



MorganJumper848
Jul. 16, 2012, 07:13 PM
I will be applying to colleges this fall and I don't want to sacrifice my riding to go to a great school! I am looking for a college that offers an animal science degree and has eventing barns/trainers nearby. I am looking for schools outside of this list that would be good choices.

So far these are the schools I will be applying to
1.University of Wisconsin
2.University of Kentucky
3.University of Florida
4.Colorado State University
5.University of Kentucky

FitToBeTied
Jul. 16, 2012, 07:26 PM
Virginia Tech
University of Delaware

pharmgirl
Jul. 16, 2012, 07:55 PM
University of Maryland

chestnutwithchrome
Jul. 16, 2012, 08:30 PM
U.C. Davis

deltawave
Jul. 16, 2012, 08:36 PM
I don't want to sacrifice my riding to go to a great school

Why? What do you mean by "sacrifice your riding"? What do you mean by a "great school" and why are these mutually exclusive? :confused: Do you have career goals, aspirations, a job-focused major planned, academic strengths? What do you hope to accomplish in college? Why are you going to college?

(not asking this as anything other than a semi-rhetorical exercise in focusing the question properly)

AKB
Jul. 16, 2012, 08:37 PM
University of Maryland, College Park. If you live at the University View apartments, you will be very close to the Animal Science building. You can park In the secured apartment garage and easily drive off to the barn at the end of the day. There are lots of events in Maryland.

If you want to go to vet school, UMD has high acceptance rates.

MorganJumper848
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:00 PM
Why? What do you mean by "sacrifice your riding"? What do you mean by a "great school" and why are these mutually exclusive? :confused: Do you have career goals, aspirations, a job-focused major planned, academic strengths? What do you hope to accomplish in college? Why are you going to college?

(not asking this as anything other than a semi-rhetorical exercise in focusing the question properly)

I mean that I don't want to go to school somewhere that doesn't have any trainers around that I can work with. I want to still be able to compete and train my 5 year old. I do have plans to do animal science and then I would like to go to vet school.

MorganJumper848
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:01 PM
University of Maryland, College Park. If you live at the University View apartments, you will be very close to the Animal Science building. You can park In the secured apartment garage and easily drive off to the barn at the end of the day. There are lots of events in Maryland.

If you want to go to vet school, UMD has high acceptance rates.

Thanks for the info! I appreciate it!

LightningHorse
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:02 PM
Clemson University. They have an eventing team, and some very good trainers, as well as an animal science program.

faybe
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:11 PM
Off the beaten path- but I rode 2 horses throughout college (helped start my school's eventing team!), competed as much as I could afford, was in a sorority and other extracurriculars, made good grades and LOVED my college experience... at a tiny liberal arts school in southwest VA. There was no animal science program, but that's not a pre-requisite for vet school (I got into vet school on my first application cycle and felt very prepared by my college education once I got there). Go somewhere where you will excel, where you will have new experiences and where you will learn what you need, and the rest will fall into place. For me that was at W&L (Washington and Lee University in Lexington, VA), for you it might be Fordham or Franklin and Marshall or Centre or a dozen other small colleges around the country. I have nothing against state schools, but I had such an incredible experience at a small school I can't help offering it up there when these types of threads come up. Good luck!

ThoroughbredFancy
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:23 PM
I don't know what their program looks like nowadays but UNH (University of New Hampshire).

AKB
Jul. 16, 2012, 09:34 PM
Although an Animal Science major is certainly not a prerequisite for vet school, I think it helps. A good state school with an animal science program often offers a lot of research opportunities for students. My daughter helped with poultry reproduction behavior research. Her research experience looked good on her vet school applications. By the time my daughter went to vet school, she had a lot of animal experience from her animal science classes. It is good to feel comfortable with dairy cattle, beef, sheep, pigs, and other species, even if you plan to work in an equine practice.

If you are brilliant, with near perfect grades and test scores, you can be admitted with any major. If your grades are good but not perfect, it helps to have a lot of hours of experience with different species and with a variety of research projects.

Debbie
Jul. 16, 2012, 10:06 PM
University of Georgia or Auburn University. Both have strong animal science programs and excellent vet schools. In addition they both have good proximity to competitions and good trainers.

I may lose my UGA alum cred by saying this, but Auburn has a much nicer large animal facility and I would expect less expensive boarding.

secretariat
Jul. 16, 2012, 10:50 PM
Otterbein and/or Ohio State, then Ohio State vet school. We have friends who coach/teach at Otterbein and several of our vets are Ohio State grads.

Georgetown (KY) is an excellent small school (great academics) just a few miles north of Lexington, with obviously the same trainer/venue access.

As a UK grad, I'm glad to see you list us twice. It's only appropriate for the horse capital of the world.

Fergs
Jul. 16, 2012, 11:47 PM
Also look at CSU and U Penn, which doesn't have an animal science department but a great vet school...and you can't do any better than being within commuting distance of Unionville.

RoyalTRider
Jul. 17, 2012, 12:02 AM
What do the five (four?) you've chosen have in common that draws you to them? There is an endless list of schools that fit the criteria in your posts, which might be good or might just feel overwhelming (it did for me!).

I would suggest that you ask other questions first (of course, you may have already), because you can make eventing work at many, many different colleges. What schools fit your big criteria? What can you reasonably afford to pay in tuition and living expenses? Do you feel just as comfortable going to a school of 25,000+ as you do a school of fewer than 5,000? Are you the kind of person who needs to get into a city every so often and wouldn't be happy in a very rural area? How do the schools rank in terms of other factors that are important to you, such as student involvement, excellence in a certain academic area, etc? From there, you can find a great fit where you can also pursue your eventing goals.

Besides good access to eventing and an animal science program, what else are you looking for that would make it easier to suggest good fits?

Eventingjunkie
Jul. 17, 2012, 12:20 AM
West Chester University - smaller school in Pennsylvania probably closer to more eventing trainers than any other school. Why is it never mentioned?

http://www.wcupa.edu/

Peggy
Jul. 17, 2012, 12:31 AM
In order to figure out what sort of college (large? small? state? private? rural? urban? etc?) might be a good fit, go to a few campuses that you can get to easily that fit into the various slots. Not necessarily to see if you want to attend that particular college, but a college like it. Might help to narrow the search.

Sort of like trying to decide if you might want to buy a green horse by riding someone else's green horse that isn't for sale and may not even be trained in your desired discipline.

EquestrianRunner
Jul. 17, 2012, 07:35 AM
I don't have any college advise, but I would make sure you do/try to "test ride" with the trainer(s) at the college before you attend because it would SUCK MAJORLY (learned that the hard way) if you got to your dream school, had big hopes to ride with XXX trainer and then you and XXX trainer don't mesh.....

good luck!!!! if you end up at Univ of MD can you keep me posted as to how you like it? I am looking there but wouldn't be headed there for another couple years -- currently at community college..

pheasantknoll
Jul. 17, 2012, 09:46 AM
is in Minneapolis, has a great equine program in vet school, am assuming they have animal science. Several event trainers in the area, especially west of the Twin Cities. Come to Area IV

PKN

piaffequeen
Jul. 17, 2012, 09:57 AM
There are a number of colleges near Lexington, VA-and the horse center. Also Hollins college is nearby. As far as a trainer-Caroline Atherholt (Dowd) is about 30 minutes south of the VA Horse Center. She has some students that go to Hollins.

oldpony66
Jul. 17, 2012, 10:01 AM
West Chester University - smaller school in Pennsylvania probably closer to more eventing trainers than any other school. Why is it never mentioned?

http://www.wcupa.edu/

Taking my DD on a visit there this summer! It has a great reputation in the state system AND is in the middle of all things eventing. She is also looking at pre-professional (dentistry) programs. Did you go there??? I would love an insider's perspective.

I've got to chuckle... "smaller" = 15,000 students? I went to a school with less than 2000 students so anything over 5000 seems large to me :lol: but I guess compared to Penn State or one of those schools it is small-er.

faybe
Jul. 17, 2012, 10:02 AM
There are a number of colleges near Lexington, VA-and the horse center. Also Hollins college is nearby. As far as a trainer-Caroline Atherholt (Dowd) is about 30 minutes south of the VA Horse Center. She has some students that go to Hollins.

Gammon Nuckols is also in Lexington. She is awesome for the lower levels and hauls out to ride with Sharon White herself. She is also good about bringing in clinicians and shows all over Area II.

Eventingjunkie
Jul. 21, 2012, 12:14 PM
Taking my DD on a visit there this summer! It has a great reputation in the state system AND is in the middle of all things eventing. She is also looking at pre-professional (dentistry) programs. Did you go there??? I would love an insider's perspective.

I've got to chuckle... "smaller" = 15,000 students? I went to a school with less than 2000 students so anything over 5000 seems large to me :lol: but I guess compared to Penn State or one of those schools it is small-er.

No insider's perspective. My kid will not be sidetracked in her life long goals to make a living as well as compete on the U.S. team. After lots of research and phone calls, West Chester was one of the strongest contenders. Good academics, very reasonable out of state tuition, lots of nearby high quality trainers, plenty of horse trials within three hours or less, beautiful countryside, and only a little over an hour from home. I'm baffled why college bound eventers don't consider it.
However, my daughter has chosen Hartpury in England for the quality of training and competitions as well as their interesting curriculum. Tuition at Hartpury is much cheaper than out-of-state tuition, but getting the horse over will be the big expense. I will miss her, but look forward to her spreading her wings!

Kelbelle21
Jul. 21, 2012, 12:47 PM
I second Auburn and UGA, both have excellent programs. I'm not sure where you're located but also take into consideration out of state tuition along with board etc. etc. the expenses can add up quickly!

Sempiternal
Jul. 21, 2012, 01:49 PM
Also which specific college are you planning on attending. Saying the University of whatever state is still fairly broad. I know the University of Wisconsin - River Falls has horse majors, but I believe UW Madison has a more broad animal science major. They both have riding teams. Then there is UW LaCrosse, Eau Claire, Milwaukee, Waukesha (more of a two year school), etc.

Each college offers different things and may or may not be located in a horsey area.

Erin Pittman
Jul. 21, 2012, 02:46 PM
I grew up in Colorado and went to Colorado State University (majored in Equine Science). I don't know what the eventing scene is like there as I wasn't into it back then - hopefully others can comment. Their Equine Science program is good, though, and they've put more emphasis recently on business which is a very good thing.

I taught in University of Maryland's equine program for 10 years (taught my last class this past spring semester) and they have an excellent pre-vet program in their Animal Science department. In my Equine Reproduction course this past spring, there were 7 or 8 students who were accepted into vet schools around the country - all of them that applied got in. Many also go on to graduate school. I think the acceptance rate to vet school is somewhere around 80% coming out of that program - VERY good. College Park itself is a little....meh.... but you're surrounded by a ton of events and lots of great eventing coaches. Good luck in your search.

kcrubin
Jul. 21, 2012, 04:09 PM
The University of Georgia is building a brand new teaching hospital Debbie! That being said, I agree that a small school is better especially for the first 2 years.

eventingVOL
Jul. 21, 2012, 05:12 PM
I think someone mentioned this already, but don't forget to consider tuition/living expenses of the various schools you're considering as well as their scholarship opportunities. As a current vet student, I'm here to tell you that vet school is definitely NOT cheap and saving as much money as you can while still getting a quality undergrad education should definitely be high on your priority list. :-) Good luck with everything!

oldpony66
Jul. 21, 2012, 05:53 PM
No insider's perspective. My kid will not be sidetracked in her life long goals to make a living as well as compete on the U.S. team. After lots of research and phone calls, West Chester was one of the strongest contenders. Good academics, very reasonable out of state tuition, lots of nearby high quality trainers, plenty of horse trials within three hours or less, beautiful countryside, and only a little over an hour from home. I'm baffled why college bound eventers don't consider it.
However, my daughter has chosen Hartpury in England for the quality of training and competitions as well as their interesting curriculum. Tuition at Hartpury is much cheaper than out-of-state tuition, but getting the horse over will be the big expense. I will miss her, but look forward to her spreading her wings!

Thanks E-J! Our kids have quite different goals so the academics is running ahead of eventing for my daughter but she doesn't want to give it up entirely.
How exciting to go to England WITH your horse for college! I hope your daughter is bowing down to worship you for giving her that opportunity :yes: Good luck to her!

Eventingjunkie
Jul. 21, 2012, 10:27 PM
I hope your daughter is bowing down to worship you for giving her that opportunity :yes: Good luck to her!

Oh, she definitely is...but is reluctant about selling her other wonderful horse to pay the transportation for her younger one. It is hard to say goodbye to such a great horse.

Good luck to your daughter as well. Let us know what school she chooses in the end and why.

reay6790
Jul. 21, 2012, 11:18 PM
Mississippi State...boarding my horse at an eventing barn 10 min from campus, ads major, allying to msu's vet school this year :)

eventingismylife
Jul. 21, 2012, 11:36 PM
I was in the same boat. Looking for a school with some sort of an eventing scene, a good Pre Vet program, and an equestrian team.

UM Western also has a block schedule so you do one class at a time for 18 days, and then you are done with that class. It is much easier to focus on one class at a time instead of 4-5 classes. They have an awesome science department, and have a very high exceptance rate into vet and med schools.

Dillon is a very small town, but it is close to Missoula and Bozeman which have good sized eventing communities. They also have a very good equestrian team, and will be adding a new ass. coach to the team that is one of the bigger names in eventing here in MT.

tres grey
Jul. 22, 2012, 10:05 AM
I third Auburn or UGA! Being an Auburn alum and having spent a summer in Athens, both areas are quite strong, although I'd say UGA has a tiny advantage over AU because of proximity to more events and trainers. I think Georgia is just more Eventing focused anyways over Alabama. Both have fantastic animal science programs, though Auburn's facilities are much nicer. I have friends from Atlanta that choose to take their horses to Auburn than UGA because of their services and facilities.

UGA is close to Pine Top, Chatt Hills & Aiken. Theres a really great Advanced rider that teaches over there... though I forget her name. Athens is a great town. Lots to do! Huge farming culture over there so the food is to die for! Fun little boutiques. Great nightlife :) and the town is large enough to accommodate different groups of people.

Auburn is close to Poplar & Chatt Hills. Susan Wainwright/Annie Aul are 45 minutes to an hour away just outside Montgomery. Many great places to board just 10-15 minutes from school. Auburn is best described as a large school with a small family feel. Everyone is very friendly, and I had an absolute blast there. Auburn has more of a homogenous student body... The majority come from southern, conservative backgrounds. Downtown is really cute and is growing! I could be out walking by myself at 2 AM and feel completely safe there.

All of that said, you can't beat going to school in the SEC! Best of luck!