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Jumpmuncher123
Jul. 15, 2012, 07:41 PM
Help. I wa uncerimoniously dragged, kicking and screaming out of hunterland and into a hunter pace. Then my friend decided since that went well, that we should do an event (my horse has event training, im just coasting). Well the bug bit. Im sunk. I dont know how i found endless, calm, line diagonal line diagonal courses ina ring sustaining. Now i crave a strong gallop in a field accompanied by a shoulder in. I guess im stuck. (which isnt a bad thing... ;D )
Anyways, what do you wish you knew before you started eventing? Thanks! PS, you guys have WAY to much fun :)

ss3777
Jul. 15, 2012, 08:18 PM
1.that you actually can get stadium time faults ;) First event ever, I took the lovely hunter route, nice round corners, made the most of the ring.....etc etc. OOOPS.....time faults!

2. If you practice dressage.......it will get better! Somehow avoiding it does not = a score below 30....who knew?

3.The more you walk your courses........the smaller the fences become:)

HAVE FUN!!!!

Jumpmuncher123
Jul. 15, 2012, 09:43 PM
Haha, thank you, i will keep that in mind :)

retreadeventer
Jul. 15, 2012, 11:37 PM
To ride a horse on the bit....

Blugal
Jul. 15, 2012, 11:49 PM
That you don't have to walk right up to the ditch/trakehner/maximum oxer [insert scary fence here] - or if you do, you only have to do it once. It will look smaller when you are approaching it on course!

Also... wait for the bell in dressage - and if you hear a bell go off during your test (if there are multiple rings), keep going unless the judge makes you stop. It's no fun screwing up your test because the bell from the ring beside you was rung!

lizathenag
Jul. 15, 2012, 11:59 PM
As long as your horse is sound at the end of the day, you don't really have anything to be unhappy about.

just stuff to work on.

deltawave
Jul. 16, 2012, 12:23 AM
Horses don't always stay sound for years and years. :lol: That was my lifelong experience until about the last 2 years . . . now I can't seem to keep any of them foursquare for more than a few months at a time! :rolleyes: :p :lol:

mg
Jul. 16, 2012, 12:24 AM
Warm-up fences are flagged with the red and white flags. Do NOT jump them "backwards"!

Welcome to the "dark side"! Many of us wandered here from h/j land, so you are in good company :)

Carol Ames
Jul. 16, 2012, 12:36 AM
find someone to help at events; there are situations which, require two hands:lol:! find a horse holder:winkgrin:also find someone to set jumps for you when schooling;); it's easier on your horse;) as well as on you!

lstevenson
Jul. 16, 2012, 01:38 AM
Help. I wa uncerimoniously dragged, kicking and screaming out of hunterland and into a hunter pace. Then my friend decided since that went well, that we should do an event (my horse has event training, im just coasting). Well the bug bit. Im sunk. I dont know how i found endless, calm, line diagonal line diagonal courses ina ring sustaining. Now i crave a strong gallop in a field accompanied by a shoulder in. I guess im stuck. (which isnt a bad thing... ;D )



Welcome to the dark side :)



http://www.MyVirtualEventingCoach.com
Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/My.Virtual.Eventing.Coach)

NSRider
Jul. 16, 2012, 01:57 AM
As long as your horse is sound at the end of the day, you don't really have anything to be unhappy about.

just stuff to work on.

This
x100

add - sound rider and a sound horse ;)

phoebetrainer
Jul. 16, 2012, 04:26 AM
You don't need a trainer watching your every move.
If you have a start time, that's the time you need to be in the ring.
There are lots of friendly people who will hold your horse, leg you up, tell you the bogey fences, wish you luck - do the same for them.
Smile.

Jumpmuncher123
Jul. 16, 2012, 08:01 AM
Thank you! Im very exited about this new adventure. :) and thanks for the tips and advice, everything is good to know or be reminded of.

cranky
Jul. 16, 2012, 12:40 PM
* Always give yourself more time than you'll think you'll need.
* It's never a mistake to walk your course one more time (unless it's going to interfere with the above).

Blugal
Jul. 16, 2012, 01:46 PM
* Always give yourself more time than you'll think you'll need.
* It's never a mistake to walk your course one more time (unless it's going to interfere with the above).

I think I need these tatooed on my arm!!

smay
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:09 PM
..to check the omnibus several times to make sure you are doing the right dressage test!!!!!!!!

PrinceSheik325
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:21 PM
Always give yourself at least 20 minutes more time than you think you will need. Unlike in h/j land, you can't change around your start times at the last minute.

Never try to go to an event by yourself or with someone who can't handle helping you with your horse. It's nearly impossible to do an event by yourself.

Expect to travel for shows a lot more than you used to, but also take full advantage of any non-rated local ht's/ct's. These are great for schooling and building confidence.

Do not be afraid of a less than "perfect" distance to a jump...especially in stadium. You may find that riding your horse to a shorter distance decreases his likelihood to knock a pole. While it may not look as pretty, at the end of the day, fewer faults = better outcome.

GotSpots
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:30 PM
Anyways, what do you wish you knew before you started eventing? Thanks! You can use the ice that's keeping your beer cold to soak your horse's feet after XC.

RAyers
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:39 PM
being nervous and even a bit fearful is good! Also, beer puke doesn't stain a bay. Just lean farther out in the gallops between fences.

Drinking after XC is allowable, no matter the time of day. My record is 8:15am after an awesome 8am prelim go.

I will contradict PrinceSheik325 and say go by yourself! I started that way and met so many good people. I have run up to a CIC** by myself.

Your role, unlike what is encouraged in the h/j world, is to be your horse's advocate. I have argued with my trainer in a pouring rain in the schooling area about riding. If you are not ready nor confident, DON'T. You are your horse's voice.

Carried Away
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:45 PM
[QUOTE=Never try to go to an event by yourself or with someone who can't handle helping you with your horse. It's nearly impossible to do an event by yourself.
QUOTE]

It's definitely possible to do an event on your own, just a little harder. Besides, you will make eventer friends who can help you if you really need it. :)

When I first started out, I wish someone had told me...

closest to optimum time on XC breaks a tie

always check out where the start and finish flags are, because they aren't always placed in a logical way

read the rulebook, there are many many many more ways to get the big E than you might think!

Have fun and welcome!

PrinceSheik325
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:47 PM
I will contradict PrinceSheik325 and say go by yourself! I started that way and met so many good people. I have run up to a CIC** by myself.

RAyers - now THAT is impressive! Kudos to you for being organized enough to go by yourself. I would never survive on my own, but I bet you did meet some awesome people that way.

nextyear
Jul. 16, 2012, 02:55 PM
Don't trust friends to remind you that the halt is at X or G read the test for yourself!

FitToBeTied
Jul. 16, 2012, 03:27 PM
I wish someone had told me that the stadium time listed on your times is most often a myth. If things go off schedule at the in gate, as they do more often than not, you become pretty much a jumper show at that point. You have to keep checking in to make sure you know where you are.

My first event I went up and checked in at stadium ten minutes before my time. and went to do some warm-up and then came back to the in gate to find I still had a forty minute wait.

I was at one event and the PA kept calling for Novice riders at Stadium since training was an hour ahead of schedule. So we went over, only to find that we had an hour since the training division was't done in dressage yet. I asked the person managing the warm-up/ check-in how could training stadium be an hour ahead when training dressage was 30 minutes behind. Only an answer you can get in the horse world "because we don't have any training horses waiting."

Horse people and numbers are two things that never go together.


I'd like to say that is rare but its been pretty much every event.

Cameraine
Jul. 16, 2012, 03:31 PM
Your horse doesn't need to jump like a hunter to get it done. It just needs to get over the fence, be clean and safe doing it.

Always have an extra medical armband in the trailer/truck somewhere. Inevitably yours will go missing right before xc.

If the event is 4+ hrs from home and you are the only driver stay overnight. Don't risk yourself and your horse driving back exhausted.

And Gorilla tape can cover up a lot of sins.

yellowbritches
Jul. 16, 2012, 04:01 PM
Your role, unlike what is encouraged in the h/j world, is to be your horse's advocate. I have argued with my trainer in a pouring rain in the schooling area about riding. If you are not ready nor confident, DON'T. You are your horse's voice.
I second this, strongly. I got a little "feedback" about opting not to run my horse xc a few weeks ago after I gave him a horrid ride in stadium. He deserved better of me and I wasn't going to chance "snapping out" of whatever horrible funk I was in at fixed fences. Thankfully, the coach, after confirming I was sure that was what I wanted to do, was on board.

The BIGGEST thing I wish someone had told me (or really made me understand) was how awesome this sport is. Had I known how much my first horse and I were going to love it, how many awesome people I would meet, and just how ridiculously fun, challenging, and satisfying this sport is, I would have come over AGES before I did!!! :yes:

yellowbritches
Jul. 16, 2012, 04:03 PM
Oh. No, I have a second biggest thing...SIT THE HELL STILL!!! I do not need to jump for my horse, and, in fact, jumping ahead is VERY, VERY bad. Getting left is a GOOD thing. If you're going to move your shoulders, move them to the back. Never, ever to the front.

XC is equitation. You want to be safe, but you definitely don't have to equitate. :yes:

PrinceSheik325
Jul. 16, 2012, 04:04 PM
The BIGGEST thing I wish someone had told me (or really made me understand) was how awesome this sport is. Had I known how much my first horse and I were going to love it, how many awesome people I would meet, and just how ridiculously fun, challenging, and satisfying this sport is, I would have come over AGES before I did!!! :yes:

Amen to that.

Corky
Jul. 16, 2012, 05:03 PM
What I have learned/wish I knew...

No one cares about the 'correct' way to tie a stock - just put a pin in it and put a coat on, you look fine.

Electrical or Duct tape is the best way to snazz up your gallop boots on a budget.

There are no points for pretty. Spend time memorizing your test and double checking your packing list, not on your braids.

White is never white, just aim for the fewest amount of stains possible. This applies to horses, saddle pads, breeches, gloves, etc.

Keep your heels down and your shoulders up - you'll survive anything.

Failing that, kick your stirrups, duck and roll!

Ask the dressage steward what sound is used in your ring, like a bell, whistle etc. Don't get mixed up! And even if you screw up a movement in a test, don't get flustered. Riding the wrong movement is like a run-out on stadium; it sucks but its not a deal breaker. I turned the wrong way down centre line and still won my division once. Keep calm, figure out how you messed up, fix it and continue.

Above all else...

Keep calm and kick on! :D

mg
Jul. 16, 2012, 06:15 PM
Always have an extra medical armband in the trailer/truck somewhere. Inevitably yours will go missing right before xc.

x2!!

OnePerfectRide
Jul. 18, 2012, 01:43 AM
Read the rulebook!

Check your scores as soon as possible after your rides. You have a limited amount of time to contest them if there's an error.

At my first HT, I got pinned with major XC faults because the rider before me had a fall and someone got confused. Today, I would have been eliminated for that, but I caught it and got it cleared up quickly.

Carol Ames
Jul. 19, 2012, 10:43 AM
Write down your final scores regardless of where you finish; a top 10/ 20 finish is still good, ribbon or no ribbon; I had won my first time out;) and had top three finishes the rest of that year, my first, but, when I moved up to prelim/ training and was no longer top 3 I quit caring and stopped checking except at he three days, where we got a "day sheet:cool:" with placings; but, at novice and training, I stopped checking unless we were
in the top three;) and it was someone else' horse :lol:

Carol Ames
Jul. 19, 2012, 10:51 AM
Do not allow a low score:sadsmile::mad:/ less than stellar dressage test :mad: ruin or lessen your enjoyment of XC; love every minute of it:yes: It can all be gone in an instant:eek::cry:

Justa Bob
Jul. 20, 2012, 01:45 PM
If you have a start time, that's the time you need to be in the ring.

In our neck of the woods the start time in the omnibus can mean nothing...often the times change the morning of and during the event -- always keep an ear out for last minute changes. Really aggravating.

ICE. Bring lots of ice in case the venue runs out.

Make fun your priority -- enjoying the whole escapade seems to get pushed to the back with the nerves and tunnel vision unfairly elbowing in to first place.

Breathing helps too.

SwampYankee
Jul. 20, 2012, 02:06 PM
Warm-up fences are flagged with the red and white flags. Do NOT jump them "backwards"!

Welcome to the "dark side"! Many of us wandered here from h/j land, so you are in good company :)

THIS! ^ I got "gated" once that way too--and was I ever mad, because I'd just WON THE DRESSAGE!!! :eek:

(You Only Make THAT Mistake ONCE!)

Cameraine
Jul. 20, 2012, 02:50 PM
THIS! ^ I got "gated" once that way too--and was I ever mad, because I'd just WON THE DRESSAGE!!! :eek:

(You Only Make THAT Mistake ONCE!)


Was at one of my first schooling trials by myself when (Like they do at h/j shows) I jumped a xc jump backwards. A kindly rider informed me I wasn't supposed to do that. Thankfully no one else saw me do it, and I thanked the rider for her help.

Nomini
Jul. 20, 2012, 06:37 PM
FINISH FLAGS on XC! Know where they are, especially if they involve a slight turn. I treat them like the final jump. Nothing worse than the euphoric "oh my god I got around XC and I'm alive!" thought only to be eliminated 30 seconds later. Don't ask me how I know this.