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Emily&Jake
Jul. 8, 2012, 11:45 PM
Anyone out there (gamers especially) tie their horses to the trailer with tiedowns?

Just clip the end of it from the saddle to the trailer? I seen people do it before and have done it once or twice before, myself, until I was told I should not tie my horse by the tie down.

Any reason why? I see it just like a halter. A lot easier to break than a halter, too, depending on what it's made from. Is it because there is no throat latch? So it could easily slip over a horses' head?

Thanks for the input! Just curious!

Emily

Bluey
Jul. 9, 2012, 02:33 AM
Never seen it done and it does seem like a harebrained idea.

Always tie with a halter.

The damage a wild acting horse can do to itself by being properly tied so it doesn't get loose is much less than a loose horse can to to itself, other horses, humans and all other out there it may run into or over.:eek:

gaitedincali
Jul. 9, 2012, 04:17 AM
Every team roping I've ever been to in CA and AZ has had a line of horses tied to the arena fence by their tie-downs while their owners socialize (aka get as drunk as it is possible to get and still throw straight :lol:)

I never did it - my horses always fit firmly in the really dumb and/or green category, I hate replacing good tack, and I always tie hard and fast and never want the horse to get the idea that he can break free when tied.

And then there's the problem that if you take the bridle off, and the horse breaks the noseband, the horse is totally naked and a bit harder to catch then a horse with a halter on - the only real difference I can see between tying with the tie-down vs. tying to easily broken twine or string which is SOP for tying in many circles.

Up to you, OP, but I still wouldn't do it.

Bluey
Jul. 9, 2012, 06:59 AM
Oh, so it is a regional thing then.
At least it is marginally better than tying with the reins.:yes:

goeslikestink
Jul. 9, 2012, 07:19 AM
Anyone out there (gamers especially) tie their horses to the trailer with tiedowns?

Just clip the end of it from the saddle to the trailer? I seen people do it before and have done it once or twice before, myself, until I was told I should not tie my horse by the tie down.

Any reason why? I see it just like a halter. A lot easier to break than a halter, too, depending on what it's made from. Is it because there is no throat latch? So it could easily slip over a horses' head?

Thanks for the input! Just curious!

Emily

unless you want your harmed or dead then dont do it

always use a halter and lead rope

people in uk use a bit of baling twine and thread it through the fixture ring thats attached either inside or out side of a trailer or horsebox
they then thread the lead rope through the baling twine loop
and do a quick release knot

haynets are tied directly to the fixture and again one wouldnt be tieing the horse to a haynet as its just as dangerous

a horse can break its neck trying to escape likewise if the rope is to long the horse can get tangled in to rope and again harm himself trying to escape

its how you have or persons before you have trained the horse in question a relaxed calm horse is less likely to want to escape even if there was a commontion on nearby

helping horses to relax- haynet, having a rug available for the type of weather for the competition, having water available if none take some

having a haynet during transit, and travel gear. can be rug travel boots and tail guard or just tial guard and boots depending on weather

giving the horse proper rest periods between classes and proper warm up before classes

always plan your day ahead of time dont rush take your time allowing time for traffic and parking once there plus entering
as the more times you rush the more likely you have forgotten something and more likely your horse will be upset to - as they feel you vibes if your tense they are tense and will more likely show this by being on there toes and hard to handle both ridden or on the ground and thus would be more likely to have a panic at something just because you was late and highly likely to be a plum when tied, or loading unloading

think before you go--

tip if you are tied to a box with your tack on, and waiting for next class
undo girth a couple of holes, runs stirrups up and places the reins around his neck so it loops over his head and out of the way place head collar over the bridle and then tie him up to the box

if eventing waiting for next eliment change you boots /bandages if you have entered any water as they constrict when wet and will cause the horse sores on his legs
always take spares boots and bandages and gamagee for bandages never bandage directly on to the legs without something underneath

SuckerForHorses
Jul. 9, 2012, 08:23 AM
Tying like that is not going to kill your horse, as suggested by the poster above. A tie down is flimsier than a halter, so basically will act as a breakaway halter if tied by this. Unless of course you have a nylon tie down headstall, then obviously this won't break as easy as the leather.

I see nothing wrong with this, as long as you realize that if your horse does pull back, you'll be replacing your tiedown headstall and possibly the connection piece.

I would not tie a green horse like this, or one that tends to sit back when tied.

OveroHunter
Jul. 9, 2012, 01:58 PM
Tying like that is not going to kill your horse, as suggested by the poster above. A tie down is flimsier than a halter, so basically will act as a breakaway halter if tied by this. Unless of course you have a nylon tie down headstall, then obviously this won't break as easy as the leather.

I see nothing wrong with this, as long as you realize that if your horse does pull back, you'll be replacing your tiedown headstall and possibly the connection piece.

I would not tie a green horse like this, or one that tends to sit back when tied.

I'm with you on this one. It's definitely not for tying a green horse, but if I were in a pinch, I would have no issue tying my been there done that trail horse with it as long as it's leather and not nylon. It's basically a break away halter.

Emily&Jake
Jul. 10, 2012, 02:26 AM
Thanks for the opinions everyone!

I was the under the same impression that it would break easier than a halter if for some reason horse spooked/pulled back, etc.

I've only ever done it twice in the past year. ;) This thread was merely just a curiosity thing.

My horse isn't green, nor does he pull back when tied. In fact, the only time he got loose at the rodeo grounds (which actually happened yesterday) was when he wasn't tied. My friend was holding onto his reins and he took off to find me and she had to let him go.

Goeslikestink: Wasn't asking for advice/tips on what to do when horse is tied, etc... Was asking about tying with tie downs. ;)

Emily

altermeup
Jul. 11, 2012, 08:32 AM
All the time, I'd un-clip my tie down strap and clip the lead on. If they run their heads they're more likely to get loose. But I haven't had an issue with that personally. At ropings it's common to either toss the rein over the fence rail or clip your rein to the tie down, then toss over the fence rail. Some don't bother bringing a halter at all, load the horses all tacked up and use the tie down as the halter.

Gnalli
Jul. 13, 2012, 06:01 AM
Tying like that is not going to kill your horse, as suggested by the poster above. A tie down is flimsier than a halter, so basically will act as a breakaway halter if tied by this. Unless of course you have a nylon tie down headstall, then obviously this won't break as easy as the leather.

I see nothing wrong with this, as long as you realize that if your horse does pull back, you'll be replacing your tiedown headstall and possibly the connection piece.

I would not tie a green horse like this, or one that tends to sit back when tied.

^^^^^this!!! Also, what is the deal with people not teaching their horses to tie and stand there? Even our baby (just turned 2) will do that. My former BM had several broke to death horses, that would NOT stand tied. Sit back, break halters, act a fool. The one that he gave my daughter then took back was a nutcase when she started working with him despite having thousands of dollars of pro training, but by gosh, he would stand tied quietly by himself until you started with the fly spray then all bets were off. He got better (probably why they took him back-free training, board etc) but he still doesn't like fly spray much.

IT IS BASIC TRAINING 101. You halter break one, then you teach it to stand tied, quietly. DO NOT TIE with a bridle, but a tie down, no problem.

Go Fish
Jul. 13, 2012, 01:13 PM
Geeez...in the olden days, we used to tie the turn back horses to the rail with the REINS! :eek:

But then, those horses would never, ever think about pulling back, either.

Crikett
Jul. 13, 2012, 03:07 PM
I do when I am roping (or at least trying to rope) but my horse knows how to tie...

rabicon
Jul. 13, 2012, 03:17 PM
It's funny though. My old barrel racer use to be a heading horse and did some other roping. He would tie great but sometimes he'd feel a little pressure on his halter then back back back he'd go. Ughhhh they always told me it was from being a roping horse and he'd feel the pressure and start to back. It was scary when he'd do it. He flipped over one time horrible. But he was ok. I don't know anything bout roping so maybe that's a lie considering all these ropers are not worried about it