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RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:01 PM
In the recent past and currently I've been seeing a lot of events, shows, dinners, fundraisers etc.. to raise money for different riders to go to big events.

These riders are not amateurs, they get paid to ride horses and give lessons and endorse products. Why should I give them (with some riders MORE money than I already give them) money to go to a show. If they are choosing to compete overseas instead of here why should I be asked to contribute?

I know that no one is holding a gun to my head asking for money but I find it arragont to ask me to front your fun. It honestly turns me off working with certain trainers when I know they have people organize these sort of charities.



Vent over

leahandpie
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:30 PM
It is about helping these riders get to the top level of our sport... nationally and internationally. It is incredibly expensive.

yellowbritches
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:31 PM
It is not "their fun." It is how they promote themselves. It's how they make a name for themselves so they can come back and get more business. It is a way to get the experience they need to have more things to teach you. It's a way to be a better rider to train your horse. It isn't fun shits and giggles. And it is SERIOUSLY expensive. I know several riders who, even with the help of these fund raisers, have maxed out credit cards and gone into quite a bit of debt to make these trips. Riders with thriving businesses at home.

Besides that, you DO NOT get the type of competition and experience here as you do over there. End of story. We have this discussion on COTH regularly. To be good (really good), you need to go.

Don't like it. Don't support. Plain and simple. But if you think they are going "just for fun" then you do not realize how expensive this sport is and how hard it can be for a lot of these riders to stay in business, let alone compete to keep themselves out there and bringing in clients.

I worked for a very good trainer for 9 years who did not have enough horse power and funding. He was very good at what he did, both as an instructor and as a trainer. It was depressing to watch his business die in the last couple of years because he could not even keep enough horse power under him to stay "out there" on the local level, let alone the national. This is brutal business. :no: Sometimes you got ask for some help.

Now MY vent is over.

leahandpie
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:35 PM
^ No kidding. You are fooling yourself if you think that trainers are making the big bucks. Most trainers have no money and they work their asses off every day because they love what they do and wouldn't have it any other way.

deltawave
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:43 PM
Well, any fund-raising that does not involve feeding the hungry, curing diseases or directly mitigating natural disasters could be considered "arrogant", I guess. You're right--nobody is holding a gun to your head. Just say no if donating is not something you want to do. But fundraising helps lubricate a whole lot of things in the horse economy, some of which even we smurfs benefit from via the trickle-down effect. :)

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:52 PM
Absolutely not required for you to participate or contribute, but you'll miss out on some fun parties, shows, dinners, and other fundraisers before you even miss out on the cool feeling you get when a rider you have some small part in helping gallops across the finish line - or heck, onto the judge at C before they ever get to go jump on purpose.

Our sport, or my sport, at least, has a cool history of competitors helping each other out, warning each other of slippery spots on course, helping each other assess how best to approach a jump, or warm up in the heat/cold/torrential rains - and helping each other improve.

Whether or not you believe a rising tide lifts all boats hardly matters. I believe that helping people I like is satisfying, so I try to do it!

RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:53 PM
I'm not implying that these riders sit around eating bon bons and riding their horses in Gucci and gold.

I do wonder though why that rider going to Germany (or wherever) is more deserving than the lady going training? Who is deserving?

RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:58 PM
Our sport, or my sport, at least, has a cool history of competitors helping each other out, warning each other of slippery spots on course, helping each other assess how best to approach a jump, or warm up in the heat/cold/torrential rains - and helping each other improve.

Whether or not you believe a rising tide lifts all boats hardly matters. I believe that helping people I like is satisfying, so I try to do it!

The things you've mentioned are very different than asking for money and to me great things!!

And for the record I have NEVER seen the person or people I am thinking of volunteering, hosting clinic for pony club or any other type of giving back with out a pay back

VicariousRider
Jul. 6, 2012, 09:59 PM
OP - I understand where your question comes from and I don't think its necessarily a place of nastiness. We all have different "causes" to which we feel compelled to give. People who are incredibly passionate about this sport and about preserving and fostering our nation's ability to compete legitimately at the top of it might be compelled to give to the causes you mention. Others might not.

I have a number of friends who are "fundraising" for upper level riding purposes - whether it be for a specific trip to England or by syndicating a horse. That is there perrogative and as their friend I am immensely supportive on an emotional level. But at this point in my life (having just graduated from law school, paying THOUSANDS of dollars this summer to study for the bar and being without a job) I am not in a position to give substantially. Whether I would if I could is another story and I can't say I'm sure if I would give.

Philanthropy is a very personal thing. How and to what people choose to give is their business. In addition, some of these "fundraisers" are really more of a quid-pro-quo endeavor. For example, the person doing the donating is the person giving a free item for the silent auction or the facility taking little or no fee for use for a clinic or show. The people who "give" by purchasing or participating are "getting" something in return.

But in the end it comes down to what you feel is the appropriate use of your hard-earned money. Funding upper level eventing may not be it and I full respect that. But we wouldn't have an Olympic team if people had not stepped up to fund those partnerships.

RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 10:02 PM
And in regards to your vent yellow britches , if a person is running a BUSINESS ( you said its not "just fun") is it our fault the business is not successful ?

I know it's expensive, so is any small business but unless they are a 501c you don't see BUSINESSES asking for handouts.

So is it fun or business?

RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 10:04 PM
Thank you VR, I'm not angry at these riders, some I feel are MORE than deserving so I do give and donate.. It's just a question

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Jul. 6, 2012, 10:18 PM
My point is I'm not donating generally to random Joe/Jane Doe, nor are they asking me to. I have donated/bid on items to benefit riders who I see regularly at competitions, who I had had lessons from or would like to get lessons from, and/or who I've seen around teaching the pony clubbers or letting strays tag along on course walks. For me, it is a community activity, and I certainly am not a major funder, but I'm happy to tack on some "community support" money in addition to my Southern Poverty Law Center & Doctors without Borders donations. YMMV, and that's fine!

RenaissanceMare
Jul. 6, 2012, 10:19 PM
My point is I'm not donating generally to random Joe/Jane Doe, nor are they asking me to. I have donated/bid on items to benefit riders who I see regularly at competitions, who I had had lessons from or would like to get lessons from, and/or who I've seen around teaching the pony clubbers or letting strays tag along on course walks. For me, it is a community activity, and I certainly am not a major funder, but I'm happy to tack on some "community support" money in addition to my Southern Poverty Law Center & Doctors without Borders donations. YMMV, and that's fine!

I understand and agree

yellowbritches
Jul. 6, 2012, 11:05 PM
Businesses can be successful in the terms that they can pay their staff, their rent or mortgage, and feed themselves, but not afford the costs to ship their horse, their groom, and themselves overseas to compete, lose the teaching income while they are away, etc. Hence, they turn to a usually supportive community to help them fund their way across the pond.

It is no one's fault. And no one is holding YOU at gun point to pay some amount to help them. But there are plenty of people who are willing and able to give/participate/buy/whatever.

As for the "fun" aspect...well, I will share the story my former boss has told about having fun with his job. He once had a client who had their daughter's horse in training with him. He rode and competed the horse, and won with it. He sent the dad a bill for his services as rider/trainer/coach, and the dad refused to pay, because the trainer had "fun" on his daughter's horse (by winning and getting to compete and what not). My former boss asked the man if he enjoyed his job. If it was fun (I believe the man was stock broker or something). "Oh yes!" he said. "I love it!"

"Would you do it for free?"

"No! I earn every penny!"

"Exactly. I love my job, too, but I earn every penny on that bill."

So, basically because someone runs a business, they shouldn't have fun doing it????

SnicklefritzG
Jul. 6, 2012, 11:30 PM
Here's my take on the whole thing:

There are some very UL riders in my area who have done a ton of really nice things for people in my area. Giving clinics, being willing to teach at all levels at affordable prices even to people just starting out in the show world (think training level dressage or 2' jumping or less) in spite of a very busy schedule with regular clients. Some of these folks aren't independently wealthy, so in other words, they don't have the funds to buy the right type of horse or ship themselves overseas for a European campaign. Those are the types I'd be happy to support if they threw a fundraiser.


There are also some UL riders in my area who have done fundraising for themselves, but you don't see them making much of an attempt to reach out to the community for anything other than money. I don't have much patience for those types - the kind who operate in their own little world and only come out of it and into yours when they need something.

It's analagous in some ways to a server who makes an effort to ensure you have a lovely evening at their restaurant vs. one who is just out to flit from customer to customer as quickly as possible in the hopes of getting more tips

delusions of grandeur
Jul. 7, 2012, 12:34 AM
I'm in a similar place to vicariousrider - have a year left in law school, and while I have a summer job that I think/hope will turn out to be a wonderful long term position, it's soooo far from guaranteed (and I'll have absurd student loans to pay off!). I also ride in an area with a concentration of ULRs, and there are plenty of fundraisers around here (and I know some of the Unionville crowd as well). I'm really not terribly offended by the fundraisers, as most of them are like $75ish - pretty inexpensive for a night out in this area (I think I generally spend more than the ticket price for most when I've gone out with my trainer... and that's not cause I'm sponsoring, haha. I definitely spend more on law school functions). If they were $500 or your first born child a ticket (i.e enough to cut into MY riding budget), I'd feel a bit differently, but at the price they generally are, meh, whatever. It's the sort of sport that the more you make/success you have, the more you spend, and I don't begrudge those that are trying to compete overseas and whathaveyou for trying to make it a little more doable. If you can't afford, or think the rider is loaded and absconding with your money to the mall, then don't go. And I agree with snicklefritzg, that the riders should be willing to do something for the community at large.

I will admit I heard someone grumble about going to one do - that it was fundraising to send a rider's trust fund to Europe - and thought that was pretty funny. ;)

The one thing that does bug me - it seems to be an expectation that other riders and their grooms/working students attend these things. Which is fine, and the other riders can pay - but the grooms/ws should get free or reduced admission. Not fair to essentially expect (and I suspect it's not a conscious thing, just a lack of thought) someone - who makes below minimum wage and probably lives hand to mouth - to pay to support you doing what they probably wish they could but are too poor to. Everyone else is free to decline attending due to finances (or organizing their sock drawer) - but the grooms/ws end up stuck paying to attend something they can't afford, which isn't right.

Eventer55
Jul. 7, 2012, 06:47 AM
From where I sit, the person "going to Germany" is almost always going to get my money because they will hopefully represent the United States in serious international competition and I like to see us do well. Going training is not as expensive as say going over seas and doesn't require the support.

On the flip side, I would also support a Pony Club effort to send a group of kids to Europe, but that is also a big time expense and involves riders who are looking at some day making a living out of our sport. I think it isn't about UL riders all the time, as much as it is the intent of the rider, at least for me it is.

Liebe-ist-Krieg
Jul. 7, 2012, 06:50 AM
I do wonder though why that rider going to Germany (or wherever) is more deserving than the lady going training? Who is deserving?
Because the rider going to Germany is better, and has probably put in way more time and effort to reach that level (I know, I know, not in every case, but most do make impressive sacrifices to reach the top of the sport). Even regardless of effort involved, I think someone with a pure skill/talent level higher than someone else deserves more support.



And for the record I have NEVER seen the person or people I am thinking of volunteering, hosting clinic for pony club or any other type of giving back with out a pay back
Perhaps because they are too busy running their business? Riding 5 horses at an event and coaching 15 students doesn't leave much time for volunteering, but I would bet they have done it at some point in their lives.

Personally, I prefer not to ask for other people's charity, which is one reason why I opted out of trying for the YR 2* team. I sell horses/train so I can afford to show. That said, I would not be adverse to one day forming a syndicate for a quality UL horse. And if I had qualified for a big overseas event and just needed a bit extra to pay for the trip over etc, who knows?

For example, the Dutch coach for WEG in '06 convinced a businessman to put up most of the money to pay for the US based Dutch rider to fly over to Aachen. He still needed a bit more, so the rider held a fundraiser at his base in the states, the businessman doubled the amount raised, and off to Germany he went.

Lord Helpus
Jul. 7, 2012, 07:18 AM
I totally agree about being more willing to donate to someone so they can get more knowledge and experience, if they make a reciprocal effort to give of their time and knoweldge -- be it pony club, or reduced rate lessons to anyone who contributes.

These upper level riders are busy, but if they are not too busy to attend fundraisers, then they should not be too busy to, say, once a month, give back to the community which supports them. (And I am not talking about teaching pony club in the spring and fall, which are their competition times. I am talking about taking time in their less busy months).

What goes around, comes around.

"We" have something they want: money. They have something we want: expertise. It should be a 2 way street.

S A McKee
Jul. 7, 2012, 07:34 AM
Here's my take on the whole thing:

There are some very UL riders in my area who have done a ton of really nice things for people in my area. Giving clinics, being willing to teach at all levels at affordable prices even to people just starting out in the show world (think training level dressage or 2' jumping or less) in spite of a very busy schedule with regular clients. Some of these folks aren't independently wealthy, so in other words, they don't have the funds to buy the right type of horse or ship themselves overseas for a European campaign. Those are the types I'd be happy to support if they threw a fundraiser.




And were they doing that because they wanted to or because they are required to do so by the NGB?

yellowbritches
Jul. 7, 2012, 07:58 AM
For the record, I do believe a lot of riders (not all, but quite a few) sit on boards and committees and serve the sport that way. Just because they aren't jumping judging, does not mean they aren't giving back. I do know there are plenty who don't do anything, and plenty (probably way more than we realize) who do stuff that isn't terribly apparent.

But again, no one is saying anyone has to give anything to anyone.

Highflyer
Jul. 7, 2012, 09:50 AM
If you would like to donate to a deserving LL rider, PM me! :)

subk
Jul. 7, 2012, 10:57 AM
Ok, so you're not into helping other people achieve dreams or goals and your not into to the whole patriotic representing America thing. How about your own self interest?

Here's an example. That "girl going to Germany?" She lives in an area of the country that doesn't have eventing professionals coming out of the wood work. If I lived near there or in her Area I'd be all over giving her money because when she comes home? I'd be at her door step with my horse and my checkbook taking lessons to learn from her what she learned abroad. A little community support means the community is going to get access to quality and knowledge they didn't have access or couldn't afford to access before. (I've also heard rumors her mama raised her right, so I am pretty confident she'll be gracious and generous with her time and skills when she comes home. ;) )

Rabbit351w
Jul. 7, 2012, 11:08 AM
And in regards to your vent yellow britches , if a person is running a BUSINESS ( you said its not "just fun") is it our fault the business is not successful ?

I know it's expensive, so is any small business but unless they are a 501c you don't see BUSINESSES asking for handouts.

I think it's unfortunate that you see these fundraisers as "asking for handouts," but whatever you call it, businesses do it all the time. We see threads on COTH all the time about paying a few dollars more for this or that piece of equipment at the local brick and mortor tack store rather than the better priced online catalog. It really is the same thing. You (well perhaps not YOU specifically, OP) are willing to pay more to support that local business. It's not OUR fault the small tack shops expenses are higher, but we choose to support them anyway. Even if your willingness to spend a little more is self serving (you want that shop open and available when you find yourself unexpectedly without flyspray in the middle of the summer), that logic is applicable here: you want that instructor/clinician to have some extra tools in their toolbox at lesson time.

I guess I see fundrasing as more considerate than increasing lesson/clinic/training prices for all customers to fund the trips. This way only those who want to be supportive are contributing.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 7, 2012, 11:17 AM
Well...I'm helping my trainer and another rider with some fundraising for a trip to Burghley. Both riders are good trainers and riders. They both have booming lesson/training programs and yet both teach pony club and donate their time to the extent they can. And more important...they both have sound and ready horses....and you have to run with they opportunities when you can.

Most of our fundraising revolves around schooling shows and other events that I would be going to with my young horse even if it wasn't a fundraiser....the difference...their friends and students (including myself) are giving our time and effort to put on these programs. The benefit dinner has a great speaker who many would pay to hear...as well as being a fun night.


They have self owned horses and the fundraising will not raise enough to fully cover the costs of a trip to Europe for a 4*. But doing that 4* will help their education, help their business...and help our sport here...and in turn, help me with my horses....so I personally support it. Plus I really want to see both go and kick some butt! It is really fun to see someone reach the top and fulfill a dream....and to cheer them on.

If you don't want to support it...that is perfectly fine. But it is no different to me than any other fundraising efforts....including the many local high school sport teams that hit me up. Some are more important to me than others...but I understand the benefits and I understand need for some amount of fundraising.

BestHorses
Jul. 7, 2012, 12:37 PM
I might be inclined to help a trainer I knew and liked but the majority won't be getting my money. I donate money to other causes like ASPCA, Red Cross or Americares. Honestly, eventing is a niche, luxury sport. Most people have never even heard of it and it takes A LOT of money to take part. If someone asked you to donate money to defray their sailing expenses would you? :lol:

A lot of the people I know work a non-horse job and ride for fun. Our horses get injured, get sick, go lame, have to be retired and no one's giving us a dime. The recent post on Eventing Nation about syndicates made me laugh. For 20k and annual expenses I would not be buying a share in an UL horse - I'd be buying one for myself!

three_dayer
Jul. 7, 2012, 01:37 PM
Every sport does fundraising, including sailing. If you don't want to give money to these upper level riders then don't. I am an ammie rider who is lucky enough to have a horse that has made it to advanced. I work hard to be able to ride at this level, doing extra shifts and taking a lot of call. I am nowhere close to being rich and I sacrifice a lot, including eating ramen.
I have been a working student for some of these upper level riders. They work hard long hours for not very much pay. Yes, at one moment they have a lot of students(usually summertime) and great horses, then at the next moment they are hitting bottom, lots of expenses and no income. That is one of the many reasons why i decided not to become a professional. If they are fundraising, that is very smart, you really can't make it to Europe without help unless you are a trust fund baby. (Unless you want to go into more debt)
I would love to go to Europe, but that is out of my budget. I know you have your own opinion and that is great, but please don't judge til you have been there.

BestHorses
Jul. 7, 2012, 03:29 PM
Every sport does fundraising, including sailing. If you don't want to give money to these upper level riders then don't. I am an ammie rider who is lucky enough to have a horse that has made it to advanced. I work hard to be able to ride at this level, doing extra shifts and taking a lot of call. I am nowhere close to being rich and I sacrifice a lot, including eating ramen.
I have been a working student for some of these upper level riders. They work hard long hours for not very much pay. Yes, at one moment they have a lot of students(usually summertime) and great horses, then at the next moment they are hitting bottom, lots of expenses and no income. That is one of the many reasons why i decided not to become a professional. If they are fundraising, that is very smart, you really can't make it to Europe without help unless you are a trust fund baby. (Unless you want to go into more debt)
I would love to go to Europe, but that is out of my budget. I know you have your own opinion and that is great, but please don't judge til you have been there.

I feel like I agree with you if that makes sense. I think pros work very hard - never stated otherwise. And it sounds like you work very hard for your riding and scrimp and save to ride at your level. So do you then donate money to upper level pro riders to go to Europe and do what you wish you could do but can't because it's out of your budget? Or do you use that money for your own riding?

As far as not "having been there" you are judging me without a clue as to where I've been...

retreadeventer
Jul. 7, 2012, 07:16 PM
This is a very important issue. Bornfree brings it home -- she's supporting her friends' effort because, essentially, she's going to benefit. It raises her trainer, her riding, therefore her horses. When you go overseas you get a big look at new ways to do things. Education is the end result. Education should raise all the boats in the harbor and often does. We are not an island, here in the US, we don't know it all. The more humbly we approach ourselves and our sport, the better we will be.
Having said that....I too find the continual pleas to be tiresome. I too can think of deserving issues that go far beyond those of an ULR looking for plane fares for two horses. But I'm not obligated to support any that I feel uncharitable towards, and that's the beauty of the U.S. We don't have state funding for political favorites!

Oh, and one of the good things that has been set up to help ULR's fundraise is the American Horse Trials Foundation; this is a non profit that can assist in a couple of ways to help with this issue.

Eventer55
Jul. 8, 2012, 07:44 AM
" If someone asked you to donate money to defray their sailing expenses would you?:lol: "

Actually, I did and so did the whole community. . .she qualified for the Olympics.

JP60
Jul. 8, 2012, 09:08 AM
Overall I am in agreement that there is no forced requirement to contribute and anyone can just ignore the requests. The number if mailings I get to help this or that organization is enough to make a tree cry and I certainly don't give to all.

In this instance I would imagine it is either a question of proximity (I know the person, the person lives/works in the community) or external beliefs (I believe this person can represent the US well so I'll help out). I had actually help Colleen for the second reason as she represented the type of qualities I connect with as an Eventer and want to see riding overseas.

Now if you want to look deeper, ask the question why do our riders need to keep going over to Europe to train, to complete? Do we ask the question is Eventing in the US up to e the same standards of course challenges, and opportunities. We have 1 4*, England has 3, add two more in Europe which end to end is still smaller then the US. They run 4 4* in one year, we run 1. Do they have more money they we do? Do they support their equestrian sports more then us?

If had to give $50 to Eventing, I would first want to give it to a program that would elevate the sport in this country to at least match what is current in Europe (Sorry USEA, USEF, you are not going in the right direction). Barring that, I'll support at least one rider who I connect with and hope he or she will do their best.

On a side note, it frosts me to no end that the Romney's horse get's more attention then the more incredible, amazing stories of those that sweat, scrape, and fight to get to the top of the game. One paints a picture of an elitist sport, the other a sport of, be, and for the people. There will always be money in this sport, but from what I read and see, there are more regular folk making it work each and every day. That is who I would support when I can.

tja789
Jul. 8, 2012, 12:59 PM
I think the OP asked a fair question. I’m amazed at how many riders—at all levels, not just well-known UL riders-- have websites requesting donations “so they can reach their goal of representing the United States in international competition.” Of course I realize that I don’t have to donate, but the requests are vaguely annoying anyway. As for fund raisers for UL riders, I’m rarely tempted since I would rather donate my limited charity dollars to truly disadvantaged people. If I was to support a rider, it would be a truly needy and extremely hard-working person, and I have actually done this in the past. I can’t help but think that a rider going to Germany (I mean rider in general, no specific person) is probably a heck of a lot more privileged that most riders, never mind most people. A rider in a position to compete in Germany has undoubtedly had and still has more family support than most riders will ever see. So they don’t seem especially worthy of even more money so that they can be even more privileged. But I know others disagree and that’s ok since we are all free to distribute our charity dollars where we see fit.

RAyers
Jul. 8, 2012, 06:26 PM
While I can choose to donate or not, these calls for donations are almost at the point of "crying wolf." In my opinion, the fact that these riders must beg for supper is an indication that the INDUSTRY is broken. Why on earth should a rider have to beg when, in certain cases, the horse owners are more than well off? Is the role of riders to be glorified panhandlers? If that is the case, forget the horses and find a corner downtown.

This industry, from my experience with other exclusive industries, is on the verge of collapse outside of the most wealthy participants due to the extensive disconnect (riders, horse values, overall numbers of participants, etc.) between the base and upper levels.

Specific to the OP and others, to be honest I won't donate to help rides compete in Europe as I believe the sport has been ruined by the entities that control it. And it is hard enough to afford chasing my own dreams.

wildlifer
Jul. 9, 2012, 02:31 PM
Specific to the OP and others, to be honest I won't donate to help rides compete in Europe as I believe the sport has been ruined by the entities that control it. And it is hard enough to afford chasing my own dreams.

x2. The sport I loved growing up and the sport that I believe in is not the one that occurs at the Olympics, so really, I have no stake or interest in what happens there or in Europe except for mild admiration for pictures of horses jumping big jumps. I have a horse that, if the cards fall correctly, could go FEI one day -- but never will because I will not give a tarnished penny to that joke of an organization or whatever it calls itself.

So, OP, I understand and I agree, but the choice is individual. To some people, that international presence is very important, that's fine, then they can donate if they want. For me, if I ever have any extra money (mostly never), it goes to true need -- abused animals, starvation, etc. It's a personal choice.

rivenoak
Jul. 9, 2012, 03:32 PM
I am not bothered by the fundraisers to help send someone to a competition. I might even look at what's been offered & bid on an item.

Loss of horse is another situation where I might consider sending a donation.

I have donated items to fundraisers to help injured riders with bills. If contacted at a time when I had another item to donate for some cause, I would.

What has troubled me is when someone has lost truck/trailer/RV/etc due to an accident/whatnot and there is a fundraiser to replace it. It's nice the rider has friends/connections willing to set up a way to receive any monetary gifts from those inclined to help. I just firmly believe that insurance should be held to cover loss of equipment and wouldn't consider contributing. But, it's my choice to not give $ for that.

Like Reed though, it's hard enough for me to fund my own horse activities, let alone someone elses.

(And I'll admit to being disappointed by the lack of interest in and donations to The Long Format Club.)

Best wishes to everyone in their endeavors!

yellowbritches
Jul. 9, 2012, 03:59 PM
What has troubled me is when someone has lost truck/trailer/RV/etc due to an accident/whatnot and there is a fundraiser to replace it. It's nice the rider has friends/connections willing to set up a way to receive any monetary gifts from those inclined to help. I just firmly believe that insurance should be held to cover loss of equipment and wouldn't consider contributing. But, it's my choice to not give $ for that.
I kinda agree with you on this. The only thing I will say, though, is that insurance often does not cover what it would cost to replace such a rig. It will only cover what they decide it was "worth", which is often far less than what it would cost to replace. So, sometimes, even if insurance is there, it is only going to cover a small portion of the replacement.

Neigh-Neigh
Jul. 9, 2012, 04:39 PM
OP, I totally understand what you're saying. But, try to look at it like this...

Look at it like the Girl Scout running thru the neighborhood selling cookies. These fundraisers are quite the same. Instead of cookies, you're getting entrance to a fun party, with (hopefully) great food; where you can mingle and network with like minded people and have a chance to learn, or possibly grow your own business.

Mtn trails
Jul. 9, 2012, 04:47 PM
I kinda agree with you on this. The only thing I will say, though, is that insurance often does not cover what it would cost to replace such a rig. It will only cover what they decide it was "worth", which is often far less than what it would cost to replace. So, sometimes, even if insurance is there, it is only going to cover a small portion of the replacement.

Usually true. I had my truck stolen and destroyed and the insurance company paid me a lot more than it was worth. Surprised the poop out of me and a bought a much nicer rig than the ones I was looking at with a lower price tag.

I do not donate because like RAyers said, I can barely afford to fund my own hobby, let alone someone elses.

RSEventer
Jul. 9, 2012, 04:50 PM
I think it's a good question- with an obvious answer, though. If you don't want to support them, just don't give any money:yes:
I have given money to two UL riders who were pursuing their Olympic Dreams. Sadly, neither panned out- but, I do not regret giving them money. Both are excellent teachers who I have lessoned or taken clinics with. So- it didn't work out for them- not the end of the world. Nor was giving them a small donation (cost of a lesson) to them.
I have my horse dreams (riding training level one day!) and they have theirs. Good for them!
I think that another poster made a good point- the sport is getting super-expensive, IMO!

yellowbritches
Jul. 9, 2012, 04:58 PM
Just for the record, I rarely donate unless it is for a show that I can do and it fits in my horse's needs, or maybe a dinner that is in my price range. I don't just donate (because I'm poor and paying my way, too), and don't buy things like hats and t-shirts and what not. Not that I don't want to see riders get the experience or go kick Euro-ass, but just because I am a poor horse girl with limited funds. If I can show or eat (my priorities in life...in that order ;) ), then I'm likely to support :yes: