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Beam Me Up
Jul. 6, 2012, 03:50 PM
I was going to post on the "top of their game" thread but maybe this is a narrower question.

Do you guys generally begin this at a certain age/level, or only when a horse shows signs of needing it?

I take occasional dressage lessons and my trainer was surprised that I don't do any maintenance on my (9 y.o., T level, moving up but not this minute) horse. He is sound, after a longer race career. Sometimes he can be a little lazy behind (getting crooked instead of sitting down and pushing, etc). I'm hesitant to blame any sort of dressage issue on him and not me though.

Anyway, I asked my vet, he said he didn't really see a need. Trainer was surprised, so we asked her vet, he said he also thought he seemed good now, would give me if I wanted.

I saw someone on the "top of game" thread said they start it before they need it, and I think that is this trainer's thought too, but I wanted to see what other eventers did. The generic version wasn't that $$, (not free though), but I've never medicated future issues before, was wondering about current thought on this.

Thanks!

fanfayre
Jul. 6, 2012, 04:01 PM
I don't think, in your specific instance, it's medicating. I would think of it as "preventive" maintenance against future issues. I don't have my 4-year old on anything, yet, but... she's 4 and not in "hard" work. I do plan on starting her on something (to be decided by me and my vet) before too much longer, however, just for -preventive maintenance against future issues.
It's one of those things: IF you have the $$$, and IF it's going to make you feel better, then go for it. If, on the other hand, you see no reason to, then don't let anyone make you feel bad for NOT spending the $$$ unnecessarily.

GotSpots
Jul. 6, 2012, 04:03 PM
I don't have a problem with using something like Adequan, Legend, Pentosan, or another HA - but I would want to know why I was using it. For a performance horse who has some arthritis or a beginning of a hock issue? Might do the loading dose of Adequan and then maintain on it, or might put them on Pentosan. Two days out from XC at the upper levels or a tough jump, I know a lot of folks who give a shot of Legend. But I'm not generally a fan of just sticking a needle into a horse without both (1) the thoughts of your vet and (2) a specific issue that you're using it for. I wouldn't, for example, use something like Adequan for a horse who needed his hocks done - would rather go right to the source of the issue first. And I wouldn't use one of these just as a matter of course, just given the basic risks that can come with regular injections and attendant cost (also, there is some limited data that seems to indicate an increase in certain tendon issues associated with long term and fairly high levels of use (Reed may be better able to remember - as I recall, the data is at best suggestive and not conclusive but at least thought-provoking)).

As a side note, Adequan doesn't have a generic; are you thinking of Pentosan? Something else? Different stuff, does slightly different things (I actually like Pentosan a lot more of the options that are out there). That isn't to say that Adequan/USEF's OBNOXIOUS email blast last week was entirely truthful or accurate (or, for that matter, appropriate for an ostensibly non-profit like USEF to be sending). But just to be clear on what product you are asking about.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 6, 2012, 04:33 PM
We give Adaquan to our foals and young horses. There are studies that have shown a significant reduction in OCD lesions in foals/young developing horses given Adaquan.


I generally use Pentosan on my competition horses when they are doing training level or higher or have something in their medical history that makes me think they will benefit from it. I don't bother with joint supplements.

Carried Away
Jul. 6, 2012, 04:53 PM
I use Adequan on my 7 year old OTTB - in the initial loading dosage recommendation at purchase and then a dose before events. I notice a difference in how he goes and I think it helps make him more comfortable in hard work. He is and has been sound since I purchased him a little over a year ago, but I am firmly in the camp of doing everything possible preventively to avoid issues in the future.

At the USEA convention in December there was a very interesting and thought-provoking presentation by Adequan/their rep. Basically what I took away from it is that Adequan stays in the body for up to 96 hours, so if you are giving it monthly it's best to do it before an event when the horse may be working harder than normal. I know not every horse works harder at an event than at home in regular training, but the rep was adamant that just giving Adequan on a random monthly basis was not one of the ways they tested/got it approved through FDA. This is what led me to start giving it before an event instead.

There is no generic Adequan, although some call MAP5 an alternative. I too have noticed the "there is no generic Adequan" ads everywhere :)

Beam Me Up
Jul. 6, 2012, 05:16 PM
That is kind of sketchy . . . vet/trainer only discussed it as "generic adequan" throughout and I didn't get it, so I'm not sure what it was.

Some googling later, based on the price point, I'd say it was probably Aceytl-D Glucosamine which sounds like an entirely different discussion.

CdnRider
Jul. 6, 2012, 06:51 PM
A vet in an area I no longer live used to sell a compounded medication - Acetyl-glucosamine (I think) under the notion that it was "like" adequan. It however was given IV, but I know alot of people who had their horses on it. I know alot of people in that area called it generic adequan.