PDA

View Full Version : Moving Turtles



leaf
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:40 AM
Show of hands please. Who else moves turtles off the road?
Box turtles, sliders, huge snappers. We do, so do our families and friends.
I have three rules: (1) Don't cause a wreck (2) don't get yourself killed (3) Move the turtle in its direction of travel.
As I have read, turtles have a cognitive map of their territory which is usually a square mile or less. They know where food, water, and shelter is to be found in their territory. Take them away from their terrritory and you're dooming them to a death of starvation or exposure.

Here's a couple of my favorite rescues.
Driving to work, came up and over a hill, box turtle in the middle of my lane. No one behind me so I could hit the brakes pretty good and pull well off the road. Jogged back and could hear another vehicle coming up the hill. Jumped over the guard rail and waved my arm twice and pointed down. It worked, as the vehicle slowed way down as it crested the hill, then came to a complete stop. I looked up, it was a cop! He turned on his flashing lights. I grinned, hopped over the rail, walked in front of him and got the turtle. Checked for traffic in the other lane, every one else had stopped when they saw the cop!

Coming home on my rural road, whipped into someone's driveway, jumped from my truck and sprinted across their yard to the road. Heard a voice yell, "WHAT IS IT?!"
"Turtle!"
"WHAT?"
"TURTLE!"
After I moved turtle, the old guy who was sitting on his porch moseyed over and I explained what I was doing and why. "I hate seeing them smushed in the road." He asked "So what do you do, drive around all day looking for turtles?"
Explained that I was on my way home from work and this was the third one I had moved that day.
He said, get this, "I don't believe I have ever met anyone like you before." I laughed and said there were other turtle movers out there and now he could be one too.
"There are some people in this world who wouldn't move another human off the road", he said.
I shrugged as I got in my truck.
He said, "You will be Blessed", and motioned that I could turn around in his yard.

Let's hear your stories :)

shakeytails
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:06 PM
I do, so does DH.

A long time ago, somebody ttld me that "It's gonna rain" if you see lots of turtles crossing the road. I thought they were FOS at the time, but for the most part, it's true!

draftdriver
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:09 PM
I do when I can, traffic permitting. Snappers are the hardest. Feisty, those gals. I use a snow brush to shove them, or if I can get them flipped onto their backs, I can push them easily with the snow brush.

Always move the turtle in the direction it was heading. If you don't, it will turn around and end up on the road again.

Vesper Sparrow
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:14 PM
I've been moving turtles since I was a kid in Maryland. I remember my mother and I moving a big snapper with a broom handle.

Up here, there are much fewer turtles to move. But recently I did move a smallish snapper on an entrance ramp to the highway (pulled over, looked carefully and kept my wits about me).

Eleanor
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:15 PM
Yes I do it as well.

I had to tell DH to keep a look out for turtles on our road. Last year I found one that had been hit on our road. So I know they cross in that area.

SmartAlex
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:17 PM
Terrapins and Painted turtles yes... Snappers can take their chances.

My mother is a turtle freak. I remember one day at college I was walking past a pond on campus and found a quarter sized painted turtle on the sidewalk. I scooped it up, skipped class, and drove across town to my mother's office. I said "close your eyes and hold out your hand". We returned the little guy to his home right away, but it was such a fun little discovery to share.

Arcadien
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:23 PM
Yay for turtle movers!!! I'm glad to see it confirmed they should be moved in the direction they were going.:)

One problem I've struggled with is box turtles coming into my dry paddocks during a drought - I let my water tanks overflow during those times so the horses feet get some moisture while drinking - the turtles were apparently attracted to the moist mud around the tanks - BUT they would end up getting smushed by horses hooves! :no:

So each day I would collect any live turtles, drive them half a mile to the creek & set them loose there. Now you are making me wonder if I'm doing the right thing, taking them so far from their territory??:confused: But if I don't move them far enough from the paddocks, they will just end up in the water tank smush zone again...:no:

Anyway it does my heart good to know others are concerned about these things too.

Hurrah to Turtle Movers United!!!:D

SmartAlex
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:32 PM
"There are some people in this world who wouldn't move another human off the road", he said.
I shrugged as I got in my truck.
He said, "You will be Blessed", and motioned that I could turn around in his yard.


Hurrah to Turtle Movers United!!!:D

:):):)

JackieBlue
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:44 PM
I absolutely brake for turtles! All kinds, anywhere. I have no problem picking up even the big snappers and I LOVE it when someone stops and says, "Watcha doin'?" and I can infect them with my turtle passion! I've probably converted about half as many turtle savers as I've rescued turtles! Just a brief explanation of what kind of turtle I'm holding, when and how it lays eggs and why it's likely crossing the road and I almost always hear, "Oh, cool! I'll keep an eye out for them!" :D

I learned a serious lesson from a turtle when I was a kid. I had a little box turtle in an aquarium that had been trapped in a neighbor's window well. Don't know how long it had been there, but it was in terrible shape and smelled like death when I found it. A few dozen earthworms, tomatoes, strawberries and various grubs later, she was a beautiful Eastern Box Turtle. I was planning to release her after another few days and while strolling the backyard I came upon the tiniest little box turtle that was missing a foot! :eek: My dad was mowing the lawn and this little guy would have been right in the path of the mower on the next pass. I swooped him up and told him not to worry, I'd keep him safe and let him go with the other turtle the next day. I showed him to my parents and I went on and on about how worried I was about the little gimp and how maybe I should just keep him since he was no doubt weakened by his disability. I placed him in the aquarium with the bigger turtle and worried about the poor little guy all night long. When I got up in the morning I raced down to check on the poor little crippled turtle. I found him gorging himself on the food I'd placed in the enclosure the night before and the bigger turtle was sealed up in her shell in a corner. :confused: I pulled her out and set her on the floor and when she was brave to emerge she looked like she'd taken a knife to a gun fight! She was punctured and lacerated on her front legs and neck. :eek::no: So much for the great wide world being too dangerous a place for a 3-footed box turtle! That little thing was a terror! :eek::lol::uhoh:
So I let Jack the Ripper go that morning and kept his victim for another week or so until she seemed well on her way to healing. And I've NEVER underestimated a human or animal with a "disability" ever since. :lol:

ChocoMare
Jun. 28, 2012, 12:48 PM
Me too :yes: --

The only time (when I was a kid) that we didn't move one was because he/she was a HUGE snapper.... this bugger could have taken my dad's thumb off in one bite. :o Fortunately it was a very rural road, so we just stood watch until he lumbered off into the drainage ditch.

ReSomething
Jun. 28, 2012, 01:09 PM
Turtles in this area know to move to the center of the road - honest. They can move pretty fast too - but if I can stop safely I get them all the way to the edge.

There's a huge female RES that I've moved a couple of times. I have two males about the size of my hand and she is easily the size of a luncheon plate, I come home and tell them all about the amazon I saw and how she's too much for them, now eat.

carla54
Jun. 28, 2012, 01:09 PM
I'm a turtle mover too. I'll move any of them, even the big snappers. (They just don't seem to appreciate it though)

ManyDogs
Jun. 28, 2012, 01:18 PM
I moved a snapper awhile back, using a stick. We are right on the river and fortunately our road doesn't have a lot of traffic.
Count me in! :-)

kookicat
Jun. 28, 2012, 01:25 PM
No turtles here but I will stop to move wildlife off the road when I can. Rescued a hedgehog this morning. (Easy done- throw an old towel over them and away you go.) So fun seeing him trundle off into the hedgerow.

leaf
Jun. 28, 2012, 01:26 PM
Arcadian, can you provide another water source? I make turtle baths with big drip pans from potted plants. Put them outside the pasture in the edge of the woods. I bury them so they're almost flush with the ground, and add a fist-sized rock or two if anyone needs help getting out. All sorts of wildlife use them.

I dread mowing, and I have lots to mow. I will walk and stomp areas that I know are frequented by the turtles, then wait a bit before I mow. The larger places I will drive the mower around slowly and with the blades off, stopping here and there, then come back a while later to actually mow. All in hopes that the turtles will have moved off. I also get off and move toads and preying mantis, I pause for honey bees. Takes me forever to mow.

Hinderella
Jun. 28, 2012, 02:10 PM
I'm a turtle mover! The one box turtle that I rescued had to be taken to a wildlife rehabber, as he had some injuries probably from a car). I made sure that they had my number to return him to his original territory, but it turned out he had lost his sight, so he remained the "turtle in residence" at a children's museum.

One day I stopped & picked up a turtle on a highway on ramp. I was walking him across the grass to the nearby pond, and I was holding him up and talking to him all the way. The driver of a big rig who was coming up the ramp just about lost it, laughing at me.

rmh_rider
Jun. 28, 2012, 02:15 PM
Hand raised on turtle saving.

Yes, I do abide by your 3 very smart rules.

I would like to add a #4, and #5.

4) Don't get bit.
5) Use disposable gloves or any gloves if you can to prevent salmonella.

Arcadien
Jun. 28, 2012, 02:17 PM
Leaf that is a great idea, I hadn't thought of that. I know just the place to put my turtle waterer :) I'm going to google other wildlife habitat ideas - thanks for the inspiration!!!

The story about the 3 legged turtle attacking the bigger turtle reminds me of when I put a new tiny Pygmy goat in with my huge goat. I worried all night about the Pygmy. In the morning I found the larger goat hanging trapped on the fence he'd tried to jump to get away from the aggressive little Pygmy! :eek:

Big goat had a broken leg & I took him into my living room for 4 weeks with his own little pen bedded with straw. He healed fine & after penning them side by side for a few months, I was able to let them in together ultimately.

I'll never underestimate a smaller specimen of a species again either!

(PS decades later my parents confessed that the moment they came to visit & found a large goat bedded down in my living room was the moment they realized they'd "lost" me as a normal, civilized daughter :D:lol::lol:)

oldpony66
Jun. 28, 2012, 02:23 PM
Another turtle-mover here! The one exception just last week... pretty big snapping turtle, not a heavily traveled road, turtle was making good time. Made DD stop and wait for it to get out of our lane then proceeded. I'm sure it made it, not a lot of traffic out there.




One problem I've struggled with is box turtles coming into my dry paddocks during a drought - I let my water tanks overflow during those times so the horses feet get some moisture while drinking - the turtles were apparently attracted to the moist mud around the tanks - BUT they would end up getting smushed by horses hooves! :no:

So each day I would collect any live turtles, drive them half a mile to the creek & set them loose there. Now you are making me wonder if I'm doing the right thing, taking them so far from their territory??:confused: But if I don't move them far enough from the paddocks, they will just end up in the water tank smush zone again...:no:

Anyway it does my heart good to know others are concerned about these things too.

Hurrah to Turtle Movers United!!!:D

Not turtles, but chipmunks used to drown in my water trough and it made me sad so I just provided a lower/safer water source for them. I wonder if you could provide the box turtles with a mud puddle that isn't in the paddock? I mean, if you're so inclined. I would be curious how many of those turtles that you've relocated have returned to your paddock! You might be moving the same ones over and over. Half a mile isn't really that far, even for a turtle.

Donkaloosa
Jun. 28, 2012, 03:56 PM
Waving my hand. I'll move them if it's safe for me to stop. Last turtle I moved was one I saw in the street in front of my house while looking out my computer room window. Moved it over to my garden. Haven't seen any turtles in my yard since, but they probably are out there.

Arcadien
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:06 PM
I would be curious how many of those turtles that you've relocated have returned to your paddock! You might be moving the same ones over and over. Half a mile isn't really that far, even for a turtle.

LOL I hadn't considered that possibility! I am spending all my office breaks today designing my nature turtle drought relief sanctuary on the side of the property away from the horses. This is fun! :D

My2cents
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:14 PM
add me to the 'turtle mover' list. i recently had to stop and shoo a snake that was warming itself in the middle of the road. he/she didn't take too kindly to the fact that i disturbed it's nap but i hate to see the smooshed bodies, especially the baby snakes. :(
biggest snapper i ever moved was at least 1 1/2 foot long. luckily i had my old tennis racket in the car and was able to hoist the rear end with the racket and direct the beast to the side of the road that he/she was aiming for (just not fast enough :) )

DownYonder
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:24 PM
I move turtles, too.

A bit of a sad story here - quite some years ago, I stopped on a road in outer suburbia to move a big one before he got smushed. While I was carrying him across the road, an old battered p/u truck pulled over and an old guy in coveralls got out.

Old guy: "What you gonna do with that, Miss?"

Me: "I'm moving him off the road so he doesn't get hit by a car."

Old guy: "So you don't want him? You are just going to let him go?"

Me (puzzled at this point): "Yes".

Old guy: "Can I have him?"

Me: "Uh, sure. I guess."

By then, I had set the turtle down off the side of the road (and yes, in the direction he was heading).

Old guy tromps over and picks turtle up by his tail.

Me: "What are you going to do with him?"

Old guy: "See that old lady in that truck?" And he points to his truck.

"She's going cook him up and we're gonna eat him."

With that, he threw the turtle in the back of his truck, got in and drove off.

So much for trying to save that poor turtle's life. :(

candyappy
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:27 PM
Where we used to live there was no way you could pull off the road to move a turtle. there was NO shoulder at all and the roads were too hilly and winding. I just did my best to avoid them.

Hinderella
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:52 PM
That's sad, DownYonder. My mother grew up poor and tells stories of her father bringing home snappers for her mother to cook when they didn't have money.

atr
Jun. 28, 2012, 04:55 PM
No turtles on my mountain, but the baby bunnies like to come out at dusk and hunker down in the warm potholes in the road, which can be rather disturbing...

allpurpose
Jun. 28, 2012, 07:27 PM
Turtle mover here (raising hand). My toddler son and I were driving down a back road one day and I stopped for a painted turtle making its way across the road. It was about the size of my fist. I picked it up, it retracted its head and legs into its shell, and I handed it to my son to look at. I think he thought I'd handed him a hamburger because he was holding it up in front of his face with both hands. Guess what happened next? Out pops its head and legs from the shell! My son's face went :eek:, he screamed and dropped it in his lap, and I almost passed out I was laughing so hard.:lol: I collected the turtle, placed him in the weeds, and went on down the road.

Poor kid. He reminds me of that story at least once a year. It's a wonder he eats hamburgers now...

Big_Tag
Jun. 28, 2012, 07:52 PM
I move turtles, and so does my family :) I remember being a kid and my dad pulling a female boxie off the interstate who had been hit. She went to the vet and they concocted some sort of fiberglass shell scenario for her (her scutes were gone on one side).

I can top turtle moving--we used to go toad hunting! In the summer as little kids, after there were thunderstorms at night, my dad would load us three kids in the car with a couple big buckets and we would collect toads off the road by the dozens (everyone knows there's toads everywhere after night rain!) Luckily we lived in a pretty rural area and this was usually probably about 10 or 11 at night (apparently bedtimes in my house were for the birds). We would take them home and release them. I don't know about the logistics of toad territories. I hope we didn't actually kill them all by doing that but we lived on a 70-acre spot with a lot of water about.

My dad later told me he did that as a tactic to help my little sister, who was deathly afraid of storms, to give her something to look forward to when it stormed.

There's still a photo of us three kids on the fridge @ my dad's with a GIGANTOR bullfrog my dad somehow managed to snag off the road. I'm not kidding, he is as long as my 3yo brother's torso in that picture.

NEWT
Jun. 28, 2012, 08:58 PM
I move turtles too! So does DH.

As far as will turtles adjust to being moved from their home territories the answer is YES! So let me tell you a short story:

In 1930 my father-in-law found a box turtle in his backyard. He was eight years old. He took out his pocket knife and carved his initials and the date onto its shell. He kept the turtle as a pet for the rest of the summer then turned it loose.

When he was seventy years old he found the turtle again. Same turtle, his initials and date of 1930. However, he was living many miles away from his childhood home and across a very large, deep water river.

That turtle seemed to survive new locations just fine!

Bacardi1
Jun. 28, 2012, 09:01 PM
Oh brother!!! A several decades long turtle mover here, as well as my husband. We always say that that's how we'll die - being run over by someone while we move a turtle across the road - lol!

And while I agree that they're somewhat territorial, if I've picked them up on a major highway or bridge with no safe area on either side of the road, they get re-seeded here on the farm. Better that than smushed on the highway.

MistyBlue
Jun. 28, 2012, 10:44 PM
Friends, neighbors and family say I remind them of the old Atari game Frogger...due to my constant stopping, blocking traffic and relocating turtles off the roads.

Our roads here are very twisty, narrow and heavily wooded. We also have tons of wetlands, ponds, streams, swamp, etc. So turtles are kinda common.

Just 2 weeks ago a decent sized (shell frisbee sized) snapper was halfway across the road and busy threatening traffic instead of moving. Neck up, mouth open, hissing, etc. Made hubby stop and pull sideways across the road (if you don't people whip around a corner and squish you) and grabbed it's tail for the move. The homeowner nearby came running when he saw me walking with a cheesed off snapper and called out, "Oh you found her!!!" The slow wide stream through his yard was apparently her home and he hadn't seen her for days and was worried. :D
What a nice man...my kinda person! :yes:

So yeah, I move turtles all the time and often have to dodge traffic to do so. I now just pull my truck sideways when I see one. They're rarely thrilled to be helped though. I have learned to move them *well* off the road or else they just turn around and try to cross again the opposite way.

I also drive turtles to the vet clinic 2 towns away when I find them with shattered shells. (raptors will pick up smaller turtles and then drop them on pavement so they can eat them) They can sometimes help them...they build new shell parts. I have no issues with wildlife predation...but eating something when it's still alive isn't something I walk away from.

wildlifer
Jun. 28, 2012, 10:49 PM
Absolutely. I will block traffic with my truck (and flashy light if I'm in my work truck!) and leap out for any turtle. Sometimes I can herd the musk turtles with my truck, they can run if they want to!

Laurierace
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:07 PM
Confirmed turtle rescuer here. Haven't seen any yet this year but am always on the lookout. The worst one was last year. I had stopped and was on my way into the street when a car coming from the other direction nailed him and sent him flying like a hockey puck about a hundred feet away. It was not a happy landing. I don't understand how anyone can run over a turtle, it's not like they can dart out in front of you like a deer.

Big_Tag
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:26 PM
Confirmed turtle rescuer here. Haven't seen any yet this year but am always on the lookout. The worst one was last year. I had stopped and was on my way into the street when a car coming from the other direction nailed him and sent him flying like a hockey puck about a hundred feet away. It was not a happy landing. I don't understand how anyone can run over a turtle, it's not like they can dart out in front of you like a deer.

I do not know 100% if this is true but I recall hearing of a study where researchers used a fake snake and a fake turtle in the street to gauge motorists' reaction to each and that a majority made a concerted effort to hit them, in particular snakes, to the point that in a few cases people came BACK to run over them again.

If so it is appalling to me, but not necessarily surprising.

Huntertwo
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:38 PM
I do not know 100% if this is true but I recall hearing of a study where researchers used a fake snake and a fake turtle in the street to gauge motorists' reaction to each and that a majority made a concerted effort to hit them, in particular snakes, to the point that in a few cases people came BACK to run over them again.

If so it is appalling to me, but not necessarily surprising.

A turtle lover and mover here also....

That study doesn't surprise me either. When driving, most people would go out of their way to avoid hitting a good size rock that could damage their vehicle.

So, that does make me wonder why I see so many crushed turtles. They must know they are turtles and get their kicks running them over... Snakes too.:no:

I know that some people simply might not see them, but, it makes me wonder.

red squirrel ridge
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:55 PM
Turtle mover here too!

MaybeMorgan
Jun. 28, 2012, 11:56 PM
I usually see turtles crossing the road I drive on to my lesson on Sunday morning. This past Sunday I saw a huge mud turtle stalled at the edge of the road so I stopped with flashers on and moved it to the grass where it could make it's way down to the creek. It's shell was at least 18" long-huge!

I haven't moved snappers but I will try next time. I saw a huge one hit last year-sad.

One time we found a water-dwelling turtle walking down the middle of my surburban street. That was a puzzle where it came from.

And one morning my daughter called me from work. "Mom-you have to come help! I have 3 box turtles in a pizza box!" Apparently they were all moving toward a cement wall on the back road she was on and she didn't have time to do anything but snatch them up.

MistyBlue
Jun. 29, 2012, 01:23 AM
If moving a snapping turtle, usually the safest grab is the tail. They have very long necks and legs and if you try a side-shell grab they can usually either claw you or even whip that head around for a bite. You certainly don't want either!

A tail grab doesn't injure them and held away from the body means they shouldn't be able to get you. All the ones I've moved have hissed but not flailed much once off the ground by the tail. A little slow leg paddling, a lot of Evil Eyeball glares.

When picking them up and putting them down, watch the front end. They can move *fast.* Once you out them down, step away fast and keep going, they sometimes chase.

Reptiles are awesome and I know a smattering on basic moving them around when needed, but 2Jakes knows the best on how to handle turtles. Maybe she'll chime in.

TexasRose
Jun. 29, 2012, 10:35 AM
Since moving to Texas, my husband and I have saved (or rather "helped") more then a dozen turtles cross the road. Only 2-water, or sliders? (no snappers), the rest box. I love turtles but have never seen so many in all my life. :yes:

Edited to add: we helped them cross the road, did not keep any!

Southernboy
Jun. 29, 2012, 11:19 AM
I passed a car in the suburbs that had stopped in the middle of the road. A man was standing in front of a very large alligator snapper. I asked him what he was doing and he said he wanted to take the turtle home with him so his kids would have a pet. I showed him what the turtle could do to my metal flashlight and he turned white as a ghost and left without saying goodbye. City people!!

Paige777
Jun. 29, 2012, 08:52 PM
I'm a turtle mover, too! I keep a snow shovel in my truck year-round because of it. Last year when I went for a run I headed down to a local river. We'd had terrible rain and the river had flooded over a road, then receded, so it left pools in the divots/indents caused by tires. There were probably 30 perch stranded, on their sides, in what water remained in the pools. I waded in with my sneakers and started picking them up and tossing them back in. A guy in his car stopped and helped me, too. All sorts of exciting rescues around here. Can't bring myself to rescue snapping turtles yet... maybe one day. But all other turtles get a ride in the snow shovel.

LauraKY
Jun. 29, 2012, 09:46 PM
Of course. I come from a line of turtle movers. My mother and grandmother both moved turtles...so does my sister. Doesn't everyone? :)

tryintogethere
Jun. 29, 2012, 09:49 PM
I have moved 2 snappers this spring. One was on my quiet dirt road ( that people still fly up and down and run over squirrles and groundhogs grrrr), I just pushed him with a stick. The other one was in the middle of town and he was quite large and I had on flip flops... Fortunately I had a new shavings fork in my Suburban so I just scooped him on to it and pushed him across the road and up the curb. What surprised me the most was that a lot of people did stop and a few men got out of their cars, but not one offered to help me lift it lol.

Foxtrot's
Jun. 29, 2012, 10:16 PM
I absolutely would move them - but up here we don't see them. I did move a possum we thought we had hit with the horse trailer, but he was only playing possum. The rehab lady said it was a very foolish move to pick him up - they can snap a finger like a chicken bone so when moving them be careful.

vacation1
Jun. 29, 2012, 11:27 PM
The area I'm in is swampy, so there are times of the year when you see turtles a lot in certain areas. I'm not usually in those areas, though so I've only had to stop and retrieve a couple turtles. I did once witness a whole crowd using a snow shovel to move a massive (as in, WTF is a dinosaur doing in Jersey?) snapping turtle off one of those typically low-lying semi-rural-but-sort-urban roads over a crick.

The critter I've tried to move off warm, dangerous asphalt the most are toads. Hoppy toads congregating on soft August parking lots on hot nights, to be exact. They're so cute, and so doomed...

edited to add: be careful, turtle movers! About once a year, I see a news story about someone being struck and killed while trying to help an animal that was in the road.

Debbie
Jun. 29, 2012, 11:39 PM
My husband and I both do our best to move turtles. He also does daily frog rescues from our pool and gives them survival advice while he's relocating them, I married well.

Last week was a first in turtle rescue. A friend and I were trail riding and box turtle was slap in the middle of the track. We were trotting along at a good clip and I called turtle, but too late, the second horse sent it spinning and it ended up upside down. We went back and I hopped off and set it right.

I wish there was video of the next few minutes of me balancing on a dead log teeter totter trying to remount. Anything for the turtle...

Alex and Bodie's Mom
Jun. 30, 2012, 04:13 PM
Raises hand -- guilty as charged! Always. And I take the injured ones to the vet to be put back together or PTS. They just know that when I come in with a box, it'll be interesting.

One time I turned around to go get one off the other side of the roaad and there was a car coming that direction. Being me, I said all sorts of four-letter words as I whipped around, praying it hadn't been hit -- and the car had actually stopped. It was an off-duty police officer. :)

The most unusual was the huge soft-shelled water turtle (Mississippi mud turtle, maybe?) I found in the middle of town - neighbors said the guys across the road went fishing, brought it home, and turned it loose.

GypsyQ
Jun. 30, 2012, 04:28 PM
I move turtles if I can do so safely.


I dread mowing, and I have lots to mow. I will walk and stomp areas that I know are frequented by the turtles, then wait a bit before I mow. The larger places I will drive the mower around slowly and with the blades off, stopping here and there, then come back a while later to actually mow. All in hopes that the turtles will have moved off. I also get off and move toads and preying mantis, I pause for honey bees. Takes me forever to mow.

I also mow the grass in a similar manner. And always with the blades on the highest setting. I have mowed right over box turtles and black snakes and because the blade was up high, they were only scared, but unharmed.

Foxtrot's
Jun. 30, 2012, 09:49 PM
What a nice bunch of posters. The thought of mowing one into mulch makes me glad I live in BC (again).

Diners , Drive-ins and Dives made me gag - the showed a turtle being made into turtle soup, poor thing.

Roomfor2
Jul. 1, 2012, 10:56 PM
Of course, i just assumed everyone did. Ha Ha. My husband never notices but he knows when I say stop it's usually to move a turtle. He pulls right over. Hmmm, good to know about the directional thing. I will pay more attention.

Sad story That I still think about. Coming around a sharp curve on our two lane country road a mother duck was escorting her new babies across as I was coming around the corner. Panicking I stopped but afraid to get out because of the blind curve. Before I could actually make a final decision a truck comes around the corner. I blow my horn and flash my lights but he never even slowed down. Got two of the babies. Hard to get out of my mind.

ako
Jul. 1, 2012, 11:22 PM
We don't see many on Long Island... Just saw my first yesterday. I avoided the turtle, then avoided the two guys running back to rescue him. I kept thinking about those guys running back in the expressway service road to save a cute little turtle! I wanted to hug them!

Dance_To_Oblivion
Jul. 2, 2012, 12:10 PM
Confirmed turtle rescuer here. Haven't seen any yet this year but am always on the lookout. The worst one was last year. I had stopped and was on my way into the street when a car coming from the other direction nailed him and sent him flying like a hockey puck about a hundred feet away. It was not a happy landing. I don't understand how anyone can run over a turtle, it's not like they can dart out in front of you like a deer.

I move them when ever I can, but we live on very narrow (not even two full lanes) back roads that are very hilly and curvy. When I am hauling the horse trailer with my dually that is a lot of tires and when a car is coming the opposite direction it just breaks my heart but there is nothing I can do :( sometimes avoiding the turtle could cause human casualties and that would be much worse.

Hinderella
Jul. 2, 2012, 01:41 PM
I almost forgot one of my favorite turtle saves...when DH & I were on the motorcycle! I couldn't move the turtle in the direction in which she was going, because that side of the road was a 10 foot high retaining wall. So I picked her up, tucked her into my leather jacket and rode a hort distance down the road, where I bushwacked through weeds to a small pond where she could be safe and lay her eggs. She squirmed around a little in there, but basically was a pretty good passenger.

re-runs
Jul. 3, 2012, 12:44 PM
I have to admit...........I am a turtle mover.

Have stopped many times during my lifetime to help them across the road but then, I have been known to carry a shovel in the truck to help stunned birds, squirrels and baby groundhogs off the road as well. (I don`t recommend this to everybody, it can be dangerous) I learned a long time ago that..... you need to help turtles on their course by going around any hazardous problems, like yards with dogs or kids or another road in their path, they know where they are going; the destination, but they just haven`t figured on all the dangers getting there. I learned this when I took a huge snapper back down to the river that was crawling through our rural yard miles from any large body of water. I took the poor thing back to the river where I thought it would be safe. Later I read that it was probably a female looking for a slightly wet place to lay her eggs, which our spring was a perfect place to do, and that is the most likely place where she was headed.

I know other turtle movers too. All friends of mine.

Bacardi1
Jul. 3, 2012, 12:55 PM
Yes - even though I know that turtles are territorial - if moving them across the road means I'll be depositing them into someone's front yard or into a housing development, they come home with me & get "seeded" onto our 22 acres. Somehow I think they have a better chance of survival that way.

If it's a water turtle, I'll also re-home it at a local pond. I'm certainly not going to let a water turtle clamber into a housing development in search of a nesting site that most likely will never culminate in surviving offspring.