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View Full Version : We alread yhave electric fence-how hard would it be



kasjordan
Jun. 21, 2012, 08:55 AM
to change out the electric fence for some type of woven wire fence? I'd like to be able to keep using the T-posts since I already have them, I know I will probably need to add a few more and some wooden posts at the ends and corners?
We're just having a devil of a time keeping this electric fence hot- my horse ,and the horse who sometimes comes home to stay with him, really respect the barely hot electric- but for my peace of mind, I need something better. I think I'd like the woven wire and a hot wire running along the top of it maybe since they respect it so much already.
Would it be pretty easy to do? Any recommendations/warnings? It's not a hugely large paddock (maybe 100 yards long each side and about 30 yards wide) and it does cross a stream in two places.

trubandloki
Jun. 21, 2012, 08:59 AM
I do not see it as a huge undertaking. Be sure to pick a product that is safe for horses (small holes not able to get a hoof thru) and follow the manufacturers installation instructions.

I would first address the issue of keeping your electric fence hot.
To me that seems like something worth figuring out even with the mesh fencing added.

tle
Jun. 21, 2012, 09:00 AM
That's what I'm doing with my main pasture. It's currently 7 strand electric and I have a contractor who's going to swap the wire for woven plus add a few wood posts. I can't say how difficult it is to do but my area is a bit bigger than yours (2.5 acres). I've heard woven isn't horrible to deal with and put in if you have a couple extra hands, but it's not something I want to deal with (plus I'm having the contractor put in a couple additional paddocks).

kasjordan
Jun. 21, 2012, 09:26 AM
We've addressed it and addressed it and addressed it lol. There's nothing touching, we replaced all the insulators, the charger is new and has good connections, the ground is in a good wet spot and plenty deep- it just Won't. Stay. Hot. I think it must be the Bermuda triangle area for electric fences lol.
So for peace of mind, I want more of a barrier fence rather than keep trusting the boys to stay where they belong!

SonnysMom
Jun. 21, 2012, 04:04 PM
I have never run no climb on Tposts.
But generally pulling no-climb fence isn't that hard.

One potential problem I see is crossing the streams. Where I housesit the fence crosses a stream that floods a bit and gets a bit higher during storms. Any type of mesh fencing she uses there gets destroyed by debris carried by the stream.
This is a stream that is normally mid calf high and about 4 foot across.

She also lost a post at some point near the stream due to erosion. DH and I reinstalled it much deeper and with lots of concrete. Her fencing is post and rail, except across the stream and there it is just a cable run through some pvc piping to give the impression to the horses it is more solid than it really is. The cable/pvc can swing a bit in the water so it doesn't get broken. Her horses have plenty of grass and have never really challenged it. You could do something like that plus the electric line. I wouldnt necessarily trust that set up for the Houdini type.

The upper part of the stream she has barbed wire and 4 x 4 wire fencing that is partially broken off at the bottom. I know that doesn't sound safe but the horses can't get to the fence due to the really dense thorns and brush on that side of the property.

JackSprats Mom
Jun. 24, 2012, 01:53 PM
We've addressed it and addressed it and addressed it lol. There's nothing touching, we replaced all the insulators, the charger is new and has good connections, the ground is in a good wet spot and plenty deep- it just Won't. Stay. Hot. I think it must be the Bermuda triangle area for electric fences lol.


I have this EXACT problem, its driving me nuts:mad:

Guilherme
Jun. 24, 2012, 02:40 PM
I have this EXACT problem, its driving me nuts:mad:

Go out and walk the fence after dark. I'll bet money you'll find "shorts." They look like fireflies in a geosynchronous orbit. ;) You'll find them around posts, splices, connections, etc. Take a can of ground marking paint with you and mark the shorts. Then go fix them in the morning.

It's not unusual for electric tape or rope to develop shorts after a winter. If the fence shrinks in low temperatures that can cause some of the small wires to break. Sometimes they arc and sometimes they don't. In either event they reduce the power of the fence. Normally you can hear a short, but sometimes really small ones don't make much noise. They are visible, however, in the dark. If your tape/rope is more than three years old it may be up for replacement.

Another very common cause of poor electric fence performance is inadequate grounding. Did you ground IAW the manufacturer's directions (usually 2-3 grounding rods, 6' deep). Not many people do because sinking a grounding rod 6' down is a challenge (particularly in hard ground). Is the grounding wire from your charger properly connected or is it a "red-neck connection"? Again, a lot of folks won't spring for a proper clamp, but just take a few wraps on the grounding rod and figure that does it; it often doesn't.

Indeed, the people most guilty of improper grounding are the users of solar powered chargers. Since these chargers are, by definition, portable the user doesn't want to "invest" the labor involved in proper grounding as they will just have to move the rods in the future.

There's no "magic" in electric fence maintenance, just some sweat (and often a bit of blood :lol:).

G.