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View Full Version : Barn style, attached workshop, plans & ideas needed!



fiddleandco
Jun. 20, 2012, 08:14 AM
Hi all,
My husband and I are 'downsizing' from our current 10 stall, center aisleway (with bathroom, tack/feed room, hay storage, 10 stalls-used 6 of the 10-, and indoor wash rack, with sliding doors on both ends, etc.) barn in selling our farm.
Long story short, we are moving and building a barn, horse facilities on some land we own (house is there already).
We have 3 horses and a mini donkey, with plans to downsize to 2 horses + mini donkey by the time we move.
We are located in SC.
I am trying to get plans together for our barn area. A few things I've run into and would appreciate some ideas and experience on!
1). We want a workshop as well to store horse trailer, jet skis, boat, tools, etc. Even if it has an overhang outside for the bigger stuff like the horse trailer/tractor, probably with the large garage doors to access.
2). We have had the large center aisle barn, and I've had/worked in/been around many barn styles, including center aisle, trainers aisle, and shedrow, and DO NOT want 'too much' barn-simple and sweet and safe is what we're after. (I train/start horses, teach lessons on and off site, and am in school to be an equine therapist).
3). I am thinking, to help with aesthetics on our 5-soon-to-be-15 acres of land we are using for this, I want to attached the barn and workshop, more or less. Think a workshop with a shedrow barn attached to the side of it.
4). I cannot find anything similar to this idea. I have no problem drawing blueprints (father is a contractor, so I learned how to!), but would love to see if there is anyone else who has done this, and their experience with it.
Thanks!

bdj
Jun. 20, 2012, 11:54 AM
Used to work for someone who had a very nice setup that sounds like it might work for your needs. Don't have any pictures of it, but I'll try to describe as best I can...
Barn was basically a wide center aisle (probably 16'), with 4 stalls (I think) - 3 on one side, 1 on the other with a grooming area and hay storage on the single-stalled side), but the "front" half of the barn (nearest the house) was nearly all open space with cement flooring (and a tackroom with staircase tucked into the back righthand corner of the workshop space). He had one HUGE roll up/garage door centered on that wall - big enough that we could pull the box truck into it to load/unload horses (the barn actually had a second floor apartment, too). You might not need to go that big, but the basic design was very workable. My own barn is similiar in layout, but instead of the big storage bay on the front, I have a run-in that's the full width of the barn on the back.

I also worked in a barn that just had an aisle and shedrow added on to one outside of the original center aisle barn - the problem with that was that you had to go outside to get into the "main barn", but that could easily be resolved by creating an aisleway between the two spaces. If you used the "main barn" part of that plan as your workshop (no stalls), it seems like adding an addition big enough for your stalls to one side (like a lean to, or enclosed underhang) wouldn't be that big of a deal.

Not sure if I've really conveyed what I was hoping to... but maybe it helps?

MDBarnmaster
Jun. 20, 2012, 01:07 PM
fiddleandco,

We offer many different configurations to meet a wide range of needs from barns and buildings. You can review our website at www.mdbarnmaster.com (http://www.mdbarnmaster.com).

fiddleandco
Jun. 20, 2012, 03:41 PM
bdj, thanks for the input. I am thinking shed row (open fronts ) (or called 'inline' barn) due to the weather in SC and simplicity, and I do want to have the workshop area and horse area separated by a solid wall, as the workshop will house equipment, so I would like to keep that separate. Like you said, I am hoping it will pretty much an 'add on' of stalls and a tack room and aisle way to a workshop but I am open to the other ideas you posted-thank you!

MD, thanks for the link. Are you located in SC, or have a rep for SC?

Aponi
Jun. 20, 2012, 05:10 PM
My parents have something similar to what it sounds like you want (Lexington, SC area). I think it is pretty much optimal for 2-3 horses that all go out together in the same pasture.

The barn is an "L" shape with a feed room and then 3 stalls with dutch door fronts/backs (all 12x12 I think, though the feed room may have been more like 12x14). The tackroom makes the short part of the L next to the 3rd stall and is like 9x12 maybe?. The area "inside" the L is covered with the main roof, and doubles as a run-in shed when the stalls are shut (the barn makes up a stretch of the pasture fence, so they had access to it at all times). Then off of the short side of the L but outside the pasture fence line there's a 24x24 or 32? covered area that they used for storage but in your case could be "finished" to more of a workshop.

The double dutch doors made everything super simple in terms of cleaning stalls/regulating temps (all tops open in the summer, outside tops closed in the winter or close both tops if it actually got cold ;)). Hay could be fed under the overhang in case of rainy weather, which was nice. The support beams for the overhang provided places to tie for tacking up, etc. We eventually added a paddock that ran the length of the long arm of the L on the outside for when we needed to keep someone separated or just wanted to limit movement.

MDBarnmaster
Jun. 20, 2012, 05:47 PM
MD, thanks for the link. Are you located in SC, or have a rep for SC?

Yes we have someone close to your area. How would you like me to get you their contact information?

fiddleandco
Jun. 20, 2012, 06:58 PM
My parents have something similar to what it sounds like you want (Lexington, SC area). I think it is pretty much optimal for 2-3 horses that all go out together in the same pasture.

The barn is an "L" shape with a feed room and then 3 stalls with dutch door fronts/backs (all 12x12 I think, though the feed room may have been more like 12x14). The tackroom makes the short part of the L next to the 3rd stall and is like 9x12 maybe?. The area "inside" the L is covered with the main roof, and doubles as a run-in shed when the stalls are shut (the barn makes up a stretch of the pasture fence, so they had access to it at all times). Then off of the short side of the L but outside the pasture fence line there's a 24x24 or 32? covered area that they used for storage but in your case could be "finished" to more of a workshop.

The double dutch doors made everything super simple in terms of cleaning stalls/regulating temps (all tops open in the summer, outside tops closed in the winter or close both tops if it actually got cold ;)). Hay could be fed under the overhang in case of rainy weather, which was nice. The support beams for the overhang provided places to tie for tacking up, etc. We eventually added a paddock that ran the length of the long arm of the L on the outside for when we needed to keep someone separated or just wanted to limit movement.

Aponi,
Can you post some photos? Sounds really interesting! Thanks!
MD, can you post it here? Thx.

Aponi
Jun. 20, 2012, 10:37 PM
Hopefully this works. The photos weren't taken to show off the barn, but I think that's all I have on my computer. My parents don't have horses right now, but I'm sure my dad would take more pics or possibly even still find the actual floor plan from when they had it built if you wanted. http://imgur.com/a/zQMvU

The worst thing about the barn is that for some reason they used rough boards for the outside and painted it white. You can see that doesn't look so great after 25 years. Structurally though, the place has held up great. The dutch doors are set up so that it's a straight shot through the stall if both are open.

I think the stalls are oak(?) boards in a vertical orientation up to 6', with another 2' of horizontal pine 2x4s with about 8" of space between each board. There's maybe 8" of space between the walls for each stall. So lots of airflow up above the stalls, which is nice when it's 800 degrees. The floor in the stalls are dirt, but the feed room and tack room have concrete floors.

PeteyPie
Jun. 21, 2012, 05:15 PM
There is a thread about barn fires on Coth that you might want to review. If you are storing gasoline-powered machinery, fuel, paints or chemicals, flammable products including horse liniments, petroleum-based hoof treatments, solvents, and hay in the same structure as your animals, maybe you could have a firewall or some fire-safe design. For example, in Aponi's barn design, putting up sheetrock on the wall between the horse stall area and the covered storage area might work well in conjunction with a fireproof roof design. Or maybe stucco or a cinderblock wall... Perhaps you could use non-flammable materials in construction. One poster on that thread stressed the importance of a sprinkler system. It's worth thinking about and good design doesn't have to be complicated. Several people pointed out other fire hazards which could be mitigated by good design:

Cobwebs and dust: very flammable, a pain to clean, and avoidable with good design. For example, you can reduce the cobwebs by not having exposed trusses with lots of surfaces. A covered ceiling with a simple flat surface is easier to clean and provides fewer nooks and crannies for this stuff to build up.

Electrical wires: enclose all wires in conduit. Wires can fray from mice and rats chewing them, from horses chewing or playing with them, and from sunlight/age. Plan the appliances you will need, like fans, space heaters, water trough heaters, radios, lights, so you can build them in a way that is safe, like installing hardwired fans and light fixtures (maybe even skylights, greenhouse roofing, or solar lighting) rather than portable plug-in appliances.

Have a grooming area in the "fireproofed" section so all electrical stuff and flammable products will be separate from the horse's living area. One story I heard recounted a barn fire from a set of electric clippers which had been left plugged in and fell into a water bucket, or water puddle, or snow melted and made a puddle... something like that.

Anyway, you get the idea.

fiddleandco
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:32 AM
Aponi, thanks for the photos and putting them up. That is exactly it, and I am thinking to add the workshop to the back of it (where your dutch doors are ), so those share that wall, with the stalls having a open grate on the front to increase circulation of air. (my only concern would be winter and storms, but I think we can do a larger overhang on the front to counteract that. Thank you!!
And yes, Petey, we would be doing a firesafe wall between the two areas. The workshop would store equipment but not flammable liquid storage, for obvious reasons. Thanks for brining it up as a good reminder. :)
I will have to repost as we begin to build, etc. with pics as we go along. Thank you for your input and suggestions.

Aponi
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:07 PM
Fiddle,

There are dutch doors on both the front/back. So maybe if you put solid doors up in addition to the grates or have the doors set aside to put up on the hinges if a storm comes through it'd work? The couple hurricanes that came through we just put the horses in the stalls and shut the tops and bottoms up tight. During 99% of the year both the tops would be open, so I'd think the grates would be a good idea if you're going to close up one side with the workshop.

AKB
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:33 PM
We know someone who has a center aisle barn, with overhangs outside the stalls and dutch doors so it is easy to let the horses in and out. They have a structure about the size of a small dressage arena attached one end of the aisle. This structure is usually used to store tractors and other equipment. In prolonged inclement weather, they can move the tractors out and ride in the area.

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 24, 2012, 08:37 PM
My high roofed center aisle barn is SO much cooler than the shed row I used to have. Almost like air conditioning.

carolprudm
Jun. 24, 2012, 09:29 PM
My high roofed center aisle barn is SO much cooler than the shed row I used to have. Almost like air conditioning.


Yup, spent 3 hours in the barn this afternoon with the vet stitching up a filly who was in a bar fight overnight. It's amazing how cool my centeraisle barn is in the heat.


It has the aisle running N & S, porches on the east and west, a cupola, ridgeline vents and an insulated roof
https://picasaweb.google.com/carolp3231/Barn02#5572497194533701858

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 24, 2012, 09:49 PM
It has the aisle running N & S,

My aisles also run N/S, but I am in the older type dairy barn, with the upper level mostly closed off from the lower. I think the upper level acts as an insulator - both for summer heat, and winter cold. With just a couple of aisle fans, we never have horses sweating up except for maybe one or two a bit damp on 99+ degree days. When I had the shed row barns - stalls back to back with overhangs, all of the horses were dripping as soon as it was above 85, in spite of every horse having a fan aimed at him/her.

In the winter, the shed row buckets froze almost every night from Dec-Feb. In my old dairy style barn, I have about half a dozen nights that I have to break ice out of buckets.

I love, LOVE my old "ugly" dairy barns!

AliO
Jun. 25, 2012, 01:27 AM
It sounds to me that you and i have a very similar idea for our barns. I am doing a 6 stall (own 3, currently, train off the property right now, want the option to bring in a horse or two for board and training when the opportunity arises) shedrow. 12x12 stalls with a 12' wide dirt, matted aisle. I have a 24x24' tack/feed room on one end, with a large overhang to park the trailer under off the side of the tack room.

I too have had center aisle barns, and the only real benefit i see in them is the ability to close it in when its cold. Living in central Texas though, i don't have to worry much about that. I like the idea of a shedrow because its very open and airy, and i don't feel like its as much work as some other styles. With the dirt ground, i don't have to worry about sweeping the aisle which saves time (especially when you're as anal about it as i am lol) and seeing as the barn will be located at the end of one of my pastures, the aisle doubles as shelter for the horses when they are turned out. I also like that I can look out my window and see my horses, and the door to my tack room. I've also decided to go with a metal building, they are cost effective, are put up in a very short amount of time, and very low.maintenance.

Bluey
Jun. 25, 2012, 07:48 AM
I disagree that a shedrow aisle is any less maintenance than a center aisle.;)

Our shedrow barn aisle was dirt and we kept it vey clean and raked in a herringbone pattern, as most race training barns did.

There is about as much to sweeping a concrete center aisle as keeping a shedrow aisle looking neat.:yes:

The real advantage of a center aisle over a shedrow is that you are truly working with your horses out of the weather when it is bad outside.

You can have the center aisle barn have an overhang so the horses can have a shed to get under without being in the stalls as you say you have with your shedrow barn.
An overhang to the barn is what we have.
I have also seen management where some with just a few horses let them into part of the aisle as we do with the overhang, but I don't like that as well.

When it comes to airy, any center aisle barn can be made as airy as any shedrow barn, but it can also be closed, which you can't with a shedrow barn, other than individual stalls and tack/feedrooms, can't close your working area there.

Shedrow barns use about the same amount of materials, but only protect half as much area, not as efficient as center aisle barns.

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 25, 2012, 07:53 AM
I disagree that a shedrow aisle is any less maintenance than a center aisle.;)

Our shedrow barn aisle was dirt and we kept it vey clean and raked in a herringbone pattern, as most race training barns did.

There is about as much to sweeping a concrete center aisle as keeping a shedrow aisle looking neat.:yes:

:yes: :yes: and I can use the blower on my concrete aisle. :lol:

fiddleandco
Jun. 27, 2012, 11:02 AM
Thanks for the input; owning a large center-aisle (very nice ) barn right now, I know the ups and downs of the center aisle, and with our weather, we are still planning a shedrow with a concrete 'aisle way' in front. I am thinking of designing some sort of pull down cover to help protect/insulate stalls in the winter,.........not sure yet. We have fairly mild winters, considering, and as long as we place the stalls correctly on the property, they will be out of direct sun. I think the 'coolness' of a center aisle barn depends too on the shade it has and the insulation/ventilation system. One of my former clients ( I start horses ) had a large center aisle barn, but no shade. It was HOT all the time. Horrible. Our barn is covered/surrounded with trees, and is about 10 degrees cooler inside all the time-nice for summer.
Thanks for all the input!

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 27, 2012, 12:43 PM
My barn sits in the open with no shade at all, and actually I came from a shed row barn with lots of shade. My C/A barn is SO much cooler.

fatappy
Jun. 27, 2012, 02:06 PM
but... could those of you who have had a center aisle barn and a shedrow comment on this format... is this what you have had that is still very hot?

towards the bottom of the page... "22 x 46 Breezeway Barn with 10 x 36 ally way and 10 x 22 tack room as shown size can be change to meet your needs"

http://www.pennypincherbarns.com/BarnKits/ShedRowsRunIns.aspx

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 27, 2012, 02:24 PM
but... could those of you who have had a center aisle barn and a shedrow comment on this format... is this what you have had that is still very hot?

towards the bottom of the page... "22 x 46 Breezeway Barn with 10 x 36 ally way and 10 x 22 tack room as shown size can be change to meet your needs"

http://www.pennypincherbarns.com/BarnKits/ShedRowsRunIns.aspx

IMO, that would be the very hottest style, due to the tackroom blocking all air from that direction. Better to have a "clean" aisle that the air can flow all the way down, from both directions. Also, shed row type barns tend to be back to back, so no place for big windows on the opposite side.

With my C/A barn, I have the high roof, that traps daytime heat in the loft - just a small opening for the ladder. I also have really big windows (3'x4'?) in each stall - some of them have 2 windows. My cinderblock barn is also the one that stays coolest in summer, warmest in winter. I love, LOVE, LOVE my cinder block barn.

Also, for those of you in hot climates, I have a couple of stalls that are shed row. If I close the stall screens, yes SCREENS, the stalls are much hotter than if the horses have just a couple of covered chain stall gards across the doors. Sounds crazy but it is totally true. The only thing I can figure is maybe the horse's 99 degree breath is going outside, since they always have their heads out? Sounds crazy, but you can feel the temp difference. A definite plus of dutch doors rather than sliding, closed ones.

KrazyTBMare
Jun. 29, 2012, 12:16 AM
I have basically a shed row with front aisle and over hang. Everything was dirt floors when I moved in but I poured a concrete aisle and have slowly made changes over the years. Theres a lot I would change (over hang, build it on 12' not 10', etc) but it works and its safe.

After adding concrete and opening up the walls between the stalls, etc
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/389019_3923621096174_552554211_n.jpg

Front - sorry its so messy we had moved in a few months before and were still getting things sorted out
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/602427_3923622496209_1157585247_n.jpg

Stalls
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/582150_3923620256153_1467758707_n.jpg

I needed to have a bigger stall as I knew my young horse was going to grow to a big horse so I closed in the end of the aisle and made the 10x10 stall a 10x20 stall.
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/539786_3923624016247_311434902_n.jpg

I also now since closed in the wash rack area to make it my new tack room as right now my tack and feed room is the same. Here you can see the enclosed room - it has the black roofing felt on it here
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/181249_3698591150566_1129432676_n.jpg

And since Im still in the middle of finishing the new tack room, everything that was where the new room is now is kind of hanging out whereever I can find space for it.. :/
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/527714_3865907053359_2123129339_n.jpg

My main reasons for wanting a center aisle barn or at least a barn with a minimum of 4' over hangs is because when it rains and the wind blows my aisle gets wet, my stalls get wet, everything just gets wet. They also built the barn basically with the front facing north north-west and esp in the summer when the sun is setting it blasts into the aisle and its hot. My girlfriend has a center aisle which is cool but it also faces where the sun doesnt shine directly into it.

Overall, its a good barn and does what it needs to do. It was here when we bought the property and Ive just been making changes as I can afford to make it as good as possible.

Bluey
Jun. 29, 2012, 07:04 AM
The idea of having a barn is to work out of the weather.
Having worked in all kinds of barns, I will say, shedrow barn protect little for the same materials in a center aisle barn.

Figure a six stall shedrow, if it was built three stalls front to front.
Now you have the same barn, the same roof and sides, now with a center aisle out of the weather and the stall doors open to the middle also protected from snow and rain.

We had a shedrow barn in a square, which you think would protect some, but we still had to add curtains and still got rain and snow in there and in that formation, it was a fire trap and very labor intensive, you could not get a tractor there to handle any bigger stuff, had to carry the manure buckets all the way outside, every one of them, from 22 stalls, took long to clean and keep clean.
Would have been much better use of all that material in a traditional barn with a center aisle, to work in out of the weather:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Scan050March272007.jpg

As for airflow, any barn can be made where you can open it for airflow, as you can close it out of bad weather.

The only place a shedrow barn makes sense is in a very narrow property, where you may not room but for a stall and aisle, can't fit any more width for a barn.

Now, not everyone puts practical up front, some really like the looks of shedrow barns and that is fine too.

Fairview Horse Center
Jun. 29, 2012, 09:38 AM
you could not get a tractor there to handle any bigger stuff, had to carry the manure buckets all the way outside, every one of them, from 22 stalls

or, enhance a low spot outside to park a spreader in kind of a hole, build a bit of a wooden ramp with a portable extention across to the edge of the spreader, then just run wheelbarrows out, up, and dump right into the spreader. :winkgrin:

Personally, I just will not clean with buckets, even if a spreader is right outside the stall door. My back would never take it.