PDA

View Full Version : Pulling horse trailer with motorized RV



txladybug
Jun. 19, 2012, 02:52 PM
So I am beginning to do a bit of horse camping and competitive trail rides. I need some type of LQ. I currently have a three horse BP trailer with front and rear tack but no LQ, and was thinking about using a motor home to pull it so it could be used by my family for other trips and recreation. I am looking at used weekend package LQ trailers or getting into a Class C or Class A RV.

Has anyone else done this that can discuss the pros and cons? How much weight and trailer could you pull with your rig? I understand RVs may need some frame/suspension/hitch modifications to help them safely tow the added weight.

Guilherme
Jun. 19, 2012, 03:21 PM
You see a few of these, but not too many.

Few motorhomes are really set up for towing any significant weight. Horse trailers tend to be heavy (relative to boat, ATV, motorcycle, etc.) trailers.

One place you will see this kind of rig is in the motorsports group (NASCAR, etc.). If you want to see what they use (converted Freightliners, Volvos, and Peterbilts) go to http://www.racingjunk.com/category/1253/Toterhomes-RVs-Motorhomes.html?source=homeCategories

Towing puts a lot of stress on the transmission and drivetrain. If the MH tranny is not set up for it you can have a very expensive lesson in the suitability of your tow vehicle. Ditto, of course, for overstressing the tranny on a pickup truck of any type.

If I were going to go this way I'd look for a "garage" type unit big enough to convert to a horse box. Then pull a small car/truck behind (called a "toad" ;) ). That would give you Best of All Possible Worlds: comfort for the horses, comfort for the humans, and a small vehicle to get around in at your destination. :cool:

Good luck in your search.

G.

txladybug
Jun. 19, 2012, 03:28 PM
G. those horse box conversions are way out of my modest budget! I do see people pull their hot rods in an enclosed trailer behind RVs. It has to be similar weights. I called a local RV place and he said a Class C could easily pull 6500 lbs BEFORE beefing it up with the mods I mentioned. He said a Class A could pull a lot more.

Guilherme
Jun. 19, 2012, 06:32 PM
G. those horse box conversions are way out of my modest budget! I do see people pull their hot rods in an enclosed trailer behind RVs. It has to be similar weights. I called a local RV place and he said a Class C could easily pull 6500 lbs BEFORE beefing it up with the mods I mentioned. He said a Class A could pull a lot more.

I'm sure the salesman told you exactly that!!! :no:

Next time one does, ask them what kind of warranty they'll give you on the engine and drive train! ;)

I gave the Racing Junk site so that you could see what folks who don't want to die while towing use. They are not cheap, but then neither is my life. :)

Overloading MHs is pandemic and dangerous. That doesn't mean folks don't do it, only that they seldom realize what they are doing.

Personally, I think the truck/LQ trailer combo is the best one going for the vast majority of folks. There is a wide variety available and you've got the truck for errands/farm work when you're not on the road.

If you decide the MH route is for you then look up the Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating (GCVWR) for the MH. It's either on a placard (usually on the drivers door post) or in the owner's manual. It's the maximum legal number for weight of MH plus tow. Don't let anyone BS you about it not being important or they don't know what it is or they just can't find it.

Then, when you find it, take the MH to a CAT Scale (found at your local truck stop) and weigh it. DO NOT take the salesman's "estimate" or the "shipping weight" or any other number. This will likely cost you $25. And it will tell you just how much horse trailer you can tow safely. Oh, and don't forget to weigh the trailer, too. ;)

Good luck in your search.

G.

Heart's Journey
Jun. 20, 2012, 12:54 PM
I have several friends that pull trailers behind their motorhomes, but I don't know what the difference between classes is. One couple is on their 2nd motorhome and have been using this one for 10 years (first one lasted about 10 yrs) it's around 30' and has 2 slides, but I know it cost $100,000 or so new, so they're aren't cheap!

2Jakes that does post on here, had a motorhome to pull her
2H trailer and she hated it - said it had way too much movement, so she sold it.

ozjb
Jun. 21, 2012, 06:49 PM
I know families that do the same thing here. Seems to work OK. One lady sold her big horse truck and bought the RV and a 3 horse angle load.

She loves it! She wanted the bigger trailer because she did not want the horse stuff in the RV.

I am in Australia and while the gooseneck with living quarters might be ideal, the cost of the vehicle to pull it is cost prohibitive for most. An imported F250 or Dodge Ram will set you back around $150,000. Even old, old used F250s are around $60,000.

So, people tend to look at all sorts of options!

Flagstaff Foxhunter
Jun. 21, 2012, 07:04 PM
I know families that do the same thing here. Seems to work OK. One lady sold her big horse truck and bought the RV and a 3 horse angle load.

She loves it! She wanted the bigger trailer because she did not want the horse stuff in the RV.

I am in Australia and while the gooseneck with living quarters might be ideal, the cost of the vehicle to pull it is cost prohibitive for most. An imported F250 or Dodge Ram will set you back around $150,000. Even old, old used F250s are around $60,000.

So, people tend to look at all sorts of options!

Wow! I'd love to ship you my 2006 Dodge Ram Diesel. Is there an import ban in place?

The option used to be a pickup with a camper and a trailer. I'm not sure why that's fallen so out of favor. It's not that difficult to mount the camper on the truckbed and take it off when not needed. It's versatile and the OP could keep using the bumper pull trailer. Campers range in price from free--I've gotten two that way--to very expensive.

If you have a heavy duty truck, the combined weight should be no issue at all.

meaty ogre
Jun. 21, 2012, 07:55 PM
A gas class a absolutely wil not do the job. Most of them are overloaded towing nothing. A small class c or diesel pusher or a class b can work.

Longer class c's are too heavy and have too long of an overhang from rear axle to hitch. Smaller c's without slides are capable of towing more. Slides weigh a lot and can unbalance the vehicle. Some roadtreks can tow 7500lbs.

You may already know this, but subtract gvwr from gcwr to get approx. Tow capacity. Many motorhomes are other gvwr when you pack them or fill water tanks. I've done a lot of research on this. Actually got a diesel pusher and then got rid of it...40' tow vehicle was way too much for me to drive. Oh, and rv salesmen are way worse than car salesmen...believe nothing they tell you.

Pplmotorhomes.com is a fun site.

NEWT
Jun. 21, 2012, 08:33 PM
txladybug,
The folks who operate HillViewFarms horse catalog do a lot of horse camping with various RV's over the years.
Here is a link to their photos:
http://www.american-flex.com/photo.htm

quarterhorse4me
Jun. 21, 2012, 09:14 PM
I guess you should ask yourself what are your ultimate plans. We have friends, who are an older/retired couple. They use their large RV to pull a 3 horse bumper pull. They only pull two horses and have been all over NC with this set up. That includes the mountains. It makes sense for them as they also use the RV for non-horse trips.

If all you plan on doing is horses and not cruising around the country in an RV, it might make for sense for you to get a nice horse trailer with a living quarters that meets your needs. If the motor gives out in your truck it is not nearly as large of a setback as if your RV died.

ReSomething
Jun. 21, 2012, 09:46 PM
. . .The option used to be a pickup with a camper and a trailer. I'm not sure why that's fallen so out of favor. It's not that difficult to mount the camper on the truckbed and take it off when not needed. It's versatile and the OP could keep using the bumper pull trailer. Campers range in price from free--I've gotten two that way--to very expensive.

If you have a heavy duty truck, the combined weight should be no issue at all.

Yep, we used to see folks towing their Bayliners with that set up all the time. I think it went away in the horse world once folks got away from the old two horse Miley or Stidham and into the multi horse goosenecks. Can't put a gooseneck and a camper in the same place.

My FIL does dog shows and for a while had a custom body on an Econoline 350 chassis for the dogs, towing a 35' travel trailer for them, then he moved up to the rock star bus, a diesel pusher which I guess just means the engine is in the back. He could tow anything he pleased with that thing but prefers to pull out the settees and put kennels there. I live on a major north south interstate and rarely see an RV towing anything but the small car. Maybe every once in a while I'll see a small sailboat or a ut trailer with dirt bikes or a real small cargo trailer.

At some point an RV towing something else is going to go over the minimum length that requires a CDL too, so you have to watch out for that. (actually I take that back, CDL's seem to be weight based only but I'm sure there's some regulation on the books about maximum legths)

Bank of Dad
Jun. 21, 2012, 10:04 PM
I am on my second motorhome and would never pull a trailer with it. Mine definately does not have enough power. You would have to have a really powerful one to tow a three horse BP. I have seen smaller class C's pulling small QH trailers, but not too many. You have to have a big turning ratio, I've gotten stuck in some bad places towing a car, but I could disconnect the car and straighten things out.

Google the Open Roads Forum, the big site for RVers. This question comes up a lot for them.

Macimage
Jun. 22, 2012, 02:20 AM
We had a new Class A diesel motorhome to tow our 3 horse slant load trailer. We took it over the grapevine here in Calif. and with the diesel motor you couldn't even tell the trailer was back there. It's like purchasing a newer diesel truck such as a Dodge Ram 2500/3500 or Ford F250/350. Many owners of those trucks state that they don't even feel their horse trailers due to the power of their motor.

We looked into gas motorhomes but concluded that they weren't really safe for towing a horse trailer. As previously mentioned, many times they are already maxed out once you load them with people, fuel, water, etc.