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Swampskeeter
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:16 PM
Was outside when my 4 yr old son said Ruger (dog) has something. It was a baby bunny. I took it from him. Bunny is alive, do not know where nest is. Son wants to keep. I just want to make sure I can help it and turn t back loose. Any ideas??

Laurierace
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:18 PM
You need to find a wildlife rehabber. Very rarely do they survive even if uninjured but the rehabber can at least give it a fair shot.

Swampskeeter
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:23 PM
Yea that's not gonna happen. Flame me if you want but we have tons of rabbits around here. I told my son it would probably die. If it lives just wanted to know how I could help it.

Laurierace
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:26 PM
You can't make a phone call? Why bother posting about it then? Probably took more time to type that out then it would to search for the number. They might even pick it up so you wouldn't be bothered.

kookicat
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:35 PM
They do usually die. I couldn't sleep at night if I hadn't given it the best chance I could though, so I'm on the 'call a rehabber' bandwagon. They'll likely have other babies that it can be with.

Derby Lyn Farms
Jun. 16, 2012, 04:46 PM
If you aren't going to call a rehabber the best thing you can do is put it back outside and leave it alone. Human contact is only going to make it worse.

zipperfoot
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:29 PM
Here's some information that may help you: http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/orphan.html

Swampskeeter
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:36 PM
You can't make a phone call? Why bother posting about it then? Probably took more time to type that out then it would to search for the number. They might even pick it up so you wouldn't be bothered.

Sorry this just hit me wrong. In my area I don't even know who to call. Now there is another one from the other dog. They are together. I want to turn them loose. But don't want the dogs to get them again.

Yea I know you will say pen the dogs up, but they keep the varmits out of my garden.

Nezzy
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:37 PM
You need to find a wildlife rehabber. Very rarely do they survive even if uninjured but the rehabber can at least give it a fair shot.

THIS, Bunny will probably die due to stress. When i worked at the wildlife center we lost more bunnies than anything..

Zu Zu
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:38 PM
No advice just JINGLES & AO for the bunny ~

Swampskeeter
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:50 PM
Thanks guys I keep telling my son it would probably die. Now there is another one that the other dog got. (not smart bunnies). They are together. I thought I would let them rest and put them back out close to where I "think" the nest might be.

Laurierace
Jun. 16, 2012, 05:59 PM
If you want to PM your address I will do the search for you.

Zu Zu
Jun. 16, 2012, 06:04 PM
I did find a dog with four bunnies and rescued the bunnies ... :yes:

Flopsy ~ Mopsy ~ Twinkle And Peter ~

Peter passed away that same day .. but the three bunnies were fine and ate (Esbilac) or some mixture & grew and played ! * Feedings every four hours but I was in high school and it was exam time so I was up studying and the feedings did not cause any conflict.

I "housed " in a Girl Scout Cookie Box and hung the Bunny Box in my ventilated locker during the exam and feed them between exams :yes::D.... they were fine ...:cool::lol:

All too soon :( it was time to set them FREE ~~~ at the farm in the woods ~took two tries ... first time I simply could not bring myself to give them up :no:... but on the second try I set them FREE and cried and :cry: cried ...

I did ALL I could for them and pray they had good lives :yes:

Tearful now just thinking about my three wild bunnies ~ they were something special ! :cool:

LauraKY
Jun. 16, 2012, 06:14 PM
If you're not going to call the rehabber, just break their necks and put them out of their misery. Odds are your dogs will just pick them up again.

I'm with the why did you bother posting if you're not going to do the right thing crowd.

craz4crtrs
Jun. 16, 2012, 06:27 PM
There isn't any rabbit rehabs around here, so I did the best I could with the bigger bunny my lab brought home 3 years ago. I kept it in a crate with some hay, dandelions etc. I had tried it before and lost the baby, it was just too little. The one I save did fine. I followed some instructions I found online, but the main thing was fluids. I did find that feeding lettuce for fluids worked great, and then the bunny ate grass and hay just fine. When he got to be about 8 ounces, I turned him loose. We saw him around for a long time and the dog learned not to retrieve bunnies. I think I kept him for about 3-4 weeks. He was 2 oz when my dog put him in my hands. I weighed him daily on my postage scale. And yes he was a he, I learned how to sex bunnies.

I say go ahead and try it, they won't make it if you put them back. Mom most likely abandoned them, but that is an option, too.

kookicat
Jun. 16, 2012, 06:32 PM
Please don't feed rabbits too much lettuce. It can give them the runs.

Swampskeeter
Jun. 16, 2012, 06:38 PM
Well sorry if I offended people for posting about this this, but I did put them back out under the the tree I think they came from.

LauraKY I could have done that but was feeling a little soft today. Could have let the dogs kill them. Sooner or later they will get to my garden and die anyway if the dogs get them again. Thought they could at least have a little chance since there is plenty of other food out here to eat.

We are very dry dry here in Ohio think maybe they where looking for water??

Zu Zu
That is what I call my one dog that I took in (Zu Zu)
Thank you for the input. I am mostly a lurker here so do not know your story. But I think that is the most I have ever seen you post.
Take Care.

craz4crtrs
Jun. 16, 2012, 07:06 PM
Please don't feed rabbits too much lettuce. It can give them the runs.

Yes, but it is excellent for getting fluids into a rabbit that doesn't understand a water bottle.

S1969
Jun. 16, 2012, 11:07 PM
Wow, do people really rehabilitate baby rabbits that their dogs find? Maybe it's not "the right thing" but honestly, who can possibly keep up with the number of wild animals our domesticated ones bring home? Usually my pets will kill them (cats being the most vicious), but the dogs do bring them back still alive, on occasion.

While I realize it's not "internet discussion board friendly"...the reality is that wild animals die very often. If not by other wild animals, starvation, disease, or cars....occasionally the domesticated pets do kill them.

I don't brag about it but I can't possibly rehab every wild critter that enters my yard. Nor do I want to, since the darn rabbits are decimating my garden! I hope that the presence of my dogs & cats will deter them from setting up shop in my yard....there are only about 200 acres adjacent to my yard they can choose....

To the OP: you can only do your best. Maybe an injured bunny will survive if given the chance. Otherwise, a quick death isn't inhumane.

Laurierace
Jun. 16, 2012, 11:17 PM
I don't really care what she did with them but she asked for help and I told her the easiest way to get him help. I didn't know she meant help throwing them back out in the yard.

Guilherme
Jun. 17, 2012, 07:21 AM
You know, the funny part of all this is that the OP said she keeps the dogs to keep "varmints" out of her garden. Rabbits, by definition, are "varmints." So the dog, in taking out baby "varmints" is doing it's job; it's following the principle that "nits make lice."

If you want to keep a garden for human consumption then you're going to be "offing" wild life from time to time. If you don't want to do that then either don't garden or don't expect to eat much from it.

G.

D Taylor
Jun. 17, 2012, 08:38 AM
Baby bunnies are not any harder to raise than baby kittens. If very small and eyes still shut they need a warm nest and feedings of milk (I use goat milk but quality kitten replacers work too) with a quick groom (rub) and warm moist paper towel on the backside so they go.

As they grow a little older they can drink milk from a saucer just like kittens as they begin to nibble greens. They groom themselves at this age. Which is good cuz just like kittens they will step into the milk with their front paws. Wild rabbits have an edge and do not make great pets. I put them in a chicken wire pen outside once they get rangy and bold and after a few days they figure their own way out and they are on their own by then. If you did your job right they will be bigger (better fed) and healthier than their wild conter parts. They have a fair chance of survival (just like their wild counter parts)as long as you provide an area from plenty of cover for them to escape into.

Raised dozen of orphan rabbits over the decades and the ones with old wounds that have been victimized by cats rarely do well. But never lost one that the dogs gifted me with. They grow so fast the real work is over in a just a week or 2.

cloudyandcallie
Jun. 17, 2012, 02:33 PM
My mother has rehabbed many baby bunnies who were caught by my aunt and uncle's dogs in South Carolina. They never got tame, so she returned all back to the farm when they reached adulthood and had a better chance of survival.

Bunnies are prey, so they don't have long lives in the wild. That's why they "**** like bunnies." I've always had cats, and the bunnies they used to bring home (before all became house cats many decades ago) went into shock and did not survive. (We had bunnies in subdivisions in Atlanta.) Those caught by my relatives' dogs on farms did survive.

If you leave a young bunny "where you found it" then the hawks and owls and coyotes will get it. Best to put it in a pen and raise it and then turn it loose. Of course no bunny is going to survive long outside. It just made us all feel batter in my family to feed them for a few months and then turn them loose back where they came from.

Bacardi1
Jun. 17, 2012, 05:31 PM
Baby bunnies are not any harder to raise than baby kittens. If very small and eyes still shut they need a warm nest and feedings of milk (I use goat milk but quality kitten replacers work too) with a quick groom (rub) and warm moist paper towel on the backside so they go.

As they grow a little older they can drink milk from a saucer just like kittens as they begin to nibble greens. They groom themselves at this age. Which is good cuz just like kittens they will step into the milk with their front paws. Wild rabbits have an edge and do not make great pets. I put them in a chicken wire pen outside once they get rangy and bold and after a few days they figure their own way out and they are on their own by then. If you did your job right they will be bigger (better fed) and healthier than their wild conter parts. They have a fair chance of survival (just like their wild counter parts)as long as you provide an area from plenty of cover for them to escape into.

Raised dozen of orphan rabbits over the decades and the ones with old wounds that have been victimized by cats rarely do well. But never lost one that the dogs gifted me with. They grow so fast the real work is over in a just a week or 2.

Ditto. Have had good luck with raising wild baby Cottontail Rabbits as well. Of course, as you stated, a lot has to do with how they were injured during capture. You can't read internal injuries & small but deep puncture wounds very well. But it is very heartening to raise the little devils up & let them go - even if they might do some damage in the garden. While I do love to garden, I also love to have a "live & let live" policy as much as humanly possible. My vegetables aren't really worth full-scale war against critters that were not only here first, but are just doing what they do for survival. And I fare pretty darn well using passive protection - fencing, floating row covers, etc., etc. Works for me.

jawa
Jun. 18, 2012, 08:18 PM
My lab brought home a baby bunny this spring. I "Googled" how to help a baby bunny and found information about size= age to be able to know that even though the bu many my dog brought home seemed small, it was at the weaned / on its own stage of life. The bunny just hadn't figured out how to evade and defend itself yet.

I took it to the barn and released it, rather than return it to the same location my dog found it, as she is relentless once she knows where to find something. I know that changing its location entirely was not ideal, but keeping the dog away from the original area wasn't going to happen either. I choose the lesser of two evils.

oldpony66
Jun. 19, 2012, 09:03 AM
For those of you who suggested a wildlife rehabber - good suggestion but some people live an hour or more from a regular veterinarian and there really are no "wildlife rehabbers" within a reasonable day's drive. I doubt someone from 4-5 hours away is going to come get a baby bunny, although if contacted they may have good suggestions on what to do with it.

OP, I understand your concern though. I have a soft spot for babies of any creature!

downen
Jun. 19, 2012, 04:30 PM
Very simple. The next time poochie comes with a little furry present, take it from him, put a leash on poochie and he will take you right back to the nest. They are usually in clear sight but you will never find it yourself. If baby is alive, put him back with his bros/sisters and mom will relocate the family overnight.

Bacardi1
Jun. 19, 2012, 05:49 PM
If baby is alive, put him back with his bros/sisters and mom will relocate the family overnight.

Not a given - especially if the young ones are furred out or starting to fur out, even if their eyes are still closed. "Mom" may definitely return to the nest if it hasn't been destroyed & is still under cover, but if it is disturbed, she most likely won't bother relocating any young. Relocate them where? Baby rabbits are born quite large, & rabbits ain't mice or rats, who are smarter & can easily complete such a feat. Momma rabbit will most likely simply abandon the nest altogether & start another elsewhere for a new brood (rabbits can raise 2-3 litters a year in temperate climates).

downen
Jun. 19, 2012, 05:52 PM
Not a given - especially if the young ones are furred out or starting to fur out, even if their eyes are still closed. "Mom" may definitely return to the nest if it hasn't been destroyed & is still under cover, but if it is disturbed, she most likely won't bother relocating any young. Relocate them where? Baby rabbits are born quite large, & rabbits ain't mice or rats, who are smarter & can easily complete such a feat. Momma rabbit will most likely simply abandon the nest altogether & start another elsewhere for a new brood (rabbits can raise 2-3 litters a year in temperate climates).

I agree, but I still think it's a better bet than just letting them loose just anywhere, right? The gist of my post was using doggie to locate the nest.

Bacardi1
Jun. 19, 2012, 06:39 PM
But she also said that her "doggie" is normally loose outside, so locating the nest via the doggie & releasing the baby there is rather a bizarre form of torture, isn't it?

downen
Jun. 19, 2012, 06:59 PM
But she also said that her "doggie" is normally loose outside, so locating the nest via the doggie & releasing the baby there is rather a bizarre form of torture, isn't it?

OK, I guess I was just relating this to my own experience. After my doggie pointed out the bunny nest, I put the baby back and locked my dog in a fenced yard for 24 hours. Babies were gone the next day, and doggies never found them again.

Appsolute
Jun. 19, 2012, 07:42 PM
Didn’t know people took the time to rehab baby bunnies. Tons of them around here, I try to avoid them with my car. Resident fox is seen at least once a week with one. Saw a red tailed hawk pick up one last week.. luckily my dog and cat have left them alone.

They are prey animals, I always thought of them as LUNCH for the larger local animals… don’t say “multiply like rabbits” for nothing…

Bacardi1
Jun. 19, 2012, 07:46 PM
Didn’t know people took the time to rehab baby bunnies. Tons of them around here, I try to avoid them with my car. Resident fox is seen at least once a week with one. Saw a red tailed hawk pick up one last week.. luckily my dog and cat have left them alone.

They are prey animals, I always thought of them as LUNCH for the larger local animals… don’t say “multiply like rabbits” for nothing…

I know, I know. But when hubby has accidentally gone over a nest with the lawnmower & we're both having a major guilt trip, I have to say that it does my heart good when I'm able to sometimes successfully able to raise the little buggers & release them. Maybe I should just consider it "adding to nature's buffet"? Regardless - feel good moments.:)

wendy
Jun. 20, 2012, 11:03 AM
I think it's quite cruel to just put a dog-caught baby outside. It's probably been abandoned by mom (slow starve to death), and/or has internal injuries (slow death); just kill it quickly and get it over with instead of throwing it out to slowly suffer and die.

If it's an endangered species, then sure, try to save it.

But a bunny? most people try to get rid of them.

Swampskeeter
Jun. 20, 2012, 12:34 PM
I know, I know. But when hubby has accidentally gone over a nest with the lawnmower & we're both having a major guilt trip, I have to say that it does my heart good when I'm able to sometimes successfully able to raise the little buggers & release them. Maybe I should just consider it "adding to nature's buffet"? Regardless - feel good moments.

This is sort of the way I was feeling the other day.

The bunnies did have there fur and eyes were open. But not sure if they had internal injuries. They did crawl back into the tall thick grass under the pine tree where I think they came from. So not sure what happened to them. It is really thick under there.

It is interesting that some here have had luck in raising them. Will have to remember this.
Thanks