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Jair
Apr. 24, 2001, 09:51 AM
While I was riding last night, there was another rider on a horse who was having difficulties going down a line in the hunter ring. The horse did not want to jump the second fence, so would stop and then duck out to the side, but as soon as the rider put her legs on to send the horse forward, it would rear up. The first time it wasn't so bad - more like little hops, but on the two more subsequent attempts the rearing got very dangerous and high up off the ground.

The girl riding him (who I should mentioned is a competent rider, and known for being patient with young horses etc.) made a point of going with the horse as he went up, and not pulling on the reins, and then trying to send him forward once he landed. Despite her patience and attempts to stop the rearing, the horse proceeded to rear again, and this time the girl gave him a good crack between the ears with the end of her crop just as he was leaving the ground - interestingly enough it worked, and obviously got the message across as the horse stopped. I have heard many people say never hit the horse over the poll when it rears, and then some say that that is what you should do.

This whole episode made me realize that I really don't know what the correct method is in dealing with a horse that rears. Aside from not pulling back and staying with the horse.

So, what should you do if your horse rears, and what do you do to stop it if the horse continues to do so?

Jair
Apr. 24, 2001, 09:51 AM
While I was riding last night, there was another rider on a horse who was having difficulties going down a line in the hunter ring. The horse did not want to jump the second fence, so would stop and then duck out to the side, but as soon as the rider put her legs on to send the horse forward, it would rear up. The first time it wasn't so bad - more like little hops, but on the two more subsequent attempts the rearing got very dangerous and high up off the ground.

The girl riding him (who I should mentioned is a competent rider, and known for being patient with young horses etc.) made a point of going with the horse as he went up, and not pulling on the reins, and then trying to send him forward once he landed. Despite her patience and attempts to stop the rearing, the horse proceeded to rear again, and this time the girl gave him a good crack between the ears with the end of her crop just as he was leaving the ground - interestingly enough it worked, and obviously got the message across as the horse stopped. I have heard many people say never hit the horse over the poll when it rears, and then some say that that is what you should do.

This whole episode made me realize that I really don't know what the correct method is in dealing with a horse that rears. Aside from not pulling back and staying with the horse.

So, what should you do if your horse rears, and what do you do to stop it if the horse continues to do so?

AHC
Apr. 24, 2001, 09:53 AM
I've been told the crack on the poll with a stick is effective. I've also heard some say that if the horse is a rearer, carry an egg with you and when the horse goes up, crack the egg over their poll. Never seen it done, but I have it on good authority that it works.

1205
Apr. 24, 2001, 09:55 AM
Put draw reins between their legs, when they start acting up pull on the Draw reins and they canrt pull themselves up into a rear. Thats whay my friend does and her horses hasnt reared since.

VTrider
Apr. 24, 2001, 09:58 AM
For real Jair, email Colin...she helped me solve my horse's rearing problem. Her and DMK both...I am dead serious, ask them.

What worked for me was, As soon as I thought that he may even be thinking of rearing...I dug my left spur into him and pinned his head to my knee and made him do some tight circles for a while (to let him think about what he had done LOL). This worked like a gem and he rarely think about being dumb...knock on wood.

havaklu
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:02 AM
like the rider had it under control.

Based on your description - she knew full well how to handle the situation. You gotta have some skill to be able to stay on and crack a rearer over the head.

My approach is to try and prevent the rear IF you think it's coming by keeping their hind feet moving. Or get OFF. LOL!

I disagree about the draw reins suggestion given the rider was jumping. Also draw reins can incite a horse to rear if not used correctly.

jreventer
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:02 AM
I would advise against using draw reins unless you are incredibly competent and even then I would say not to. If the horse has draw reins on and does try to rear they will lose their balance very easily and flip...
I have been fortunate enough to not have a horse who really rears(like what I beleive Jair was talking about, not just come up halfway)...I have always been taught to send them forward but I think that that is not always practical, sounds like this girl handled it about as well as anyone else would have. If I were in her position i would not hesistate to pop the horse on the poll with the whip.
Rearing is one of the most dnagerous habits in my opinion. I have also heard the water balloon trick(but you also must be very skilled)...of course this is assuming it is not a pain, tack, rider problem

"There are times when you can trust a horse, time when you can't, and times when you have to."

DMK
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:13 AM
There are pros and cons to most things people have suggested, but a lot of it comes down to knowing the horse you are on, and being good at reading the situation. The first and foremost thing to do is KNOW that you must get the horse's feet moving. Rearing is usually just a really nasty way of saying "I WON'T GO FORWARD", but it can be "I'm really, really scared..."

With that in mind, my first plan of attack is to take the decision out of the horse's hands (or feet as the case may be!). If a horse starts to rear, I whip his head around to my knee and move his hind end off with my leg (kindly or with great vigor, depending on how entrenched and nasty the rear behavior might be). This serves two purposes: First, he is moving his feet and it is MY idea; second, a horse with his head to your knee can't rear. We circle a few times like this, then I ask for FORWARD again. If the rear repeats, we repeat circling behavior with more vigor, for lack of a better word, and so on until FORWARD is achieved.

Eventually the horse will get tired of staggering around in a circle and decide that forward is easier than rearing or circling. And I won't hesitate to use lots of voice and stick along with my leg if he insists on repeating the behavior. Rearing is nasty stuff and needs an appropriate response! And of course when they do go forward, that is no time to get picky about what speed or frame - reward forward even if it is the most pissed of spine jarring trot you have ever sat on.

After you know the horse, you can generally catch the rear before they even commit to it which is safer for all concerned.

If you REALLY know your horse, you might know he is the kind that will tolerate being whacked between the ears, and decide that a whacking is not worth the pleasure of a rear. I don't particularly object to the hitting between the ears - I am no fan of rearing, and if it works on a particular horse, then more power to the person. What I am most concerned with is taking a willful horse with a bad behavior and turning him into a scared, defensive horse who flips over on said rider. That's where the "know your horse" part comes in real handy.

When they are rearing, you do want to try to not overbalance them, hence the more forward seat with a following hand. That is just good riding and a strong dose of self-preservation!

Albion
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:16 AM
My trainer did the egg thing on my pony mare - after we had ruled out physical pain, tack, rider error, etc. At first it was just those baby hops, but she went up with me several times pretty high - nothing close to flipping over, but enough to be quite dangerous. My trainer got on, and when she went up (really up), she cracked her over the head with a raw egg. She came right down & never did it again.

I still remember her shocked expression, with raw egg all over the top of her head.

Sounds crazy, but it worked on an ultra-b*tchy, VERY tempermental mare. I've heard other "success" stories with this method too - the pony mare I had was a little whipshy, and I don't think whacking her over her head would have quite the same effect.

-Albion

Elmo
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:24 AM
I've sat on a few bad rearers, and I do both the whip between the ears thing, and the tiny little circle thing. Both work well! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Nylar
Apr. 24, 2001, 10:46 AM
I'm not a big fan of cracking the horse between the ears for ANY reason, but I do understand that it works. I think I'd prefer the tight circles, but that's just me.

I've fortunately not had to deal with this so far, but a friend has been training a chronic rearer. He got her to stop by carrying a floppy hat with him. When the mare went to rear, he waved it by her eye and shoved her forward. It worked, she hasn't reared anytime lately as far as I know.

*Nylar*
http://www.geocities.com/dunnbypicasso/

Lucassb
Apr. 24, 2001, 11:17 AM
is such a nasty habit - the ultimate rejection of the rider's aids. It is not just no, I won't go forward... it is HELL NO I WON'T GO FORWARD, the worst of all possible sins.

Cracking the horse a good one between the ears, in my opinion, is not a bad response - many horses are cured after one such experience, having become convinced that there is some mysterious monster lurking "up there" ready to inflict a good whack... ditto the use of eggs, water balloons etc (the theory is that the horse thinks the water, gooey egg etc is really his BLOOD) but both are tough to do unless you have an absolutely independent seat, hand and leg. It is quite easy to overbalance a rearer when you are lifting your hand/arm etc to deliver the punishment.

For that reason, I am in favor of the turning in circles method- preferably as the horse is going up, before he gets up too high - but I have used all three methods and have found them all to work about the same.

Wicky
Apr. 24, 2001, 11:23 AM
related to our assessment of the entire picture - that my horse hadn't been started correctly and had no respect for his people. So first, in the round pen, we established respect. Then, we had a running martingale on, for additional leverage (he's big and strong), and I did the head to knee thing, with lots of kicking, yelling and some dressage whip. We kept circling till he stopped, then I made him go forward. After about three half-hearted attempts (after the round pen, only the first was really high and scary), he has quit and hasn't gone up for at least a month! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I think one of the most important things is that now I feel that I can control him if he is stupid. That is, in my conscious mind. My subconscious is still quite nervous.

My trainer mentioned the egg thing, but I am not convinced that I am coordinated enough to do that while a horse is rearing - same with hitting with a crop.

City Filly
Apr. 24, 2001, 11:34 AM
i read a book by a british, english version of monty roberts, though i forget his name... he said that usually rearing is a pain/fear response and stressed not to punish it 'til you know that's not the cause. then he says you should smack your horse's belly, since that's his most vulnerable spot when he rears. it teaches the horse that when he's trying to assert dominance over you he's not going to be successful. accordign to this guy, you can do it from the saddle, and it prevents the horse from associating pain with the rider. i would think it would be okay from the ground, but more difficult from the saddle. anyway, never tried it, it's just another idea.

brilyntrip
Apr. 24, 2001, 11:35 AM
agree with DMK it is a refusal to go forward .Do not use draw reins serious injury if horse flips over on you!The leg spin works but you have to be quick as rabbit! Have had several sent to me because of this when I broke young horses, the egg or a baggie with jello works too but again you have to be quick .My personal feeling is that once a horse has mastered this very bad habit you must be quite a horse man to break the habit.I was successful with some but one I had one that was so bad about it that after three weeks I sent him back to his owner because I literally felt if I got hurt badly I could've been crippled .So be warned unless you are very compitent do not attempt to train this out alone!

AAJumper
Apr. 24, 2001, 11:35 AM
I had a chronic rearer, and my trainer recommended hitting him on the poll with the crop. That worked...for a while. He eventually figured out how to rear and twist his head so that it was difficult to smack him...and then he'd buck. So it may work once or twice, but I don't think it's necessarily a long term fix. In this particular situation, the trainer never helped me fix the problem and I subsequently left her (also after finding out the horse had navicular problems which I had suspected but was convinced by my trainer that I was imagining things....LONG STORY!). I have since heard that the circling mentioned by everyone is an effective way of dealing with a rearer. Fortunately, I have not had to deal with that problem again!

Flash44
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:05 PM
If you try to hit the horse on the poll and miss, you may put out his eye.

moose
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What worked for me was, As soon as I thought that he may even be thinking of rearing...I dug my left spur into him and pinned his head to my knee and made him do some tight circles for a while VTRIDER <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

From my little bit of experience, I agree with VTRIDER and DMK on this. Usually a rear is the beginning of a pivot/rollback to go the other way-so you need to catch and double them before they accomplish it. I've also found that to gallop them, hard, once you've got them facing the right direction, can reinforce the "go forward".

I've been around people who subscribe to the whack them over the head theory, and have tried it myself- I think it's done in frustration. If any thing I think you endanger your self doing it.

Another one that I've heard of and seen, but don't quite have the kahungas to try (and hope to never have to) would be to step down and pull them over as they go up, and then sit on their neck. I've read that it can work, but quite honestly if a horse is that bad, I'd be shipping him or paying some one else to try it.

VA
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:27 PM
My boyfriend used to train horses and one was particulary horrible about rearing. Nothing worked. So as a last resort, he took it up a hill and when it reared up, he leaned back and pulled the horse over so the horse fell on his back (jumping very quickly out of the way!)

This had worked 100% of the time, except for this horse which proceeded to rear again almost immediately after my boyfriend got back on. So, my boyfriend told the owner to sell it straight away.

VTrider
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:28 PM
EXACTLY MOOSE!

Think people...what is the most collected movement a horse can do - it's a REAR! A horse can't rear if it's nose is poked out! If you horse is getting behind the vertical...and you THINK he may be getting ready to rear...throw your anti'rear plan into action IMMEDIATELY!!! Don't give him another split second to think about it!

DMK
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:35 PM
VA, it's not that the method you described doesn't work... it's just that I don't want to die if he loses balance on one leg and falls over on me as I jump off.

Some training methods work, but to quote a business axiom, the price of acquisition simply isn't worth it.

VA
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:43 PM
You wouldn't catch me doing that, unless I was on a 12 hand pony and my feet were already touching the ground.

I should have made the subject *Don't try this at home!*

MHM
Apr. 24, 2001, 12:53 PM
Two words: "Goodbye, Trigger!" /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

jreventer
Apr. 24, 2001, 01:01 PM
Va-I have also seen that done by a very experienced rider. The mare had gotten very aggressive(like she'd attack people because another trainer thought he could work her into submission). She would bolt, rear, etc. The rider took her on a hill, she reared, he flipped her. She never did it again. I would use this method only as the absolute last resort and you wouldn't see me doing it

"There are times when you can trust a horse, time when you can't, and times when you have to."

hunterested
Apr. 24, 2001, 01:51 PM
I started reading this topic and was all set to reply but as I read through it, it dawned on me that there are some really good posters here on the COTH BB. While some mention ruling out pain, etc. first...others offer some great (tried and true) experiences in their advice. It is a well rounded "conversation" as most serious topics are. I really don't have anything I can add except that you guys are a great "think tank" and we are lucky to have such a helpful, intelligent, experienced group of "advisors" to go to for brain picking! GOOD JOB, EVERYONE!!!
COTH BB RULES /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Reckoning
Apr. 24, 2001, 02:19 PM
I've got one who rears. For him, its a fear of being reprimanded when he's fresh. He rears if he anticipates being pulled up hard. By correcting a spook by bending him away from whatever is bothering him, I have minimized his desire to rear. When he does rear out of fear, I try to reassure him rather than reprimand him. Its been more productive for this particular horse than beating him... I get the feeling he's seen enough of that to last a lifetime already.

Horses like this one rear to evade the rider out of base fear. That's always a good clue that it might be time to re-evaluate how you ride/treat the horse. Rearing is evading the rider, so if the horse rears figuring out what triggers it is the best way to decide on a course of action. If the horse rears because it can and he/she may be able to dislodge the rider, one may want to consider reprimanding the horse in a way that reinforces who is dominate in the relationship. Just my $0.02 or $0.08, depending on Greenspan's plan for the economy.

Reckoning
Apr. 24, 2001, 02:23 PM
Second thought on the matter- a baggie of warm water broken open over the horses head when he rears will work even better than an egg. The temperature of the water makes them thinks they're bleeding and will scare the daylights out of the horse. I wouldn't recommend it unless the horse rears with malice.

second chance
Apr. 24, 2001, 02:24 PM
My method has been mentioned a lot before. I do the stick inbetween the poll thing. Except I used a stick that when you fling it, it does not bend. When they land, grab one rein up by the bit and let go of the other and just pull on it until s<he> settles.

My tb that I used to own reared straight up and fell over, luckly sending me flying off his butt and like 3 feet to the other side of him when he landed.

You really should be able to feel when your horse is sucking back behind your leg. When you feel that just do a 10 meter circle. Then go back to what you were doing.

I was told by an event trainer<Lynn Cotes Holmes> that you should be able to change your horse's mind when he feels like hes' going to blow up.

My tb almost hung me in an apple tree, he backed up and would not go forward if I looped the reins, kicked him or even used the whip on him.... then she came over and yanked the reins out of my hand and then got me untangled from the branches of the apple tree and told me to get off him and she got on him. Granted, she had a set of legs that could squish the largest pumpkin... he would not even think of going up again.

so, all in all, a horse can not rear if he is going forward and a horse can not buck if s<he> is going forward


just my $.02

~~~nellie~~~

Apr. 24, 2001, 02:30 PM
This has been already said before, but yes, hitting the horse on the poll with the end of a whip or using an egg does work. And draw reins.

My horse WAS a rearer. It was her bit... a snaffle and a low mouthed palette horse does not mix, lol. No more snaffles = No more rearing for my horse /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

And if you're ever in a situation where a horse rears really high like high-ho... put your arms around it's neck so you'll stay on.

- K a h l u a -
PIX (http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1521322)

AWIP
Apr. 24, 2001, 02:44 PM
what can help with the quickness and aim (to reduce chances of striking the eye) is to carry the crop inverted like a jockey. This places the crop end closer to where you want to use it reducing swing distence & preventing the horse from seeing it coming and twisting away. It also prevents you from hitting too hard in temper, making it a correction, not an abuse.

Lisi
Apr. 24, 2001, 03:01 PM
someone said that the crack on the poll only works a few times... probably if you get it hard and sharp the first one or two times, the message will go through completely and the horse will decide never to rear again. unless its a really consistent rearer.

baymare
Apr. 24, 2001, 04:38 PM
"Get another horse."

coco
Apr. 24, 2001, 04:49 PM
I have a 17.1 hand mare that will sometimes rear when being led. How on earth do I reach her poll with an egg or whip at this point?

CdnRider
Apr. 24, 2001, 04:50 PM
I hate rearers, I've only been on one once, and I hope to never encounter one again, it gets quite frustrating.

I have a question...VTRider said that when she felt him go to rear she would dig her left spur in and pull him in a tight circle. I agree that this would work. Let's say though you aren't expecting a rear and the horse does rear. You go to pull him in a tight circle, while jabbing him in the ribs. Would this not cause him to fall over and possible seriously injurying the rider??

I only ask because I am thinking of movies where they make the horses fall down. The horse appears to do a half-hearted rear and the rider pulls the horses head and down go the horse and rider.

Maya
Apr. 24, 2001, 05:05 PM
On green horses, I would try the egg thing. But if they are older and they are still rearing, I believe that the crop thing does the job. I first tried it on a friends horse, and his front legs haven't left the ground like that ever since. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif


~*Megan Black*~

brilyntrip
Apr. 24, 2001, 06:29 PM
the trick about the hill is brilliant but...I would never have been able to do it because if (big if) you don't get out of way you are squished .Let me caution anyone with this problem unless you are very accomplished as a rider DO NOT tRY any of theses methods rearing has hurt crippled many people .

ljo
Apr. 24, 2001, 06:38 PM
FORWARD FORWARD FORWARD
Every minute every hour every day!
A horse going forward can't rear.

Squirt
Apr. 24, 2001, 08:49 PM
Coco-you mentioned that your horse would rear as you lead her...what I would suggest, if the rear is in malice, is to pull her over sideways. You don't want o do it directly backward, you could break her back! To do this properly you have to be slightly behind her head, like at the shoulder area. And when she goes up let her go as far up as she wants to and then pull her over. Once you have her on the ground sit on her neck right behind her head. This prevents her from getting back up. Sit on her for awhile to get your point across. What you're doing is a dominance reassertion. The horse is thinking while on the ground that you have the ultimate power over it's fate. You'll see stallions in the wild pin down a herd member the same way. I know that this sounds cruel, but I have done it a couple times with great success.

Now if the mare is rearing out of fear or pain, I would just let the mare rear all the while reassuring her. Then you just have to desensitize her of whatever is scaring her.

Disclaimer: I only recommend the first method if the horse is truley being malicious. Oh, and once the horse starts falling, get the heck out of the way!

havaklu
Apr. 25, 2001, 04:56 AM
Are all wonderful ideas and I've been told (never seen it done) numerous times it works.

One problem - to use the egg, baggie, whatever means you are getting on a horse with the expectation it will rear. IOW you have previously ridden this horse and it reared and you didn't fix it the first time.

That's why I like the keep em moving forward, sideways, cirlces (whatever given the situation) method. It can be used when you are on one you don't expect to rear or on a greenie who you have no idea if it will rear (hence you didn't bring your egg).

The bottom line is - anyone who rides strange horses or works with greenies should at least be a little prepared with how to deal with a rear. If you don't know how to correct it then my advice is simple. GET OFF the horse after the first rear and find a pro to deal with it.

It's one of those situation where it needs to be nipped in the bud ASAP or you end up with a dedicated rearer.

VTrider
Apr. 25, 2001, 05:27 AM
Hey there...let me clarify for ya'....

Pull head to left (or right) knee first...then kick kick kick with inside leg...make him turn in small circles....

Obviously I wouldn't try to pin him to my knee while he is in mid-air...as that may cause him to fall onto his side - you are right there /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I know that they need to go forward, but it doens't have to be in a straight line.

Does that help?

Jumphigh83
Apr. 25, 2001, 05:31 AM
Pull the head one way or the other, go forward to a phone and call someone to take the beast away. It costs just as much to keep a good horse as it does to keep a puke. I wouldn't ride or let anyone ride a confirmed rearer. That's basically what happened to Brian Jones and look what happened to him.

Betsy

Paddys Mom
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:03 AM
To everyone who said a horse can't go forward and rear...I know of one who can!

A contesting horse at my old stables would rear and walk or hop forward on her hind legs. She was an Arab/Appaloosa cross and was crazy! They finally got rid of her after she fell on the rider for the third time and the saddle horn (western saddle) broke ribs.

havaklu
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:09 AM
but to my knowledge they need to have both hind feet planted (no moving) in order to lift their two front feet off the ground (aka rear)

IOW they can't rear WHILE going forward.

See the difference?

VTrider
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:13 AM
Love ya JumpHigh83, but gotta disagree here....

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> It costs just as much to keep a good horse as it does to keep a puke. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you know how to ride through a rear and prevent it from occuring again...you've won the battle!

I wouldn't trade my horse for anything else in the world. Yep, he can rear...but since I now know how to prevent the rear from occuring...I can smell a potential rear from 500 miles away and am able to beat it!

[This message was edited by VTrider on Apr. 25, 2001 at 09:22 AM.]

DMK
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:24 AM
Yup, I'm with VT - a lot of horses try this out - either through fear, pain or stubborness (and while I will make sure that I eliminate the cause of pain or fear, that doesn't mean I won't punish the behavior). But if you catch them early and show them the foolishness of their ways, problem is usually solved.

Now a hardened, confirmed rearer who is unreformable, or will always test new riders is a different story. But who knows, maybe if the first time he tried it, somebody had attended to business rather than sending him down the road, he very well may have not turned into an unreformable character!

And just to clarify, I don't think of it as going forward, but more of making sure his feet keep moving, especially the hind feet! A horse might could bounce forward out of a rear, but not if he can't plant his hind feet!

lisa
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:30 AM
CndRdr describes a scenario that I know happened: The horse was in mid-rear, the rider used the spur and spin technique, and the horse flipped over and landed on the rider. Both were seriously injured. The horse hit his head, blacked out, and needless to say, is not right. The rider had to have serious knee reconstructive surgery.

The spinning technique works if, like DMK said, you know your horse. You have to be quick and spin before the horse gets completely off his/her front end. Thinking about it for more than a second is too long.

havaklu
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:50 AM
full rear I don't DO anything other than try to figure out IF they are going over - cause then I'm gonna BAIL OUT (aka fall off with intent).

I don't think the posters were saying to spin them once they were up there and "wavin' to the crowd". /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

VTrider
Apr. 25, 2001, 06:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> I don't think the posters were saying to spin them once they were up there and "wavin' to the crowd". <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

ROTFLMAO....you mean I am the only one that does that? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

DMK
Apr. 25, 2001, 07:12 AM
you got it klu!

Just to clarify, Lisa - if you catch 'em before they go up, that's the best, but spin 'em when they hit the ground again if you don't! They will put 2 and 2 together quick enough /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Me, I just hang on for dear life and pray when they are in the air /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

lisa
Apr. 25, 2001, 07:25 AM
I didn't thing the posters were implying that, either... It was just something CdnRider posted that got me thinking... oops, that hurt... /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

CdnRider
Apr. 25, 2001, 07:49 AM
VTRider-I'm not saying that you did that...sorry for the miscommunication. I was just saying that a little less inexperienced person could be told to spin a horse around, but they may not have the timing right and the result would be a fall. I guess what I was saying in my last post was "What if" a person were to spin in mid-rear. Sorry for the confusion! /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

DMK
Apr. 25, 2001, 07:57 AM
Now, now, Lisa... we have HAD that discussion about thinking. I'd ask you not to do that anymore... don't want to set off any smoke alarms /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

lisa
Apr. 25, 2001, 08:02 AM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif ... is that the fire truck I'm hearing?

havaklu
Apr. 25, 2001, 09:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> we have HAD that discussion about thinking. I'd ask you not to do that anymore <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If I hadn't met you in person I'd suspect you were some sort of BNT!!

heeheehee /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

DMK
Apr. 25, 2001, 09:32 AM
ROTFLMAO!!!!

Finzean
Apr. 25, 2001, 09:35 AM
And was working with an excellent trainer. We worked the mare in long lines and she would flip herself over and not give a d*&^. She had no self preservation and I should have just turned her out for the rest of her life. Couldn't sell her - liability.

Anyway, we did draw reins which DID work; but then again they were never used when jumping (yikes), were always snap in front and low onto a special girth attachment (lower than a breastplate but higher than the dee on a training girth), and NO ONE else but me and the trainer roder her. She was a flawless moving beautiful mare with a great jump - and for these reasons we tried to make her work out. But the rearing was always just under the surface and when she decided to evade anything it was the first trick out of her hat. TOO DANGEROUS. I decided there were other horses to be had and while this idiot might look beautiful and never lose a hack, pretty is as pretty does. A rearer is and always will be IMHO.

My suggestion if you have a rearer...stay with the motion while the horse is rearing and then sell it as soon as you can!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

diane
Apr. 25, 2001, 09:40 AM
We've had a couple of horses that reared .... but both were three year olds at the time, they both did it when they wanted to go see another horse and the rider insisted that they carry on with the work they were doing ... was more like a spoilt little kid having a temper tantrum .... we did the crop handle on the poll .... took just the once with the mare and she never reared again - went on to bucking! and the stallion took three or four times then never did it again.

Wicky
Apr. 25, 2001, 09:47 AM
When my horse reared, he was not nose up in the air. THhs, I felt comfortable pulling his head to my knee because that made him go back down. Then I added the inside leg kick kick kick as a punishment.

I think the running martingale helped lots, because it gave me downward leverage at the same time as I was pulling his head around to my let knee.

It's been 6 weeks or so since the cowboys were here, about 4 weeks since he last reared, and I am now working with a standing martingale. Can't do the hunters with the running martingale. I will use the running martingale if we go out on the trails, or when we try the beach again.

nyc_rider
Apr. 25, 2001, 11:59 AM
Do you, perchance, happen to train with Art Coomes?