PDA

View Full Version : SUV for Towing a Brenderup



TuxWink
Jun. 14, 2012, 12:53 PM
Here's the deal. It's time for me to get a new vehicle and I would like to get something I can drive everyday and haul a horse trailer with. I know that a full size truck is the BEST option for hauling, but that is not a practical purchase for me right now. Down the road, yes, but for now I need a lightweight setup that can travel short distances and be ready to go in case of an emergency (fire, vet clinic visit, etc.)

I've read the threads on Brenderup trailers with great interest and think this would be a really good trailer for me. I understand you can haul these with a mid-size SUV and I would feel comfortable driving this size car as my everyday vehicle as well. If Brenderup owners or those knowledgeable about these trailers could chime in and let me know what vehicles they tow these with, that would be great. I would like to get something as fuel efficient as possible.

Also, please let me know what I need to have installed on the SUV for towing a Brenderup. Depending on what I end up spending on the SUV, I may be able to purchase the trailer within a couple of months and I want to be ready to go. :)

For those who hate Brenderups, I am open to investigating other lightweight trailer/SUV options, so please feel free to chime in too.

Alagirl
Jun. 14, 2012, 01:02 PM
The people who hate them never drove one. ;)

Big problem usually is that the SUVs are so much higher than the sedans the trailers were originally planned for. So you must have the hitch installed that allows for level towing. It's better for your car and for the trailer.

I am not a great fan of SUVs. Seems to me that most models are underpowered for their size and what they claim you can tow with.

(and while I love the option, for what you can buy even a used Brenderup, you can buy a conventional rig, truck and trailer...)

joiedevie99
Jun. 14, 2012, 01:09 PM
Mine pulls beautifully with a Jeep Grand Cherokee, V8 Hemi engine, towing package including transmission cooler factory installed.

When I was vehicle shopping, I limited my search to vehicles with a tow capacity of 7000 lbs. or more.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jun. 14, 2012, 03:10 PM
My Expedition 5.4L V8 with factory tow package (tranny cooler, etc.) would just need a drop hitch, and I would be good to go.

I base this on having used it to tow a 14' Featherlite (for which I had a break controller installed). There I really needed sway bars and was only hauling one horse, but I think that was a 3,400 lb trailer (empty) too. Not my favorite set-up, I would prefer more truck. If I was using that trailer more than 1x a year, or at higher speeds, I would add a weight distribution hitch.

I personally would stick to a larger SUV: Suburban of course, or Yukon, Tahoe, Expedition and would skip the Explorers, Trailblazers, Escapes, RAV, etc.

Snowflake
Jun. 14, 2012, 03:13 PM
I haul with a V6 TrailBlazer and my brenderup royal with no problems. In fact, you don't even know the trailer is back there. I have a factory installed class III hitch and I did an aftermarket tranny cooler. I also upgraded the suspension in the back just to be on the safe side. The suspension needed some attention anyway.

LEL
Jun. 14, 2012, 03:20 PM
I haul my solo with a V6 Lexus RX350. It has the factory tow package.

I adore my Brenderup Solo, but I would caution you against purchasing one in the states. Mine needs a repair on the ramp, and no one can get the parts here. (I'm in Texas.) There is supposedly a company in New Hampshire that can or will get parts, but they are not responding to calls or emails from the trailer repair companies here. ASAP Trailers in Tomball, TX used to get parts, but can't anymore. They haven't had any luck getting a response out of the NH shop either.

Snowflake
Jun. 14, 2012, 03:23 PM
I haul my solo with a V6 Lexus RX350. It has the factory tow package.

I adore my Brenderup Solo, but I would caution you against purchasing one in the states. Mine needs a repair on the ramp, and no one can get the parts here. (I'm in Texas.) There is supposedly a company in New Hampshire that can or will get parts, but they are not responding to calls or emails from the trailer repair companies here. ASAP Trailers in Tomball, TX used to get parts, but can't anymore. They haven't had any luck getting a response out of the NH shop either.

Try Traveled Lane Trailers in MD. They do a lot with the European trailers and have been awesome as far as researching things for me. They understand there is a definite market for European trailers in the US and are very dedicated to serving people who own one/want one.

pal-o-mino
Jun. 14, 2012, 03:35 PM
I tow mine with a jeep grand cherokee, 6 cyl, no special tow package. I added a class 3 hitch. no problems towing.

sucks that we can't get parts for them here.

NinaG
Jun. 14, 2012, 04:02 PM
I tow with a Nissan Pathfinder with towing up to 7000lbs. I just bought a trailers usa (out of FL) 2 horse warmblood size, all alluminium that weighs 2300lbs. tows great.

Jim_in_PA
Jun. 14, 2012, 04:24 PM
Try Traveled Lane Trailers in MD. They do a lot with the European trailers and have been awesome as far as researching things for me. They understand there is a definite market for European trailers in the US and are very dedicated to serving people who own one/want one.

Agree. Good people
-----

As to the tow vehicle, a Euro trailer will tow easily with many available choices. I test towed at Traveled Lane with my Highlander. I still feel that a true mid-size or full size SUV is the best choice for this to insure that the tow vehicle weight is up where it should be for best results. I wouldn't hesitate to tow a Euro trailer with my current Highlander or with the Grand Cherokee that I drool over as a potential next vehicle.

As to the question about what you need on the tow vehicle, aside from the obvious (Class III or better hitch and electrical), the best practice is to have a factory tow package if available that provides additional cooling for the drive train. My Highlander has that, for example. You do not need a brake controller for a Euro trailer as they don't use electrical brakes. Rather, they use inertial braking which is self-contained in the trailer, itself. The second you let off the gas, the trailer begins braking proportional to the decrease in velocity of your tow vehicle.

DMK
Jun. 14, 2012, 04:33 PM
The only thing I will add is a friend of mine in FL had a brenderup and sold it within 2 years because it was much hotter than other trailers she had experience with (and her replacement Trail Et was much cooler). Maybe up north and in Europe it's not such a big issue, but she thought it was pretty significant in Florida.

TuxWink
Jun. 14, 2012, 04:49 PM
Thanks for all the replies so far.

I want to get a 2 horse model, so does everyone agree that I need the V8?

I've been doing some research and it looks like there is a big price jump between a V6 and a V8 vehicle.

Major Mark
Jun. 14, 2012, 05:18 PM
Over in England/Ireland you go to hunt meets and people are pulling Brenderups with BMW sedans, Volvos, I even saw a VW Jetta pulling a two horse near Thurles once. I tend to think we Americans go a little overboard in sizing rigs for trailering a horse or two.

When I was talking to Brenderup about getting a Brenderup Solo, their brochure stated all you needed was a minimum 115" wheelbase and 115 hp.

dani0303
Jun. 14, 2012, 06:44 PM
When I first bought my Brenderup Baron, I was torn between getting a Volvo XC90 and an F-150. I eventually went with the F150 simply because it was a good $15,000 cheaper. (I eventually upgraded for a 250, but I still have my Brenderup. Feel kind of ridiculous hauling it with such a big truck ;) )

Inese
Jun. 14, 2012, 07:08 PM
I have towed my 2003 Brenderup Solo with a Volvo S70 sedan (5 cylinders), a Volvo S80 sedan, and now I drive a Volvo XC90 SUV with a 5,000 lbs tow rating.

The SUV has been the best ride/handling of my 3 vehicles. I have been able to find the one repair item i've needed in the last 9 years -- (brake light/turn signal assembly) at a trailer place in NJ - ordered from their on-line catalog. Got the part number off the old light assebly... easy peasey.

Snowflake
Jun. 14, 2012, 07:37 PM
As to the question about what you need on the tow vehicle, aside from the obvious (Class III or better hitch and electrical), the best practice is to have a factory tow package if available that provides additional cooling for the drive train.

Not all SUVs with a towing package have an appropriate transmission cooler. My trailblazer cooled the transmission by utilizing the radiator that also cooled the engine. This means my transmission would overheat when hauling and start pushing tranny fluid out of it and eventually, the transmission took a total crap and I had to have it replaced. When I did, I had them install the biggest auxiliary cooler that would fit on my truck - basically, it's the same one that's on the big bus RVs. I was going to protect my investment. And it was less than $300 installed. Well worth it I say. I would talk to your mechanic about the specifics of the truck that you're interested in. They will be able to tell you about what upgrades would be appropriate for the truck in question.

My truck has a large 4.2L 6 cylinder engine and I don't feel underpowered at all when it comes to towing. I would have no qualms about hauling a brenderup with a V6.

gerut
Jun. 14, 2012, 09:55 PM
I love my 2010 Brenderup Baron TC and I safely pull it with my 2009 Audi Q7 diesel w/ towing package (capacity 6600 lbs).

Alagirl
Jun. 14, 2012, 10:36 PM
I have towed my 2003 Brenderup Solo with a Volvo S70 sedan (5 cylinders), a Volvo S80 sedan, and now I drive a Volvo XC90 SUV with a 5,000 lbs tow rating.



5 cylinders? really? :confused:

Alagirl
Jun. 14, 2012, 10:39 PM
Over in England/Ireland you go to hunt meets and people are pulling Brenderups with BMW sedans, Volvos, I even saw a VW Jetta pulling a two horse near Thurles once. I tend to think we Americans go a little overboard in sizing rigs for trailering a horse or two.

When I was talking to Brenderup about getting a Brenderup Solo, their brochure stated all you needed was a minimum 115" wheelbase and 115 hp.

Well, the new Jetta's are about 3 sizes bigger than the ones from my youth....but not exactly what I think I'd use. (a cousin pulled one horse with a VW Golf...now THAT was a sight, and so not safe! :lol: and up a really steep hill, too!)

When you consider that US trailers don't have the same breaks as a european trailer, yep, you need the big machine.

But I think the Europeas when the other way around: Small cars, narrow roads = smaller trailer. ;)

Jim_in_PA
Jun. 14, 2012, 10:48 PM
Important to remember here that for Brenderup, it's "used" only in the US at this point. They are no longer manufactured here as the owner, Thule, pulled out of the US market. Other Euro options include Fautras, St Georges (made by Fautras) and Böckmann.

----
As an aside, I saw a woman pulling a Brenderup Solo with a Subaru Forester last weekend near Flemmington NJ. While it brought a smile to my face, I know too many people who would have been cringing! LOL

Alagirl
Jun. 14, 2012, 11:15 PM
Important to remember here that for Brenderup, it's "used" only in the US at this point. They are no longer manufactured here as the owner, Thule, pulled out of the US market. Other Euro options include Fautras, St Georges (made by Fautras) and Böckmann.

----
As an aside, I saw a woman pulling a Brenderup Solo with a Subaru Forester last weekend near Flemmington NJ. While it brought a smile to my face, I know too many people who would have been cringing! LOL

yep, yep and yep.

Böckmann is a good German brand.

OTTBs
Jun. 15, 2012, 12:14 AM
They are no longer manufactured here as the owner, Thule, pulled out of the US market.
It's my understanding they aren't being made in Europe either--otherwise you could import one the same as you could import a Böckmann trailer. Very confusing though, since Fox Hunt Trailers was supposedly able to get some B'up floors sent over here this spring.
I first pulled my 2001 B'up Royal with my Mercury Cougar rated to tow 2000 lbs and it pulled just fine. Now towing with a 2004 Explorer.
I would think a lot of parts would not need to be replaced with original parts. If I could get a Rumber floor put in my trailer (which I did this year,) then I don't see why a ramp couldn't be replaced or repaired without getting a B'up ramp.

pandorasboxx
Jun. 15, 2012, 07:41 AM
I needed to replace my floor in the Brenderup 2 years ago. There was still an option to get a Brenderup floor but instead I went with a local repair place who put in a non-Brenderup floor. Works like a charm. As a matter of fact, I take it to them when I need any upkeep or repair so I'm not sure if all parts have to be OEM.

I've towed my Baron SLC with a V6 Pathfinder, QX4 w/aftermarket aux transmission cooler installed, Land Rover Discovery, F250 7.3L diesel and currently a Yukon 5.7l V8. No problems with any of those however for mountain driving and a full load, it was much better with the F250, Yukon and surprisingly the Discovery. (I miss the Discovery B-up combo!).

I've toyed with the idea of selling my Brenderup and moving to a gooseneck 2+1 for the camping aspect but I just can't do it. I'll probably end up with 2 trailers since the B-up is so easy to hitch up, haul and overall manage that it has become indispensable in the 10 years I've owned it and I cannot bear to part with it. Still looks great, hauls great and the floor is the only thing major I've replaced. Pays to do regular maintenance!

Snowflake
Jun. 15, 2012, 08:18 AM
I needed to replace my floor in the Brenderup 2 years ago. There was still an option to get a Brenderup floor but instead I went with a local repair place who put in a non-Brenderup floor. Works like a charm. As a matter of fact, I take it to them when I need any upkeep or repair so I'm not sure if all parts have to be OEM.

I've towed my Baron SLC with a V6 Pathfinder, QX4 w/aftermarket aux transmission cooler installed, Land Rover Discovery, F250 7.3L diesel and currently a Yukon 5.7l V8. No problems with any of those however for mountain driving and a full load, it was much better with the F250, Yukon and surprisingly the Discovery. (I miss the Discovery B-up combo!).

I've toyed with the idea of selling my Brenderup and moving to a gooseneck 2+1 for the camping aspect but I just can't do it. I'll probably end up with 2 trailers since the B-up is so easy to hitch up, haul and overall manage that it has become indispensable in the 10 years I've owned it and I cannot bear to part with it. Still looks great, hauls great and the floor is the only thing major I've replaced. Pays to do regular maintenance!

Do you mind if I ask how much your floor cost you to have redone. I'm needing to replace mine soon and I think a factory floor is out of the question. I was going to go with 3/4" plywood biscuited and glued into one sheet and then fibreglass it like you would the hull of a wooden boat. My father and I would basically fabricate a one piece replacement floor and I would then take it to the trailer place to have them install it. I'm just curious how much that would be.

2tempe
Jun. 15, 2012, 08:32 AM
I had a B'up for 8 years, loved that trailer. Sold it last year because new horse told me in no uncertain terms that she preferred to ride sideways. Anyway, I towed that trailer with a Chevy Tahoe, tow package included. Not a problem.

Think about the size of your horse when you think about the vehicle. The three different horses I have towed in that trailer were all over 1250 lbs. I only ever had one horse on the trailer. When I did hills up there in Ohio, we did lose some momentum and the Tahoe had to work! Down here in flatter Florida, not an issue

Jim_in_PA
Jun. 15, 2012, 09:52 AM
It's my understanding they aren't being made in Europe either--otherwise you could import one the same as you could import a Böckmann trailer. Very confusing though, since Fox Hunt Trailers was supposedly able to get some B'up floors sent over here this spring.

I hadn't heard that Brenderup wasn't happening "over the pond", either. Interesting.

Böckmann is available in the US now. Maple Lane in Canada is acting as the US distributor. Fautras is doing some manufacturing in CT and importing some.

Traveled Lane in MD, BTW, I believe has an arrangement to create replacement floors for Brenderup using that really great flooring material that Fautras makes. Very resilient composite material.

Snowflake
Jun. 15, 2012, 09:57 AM
Traveled Lane in MD, BTW, I believe has an arrangement to create replacement floors for Brenderup using that really great flooring material that Fautras makes. Very resilient composite material.

When I last talked with Traveled Lane they said they were in talks with Fautras about using their floors in the Brenderups but nothing had been committed to or finalized. They were still looking at the ability. Basically what they were looking at doing was taking a floor made for a fautras and modifying it to fit the Brenderup. Not having Fautras manufacture floors specifically for the Brenderup trailers.

pandorasboxx
Jun. 15, 2012, 04:00 PM
My replacement floor is 3/4" marine plywood, which is used in dock and boat building. It's very moisture resistant and strong. Cost us about $800 vs. $1100 for the Brenderup flooring.

SBrentnall
Jun. 15, 2012, 11:47 PM
I tow a Baron TC with an Acura MDX. It hauls like a dream. And for the person who thought it was too hot, the Brenderup is far cooler than my friend's Sundowner on a 100+ degree day here in S. Cal.

Xanthoria
Jun. 16, 2012, 12:32 PM
I tow a Brenderup Baron TC with a Toyota 4Runner v6. Great combo - Toyotas are super reliable and relatively fuel efficient.

Mine's rated to tow 5500# and gets 19-21mpg

TuxWink
Jun. 16, 2012, 02:43 PM
Thanks everyone...I'm glad you posted Xanthoria, because I was already leaning towards the 4 Runner. :) It is a good size for everyday driving and seems to be beefy enough to haul with. I like to buy used as I feel you get more value that way, preferably a car that has just come back from a 3 year lease. This way it has low mileage and has been well maintained, and I've seen a lot of 3-4 year old 4 Runners in my price range.

However, dumb question...do all the 4 Runners come with a tow package? Is this something I can have installed after I purchase along with the transmission cooler? I want to make sure I ask the right questions when shopping.

I'm open to the other European trailer options people have mentioned, but I need so spend under 10K and Brenderup seems to be the only brand that has used trailers out there in this price range. I've looked at Fautras and Boeckmann, but I can't seem to find anything used or in my price range.

I'm going to get the car first and then will pursue a trailer in earnest. I really appreciate everyone's input and ideas!

Xanthoria
Jun. 16, 2012, 02:51 PM
I am on my third 4Runner - that's how impressed I have been with their reliability. My first was totalled while parked at 220k miles. The next one I was in a roll over accident on the freeway and walked off without a scratch (they have good impact ratings.) My current one is at 217k miles and twice in the last 6 months has had a mystery loss of power. Started right back up, mechanic couldn't replicate, but I consider that pretty good track record - and I bought each one used with about 50k miles on it.

The current one has an after market hitch, no cooling needed AFAIK. 4WD too.

I live in the city and can't park a truck and a daily driver, nor do I want to pay the extra insurance etc - a 4Runner covers all my bases, is easy to park in compact spots no less and tows the Brenderup with 2 horses over 16h no problem at all.

I have been looking for a slighter better mpg in a slightly higher tow capacity but can't see anything I'd want to buy. It's likely I'll get another 4Runner when this one dies!

Worth noting: we have 5 Brenderups at my barn, 3 of them towed with 4Runners. The other 2 towed with a Jeep Cherokee and a Saturn Vue I think. (correction: Jeep driver just moved barns)

JeanM
Jun. 16, 2012, 07:20 PM
I have a '98 Explorer, V-8, AWD, tow package, coming up on 230K miles :eek:, that still tows my '99 B-Up Baron with my ~1200 lb. horse, just great (I admit, the bulk of the mileage came from being idiotically stubborn for way too long about getting a "real" commuting vehicle :yes:). The Red Pig gets about 22 mpg highway, sans trailer. It was a great day at the factory when they made my wonderful "Pig"!

I also am in contact with Traveled Lane about replacing the floor (my fault -- I never rolled up the mats until about 3 years ago). I'd prefer to replace the floor with something designed for the European trailers (B-up or Fautras), but since the floor is getting to the point that I am starting to worry about it, if TL doesn't have a solution by this winter I'll go ahead and have the floor replaced with marine plywood.

While you can tow a B-up with a smaller vehicle, I have to wonder how well said vehicle will last if used to tow a loaded horse trailer on a regular basis, especially on the hills here in New England. I think the fact that I have had as "large" a towing vehicle as my Red Pig has had a lot to do with the fact that I still have it as my towing vehicle, despite its high mileage.

Jim_in_PA
Jun. 16, 2012, 07:45 PM
I'm open to the other European trailer options people have mentioned, but I need so spend under 10K and Brenderup seems to be the only brand that has used trailers out there in this price range. I've looked at Fautras and Boeckmann, but I can't seem to find anything used or in my price range.

Fautras and Böckmann are relatively new to the US marketplace, so there is probably only a small chance on finding one used. Brenderup is a good target in that case.

WildBlue
Jun. 17, 2012, 08:34 AM
While you can tow a B-up with a smaller vehicle, I have to wonder how well said vehicle will last if used to tow a loaded horse trailer on a regular basis, especially on the hills here in New England. I think the fact that I have had as "large" a towing vehicle as my Red Pig has had a lot to do with the fact that I still have it as my towing vehicle, despite its high mileage.

That's pretty much what it comes down to, doesn't it?

While the trailer may have its own braking system (that, knocks wood, doesn't fail), the towing vehicle still has to get that load moving and stabilize it when maneuvering/cornering. The more the tail wags the dog (or the smaller/lighter/less powered the vehicle is), the more strain your tow vehicle is under. I, personally, would want something built on a truck frame (rather than the much weaker car frame, which is under a lot of smaller and mid-size SUVs) and with enough engine/power train/etc. capacity to handle the additional load without excess wear and tear and early demise thereof. Remember, whatever accumulated wear and tear your vehicle gets from towing is also going to make your daily commute more dangerous.

Jim_in_PA
Jun. 17, 2012, 12:41 PM
That's pretty much what it comes down to, doesn't it?

While the trailer may have its own braking system (that, knocks wood, doesn't fail), the towing vehicle still has to get that load moving and stabilize it when maneuvering/cornering. The more the tail wags the dog (or the smaller/lighter/less powered the vehicle is), the more strain your tow vehicle is under. I, personally, would want something built on a truck frame (rather than the much weaker car frame, which is under a lot of smaller and mid-size SUVs) and with enough engine/power train/etc. capacity to handle the additional load without excess wear and tear and early demise thereof. Remember, whatever accumulated wear and tear your vehicle gets from towing is also going to make your daily commute more dangerous.

What about the thousands of people who tow these trailers all the time in Europe with what they have available? Truck-based vehicles are the exception and are very, very expensive to obtain and maintain...there are taxes on engine displacement, for example.

I'm not saying that "any" vehicle is a good target for towing as I believe it's appropriate to use something set up for towing as a best practice. But these 1800-2400 lb trailers were designed from the ground up to be manageable by smaller vehicles, including when loaded.

Oh, the inertial braking systems may actually be more reliable than electric brakes since that power connection is removed from the picture. The mechanical or hydraulic actuator is built into the hitch. They also start braking immediately and automatically as the tow vehicle slows and in proportion to the rate of slowing.

WildBlue
Jun. 17, 2012, 01:38 PM
What about the thousands of people who tow these trailers all the time in Europe with what they have available? Truck-based vehicles are the exception and are very, very expensive to obtain and maintain...there are taxes on engine displacement, for example.


Sure, let's go ahead and compare apples to oranges. One simple fact is that people in the US drive a LOT more than people in Europe. Many of us have a normal driving commute that'd make your average European cringe. Our roads, and vehicles, also tend to be a lot bigger. Etc, etc.

Frankly, "what they do in Europe/did back in the olde days" doesn't matter a Sweet Miss Molly to the laws of physics and towing today in the US. *We* tend to expect to accelerate from a stop fairly quickly and frequently plan to/have to stop fairly quickly. *We* also drive fairly fast on hills, around curves, and in traffic. And *we* have to expect there will continue to be more cars on the existing roads ready to run our collective a**es over if we don't keep up.

Simple vector physics says that every time you change acceleration or direction--such as pulling out from a stop sign or going around a curve--the tow vehicle's drive train and frame is subject to the stresses created by the weight of trailer+horse+equipment traveling on its former path and speed. Period. Those stresses are "wear and tear", and ARE going to build up faster in a vehicle that is not designed to handle the load. Which means it will wear out faster and potentially become unsafe or, at least, less safe than a similar vehicle that hasn't been used for towing. The odds are excellent it'll never matter enough to kill someone, but it *could* easily be a case of saving a little on fuel economy but having to replace the vehicle sooner. (I'm not even going to get into the whole "have enough vehicle to control a fish-tailing trailer" thing--it's been done to death here already. And people are either going to realize it could happen to them, or they're not.)

In plain English, I'm not jumping on the "OMG, you need a huge truck!" bandwagon. I AM saying it's a lot smarter (and safer, and more pleasant) to get equipment big enough to do the job easily and, in this case, many of the larger SUVs and smaller crew-cab trucks fit the bill nicely. Many crossovers, 'cruck's, and minivans...don't.

lilitiger2
Jun. 17, 2012, 01:43 PM
That's pretty much what it comes down to, doesn't it?

While the trailer may have its own braking system (that, knocks wood, doesn't fail), the towing vehicle still has to get that load moving and stabilize it when maneuvering/cornering. The more the tail wags the dog (or the smaller/lighter/less powered the vehicle is), the more strain your tow vehicle is under. I, personally, would want something built on a truck frame (rather than the much weaker car frame, which is under a lot of smaller and mid-size SUVs) and with enough engine/power train/etc. capacity to handle the additional load without excess wear and tear and early demise thereof. Remember, whatever accumulated wear and tear your vehicle gets from towing is also going to make your daily commute more dangerous.

^ This. Totally correct. you could pull a horse trailer with a jetta and I would if I had an emergency! But towing is not just about pulling and rated pounds. It is also about power, stability and control. Sure, you can cruise along at 60mph but you also have to stop. Those ratings are for IDEAL conditions-flat dry road, no wind. They do not address ice, wind, and so forth that can greatly impact the trailering experience.

A week ago, a VERY experienced gov't lineman was towing a heavy trailer, luckily with a heavy tow vehicle. Going over a small bump, the trailer bounced off the ball, leaving just the safety chains. On narrow two lane road with oncoming traffic. If that tow vehicle hadn't been really heavy (and the lineman a very good driver), it could have been really bad.

Years ago, I was in the position of wanting one vehicle to do it all; get me to work comfortabley with good gas mileage, be easy to manage in small spaces and also tow a horse trailer safely. I also looked at the toyota 4 runner and was also told-"Oh don't worry it'll tow!" (that was certainly not my DH's opinion!) I know many people who pull with these lighter SUVs and all I can say is I am glad, for myself, I don't. I figured my highest priority was my horses safety. I wanted the other stuff but they had to be number one and I went with a vehicle that was designed to tow and was relatively comfortable.

Sure, if that's all I had already, then that's what I'd use (while I saved for something else). Probably towing in flat dry areas with NO adverse conditions, someone would be fine, again as long as NOTHING happened. But if I wanted to tow, I would not go out and purchase an SUV for that purpose.Obviously, that is just my experience, clearly others have different experiences and wisdom about this, but you might want to check out towing forums as well!!:)

TuxWink
Jun. 17, 2012, 04:08 PM
I really appreciate all the different viewpoints. In addition to the Toyota 4 Runner I'm also considering the Volkswagon Toureg.

As for the frequency I'll be hauling, it will most likely be 1-2 times a month. Most of the places I'm interested in hauling to are 20 miles away or less. (Most are within a 5 mile radius.) If I do venture further afield it will be a couple times a year but will be in Southern California with highway driving. No chance of ice or snow and, like a true native Angeleno, I avoid venturing out in the rain at all.;) It will probably happen eventually, but if it was a true downpour I would most likely just wait it out until conditions were better.

I also want to have a trailer at the ready for emergencies such as wild fires and vet clinic visits.

It seems like the Brenderup is a love/hate kind of thing. ;)

Shermy
Jun. 17, 2012, 07:41 PM
I have towed my Brenderup Royal HB w/my Dodge Durango for over the last four years w/out any issues. I LOVE my B'rup!

Kinda agree, have kicked around the idea of getting a bigger trailer w/some living quarters since I do camp a several times each year, BUT just can not do it. I just LOVE the ease of my B'rup. I trail ride a lot & most of my hauls are just day trips, so it fits most of my needs perfectly.

At some point, I may end up w/TWO trailers. I just never see myself ever selling my B'rup. My friend has a 11 yr old Baron that is in wonderful condition. They last forever if are taken care of well.