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SnicklefritzG
Jun. 7, 2012, 10:42 AM
Assuming you already have a truck and trailer, what are the typical costs associated with operating it yourself? Fuel varies from region to region of course, but I'm kind of curious what most people are finding on average in terms of costs per mile to haul themselves after taking fuel, yearly maintenance, wear and tear, and misc fees (registration etc.) into account.

meupatdoes
Jun. 7, 2012, 10:54 AM
About $100 a month just to have it sit in the driveway (truck and trailer are both paid for, this is insurance plus prorated maintenance).

One tank of gas to fill up my truck is currently around $125-$150 (the pump always stops at $100 before it is all the way full so that is a guesstimate).

Two round trips to a farm about 30 minutes away plus about 1 hour of other weekend driving ran me $65 in gas last weekend.

TrakeGirl
Jun. 7, 2012, 11:17 AM
Truck and trailer are paid for. Truck is also primary vehicle, so I won't include registration, repair and insurance expenses on it as part of the cost of self-trailering as I would be paying those regardless.

So...right now, to self trailer somewhere, it costs me the price of gas to make the trip anywhere from about $40 - $160 depending on distance.

Trailer costs for the year: $55 registration, $144 insurance, average of about $100 in maintenance (simple 2 horse bumper pull). $10 to put shavings in it once per year. Pretty cheap.

I can't really break down the per mile expense, but I haul about 7 times a year. Adding together the above expenses and dividing by 7 = about $55 per trip is my expense.

Trainer charges about $100-$200 per trip. So I am saving some money per trip - BUT I also invested about $25K up front in the cost of the truck and trailer. You can have someone else haul your horse A LOT for $25K.

Pretty sure it will never ever make financial sense to haul yourself.

But the freedom to come and go as I choose - PRICELESS.

meupatdoes
Jun. 7, 2012, 12:03 PM
Pretty sure it will never ever make financial sense to haul yourself.

It does for me.

I bought the truck and trailer ($6,000 total) to do a cross country haul with my two horses. Their bill to do that commercial would have been $3,000.
I hauled them back a year later and boom, paid for both the truck and trailer.

I also haul frequently. They go to clinics, lessons, shows, farrier/vet appointments, etc. There have been weeks where between lessons, going down the road to school, and getting their teeth done I have hauled one horse five times in one week.

One horse has a 12 hour roundtrip planned for October to demo-ride in a clinic, which would be cost prohibitive if I had to pay pro rates.

So yes, I spend a SMALL FORTUNE on running and maintaining that thing, but it would be a much bigger fortune if I was calling a pro hauler out several times a month (or even multiple times per week).

jump4me
Jun. 7, 2012, 12:33 PM
Truck and trailer were paid for with cash.
Already had truck, and it is my everyday vehicle, so I don't consider it as a towing expense outside of lower MPG due to the weight. Right now, gas is about $70 to fill the tank (down from $95 to fill several weeks ago) and that gets me about 350 miles NOT hauling, in summer. About 275 miles not hauling in winter. I don't use this truck for long distance hauling (not enough truck for the hills) so I don't know the MPG with the trailer.


Trailer registration is $11/year.
Inspection (yearly, required, and VERY thorough) was about $90 last year, IIRC.

Other than that, the trailer doesn't cost anything but the time to clean it out after use and wash it occasionally. In the 3 years I've had it, the only thing it needed was new brakes when I first got it, no other repairs needed yet.

I use the trailer.. I guess on average, at least twice a week or so (year 'round) to ride on public trails/arena, occasional shows, vet, etc.

I also use it to pick up hay, move stuff, etc, at least once a month, often more.

So it costs me ~$100 a year for the trailer, plus whatever extra the gas costs, or diesel when I use the bigger truck.

vtdobes
Jun. 7, 2012, 12:43 PM
Pretty sure it will never ever make financial sense to haul yourself.

But the freedom to come and go as I choose - PRICELESS.

This sums it up for me.

My truck/trailer are paid for but the two combined cost about $51K so it is probably cheaper to pay someone else!
Being able to come & go when and where I want was worth it for me. I keep my horses at home so don't have others at a "barn" to trailer with.

SnicklefritzG
Jun. 7, 2012, 04:24 PM
Thanks to everyone for the helpful info so far.

What's are typical mpg's for something like an f350 pulling an average 2 horse rig?

Janet
Jun. 7, 2012, 05:02 PM
Assuming you already have a truck and trailer, what are the typical costs associated with operating it yourself? Fuel varies from region to region of course, but I'm kind of curious what most people are finding on average in terms of costs per mile to haul themselves after taking fuel, yearly maintenance, wear and tear, and misc fees (registration etc.) into account.

I do not quite understand the question. If I already have the truck and trailer, I am already paying the registration fees, and my yearly maintenance is pretty much the same whether I haul the horses or let it sit. The only thing I seem to "use up" is trailer tires. I probably buy a new one, on average, once a year. I need a brake job about once every 6-8 years

With a a Ford E-350 pulling a Hawk 2 horse with dressing room, carrying one horse, I average 10 mpg. A little less if I am carrying two horses.

For my situation, I don't see how I could save money by not having my own trailer.

Approximately once every two weeks I trailer to a lesson about 7 miles away. The incremental cost is about 1.4 gallons of gas, which is under $4/gal, so less than $6. Do you really think a commercial hauler is going to pick me up (with a VERY narrow time window), take me to the lesson, hang around for an hour and a half, and take me home - for $6?? I doubt it.

Even if I factor in all my annual expenses- insurance, registration, pro-rated repairs, that is probably less than $1000 a year. Divide that by about 40 trips, that is $25 per trip.

What commercial hauler is going to take me where I want to go, when I want to go, for $25 plus $.40 per mile?

SnicklefritzG
Jun. 7, 2012, 05:46 PM
JAnet, Thanks for the info, but how about dropping the sarcasm? :)

ReSomething
Jun. 7, 2012, 06:03 PM
Let's see. Truck and trailer paid for, and fixed costs are less than $100 a month. One trailer ride to a horseshow with my trainer would cost less than that, but two?, plus as we have a stock trailer we haul lumber, hay bales, pigs and we've used the thing as a chicken coop, rabbit barn, and pig convalescent home (I hate that part though, because the whole point is having it be available to use as a trailer). And really not having it ready to go is my own fault, we should have saved up, knocked down the old run in and replaced with a larger barn with space for these things.

shakeytails
Jun. 7, 2012, 06:30 PM
Thanks to everyone for the helpful info so far.

What's are typical mpg's for something like an f350 pulling an average 2 horse rig?

96 F250 single rear wheel auto-transmission 4WD with 7.3 PSD- gets about 14-15 mpg with a loaded 3H slant GN, mostly highway driving at about 70mph. Only slightly better mileage when unloaded. The only modification is we added an air kit.

99 F350 dually manual tranny 4WD, 7.3 PSD has been getting about 19 mpg with no modifications yet. Muffler and catalytic converter are going bye-bye tommorrow. Will add an air kit as soon as we have time to go pick it up from a friend. Haven't done enough hauling to see what it's going to do when loaded.

ReSomething
Jun. 7, 2012, 06:38 PM
DH says our '97 F250 HD 7.3 gets slightly less than Shakeytails' laden or unladen, but his freeway speed is higher on average - the CC is not yet repaired and the truck is way too easy to get going fast on the freeway. It's also a 4x with a high profile tire.

Janet
Jun. 8, 2012, 12:11 AM
JAnet, Thanks for the info, but how about dropping the sarcasm? :)
Huh? Where was I being sarcastic?

shakeytails
Jun. 8, 2012, 12:32 AM
DH says our '97 F250 HD 7.3 gets slightly less than Shakeytails' laden or unladen, but his freeway speed is higher on average - the CC is not yet repaired and the truck is way too easy to get going fast on the freeway. It's also a 4x with a high profile tire.

Oh, I've definitely noticed a marked decline in mpg when over 70 mph. In that '96 I find it too easy to creep up to 80 without even realizing it, and I think 80 is just a tad too fast for pulling horses, even if the truck doesn't seem to know there's a trailer behind it!!