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View Full Version : Do garages have to have a side door?



Alagirl
Jun. 1, 2012, 12:29 PM
DH has gotten himself a crew together to enclose the carport.
bad part about it is that it cuts off the traffic flow to the back door which we use as our main entrance. The front door is pretty much blocked....

And the garage will have no other exit (not that there is a chance of ever having a car in it....)

Guilherme
Jun. 1, 2012, 12:31 PM
DH has gotten himself a crew together to enclose the carport.
bad part about it is that it cuts off the traffic flow to the back door which we use as our main entrance. The front door is pretty much blocked....

And the garage will have no other exit (not that there is a chance of ever having a car in it....)

I don't know what your local building code does or does not require.

That said, I think a garage should have a "side door" for ease of entry and exit.

G.

Bacardi1
Jun. 1, 2012, 12:32 PM
While I'm having a little trouble envisioning this, from what I can see, this sounds like a pretty dangerous idea.

ReSomething
Jun. 1, 2012, 12:45 PM
I have seen some pretty old and funky garages in my time, and all of them had an alternate entrance/exit apart from the big door. Attached, detached, all had a man door. Our partly enclosed car port didn't have one, didn't have a garage door either as a matter of fact. Check your local building code.

SmartAlex
Jun. 1, 2012, 12:50 PM
Our old garage does not have a side door, and since we have automatic garage doors, we have to remember to go pull the openers off before any storm that may result in a power outage... if we ever hope to get to our cars.

Larksmom
Jun. 1, 2012, 01:07 PM
Until I did my BIG remodel. I have been here for over 30 years, but I wanted a garage door opener, and decided I MUST have a side door, too creepy to not have one. I rarely use it, as the last time I did there were TWO SNAKES! there! :eek:
Mine is detached.

Hinderella
Jun. 1, 2012, 02:35 PM
Not to be a killjoy, because every town/state is different, but enclosing a car port to make a garage often won't meet building codes. Because garages inherently have a greater risk of fires (cars, engines, etc.) there can't be any openings between the garage and the dwelling (door or window) unless they're sealed with a fireproof door or barrier. There are some other restrictions, but I don't remember them all.

That aside, I do thing that even free standing garages, at least in my area, are required to have a second door, or at least a large window, as an escape in case of emergency.

Good luck with the project.

Alagirl
Jun. 1, 2012, 03:26 PM
Thanks.

My input was rather limited.
But since there will likely be no car in it ever, I am not too worried about that part.
There was a door planned, but the garage door guy said the door would bump into the track of the garage door. Which had me wonder...would that not have you bump your head at the track all the time?

SmartAlex
Jun. 1, 2012, 03:34 PM
The top edge of my doors are higher then my head. Not so with my ex husband, who was 6'7" plus thick boot soles. But only a small percentage of the population has that problem.

Snowflake
Jun. 1, 2012, 03:34 PM
http://www.walkthrugaragedoors.com/

You could install one of these to keep from having to open the whole garage door just to get in and out. That said, I believe there should be another mode of entry/exit.

Alagirl
Jun. 1, 2012, 05:03 PM
http://www.walkthrugaragedoors.com/

You could install one of these to keep from having to open the whole garage door just to get in and out. That said, I believe there should be another mode of entry/exit.


That is neat!

(I should have asked COTH first! Duh....)

clanter
Jun. 1, 2012, 05:13 PM
Thanks.

My input was rather limited.
But since there will likely be no car in it ever, I am not too worried about that part.
There was a door planned, but the garage door guy said the door would bump into the track of the garage door. Which had me wonder...would that not have you bump your head at the track all the time?

not necessarily... there is a residential jackshaft operator that will work on low head room applications... the operator has a provision for battery backup also...it installs to one side of the door and connects to the torsion assembly.

Also the door could be installed with "quick close hardware" (also called low head room) which would provide clearance for a standard rail drive residential garage door opener. OR the door height can be decreased from 7 ft to 6ft 6 inches which is still a standard garage door height.

IF an operator is installed on a building that does not have another point of access make sure the company includes a Vault Release that allows you to disconnect the operator from the door from the outside in case of failure

Bacardi1
Jun. 1, 2012, 05:26 PM
Thanks.

My input was rather limited.
But since there will likely be no car in it ever, I am not too worried about that part.
There was a door planned, but the garage door guy said the door would bump into the track of the garage door. Which had me wonder...would that not have you bump your head at the track all the time?

It doesn't make any difference whether "you" say "there will likely be no car in it ever". That's totally irrelevant. The fact is that a car, or other fuel-containing equipment (lawn mower, etc.) definitely could be in there at some point. A safety door is required for a reason - safety.

Building code violations notwithstanding, if you want to just toss the safety issue to the wind, I guess that's your call.

clanter
Jun. 1, 2012, 05:58 PM
A safety door is required for a reason - safety.
.

If it were truly a "safety door" it would be required to open outward, not inward... review Apollo 1

Alagirl
Jun. 1, 2012, 06:39 PM
If it were truly a "safety door" it would be required to open outward, not inward... review Apollo 1


Which really makes me wonder about the logic of building codes...I have yet to see a house door open outward....

Alas, losing the door is an inconvenience mostly. I mean, all my doors are in that part of the house. Should I need to escape with those doors blocked, I am in trouble anyhow....

(then again, I can always add the door, it's only a layer of plywood and vinyl, nothing a good reciprocating saw can't handle. :yes: surprises me anyhow that not more burglars use that method...:lol:)

But actually, the garage door might add some sort of safety measure. Since now I won't need to pile stuff near the door to keep it out of the weather! :o:lol:

furlong47
Jun. 1, 2012, 06:57 PM
Which really makes me wonder about the logic of building codes...I have yet to see a house door open outward....



In many cases, you have a screen door too... they can't both open outward, and then you couldn't open the solid door and leave the screen door closed, anyway.

Of course building codes for public spaces require doors to open out, so a crowd in a panic doesn't smoosh and trample the people in the front as they try to open it.

Bacardi1
Jun. 1, 2012, 07:00 PM
If it were truly a "safety door" it would be required to open outward, not inward... review Apollo 1

Alright - so it has to open outward. Have the door open outward. Frankly, at least have SOME SORT OF EXTRA DOOR FOR SAFETY. Good grief.

JanM
Jun. 1, 2012, 08:21 PM
You need a door, with a deadbolt. You need the extra exit door, unless you want to run around the house to put stuff in the garage anyway (at least with my minimal understanding of the layout I think that's it). You just have to get a metal firerated door, and that's the standard for most doors these days anyway. The height difference from the garage/carport floor to the rest of the house is a safety measure also, in case something like gasoline spills and is on fire too. That aspect is already taken care of, so you just need a decent sized door to the outside (make sure it's wide enough to get what you need to get in the garage can get through).

A friend's husband always likes to get the biggest and best item, and he bought her a huge, metal wheelbarrow. Unfortunately, it fits in the garage, but not in any gate but the big double one, and not in the shed either. And the silly thing is so big and heavy that she can't move it very far, even empty. They both still laugh about it, but it is a serious consideration when you're trying to get stuff in and out, and it doesn't work.

ReSomething
Jun. 1, 2012, 08:33 PM
I think house doors open inward so you can get out if it snows and piles up in front of the door. If there's any logic to it at all.
And you can pop the pins out of the hinges on outward opening doors and circumvent the locks thataway. But if you ever get locked in a standard room in a house you can kick your way through the drywall PDQ, it's just noisy and a pain to repair. Getting outside is a little harder, I'm not so sure I could kick my way through brick veneer or metal or even OSB.

Ambitious Kate
Jun. 1, 2012, 09:24 PM
You have to contact your municipal zoning for the rules, and the building has to be done to code. Either its a shed or a garage, but either way the foundation has to be to code, the head clearance has to be to code, the doors and windows have to be to code, and the distance between buildings to code, as in if there isn't any, it may have different rules than if there is. You can't just 'get together' some people to build it. It could invalidate your house insurance and your bank could call in the mortgage if you don't, and the town fines can be in the thousands.

Then there is safety.