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pj
May. 24, 2012, 11:41 AM
Heard my two dogs barking and barking, the kind of bark they do when they've got a snake, turtle or the like cornered. Since the sorry things actually killed a turtle the other day I thought I'd better go see what was up.

A baby brown thrasher. Fully feathered and seems unhurt. I didn't see the parents.
There is a giant oak in the yard where baby was found so I presume he came from there. Got him and put him on the other side of the fence under some really thick bushes. As I came back to the house I Thought I saw the parents fly from the bushes but can't swear it was them.

Baby is being really quiet. I'm hoping his/her parents will find her and take care of her but if they don't....I guess it's me although I really really don't want to have to do this. I've hand fed lots of baby birds but never a bt so IF I have to do this what do I feed this little sucker?

I know :) you guys jingle like mad that mom and dad bird find baby and live happily ever after as a family and I don't have to play mama bird.

HPFarmette
May. 24, 2012, 12:22 PM
Do you have wildlife rehabilitators in your area? I.E. people who specialize in this....around here we have them, licensed by our Dept. of Environmental Conservation...just a thought.

pj
May. 24, 2012, 12:30 PM
Do you have wildlife rehabilitators in your area? I.E. people who specialize in this....around here we have them, licensed by our Dept. of Environmental Conservation...just a thought.

I wish but don't think we do. There was one but she withdrew some years ago.

I'm thinking (hoping) maybe the parents know where baby is as I've seen them on the ground in front of the bushes although I haven't seen them go under the bushes yet.
Keep your fingers crossed for us. I really really don't want to have to raise this baby.

Unless someone tells me different IF I should have to I'm thinking cat food??
I have baby cockateil food here but don't guess that would be suitable for a bt.

Hinderella
May. 24, 2012, 12:36 PM
The parents will very likely feed her. If she's fully feathered, she may have been testing her wings and just couldn't get very far. It doesn't mean that a predator won't still get her, but you probably don't need to raise her.

I'm jealous that you founda brown thrasher. So far, all I've found this year are starlings :(

pj
May. 24, 2012, 12:58 PM
The parents will very likely feed her. If she's fully feathered, she may have been testing her wings and just couldn't get very far. It doesn't mean that a predator won't still get her, but you probably don't need to raise her.

I'm jealous that you founda brown thrasher. So far, all I've found this year are starlings :(
:lol: well I wish you were the one who found her.

I THINK the parents have her spotted. I've been trying to watch from a distance and it seems that I saw them come out from under the bush a couple of times.

Poor little thing. She was just sitting quietly while my two big dogs danced around her barking that shrill bark. She must have been terrified. It's an absolute wonder that they didn't kill her but she seems completely untouched. Maybe all that screeching i did when they killed that turtle taught them something.

DownYonder
May. 24, 2012, 01:05 PM
She is being quiet so as not to attract predators. If crows spot her, she will be a goner.

pj
May. 24, 2012, 01:20 PM
She is being quiet so as not to attract predators. If crows spot her, she will be a goner.


We have lots of crows but they don't come into the yards and they can't see her under the bushes. I also have a deaf OLD cat but she never goes into that part of the yard either. There is a king snake that lives here but his head is too tiny to get her, he still hunts down bugs and teeny little frogs. Hope no other snakes pass through and spot her. It sure would hurt me for this little thing to die because I didn't take her in. That would bother me for a long long time.

lcw579
May. 24, 2012, 01:37 PM
Chances are she would die if you did take her in. I think leaving her out where her parents could find her was the right thing to do.

cloudyandcallie
May. 24, 2012, 01:38 PM
I forget, are you in Coweta county? If so, call the humane society. If not, and in Griffin area, call the humane society.

Otherwise call the state DNR for info on whom to give baby bird to.

Get bird off of the ground. Doesn't matter if parents feed it, as if was fledged too soon, and cannot fly, the coons and possums and dogs and cats and foxes, etc., etc., will kill it. If you have a spare bird cage, put it inside, and feed raw hamburger and water with an eye dropper or somethig like that. It will be ready to fly in a few days or weeks.

My mother has spent 89 yrs rehabbing birds. But we are too far from you to help with this one.

If you leave it on the ground, it will die tonight.

Call any pet shops in your area as well. There are people who take in baby birds ad raise them and release them.

We are anxiously awaiting the fledging of the baby blue birds in the nest above Cloudy's stall. Fortunately he loves animals and birds, so he won't step on any of them if they end up in his stall.

cloudyandcallie
May. 24, 2012, 01:40 PM
Chances are she would die if you did take her in. I think leaving her out where her parents could find her was the right thing to do.

Wrong. Baby birds all tend to live when rehabbed. It's the injured adults that go into shock and die.

In GA, a bird on the ground is a dead bird. I forget how many hundreds of baby birds my mother has rehabbed over the years, but none of the healthy babies died.

cloudyandcallie
May. 24, 2012, 01:43 PM
She is being quiet so as not to attract predators. If crows spot her, she will be a goner.

She's right. Crows actually raid nests and carry off and eat baby birds.

Get her in a box or a cage and start feeding the hamburger or if you are near a petsmart, the baby bird formula. She's leave you when she's ready to fly.

Mortality rates on baby birds in the wild are something like 3/4!!! So a lot are killed by predators, etc. So every songbird saved is a good thing. Plus it's our state bird.

Nezzy
May. 24, 2012, 01:57 PM
when i worked for the wildlife rehabber we soaked iams cat food and when it was soggy, used forceps to feed them until they would not take any more. this went on every hour during the daytime.

PRS
May. 24, 2012, 02:08 PM
Baby Thrashers leave the nest fairly early and I find them all the time hanging out in and under the bushes. The parents will continue to feed them until they can take care of themselves. I don't believe you have anything to worry about. They know where their baby is.

animaldoc
May. 24, 2012, 02:17 PM
If it's fully feathered best thing to do is leave it alone....
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x55/animaldoc_01/Fledgling.jpg

pj
May. 24, 2012, 02:37 PM
I've hand fed many baby birds from an amazon to a tiny zebra finch and they all lived. The last wild bird was a blue jay. They are FUN and funny birds by the way,.

I don't think anything will get her unless a snake passes through. Course that could happen. She is in a pretty safe place. Whole different story than if she was out at the barn or in one of the pastures I'm almost 100 percent certain now that the parents are taking care of her. Hope I'm not making a mistake but I think I'll leave them be.

She or he is a pretty little thing and if she isn't flutter flying now I feel sure she will be in a day or two. They progress so quickly.

UPDATE:
Good I hope. Just went to check on her and I think she's gone. Maybe she was flutter flying and Mom and Dad took her away.

One year we had wrens build a nest in our loft. I would come in the tack room and there some would be. I thought they were too little to leave the nest so I'd haul them back up the ladder and dump them back in the nest. Go back later and there they'd be again. One day I went out and there was Mom and Dad flying very low over the ground. They'd fly from tall grass bunch to sticks laying on the ground and wait. Fluttering along the ground were their babies following them. I could just hear the parents saying to each other "we've GOT to get these babies outta here. They'll never learn to fly with that dumb old lady insisting they stay in the nest." :) Guess I should have tended to my own business. :lol:

pj
May. 24, 2012, 02:41 PM
If it's fully feathered best thing to do is leave it alone....
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x55/animaldoc_01/Fledgling.jpg

Good point.

Carolinadreamin'
May. 24, 2012, 02:42 PM
Good to hear. Just wanted to add that in the past when we've found a fledged baby on the ground that we're worried about, we've put them in a small, shallow box in lower branches of the nearest tree. The parents know where the baby is, continues to feed it and the baby hops/flies back out once it's ready again.

pj
May. 24, 2012, 02:44 PM
when i worked for the wildlife rehabber we soaked iams cat food and when it was soggy, used forceps to feed them until they would not take any more. this went on every hour during the daytime.

And this is why I really was hoping I wasn't going to have to be a bird mama. :lol:

pj
May. 24, 2012, 02:47 PM
Good to hear. Just wanted to add that in the past when we've found a fledged baby on the ground that we're worried about, we've put them in a small, shallow box in lower branches of the nearest tree. The parents know where the baby is, continues to feed it and the baby hops/flies back out once it's ready again.
Great idea, good to know what to do in the future. Thank you.

ThisTooShallPass
May. 25, 2012, 01:05 PM
Chances are she would die if you did take her in. I think leaving her out where her parents could find her was the right thing to do.



^This^

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.