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bluebuckets
May. 20, 2012, 01:06 AM
So, it's been confirmed by the local University vets: the entire hog barn is down with e. coli.
This is my first time dealing with this, what do I do? They've been getting scourguard and another shot (I forget the name). The shot is given IM.
Is there something I can topdress their feed with?
Should I sanitize the barn?
Can it be transferred to horses and dogs?

Thanks, any info is greatly appreciated!

goodhors
May. 20, 2012, 11:50 AM
YESH! What a horrible thing to have happening!!

I would immediately contact my Vet, maybe the University Vets, ask what measures need to be taken to "clean up" the place while the hogs are getting better. I am expecting you to hear that certain SPECIAL measures need to be applied to the removed manure which will contain the disease. Also getting some kind of sanitizing agent to powerwash the barn and holding facilities. And the cleaning will need doing a NUMBER of times. You humans may need to be wearing protective masks, gloves, coveralls and sterilizing boots as you enter and leave the pig facilities.

This is not going to be easy to deal with or manage, to contain the disease. I really feel for you in this situation. Be VERY careful so you humans don't also get contaminated.

bluebuckets
May. 20, 2012, 09:57 PM
Thanks. Yes, this has the potential to be devastating. These are all show hogs, so there's a significant amount of money to be lost if they don't make it (not to mention loosing my piggy friends!). I will start taking biohazard measures, and we have recieved new medicine from the University vets (a powder to topdress their feed with) that will hopefully help. Thankfully, my favorite girl is looking OK at the moment.

Anyone know anything else or been through this before?

goeslikestink
May. 21, 2012, 06:29 AM
read this

your animals need to be destroyed as its not just you but everything that will be infected including wildlife and pets and even though a great lost to you but it would far worst a lost to all the other people around you and widlife and showing the hogs is putting other people at risk and making it wide spread
terrible decease highly contageous to humans


E coli 0157 is a bacterium that lives in the gut of animals, including cattle, sheep, deer and goats. It can also be carried by pets and wild birds. Simply carrying the bacterium will not normally cause an animal any harm or illness, but if contacted by humans, the toxins it produces can cause illness ranging from diarrhoea to kidney failure. In some case the illness can be fatal. Young children and the elderly at the greatest risk.

is unusual in that very few individual organisms are needed to infect humans. People can become infected through a number of routes including the consumption of contaminated foods, direct contact with animals, contact with animal faeces e.g. camping on agricultural land and person-to-person spread both in families and institutions.

A number of outbreaks involving children have been associated with educational and recreational visits to open farms. While the hazard from infection resulting from a farm visit is real the risks are readily controlled by simple everyday measures. Primary amongst these is the need for good personal hygiene. Infection can result from exposure to bacteria from animals or animal faeces and then eating, drinking or smoking without first thoroughly washing your hands.
Risks from wildlife – rabbits

carolprudm
May. 21, 2012, 09:36 AM
GLS: there are many strains of E. coli, most relatively benign. Pretty much if an organism has a digestive tract it probably has E. coli present.
The OP didn't identify the strain but I'm sure she will take all the measures the local vets stipulate.

OP, I hope you don't have to euth your herd

goeslikestink
May. 21, 2012, 12:52 PM
yes i know- but

there comes a time when human lives might be endangered via baterial germs
which can effect the ground the animals are on in turn could effect the water systems when it rains etc

and then kids and other humans die-------- i wouldnt want that responsibility
knowing i am keeping animals with a highly contageous decease
and possible human deaths let alone wild life
as there deaths would be on my mind

one has to do the right thing money doesnt come into it and nor do shows how can one show a pig thats had an illness like that and think its ok to do so here
they would be destroyed

its about living and being able to live a life

and the animals in question have to be disposed of properly

if these were my horses like your pigs as much as i love them then the answer would be as exactly the same

just my view------ human lives count

threedogpack
May. 21, 2012, 01:19 PM
So, it's been confirmed by the local University vets: the entire hog barn is down with e. coli.

I would think that if a University Vet team is involved with this, they would have a protocol in place.

carolprudm
May. 21, 2012, 03:13 PM
yes i know- but

there comes a time when human lives might be endangered via baterial germs
which can effect the ground the animals are on in turn could effect the water systems when it rains etc

and then kids and other humans die-------- i wouldnt want that responsibility
knowing i am keeping animals with a highly contageous decease
and possible human deaths let alone wild life
as there deaths would be on my mind

one has to do the right thing money doesnt come into it and nor do shows how can one show a pig thats had an illness like that and think its ok to do so here
they would be destroyed

its about living and being able to live a life

and the animals in question have to be disposed of properly

if these were my horses like your pigs as much as i love them then the answer would be as exactly the same

just my view------ human lives count

Of course if the hogs have a shiga like verotoxin producing strain of E.coli appropriate precautions must be taken but not all strains produce toxin. But E. coli is just about everywhere and its presence alone does not mean the host has to be destroyed.

Now, about the E. coli in your gut......

wendy
May. 21, 2012, 03:42 PM
why would they have to euth the hogs? a course of antibiotics will sterilize their guts, then they just have to make sure their guts get re-seeded with good bacteria (probiotics), and clean up/sterilize the barn area. Bye-bye dangerous e. coli strain.

StGermain
May. 21, 2012, 05:40 PM
I would imagine that if your entire herd needed to be destroyed, the University vets would've said something. I would ask them for the protocol and follow it to the letter. Depending on the strain, you probably will have different protocols.

Just in Googling e. coli in swine I came up with this article about controlling outbreaks. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040308073940.htm) It seems like this is very common, and no need for hysteria or rash actions.

StG

deltawave
May. 21, 2012, 09:27 PM
Roughly half of what makes up poo is E. coli. No gut is ever "sterilized", but toxin-producing forms of E. coli and other pathogens can be treated, allowing the healthy/happy beneficial and benign strains to return to dominance. :)

goodhors
May. 21, 2012, 09:43 PM
Thanks DW, I kind of figured it was something like that.

Otherwise the University Vets getting bad test results would have already swarmed the place and OP would have told us about it.

bluebuckets
May. 23, 2012, 04:56 PM
Thanks everyone.

E. Coli isn't like anthrax, so the herd does not need to be destroyed. After talking to some experts, I learned some definite facts:


it is not air-borne, so I'm safe walking in the barns without a face mask.

I do have to be especially careful about washing my hands, bleach dipping my shoes, washing any clothes that go into that barn, and showering immediately after exiting that barn. (Low-level biohazard procedures)

And there are many different types of e. coli. The medication we've been giving hasn't seemed to work, so I will be trying another, nastier one tomorrow.

I do need to feed electolytes. (The pigs had a ball with tubs of orange gatorade yesterday!)

Post-medicating for five days, I will need to completely sanitize the barn and begin feeding probiotics because after feeding Oxy-Tet, their guts will not be happy.


Two days later I will re-sanitize just to be extra safe.

Then I will begin feeding high-calorie, high-fat feed to get the pigs to gain back the weight they lost.


Basically, lots of sanitizing and finding a medication that works in time.

JSwan
May. 24, 2012, 03:14 PM
Ask your feed store if they carry Diamond V Yeast (or something similar) It's dirt cheap and a great probiotic (for all livestock) Pigs LOVE it. It's very palatable.

It will increase feed utilization as well, you can continue to feed it after they've recovered.

Hope they recover soon. Good luck.