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View Full Version : Ideas for Completely Removable Stall Front?



King's Ransom
May. 16, 2012, 08:47 AM
My older horse fell asleep, then toppled over in his stall yesterday, and had a very hard time getting up. He was not cast per se, just that he needs a lot of room to get positioned "just so" to get up whenever he lays down ... and he can't get into that position within the confines of his stall. I was able to help him, using lead ropes around his body, get his front end halfway out the door ... then he was able to get up on his haunches and heave himself back up on his feet.

His stall is a 10 x 12, built long before I owned this farm, and there would be no taking it apart in an emergency ... and certainly not by me all by myself.

I am thinking of having someone come in and remove the entire front of the stall and replace it with something I could easily remove by myself -- such as a large gate or a sliding mechanism of some sort.

Any ideas?

Bluey
May. 16, 2012, 09:07 AM
I have seen more and more barns today built with the whole front a gate up to 16'.
Our neighbor built a barn like that, the front is solid 4' metal with one bar above and the whole front a gate.
He is very happy with that.

I saw that first when a local vet built his barn some 30+ years ago.
The whole was chain link panels and gates.

Generally, the aisle is the same width, so you have the horse confined there if you want, in the stall and the aisle.

Just saw one like that with 12' x 12' stalls not too long ago and it was working fine, if you don't have much in the aisle.

I have also seen vet hospital stalls with a sliding door half the side of the front, so that may also be an option that makes getting a horse in and out easier than with standard stall doors.

The ones I have seen were solid bottom or mesh, not bars.

I hope your old horse will be fine.
Can you keep him where he is not confined?

When we had a horse we got out of a bad situation, even if he was small and our stalls 14' x 14', we were afraid he would lay down and not be able to get up, so we kept him loose in the dirt and sand aisle, that was wider than that, with a panel across the middle, so he had 40' x 16' to move around in.
We were having a blizzard, so we could not keep him outside.
He was fine, gained strength and weight quickly and then where we kept him was not a problem any more.

winfieldfarm
May. 16, 2012, 09:19 AM
Take off the front of the stall. Buy a pipe gat that would cover the stall width. Lag bolt or u bolt plywood to the inside of the gate so he can't get a leg through the gate. Mount gate so it swings open into aisle.

trubandloki
May. 16, 2012, 09:24 AM
Look forward to reading the ideas.

I suppose we could remove a stall front if necessary just by unscrewing all the individual boards.

Bluey
May. 16, 2012, 09:42 AM
Look forward to reading the ideas.

I suppose we could remove a stall front if necessary just by unscrewing all the individual boards.

Or sawing them if they are wedged behind others.;)

Pictures would help.:yes:

PRS
May. 16, 2012, 09:55 AM
Almost my entire barn is constructed to come apart. The walls are all 2" x 12" treated lumber slid down into steel channels. The boards can be just lifted back out in case of an emergency.

Nes
May. 16, 2012, 10:37 AM
Going to agree with the gate suggestion as probably a cheaper alternative.

But was just going to suggest what PRS explained if you want to build. Not as quick to get out in an emergency (the steel channel is a good idea, I haven't seen that before) as a gate, but makes your barn more flexible for making stalls bigger too.

Alagirl
May. 16, 2012, 12:43 PM
borded at a place where the front was the door, the whole 12 or so feet swung out into the aisle.
You have to make sure to have the right support fr it though, the gate will be heavy and lopsided.(I guess a wheel on the swinging side would help...)


And you really have to make sure you get everything done in the right order, the door blocks the aisle way...but it was never really a hassle, the people in that barn cooperated well.

sublimequine
May. 16, 2012, 01:47 PM
I'm sure you've already thought about this, but maybe consider combining two stalls so he's got what would basically be a foaling stall? That way maybe he'll have enough room where he won't get "stuck" trying to get to his feet.

JanM
May. 16, 2012, 06:21 PM
To make the gate lighter I would do two 6' gates that meet in the middle. Either one, or preferably both could have the pole (on the aisle side of the front of course) that goes to the hole in the ground like the gates you use to your back yards for bigger items. Then do a conventional latch in the middle.

King's Ransom
May. 17, 2012, 12:21 AM
Great ideas. I was thinking of the gate idea, but am glad to see others have used it successfully. I did consider moving him into one of our two double stalls, but that would upset my horsey order (2 big horses in the doubles now), plus I would still have to deal with a small opening. I have two stalls that can break down, using the steel-channel and slide-in boards concept, but I cannot do it by myself, nor is it a quick job. I think the proper gate, properly executed for our space, is going to work. Too bad, too, though, because King's is only "fancy" stall I have -- with expensive grills and slider. Ha! I will just take it all out, though. Small price to pay.

2DogsFarm
May. 17, 2012, 07:49 AM
Tell King he has my sympathy - I know how it is to have trouble getting out of bed!

If you do go with a gate, make sure there's no way he can catch a leg in it when he's moving around to get "just right" for getting up.

IIWM (lazy & not inclined to re-build things) I'd give him the doublewide and rearrange the others.
Maybe Eli could inherit the fancy stall?
Next in line for seniority, right? ;)
Like getting the corner office :lol:

Pa Rural
May. 17, 2012, 08:38 AM
My older horse fell asleep, then toppled over in his stall yesterday, and had a very hard time getting up. He was not cast per se, just that he needs a lot of room to get positioned "just so" to get up whenever he lays down ... and he can't get into that position within the confines of his stall. I was able to help him, using lead ropes around his body, get his front end halfway out the door ... then he was able to get up on his haunches and heave himself back up on his feet.

His stall is a 10 x 12, built long before I owned this farm, and there would be no taking it apart in an emergency ... and certainly not by me all by myself.

I am thinking of having someone come in and remove the entire front of the stall and replace it with something I could easily remove by myself -- such as a large gate or a sliding mechanism of some sort.

Any ideas?

I had the same problem last winter- the old man (33yrs young) was having difficulty getting up in his 10 x 16 stall. We took the front off and replaced it with a 12ft. tube gate. Now I can safely help him up without risking injury. Just make sure the gate is horseweight secure in case he falls against while getting up.

cgn38
May. 17, 2012, 10:25 PM
Instead of steel channels with slip in boards, I have used two 2 by 4's run vertically next to one another to create a channel. Just nailed then to the posts (if you have posts), and the boards were ready to slip in. I still had a doorway with a stallguard on the front side, also.

carolprudm
May. 18, 2012, 09:53 AM
I have 2 12 x 12 "bays" in my barn, one on each end, that can be used as storage or also stalls. They are closed off with 12 foot gates that I can also use to keep the horses out of the aisle.

You do have to e careful that the horse does not lie down and get a leg under the gate. If I ever replace the gates it will be with mesh gates hung so they are almost flush with the floor.

Or if I win the lottery with these
http://www.keystonebarns.com/images/HorseStall-6502.jpg They look like they are bolted onto the posts.

King's Ransom
May. 27, 2012, 08:53 PM
Well, today we got in there and fixed up King's stall. DH and I removed the beautiful (expensive) sliding stall door and grille. Then I swung the sledge hammer to take out all of the front boards.

We opted to leave on post, so we ended up with one 6-foot opening and one 4-foot opening (approximate sizes). We put a stall guard across the 4-ft. opening and installed a wire mesh filled gate across the 6-ft. opening.

This required us to move and relocate wiring and bucket holders, but I actually like the way it turned out. King loved it, too -- this is the first evening he has been able to come inside with the others at dinner time since his fall. We have been feeding him outside in the run-in shed, and he has been quite unhappy about it.

Overall, I think this is a good solution. It looks nice, if very light and airy, and our total cost (our own labor) was $111 for the 6-foot gate ... oh and the $600 door and grille we removed. What shall we do with THAT?

Alagirl
May. 27, 2012, 10:55 PM
Hang on to the door, for when you have to build on for grand kid's pony! ;)

(being serious though, there is always Craigslist)