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whalo
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:37 PM
Hey,
i was just wondering for those of you out there that have many absents due to shows, what reaction do you get from you school. do you have a difficult time with makeup work? is it worth home schooling in order to do the "a" circuit more competivily? all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show. horses are stupid they do all the work. it is great to have a horse as a hobby but it cant interfere with school. you cant get ne where with horses like you can in basic athelics sports. do you all get these comments and flack? /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

whalo
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:37 PM
Hey,
i was just wondering for those of you out there that have many absents due to shows, what reaction do you get from you school. do you have a difficult time with makeup work? is it worth home schooling in order to do the "a" circuit more competivily? all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show. horses are stupid they do all the work. it is great to have a horse as a hobby but it cant interfere with school. you cant get ne where with horses like you can in basic athelics sports. do you all get these comments and flack? /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

Tosca
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:42 PM
I was always a good student so it didn't matter. You're probably getting flak because your grades are suffering. Believe me, teachers aren't out to make your life as miserable as possible. If they are getting angry, it's because they care.

whalo
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:45 PM
i get the most flack because alot of my teachers dont want to put ne extra work into getting me my work before i leave or when i get back

WhittiMcD
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:46 PM
It depends how much school you miss. If you are talking about 2 - 8 weeks in Flordia, then my teachers would probably be concerned. I will miss a day or two in the spring, two days in a row at most for a couple of the big "A" shows up here: St. Clements and the Saratoga Classic. Sometimes I just leave early, the show grounds are 5 minutes from my house. My teachers generally don't mind too much, but I am very careful to make up all of my work on time and make sure it is done thoroughly. The rest of the year, however, I will drag myself into school, sick or not. I save my sick days for horse shows! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Also, are you at a grade level that is sastisfactory for you? Are you worrying about applying to colleges?

And as for the comments like "Why skip school for horse shows?" Just reply "Why leave early/skip for basketball??"

Always put an education before horses. You never know whats gonna happen later on in life.

The One And Only: WhittiMcD

** Rainmaker **

"So I look in your direction, but you pay me no attention, and you know how much I need you, but you never even see me." - Coldplay, Shiver

Nikki^
Dec. 10, 2002, 04:47 PM
I didn't show but I love horses so much that I got a ton of crap from the peeps at school. Just ignore them. I had one teacher in class (I was in 7th grade)say, "are you in horsey land?" and the whole class and the teacher laughed at me. /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

I once invented a halter with lights on it so you could find your horse in the pasture at night, well the science teacher gave me a "D" on it while the popular girls got "A's" inventing jewelry. (porcupine earrings?????????, which was the teacher's idea.) /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Ignore them. They are JEALOUS that you are having fun and doing something you love. Get home school if it bothers you. When you get into college, people tend to be more open minded (like your professors)

http://www.dmtc.com/dmtc98/Pedigree/
Look up your TB's bloodlines

DreamBigEq37
Dec. 10, 2002, 05:03 PM
I go to a private school, so not the same topic, but although they encourage students to have extra-curriculars, and support riders, etc., they are serious about school-work. As long as I am caught up in classes and don't have late homework, etc., (I am a very good student, and work really hard to be able to ride) as long as I do my part, and I have to WORK, most of the teachers and the school are very supportive, and allow me to miss school to show.

Towards people (riders) who don't work to get their schoolwork and missed a ton of school, they aren't as accepting, and will get in trouble, talking to parents, etc.

It all boils down to how hard you're willing to work to stay caught up. I've been found many a time in hotels with my dad's labtop, writing english papers, and driving to and from horse shows, doing history and biology homework in the car /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif because my parents feel the same way, as long as showing doesn't interfere with my schoolwork, it's acceptable, so I work pretty hard at schoolwork!

*~*~Lauryn*~*~*~
<3 Justice Served <3
<3 Nip N Tuck <3
The entry deadline for the COTH Winter Equestrian Festival is December 11, 2002, at midnight! Send your entries!

BenRidin
Dec. 10, 2002, 05:06 PM
My guidance counselor just gave me the okay today to leave for 6 weeks for wef. I didn't think they would be so nice about it but they were. Last year I had to miss school for st. clements for the first time and while some of my teachers got a little upset that I would miss their wonderful class just to go ride some smelly horses, others were fine with it and helped me with all my work.
I guess it just depends on what kind of a student you are. If you are responsible and take care of all your work they should have no problem letting you go. However, if you aren't getting your work done in the first place and not getting good grades they will be stupid about it because you can't afford to miss much school when your a bad student, in their minds anyway /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

~BenRidin

whalo
Dec. 10, 2002, 05:16 PM
i guess my school is just stupid. i generally make a's and b's and am in all pre-ap classes. although i dont consider myself a great student i dont turn in stuff late. at my school the teachers grumble about getting me my work then when i get back with the completed work i find out they changed what they did at school and i have a ton of makeup work ne way, and much of our tests are based on lectures that you cant possibly really take notes on so it is hard to catch up for tests and students are jealouse that you got to miss school and they didnt so they dont help all that much. the teachers are really disorganised and lose alot of stuff so you dont get all of your makeup work, and they all ask snydely "how was your vacation?, i had to come to school!" and in one class i am failing, i have never gotten below a b before and it is cause all of his tests are based on lectures and teenie details in them that you wouldnt care to write down and one quiz of busy work that had nothing to do with his subject that i got a 0 on cause i was absent! i dont know what to do!

poltroon
Dec. 10, 2002, 05:24 PM
In California, schools are paid based on their daily attendance, so they are very difficult on this topic regardless of how good the student's grades are.

Unfortunately, the school gets paid if you're absent to play basketball on the school team, but not if you're showing.

I have heard that the US Eventing Assn has a letter they will send out for juniors who are competing at the FEI levels, pointing out that the student is competing in an Olympic discipline, yada yada.

Molly99
Dec. 10, 2002, 05:25 PM
I can see both sides:

I was the kid in high school that missed days for horse shows. The majority of my teachers were great (especially the two that rode), as long as my grades did not suffer. I was always an A student so that wasn't that hard, however it would be difficult when I missed quizzes etc. I was not allowed to make them up. Some teachers did not count them in my and some gave me the opportunity to do bonus work to make up for it.

I also taught school: As a teacher I am NOT going to change my lesson plans around to suit the planned absense of ONE student.

Sorry, but it sounds like you think they should alter their teaching method or plans to make the choice you have made to miss school based on a horse show. That is not how it works. The school day goes on regardless of what students are missing. All students are expected to make up missed work.

And it is EXTRA work for teachers to get materials together in advance for ONE student. The majority to plans are not made more than a day or two in advance. That means that copies are not always ready.

Alot really depends on your grade in school, but remember that teachers are not out to get you. It sounds to me like some may be concerned that your grades are slipping based on the absenses.

Hopeful Hunter
Dec. 10, 2002, 06:19 PM
um, well.........

First, I'm an adult - I did not show as a child, I do not show rated now, so I"m sure you'll take what I say with that in mind.

However....I have also taught - at the college level as an adjunct professor, though - and when I WAS in school, a private one at that, I was heavily involved in dance and theater. And I can tell you this -- if you missed days when a quizz was given, you simply missed that mark unless you had an excused absence. Period.

Right now, your primary responsibility in the eyes of many adults, including your school, is, well, school. Like it or not, riding IS a hobby. It is not a school-sanctioned or supported activity, therefore it doesn't get the kind of consideration that football, say, does. That's life.

It is up to you and YOUR PARENTS to work with the school if you choose to take time off to ride. If you can't work satisfactorily with the school, your options are to change to a school that will work with you (public or private) or home school.

It is YOUR and your family's choice to ride and miss school. Therefore it is YOUR responsibility to make your educational commitments work around that choice. Think of it as good training, because I can assure you that IRL a job isn't going to support riding, either.

Good luck.

PlusTax
Dec. 10, 2002, 06:40 PM
Sorry that you're having problems! My only advise it go to a school that doesn't care but that's much easier said than done! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I think riders just need to realize that most people are ignorent about what we do and you can't let it piss you off, it's just going to happen no matter what /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif I know that doesn't help much with getting out of school but if you do leave you shouldn't let other people's comments bother you /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

**Kelsey**
&
**Notoriety**
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**Clearly Canadian**
**Pavielle**
**Angel Face**

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ride2hounds
Dec. 10, 2002, 06:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
i guess my school is just stupid. i generally make a's and b's and am in all pre-ap classes. although i dont consider myself a great student i dont turn in stuff late. at my school the teachers grumble about getting me my work then when i get back with the completed work i find out they changed what they did at school and i have a ton of makeup work ne way, and much of our tests are based on lectures that you cant possibly really take notes on so it is hard to catch up for tests and students are jealouse that you got to miss school and they didnt so they dont help all that much. the teachers are really disorganised and lose alot of stuff so you dont get all of your makeup work, and they all ask snydely "how was your vacation?, i had to come to school!" and in one class i am failing, i have never gotten below a b before and it is cause all of his tests are based on lectures and teenie details in them that you wouldnt care to write down and one quiz of busy work that had nothing to do with his subject that i got a 0 on cause i was absent! i dont know what to do!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, if I were a teacher, and I had a student hand in papers that looked like this post, I would give a zero as well. The grammatical, spelling and syntax errors that litter this post make me --want to scream very loudly. I hope you make a better effort with the quality of your school work than you do in expressing yourself coherently on this Bulletin Board.

Attendance in school is more important than your horse shows. You need to establish some priorities. Funny thing how teachers test on the materials they lecture on. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif It is their way of rewarding attendance and attention to what they are teaching. If you don't attend, you won't pass. Just like in the real world; if you don't work, you don't earn a paycheck. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

You can show horses for the rest of your life, but if you blow your education, you will PAY for it for the rest of your life, to include not being able to find a job that will pay enough for you to own a horse, much less show one.

~*~Tally Hoooooooo!~*~

whalo
Dec. 10, 2002, 06:48 PM
i have fine grammer, i typed that very fast cause i am in the middle of writting an essay. and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

PonyJumperGRL
Dec. 10, 2002, 06:53 PM
Mind you, I don't show every weekend, but I usually take any tests I know I'm going to miss in advance or make them up THE DAY I get back. The latest I'll have everything made up by is my second day back (Any later, I'd be screwed---5 Honors/AP Classes and 3rd Year Language aren't very forgiving),

tats
Dec. 10, 2002, 07:00 PM
Ok, here's my situation. I go to a huge public high school. I am now a senior, and have missed a TON of school due to horse shows. I first started flying back and forth in 8th grade (I was at a small private school then, until sophmore year), and my teachers were great about it, granted it was only every other weekend. Then my 9th grade year, i went down for all of palm beach (like the 3rd in jan to april, the last two of weeks of march were vacation), and i came home for 3 days in between there (basically for a ski trip). my school was very good about it. but... we basically presented it in a way that they couldn't say no. my parents wrote a letter in like oct./nov. just giving an overview of what our plans were, as well as my trainer writing a letter (sometime you have to write those, but then they sine it). but in the letter, we said that these were our plans, and no if's or but's based on what the school said, basically there was no room for protest. my parents also met with my headmaster. so that worked. and i had a great tutor (carolyn tribble) who worked things well (and also who wrote a letter). i mean some teachers were upset, but they dealt, my bio teacher was pissy, but i did fine, so she couldnt say anything.
then my sophmore i was at a huge public school (in MA), and i went to school for the whole first semester (until christmas), and left and came back for a week. again, we had the same note, presented to my guidence counseler, not principal. if you can, deal only with your guidence counseler personally, its a lot better. a meeting with him, and a meeting with all my teachers, me, my guidence counseler and my parents. it worked out well, some of them did not have e-mail so it was annoying to get work, but i did well, and i was in all honors, and ahead when i came back. and i took mid-terms and exams away too. so basically i'm rattling and i should stop, b/c your not going to read this, but to hear about more, e-mail me (tats9@hotmail.com). and last i left b/4 christmas and never came back. i know i am lucky, but it is do-able. so e-mail me.
tattie

~maybe
~max v.

CourtneyLiz
Dec. 10, 2002, 07:02 PM
Chill Whalo. Most of the posters on these boards are adults, and most adults are unnaccustomed to the complete lack of grammar/internet abbreviations that younger people use online. Heck, I'm 21 and I have trouble deciphering it. If you can use good grammar, appropriate syntax and spelling you should, you'll appear to be a lot smarter. If you appear to be smarter and older, you'll get better responses, especially when you're writing on a subject like school. It's hard to take you seriously when your posts lack punctuation and are misspelled--it makes it seem like maybe you would be better off in school than at a horse show.

Teachers work very hard and get paid pretty poorly. If you're not in class, it's your job to get lecture notes from another student, not necessarily from the teacher. I know if I went to a professor and asked for his notes for a class I skipped, he'd be pretty angry with me. Now, if I got the notes from someone else, and after reviewing them I had intelligent, well thought out questions to ask, I'm sure that he would help. It's just not your teacher's fault that you are going to horse shows. They really shouldn't have to teach lessons again (or lecture privately) to you just so you can go ride (and nor should they do this for gymnasts, figure-skaters, or runners).

It sounds like homeschooling may be a good option for you while at shows, if you are unwilling or unable to make up the work at your school.

Finally, you're not going to get anywhere by telling people that you're smarter than them. Especially not here /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.
Courtney

fleur
Dec. 10, 2002, 07:03 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
i have fine grammer, i typed that very fast cause i am in the middle of writting an essay. and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yup, that's the way to get sympathy /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif Honestly, school is far more important than horse shows. Really. Go to school!

*EMMA*

Lily
Dec. 10, 2002, 07:19 PM
Whalo, if you've made your argument to school administrators in the same way you've made it here, it's no wonder they're giving you a hard time.

And I'd watch out before attacking other BB members. For all you know, ride2hounds could be judging you at your next show. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BybeeGirl
Dec. 10, 2002, 07:48 PM
I don't teach any students showing on the A level. I do, however, have plenty who miss anywhere from a week to ten days for local shows. The school is ok with that, I'm ok with that, just don't ask me to compile all of your work 5 days in advance of your absence, and then chase you for it because you "forgot" to turn it in 5 days after you return.
And please don't tell me you have to miss my class to go home and wash your horse and clean tack for a show the next day. (Yes, I've heard that one too many times)
Ok, enough gripes /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Here's why I get upset with students who miss significant time from class:
In VA, they're called Standards of Learning Tests, and maybe they're called something else where you're from. Either way, someone is held accountable when students don't pass them. And, no the state dept of education doesn't look at your number of absences when examining pass rates, or when they are determining school accreditation status.
So help me do my job, which is to teach you, and I'll help you do your job which is to learn how to read, write, listen and speak effectively.

Peggy
Dec. 11, 2002, 12:35 AM
Different public schools have different tolerance levels for this sort of thing, even different schools within the same district.

You stand the best chance of getting a desirable answer from your teachers if you plan in advance. Let them know ASAP when you'll be gone. Offer to turn stuff in and take makeup tests before you leave. Don't expect them to do extra stuff for you, especially at the last moment. Be pleasant. Don't tell lies or exaggerate. One of my colleagues got a story from a student to the effect that she needed to miss class b/c "she was GOING to ride in the Olympics" and had to do something for that. He asked me if this was plausible and I said no one in this country could make that statement at this point in time.

I teach at a community college and have let students miss class, but not assignments or tests, for a variety of reasons--sky diving, horse shows, college athletics, child-care problems, etc. If you're not there for a test, I drop one and that would be it. There are no makeups. The one thing we have to excuse students for is religious observations; however, I publish the test dates at the beginning and require that they let me know about any conflicts with religious observations within the first week of the semester. If there's a conflict, I simply change the date for everyone.

caffeinated
Dec. 11, 2002, 05:14 AM
The very few times I missed school for an extended period of time I had to do my assignments in ADVANCE! Can you BELIEVE that? Isn't that just HORRIBLE!????? LOL. Actually it worked out well. I only ever missed a week at a time, and we knew several weeks beforehand if I was going anywhere. My teachers all had a course syllabus, so I knew what would be covered during that week (though sometimes they would advise me of changes). Then the few days before my week off I'd turn in any papers due during that week, and take any tests/quizzes that would occur before school.

I actually really like it that way- there was nothing hanging over my head when I came back. I didn't do as well as I would have if I'd been there for the lectures, but none of the grades brought down my GPA.

In any case, whalo, if you want your school to cut you slack you have to present your case responsibly, and prove that the absences aren't affecting your grades. It seems that the absences are bringing your grades down (even if just slightly)... and as much as I hate to say it, school DOES have priority over horse showing, unless you're in the .00001% of high school riders that will turn pro AND be able to support themselves without going to college and getting a "real" job.

And I wouldn't claim you're smarter than anyone here, if I were you- it actually has the opposite effect of making you look less smart. That's not meant as an attack on you, just an observation... protesting to people about how smart you are generally gives them the opposite impression (and that's in any situation).

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

SpringBreak
Dec. 11, 2002, 05:28 AM
i kno!!! i missed 2 weeks in 7th grade bc of ocala n my teachers decided to give me all my make up work when i got back and they obviously didnt give me everything bc for the rest of the year all these never seen assignments kept popping up from when i was in ocala! i asked each of them about 3 times when i got back from fl for all of my assignments! go figure, bc i got 3 C's and an E on my report card.....just because of those stupid teachers not giving me my work!

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

Room 31
Dec. 11, 2002, 06:11 AM
I go to a private school and my teachers are fairly concerned -- but they do not get upset or mad. In the area I show in, I usually miss a couple of days in the fall and a couple of days in the spring.

I remember one day this past fall when I had a show Fri-Sun, and 3 tests on Monday!! In that case, my mom drove me back to the hotel between classes and right after I finished showing for the day to study!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SpringBreak
Dec. 11, 2002, 06:41 AM
that kinda suxs tho! werent you tired to study?

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

jasper
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:09 AM
Honestly, I have to say something here. If only for your own good. You sound like a spoiled child who wants everyone else to take responsibility for your actions. Only you are accountable for what you do, not everyone else. If you had come to the board and said that you were having issues with one, maybe two, teachers, then I would have an easier time being sympathetic. But EVERY teacher has it out for you? EVERY teacher refuses to give you your assignments? Seriously.

To post your concerns on a BB such as this one, where there are many educated and wordly people who have seen more and done more than you ever have, and then get upset and start insulting is just a sign that you do need an education. To say you are smarter than someone you never met is a sign of ignorance. You have no idea who these people are. Many are highly educated professionals, who know the value of an education. Please do not even try to get into a contest of wit with them. You will lose.

If you presented your case to your teachers and school officials in a mature, presise way with a plan to do the work and keep your grades up, you might get somewhere. Just whining that you want to show is just going to get looks like this: /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

It's no wonder your schoolwork is suffering. Didn't you say that you interrupted doing an essay to post here? You need to get the essay done, and then you are free to do as you please. That is how it works in real life. Responsibilities first. It will help you pay for your fun in the future.

Where are your parents and what is their stand on all of this?

Please know that this post wasn't meant to insult or degrade you. I'm just saying it like it is. Please don't try to get into a battle of wills with me or anyone else on this board. You will just come out of it looking a bit clueless /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

peepie
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:19 AM
I'd miss Thursday, Friday & Monday for "A" shows...I got a TON of flack, and the school's reasoning was that my sport was not school sanctioned so it didn't count! Baseball, basketball & football players missed classes all the time for away games, but that was ok!
My school also refused to recognize my accomplishments when I'd get champion, etc. for the same reason.
perhaps this is why I had a huge chip on my shoulder @ school. BTW, I had excellent grades!
Sad to see things haven't changed sionce the 70's!

My horse bucked off your honor student!

Founder: LOFL (lawn ornaments for life) clique

McLeanHunterRider
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BybeeGirl:
Here's why I get upset with students who miss significant time from class:
In VA, they're called Standards of Learning Tests, and maybe they're called something else where you're from.....<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Oh, the dreaded SOL's!!! How I loathe them!! I haven't missed any school for horse shows, since I don't show that much. I've only missed one day of school due to being sick, which was about two weeks ago, and i still haven't made up all of the work!! in fact, i was supposed to stay after school today to do some make-up work, but school was cancelled. While I know that schools stress attendence, I wish that maybe they could take it a little more lightly. The day I was sick, I was so stressed about the amount of make-up work I would have to do. Oh well, at least I get a great education.... /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard.

rileyt
Dec. 11, 2002, 09:07 AM
I hate snotty children posts.

Whalo- You owe Ride2hounds a HUGE apology. Some of the smartest, best-educated people I've ever known have been career "horse people". How dare you suggest that because she is a career foxhunter, that she is somehow dumber or less educated that you.... a snotty 15 year old who spells things like "ne"?

Your attitude stinks. It is not the teacher's responsibility to make any special arrangements for you. If I were your teacher, not only would I not bend over backward to HELP you, but I probably wouldn't cut you any slack either. Sorry, teachers have far too much other work to do to create an entirely new lesson plan for you.

Half of Riding is 30% mental ... no wonder there are so many bad riders /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

PlusTax
Dec. 11, 2002, 09:57 AM
At Foxcroft they had the exception for academic proficiency, or something like that, but you had to have a B average and they would let you miss as much school as you needed. Alison Firestone started it when she went there and I took advantage of it my jr and sr year /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Some people did it different ways, my parents wouldn't let me miss that much school so I ussually just missed Thursdays and Fridays for big shows like WEF and just Fridays for shows in VA. Some people like Alexa Weeks and Sparky Frost were gone for months at a time and they worked with tutors and had their teachers fax them work /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

**Kelsey**
&
**Notoriety**
**Plus Tax**
**Clearly Canadian**
**Pavielle**
**Angel Face**

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DreamBigEq37
Dec. 11, 2002, 10:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SpringBreak:
i kno!!! i missed 2 weeks in 7th grade bc of ocala n my teachers decided to give me all my make up work when i got back and they obviously didnt give me everything bc for the rest of the year all these never seen assignments kept popping up from when i was in ocala! i asked each of them about 3 times when i got back from fl for all of my assignments! go figure, bc i got 3 C's and an E on my report card.....just because of those stupid teachers not giving me my work!

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

How do you get an E?? Just wondering

*~*~Lauryn*~*~*~
&lt;3 Justice Served &lt;3
&lt;3 Nip N Tuck &lt;3
The entry deadline for the COTH Winter Equestrian Festival is December 11, 2002, at midnight! Send your entries!

race_run_jump
Dec. 11, 2002, 10:18 AM
I teach at a private school in VA, and we have several elite athletes who miss school - sometimes for one or several weeks for various reasons - riding, tennis, etc. All of these students are very diligent about keeping in touch by fax and email, and we have been happy to work with them. BUT this is only because the student has fulfulled his or her academic responsibilities in addition to their athletic obligations. If we were to get someone who used athletics as an excuse for slacking on their work, we would be less tolerant and willing to be flexible. As things are now, though, it is a great situation.

J. Turner
Dec. 11, 2002, 01:43 PM
grammAr

Enough said.



"And Max said, 'NO!'"
-- Maurice Sendak

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peepie
Dec. 11, 2002, 01:49 PM
...and "absents"....I believe it s/b absences!

My horse bucked off your honor student!

Founder: LOFL (lawn ornaments for life) clique

mst
Dec. 11, 2002, 01:51 PM
my mom went in to meet with my guidance counsler. He had her write a letter to the school board saying i was in training for the olympics. after that, they gave me no trouble. My guidance counsler actually would then pick my teachers for the following year to make sure that no one would make it harder for me. i think i missed 80 out of 120 days of school my senior year

ClemsonGraduateRider
Dec. 11, 2002, 03:01 PM
First of all Whalo, riding is a privelege not a right. Education is a need, you will NEED it to survive anything other than being a trophy wife for the rest of your life.

School is far more important than horse shows, however if your parents have invested a good amount of money in your riding career then I can understand that they would want you to show. That being the case I would suggest that you AND your parents sit down with your guidance counselor etc and have a rational discussion about what and how you can compensate for misssing school and making up work etc. I also suggest that early in the year you make out a schedule of where and when you are going to be showing throughout the year, this way everyone will know in advance what is going on.

Second, teachers are overworked and underpaid and honestly have many better things to do than cater their work habits to you. They are required to present material IN CLASS, although I find that most are very nice about helping you out however else they can. That said if you need notes from a missed class, get a students notes. It is not your teachers job to make sure you get the lectures you missed, he/she was doing their job YOU were the one not present. Also like many have already stated if you are a good student teachers tend to want to help you out more because they know you are responsible. If you show the same attitude in class here that you do here on the BB I would not go out of my way to help you either.

And for those of you who say football players etc. miss tons of classes, when I was in public high school, the MOST any football player missed for an away game was one or two classes in the afternoon of an away game but to be honest I don't even remember that happening often.

IF showing is that important to you, get a private tutor or be home schooled then you wont have to deal with the teachers out to get you /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Personally I think that we are all lucky that education is provided to us in this country, it's a shame that some of us don't realize how lucky we are.

- - - - - -
"We learn from history that we do not learn from history." ~ George Bernard Shaw

TB4me2000
Dec. 11, 2002, 03:40 PM
and for all those ::ahem:: inquiring minds...

An "E" is basically the same term for an "F"--well--in my school, at least; but its just a 'nicer' way to say it...

Also...back on topic /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif
I agree with all ye well-learned people out there...school should be the top priority--no matter what. I've never missed a single day of school to go riding or go to a show or anything besides being sick, and I plan to keep it that.

&curren Britt &curren

TB4me2000
Dec. 11, 2002, 03:41 PM
and for all those ::ahem:: inquiring minds...

An "E" is basically the same term for an "F"--well--in my school, at least; but its just a 'nicer' way to say it...

Also...back on topic /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif
I agree with all ye well-learned people out there...school should be the top priority--no matter what. I've never missed a single day of school to go riding or go to a show or anything besides being sick, and I plan to keep it that way.

&curren Britt &curren

*In Your Dreams*
Dec. 11, 2002, 03:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
Hey,
i was just wondering for those of you out there that have many absents due to shows, what reaction do you get from you school. do you have a difficult time with makeup work? is it worth home schooling in order to do the "a" circuit more competivily? all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show. horses are stupid they do all the work. it is great to have a horse as a hobby but it cant interfere with school. you cant get ne where with horses like you can in basic athelics sports. do you all get these comments and flack? /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

*Holding my fingers down.* You will be taken more seriously if you type your messages correctly. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Just some food for thought.

~Andrea and Dream~
*Challenge Everything*

JenEM
Dec. 11, 2002, 04:17 PM
I have never shown rated or missed school for horse shows, but I had to miss it occasionally for other extracurriculars. The secret to doing it successfully? Advance planning. Let the teachers know well in advance, make prior arrangements with someone in your classes to make a copy of classnotes for you, and make up the work IN ADVANCE when possible.

Sophomore year, I missed afternoon classes for 4 days for a play, then was out for a week with the flu (silly mother wouldn't listen to me and told me with a 103 fever I had to stay home /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif), but I called friends in my classes and got assignments from them and had them completed for when I got back. When I went abroad to France for a school-board sponsored trip Junior year, I got work in advance and had most of it turned in before I left. Senior year, I had an internship one afternoon per week, and teachers were aware of this. They worked with me to coordinate due dates on assignments, which I'd normally just have a friend turn in for me, or take tests. Of course, I had a 4.3 GPA and ended up first in my class, so maybe that made them more accomodating /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

As far as football players, etc., missing class, I know my high school never allowed students who were even late coming in the day of the game to play, and they hardly ever got out more than an hour before the rest of the student body. I'll just bite my tongue on the whole standardized testing issue, however.

In short, Whalo, listen to the advice you're being offered here, and make school a priority. Very few people are good enough to make a career in the horse world. You're going to need to know how to deal tactfully with difficult situations and work around deadlines in the real world, just as much as you're going to need that math class to balance your checkbook, and that language class to help negotiate business in an increasingly global economy.

Linny
Dec. 11, 2002, 04:24 PM
I agree with those who feel that education should be your priority. Unless you are so talented and hard working that a career in riding and showing is a likelihood, a good education is the best way for you to continue riding after your parents bow out of the bill paying. This bb is populated by many professionals who have worked hard to afford the luxury of horses. Many of the juniors here may not know how much work is required to pay for one horse show.

Some here attend or graduated from private and/or boarding schools. These schools are likely more familiar with the issues of circuit riders and are therefore more flexible. Teachers there are also often dealing with smaller class sizes and have more of a "one on one" relationship with students. Public school teachers, even in wealthy areas are often dealing with many more pupils and issues. A teacher with a class full of pregnant girls, drug dealers (yes in wealthy areas) and kids who can barely read is not going to feel much sympathy for a student who complains that she has to miss school to ride a horse.

If the format of some of the posts from juniors on this (and other) threads is representative, I think many of you need to go to class! /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif I suggest skipping WEF or Ocala and doubling up on English classes.

Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique

Resident racing historian

RAyers
Dec. 11, 2002, 04:39 PM
I must say I really hope the original poster, Whalo, decides to come to one of the 3 universities where I teach and do research, because I would love show that person what happens when one dismisses their education nonchalantly. I would posit that the reason the teachers seem to have little respect is because the student shows the teachers little respect.

As for horses and education, I managed to have my horse, compete in the A/O jumpers, and do other athletics all through high school, college and graduate school. Now I do equine and human orthopedic research, event at the upper levels (national and FEI) around the western US and teach, so one can not tell me that learning and riding can not be done.

Reed

Room 31
Dec. 11, 2002, 04:59 PM
SpringBreak, yes I was tired, but I guess I know (but don't like to admit) that school does come first. The studying didn't help much anyway... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif.

Molly99
Dec. 11, 2002, 05:17 PM
Room 31,

you just brought back a memory for me.

During college I would miss a few classes every semester to go and show. I always scheduled my semesters as best as I could to allow for Fridays off. Of course the beginning of the week was swamped, but that was my trade off to show.

On the few times I did have to miss, my professors were very good. I was of course expected to make up work if needed and it did count as a miss. So I did have to drag myself when sick to class.

Anyway, I remember getting to the show on Thursday night and not being allowed to go out with everyone to the mall until my school work was done. That was a BARN rule.

Looking back, it means alot to me that they cared that much about my education.

Elghund2
Dec. 11, 2002, 05:19 PM
I've coached other sports over the years and have seen many athletes ignore school because the were going to be professionals. They sadly learned that very few people in any sport make it to the highest levels that enable them to make a living at the sport.

Here is a true story.

When I was living in Dallas, a friend asked me to come out and watch a local kid play baseball. The kid was a catcher and was a local star. Everyone was telling him he was going to be drafted by the pros, etc. I went out and watched. After watching the kid play, I told my friend that at best he might be able to get a scholarship to a small school.

well, the kid believed what everyone was telling him and doesn't do the school work. This being Texas he graduates but doesn't have the grades to get into college. The pro draft comes and goes, and he is not selected.

So he goes to work in the local stamping plant where he promptly loses three fingers in a machine. So, he is left with collecting disability and working minimum wage jobs. That's a long way from playing in the major leagues.

If he would have concentrated on his schoolwork he would had at least an education to fall back on. No one can ever take your intellect away from you.

"I'd be more tactful, if I were wrong."

SpringBreak
Dec. 11, 2002, 06:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DreamBigEq37:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SpringBreak:
i kno!!! i missed 2 weeks in 7th grade bc of ocala n my teachers decided to give me all my make up work when i got back and they obviously didnt give me everything bc for the rest of the year all these never seen assignments kept popping up from when i was in ocala! i asked each of them about 3 times when i got back from fl for all of my assignments! go figure, bc i got 3 C's and an E on my report card.....just because of those stupid teachers not giving me my work!

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

How do you get an E?? Just wondering

*~*~Lauryn*~*~*~
&lt;3 Justice Served &lt;3
&lt;3 Nip N Tuck &lt;3
_The entry deadline for the _COTH Winter Equestrian Festival_ is December 11, 2002, at midnight! Send your entries!_<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

it was in tech ed and the dude is like a freaked up teacher and he woulndnt help me make my template!! i asked him like every day to help me bc its really hard! and that was the first project of the marking period! AND you cant start another project until you;ve completeled the one be4 it! i was so pissed with him. hes fired now. too bad i was there when he was still there /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

SpringBreak
Dec. 11, 2002, 06:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by mst:
my mom went in to meet with my guidance counsler. He had her write a letter to the school board saying i was in training for the olympics. after that, they gave me no trouble. My guidance counsler actually would then pick my teachers for the following year to make sure that no one would make it harder for me. i think i missed 80 out of 120 days of school my senior year<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


HOLY CRAP! thats alot! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

achcosuva
Dec. 11, 2002, 07:51 PM
I've missed a few days here and there for horses. When my horse colicked pretty bad (a result of a spider bite, though we didn't realize that at 5:30 that morning when we were freaking out because we couldn't get in touch with the vet :eyerolls:), and lately, to go horse shopping. When the horses I need to see are 4 hours away and the person cannot show them on a weekend because of shows...I miss school.
But, I carefully schedule the days that I'm going to miss for my easy day (we have block scheduling), so if I have a choice between showing this Friday or next, and next Friday is my easier class load, even if I want to do it this Friday I'll do it next.
Also, I go to school when I'm sick, when I'm tired, when I have a back ache or a stomach ache, when I've got cramps so bad I can hardly walk...yeah, all that stuff that normal people just call in sick for? I go to school. I save my "sick days" for horse emergencies and shows. And this year in my dual enrollment pre-calculas college level course (my gawd, what a title, huh? actually, I loff the class. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif) I may only miss 5 days per semester. I've only missed one so far, and that was just yesterday as I had to go up North to vet a horse, but that is defintely something I keep in mind when I'm missing school!
And, I hate make-up work. Most kids are happy when they get to miss school. I hate it because I have to make up all that work, making my already difficult day doubly hard. /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

My advice is to keep your grades up, and to be nice and courteous to the teachers (yes, in short, suck up!). /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

As for your writing on the board... No, mine might not be perfect, and no I don't proofread, but it is better recieved (and much easier to read) if you type in English. I'm 16 myself and cannot for the life of me read short-hand typing. /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif
Most people on this board are adults--by biological age, at least /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif--and have no clue as to what "ne" means. Heaven knows, we'll soon have a bunch of elderly people walking around in flare-leg jeans and belly-tops saying "neh!" or "knee!" thinking they're so cool. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif (Juuuust playing with ya'll, of course!) Besides which, when you're making a plea as to how educated you are, it's better to show it than to say it, especially when you're talking to some very educated people.

-Anne, the sister of a PrettyFilly and searching for the PerfectHorse-
"I'm not insane...I just compartmentalize!"

carribean
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:24 PM
You never know what could happen.. and cut your teachers some slack- they work hard and don't get paid nearly as much as they should.

**anna**
*~Proud Founder of the H/J Paints Clique~*

hunterprincez
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:26 PM
I encounterd the same problems that Whalo is talking about all throughout school. I don't know about her particular situation, but I was a mostly A's and that one B in math student. At the begining of the semester I would always try to talk to my teachers and explain what I did and that it did require me to miss some school. I don't know about other states but Texas has really strict attendance rules. I once went to Washington to watch the horse show and the lady who was taking us knew a senator. We were invited to lunch with the senator and kind of a behind the scene tour of the White House. My friends private school thought that was a wonderful experience and excused the absence as long as she kept a journal on all that she saw. My public school said nope it won't be excused. All throughout high school I had to watch other athletes miss tons of school and it was ok because they were school sports. You just have to cope with it. Like everyone else has said, offer to turn in assignments and take tests early. Make sure you tell them you will be missing well in advance and be very nice about it. Remember a smile and postive attitude can get you very far in situations like this.
P.S. Olivia, I remember your turtles Speeter(sp?) and Iris from Oklahoma a Loong time ago. lol!

Blue Devil
Dec. 11, 2002, 08:30 PM
My high school was very rigorous--I started taking APs in 10th grade--and so as a result, missing school was not really an option. If I had to miss school for some reason (and the only reasons for me usually were horse shows, science competitions, quiz bowl tournaments, or mock trial competitions) I was responsible for talking to teachers in advance, turning in the homework or other scheduled assignments in advance, and taking tests/quizzes in advance or immediately the day I got back from my absence(s).

It would be a big pain--at horse shows I never had free time to socialize because I was always doing homework--and many teachers, such as my AP Calculus teacher, gave me a very hard time about missing class even for other academic obligations, let alone something horsey.

My advice? First of all, be a good student. I know it may be harder for some students to make high marks, but I have repeatedly found that teachers are much more cooperative to students with excellent grades and study/orgizational skills than those without. Be organized, keep a calendar of due-dates, always do your homework as assigned, and keep up when in class. If you don't understand something, ask; always do extra credit if it is offered and review material throughout the semester, not just for the final exam. "Stay ahead of your [academic] game" and prove to teachers you are responsible enough to hold your scholarly own when not in their class.

As a college freshman, having to juggle activities (such as horse shows) and work is proving to be beneficial; I can out time-manage my friends by a long shot ;D

My karma ran over your dogma.

cookiesncream
Dec. 11, 2002, 09:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
[QUOTE]Originally posted by mst:
my mom went in to meet with my guidance counsler. He had her write a letter to the school board saying i was in training for the olympics. after that, they gave me no trouble. My guidance counsler actually would then pick my teachers for the following year to make sure that no one would make it harder for me. i think i missed 80 out of 120 days of school my senior year<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Wow, that's a lot of school to miss!

The whole olympics thing totally brought back a memory though, so, here goes a random story!

My freshman year (in college) I was in a math class that gave quizes in discussion section every Thursday, with a no make up policy. I knew I was going to have to miss some Thursdays (Jr/AO jumpers starts on Thursdays, and I already had my plane tickets to commute back and forth to Indio all winter), so I headed in to the professor's office hours to have a little chat.

Now, for those of you who aren't familiar with math professors, the don't speak english (or at least no well)! So, I started explaining to the teacher what it is I do at these horse shows, and why it is important to me, and how math makes me a better rider, and how much I love his class, etc., etc. After I while, the professor told me that he had seen a horse jump once when he was a child in Romania. That got me talking about international show jumping competitions, which lead me to talking about my trainers exploits on the international scene. I think somehow the professor (given the limited english skills, and my tendency to talk rather quickly) thought that I was saying that I was doing all these amazing things (Olympic trials, etc.) Of course, I didn't say that, and I never would have, and my professor never said directly that he thought that, but he suddenly got very nice, and much more flexible about letting me make up the quizes if my gsi (ta) was willing to administer them in a different time, so it all worked out in the end!

whalo
Dec. 11, 2002, 10:05 PM
hi,
thanks for the advice from some of you! and to those of you who say i am disrepectful ect. i have always been liked by my teachers and tell them much in advance about when i will have to miss for shows. i have only missed 7 days so far for shows this year. horse showing has always been a large part of my life (my parents are trainers). when i miss school i ask for assignments ahead and they cant get them to me, so i am like ok well i will do what i can and get them when i return. then when i get back they are like oh i cant find that paper i will have to get it to you later, this reacurres over and over. then i will think i am all caught up and they will be like you are missing this, and it is a paper they forgot to tell me i missed. and also i was getting advice more than blaming teachers because even the ones that do help it is hard to catch up in thier class. but what bothers me the most is when i hear from other students the comments some of the teachers made about me and my horse showing behing my back to the class while i was away. also i never said i had problems with all my teachers, and generally i am a good student, a's and b's, and i have all advanced classes. oh and i am not this mean and abnoxious in person, sorry guys, lol /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

PonyJumperGRL
Dec. 11, 2002, 10:20 PM
Whalo, I really agree with everyone. Maybe if you cut back on how many shows you were doing/how much school you missed?

Think of how lonnnngg your life is. It's pretty long. Lots of time to do anything you want...horse showing included.

However, High School is one of the few things that you can't ever experience later in life. If I were you, I wouldn't take missing school so lightly, because I would bet you that there are many many people who didn't take advantage of the opportunities they had in high school who are getting themselves in the pants now because they can't go back to that time of their life. And that's a shame! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

caffeinated
Dec. 12, 2002, 06:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PrettyFilly:
Most people on this board are adults--by biological age, at least /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif--and have no clue as to what "ne" means. Heaven knows, we'll soon have a bunch of elderly people walking around in flare-leg jeans and belly-tops saying "neh!" or "knee!" thinking they're so cool. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, we are.... the knights who say.... NNNNEEeeeee!

/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif heh. Sorry. The second I read that I started having odd Monty Python flashbacks. That was a beautiful and well thought out post, and not any kidspeak net gibberish! brava!

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

Whistlejacket
Dec. 12, 2002, 06:28 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ClemsonGraduateRider:

Personally I think that we are all lucky that education is provided to us in this country, it's a shame that some of us don't realize how lucky we are.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yup, I very much agree.

From a historical perspective, lack of access to an education has been an effective mechanism that various oppressive rulers have used over the centuries to control and subjugate their people.

And unfortunately, there are modern day examples...e.g. Afghanistan under the Taliban denied girls/women anything beyond a rudimentary education. Lack of access to education = control and oppression.

Historically, a significant advancement in social progress was the establishment of a public education system in the U.S. Thomas Jefferson, a person of numerous amazing accomplishments, actually considered the founding of the University of Virgina - a public university - his most significant act...more so than writing the Declaration of Independence or serving as president.

So Whalo, I know that you consider the school situation a pain or inconvenience, but in actuality it serves as a fundamental basis for the freedoms that we in this country enjoy.

(I know, I know...a grandiose statement...but none-the-less...true! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif )

Kirsten
Dec. 12, 2002, 07:45 AM
mst, were you actually in training for the Olympics?

If not, I'm more than a little surprised that you and your parents would blatantly lie to the school to get you excused from class.

ride2hounds
Dec. 12, 2002, 08:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
i have fine grammer, i typed that very fast cause i am in the middle of writting an essay. and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

/infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Somehow, I doubt that very seriously. When you receive your university degree from Princeton, you may discuss "how smart" you are at that time, but not before. Until then..... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif You should always pay attention to grammar, spelling and syntax. It allows those of us who read your plight to understand and sympathize with you, because you come across as an intelligent and educated individual.

So far, you have yet to convince me (and several others) that you are anything but a spoiled child who is pouting because isn't getting her way. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

~*~Tally Hoooooooo!~*~

[This message was edited by ride2hounds on Dec. 13, 2002 at 09:56 PM.]

crave2event
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:01 AM
Just because I think this is an interesting topic...

My principal is a horse person. So, I must admit, I get breaks there. And being in a small school where everyone knows me, I get breaks there too. I have missed school for horse things. I have ran out of class in the middle of it, because I had gotten a phone call telling me to get to the barn right away.

Our school lets people who play school sports out, and with homework to do. As a dedicated horse person, I get the same rules. As do the other dedicated riders. That may have something to do with the fact that we all seem to be honor students, pass in work on time, and get good marks on tests. From being around horses, we have learned to respect those with errr greater power.

Schooling is important. When I was looking into a horsey career, it didn't seem as important to me, but I soon realized it was. The comment you made about horsey careers is oh so wrong. Ride2Hounds wrote a beautiful post, and the return was less then.

Back to the original topic at hand, my teachers have been very helpful with me. The same as they were when my brother played on high level hockey teams. They see the importance in this, and encourage it. better then us skipping school to get high.

Andrea

our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall

hobson
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:33 AM
So, whalo, if school is such a big problem why not stop griping about it and drop out? If you're as bright as you say you are (it doesn't show in your communication, but whatever) then you should be able to take the GED after your junior career is over, pass with flying colors and get admitted to the university of your choice. If you're so good at the riding that you need to be showing regularly, quitting school will give you the time you need to ramp up to a pro career. Problem solved.

PlusTax
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:48 AM
I don't think anyone is helping by saying that she should just drop out of school or lie or anything. She came to us for advise, and b*tching at her about her grammar is not the purpose of these boards. God knows I have the **worst** grammar of any human being, yet I seem to be making good grades in a good college so lets not all jump on whalo and tell her she's dumb.

I know what Whalo is going through, she never said she was so good that she should just turn pro. She wants to show a lot and as much of you may hate to admit it, must of us do show a lot! I had one class last year that I only attended 20 times because I was riding. Never once did I say "I don't want to go to school, I want to turn pro" I still made good grades, got into college, and didn't even take a year off! I'm sure whalo is a normal person who just wants to be able to show. When I would miss Fridays I would see tons of other kids, most younger than me, also there. So obviously somwhere, somehow, those kids got out of school!

Whalo- if it's really that big of a problem then go talk to the principal of your school as well as your teachers. If they still won't let you, get your parents/trainers involved. If it still doesn't work, look at your other options. You could transfer to a school that would let you, home school, or make a deal with your school that you could work with a tutor for extended periods of time. I hope I helped /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

**Kelsey**
&
**Notoriety**
**Plus Tax**
**Clearly Canadian**
**Pavielle**
**Angel Face**

http://community.webshots.com/user/jrhntrpavi

creseida
Dec. 12, 2002, 10:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kelsey D:
...so lets not all jump on whalo and tell her she's dumb.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Kelsey, no one accused whalo of being "dumb". She implied in her post that ride2hounds was "dumb", using the arguement that she, a teenager could "out think [him] anyday". People made comments about her need to grow up and get her education AFTER she made this insulting, and barely comprehensible post (if you will refer to page 1 of this thread) :

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> i have fine grammer, i typed that very fast cause i am in the middle of writting an essay. and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

By the way, whalo, the correct spelling is "grammar". I really have no sympathy for this child's plight. She does not present herself in a mature manner.

When I was in high school, if you missed a class 5 times other than for documented illness or excused absences, you failed. No "ifs, ands or buts". Horse shows, and other leisure activities, did not qualify as "excused absences", and hate to burst your bubble, but they are a luxury, not a necessity in life.

BTW, Kelsey, at least your posts are easy to read; whalos are not.

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Blue Devil
Dec. 12, 2002, 11:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ride2hounds:
When you receive your university degree from Princeton, you may discuss "how smart" you then. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ride2hounds, m'dear, not Princeton, Yale!
/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
-the best friend of a Bulldog

My karma ran over your dogma.

lmlacross
Dec. 12, 2002, 12:09 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by whalo:
Hey,
i was just wondering for those of you out there that have many absents due to shows, what reaction do you get from you school...QUOTE]

Given the topic of this post, I would be remiss not to point out that absent (adj) and absences (pl. n.) are two different things.

I apologize if this has already been indicated. Aah-- and I see that it has. Carry on, then!

LML

*MidWest/Chicago Clique*
*Cripple Clique*

tyedyecommando
Dec. 12, 2002, 12:14 PM
I can't say I feel sorry for you kids. When I was in high school they had a thing called an attendance policy. You HAD to be in class 90% of the time which equaled missing about 7 days a semester whether you were sick or just absent. I went to school and showed on the weekends and didn't find it to be a huge hassle.

I really don't think the teachers should bend over backwards to make your life easier. If they want to be very nice that fine, but its not their responsibility to cater to your every need every week because you are going to a show. Sorry.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
I hope life isn't a big joke, because I don't get it.
Jack Handy

Coreene
Dec. 12, 2002, 12:36 PM
A few times when we were in grade school, our parents pulled us out for six or eight weeks to travel. They set an appt with the teacher and pricipal at the beginning of the year, explained what we were going to do and when, and asked which was was the easiest and most effective for them in terms of doing our schoolwork. They were great about it; we did some of the work before leaving and most of it on the trip.

Tosca
Dec. 12, 2002, 01:36 PM
I missed a month of school at the end of grade. 11 to go to Europe! I talked to my teachers sensibly and politely and they were more than happy to help me out with assigned homework and whatnot. Maybe you should stop throwing the blame around, whalo, and take a little bit of responsibility for yourself.

To quote a line from Ferris Bueller, "I weep for the future."

SpringBreak
Dec. 12, 2002, 01:40 PM
you're lucky craze2event!! horsey prinicpal? you've got yourself a reprieve there! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

whalo
Dec. 12, 2002, 04:11 PM
i do take responsibily for my work! and thanks kelsy for succesfully answering my question and defending me, lol. i guess many ppl on this board are not good with staying on topic, lol. jk to everyone else, i simply wanted some questions answered not to get griped at, if you actually knew me then i think you would feel differently. here is an example of somthing i wrote where i actually tried to use good writing...

Most people don't understand horse showing
A show captivates the individual
Horse and rider must be the ultimate team
Without understanding each other no success Can be achieved
You find yourself lost in a world separate From reality
When you are riding all that exists is you And your horse
You are no longer two beings but one, that Is superior to anything separate
When you are at a horse show no external worries arise
The only importance is the performance you And your horse achieve together
Horse showing is an art form
Your horse and you are the artists
And the arena a canvas of vast expression and discovery

crave2event
Dec. 12, 2002, 06:04 PM
Springbreak...not only is he horsey, but man could he ride!!! I saw a picture of him over quite a large fence, with amazing form. He breeds them now, and breds them well, his babies are cleaning up. His daughter coached me, and was also my chiropractor. And as my mom was a teacher there, I kind of get special treatment /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif It must be my charm /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Andrea

our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall

SpringBreak
Dec. 12, 2002, 06:52 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by tyedyecommando:
I can't say I feel sorry for you kids. When I was in high school they had a thing called an attendance policy. You HAD to be in class 90% of the time which equaled missing about 7 days a semester whether you were sick or just absent.

thats how our school is /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

SpringBreak
Dec. 12, 2002, 06:53 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by crave2event:
Springbreak...not only is he horsey, but man could he ride!!! I saw a picture of him over quite a large fence, with amazing form. He breeds them now, and breds them well, his babies are cleaning up. His daughter coached me, and was also my chiropractor. And as my mom was a teacher there, I kind of get special treatment /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif It must be my charm /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Andrea

our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



thats so awesome!!!!! i wish i had teachers or sumthin that rode! /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

whalo
Dec. 12, 2002, 07:37 PM
bump

eqnjumperrider
Dec. 12, 2002, 08:32 PM
My school and teachers are excellent at letting students miss school for horseshows. They are like this, because they know that the kids that they give this privledge to are responsible, get good grades, and try to accomadate the teachers' requests as much as possible. I usually get my work before a show and either turn it in before I leave or the day I return. Most of my teachers allow us to take the tests before we leave or up to one week after we return (they make it very clear that it is not their job to find us and remind us). When I miss school to go to Europe for 2-3 weeks every fall, my teachers give me independent study contracts and work to take with me, and e-mail/fax back as I complete it. This system seems very fair to me, and I think people need to stop getting pissy at their teachers for trying to do what they are paid to do. Teachers don't have to be helpful, assign work in advance, or allow kids to take tests when they have time. They work hard for you when you show them respect and hard work.

Chelsea
Dec. 12, 2002, 08:52 PM
I am absent...frequently for shows. I am a VERY responsible student and I am on the honor role and I am in advanced classes. I put effort into everything I do and I am very up front with the teachers and they know early on that I am a competitive horseback rider. They learn that I have goals to achive and I still value academic sucess.

Another thing to keep in mind, my parents demand academic excellence. As long as I can keep my grades to mostly A's and the occasional B+ I may continue showing. If my grades drop to B-'s I loose shows until my grades are up in the appropriate zone.

School comes first. If I quit performing academically I quit performing in the equine world also. That is the deal and I'm sticking to it.

Last year my teachers were less than supportive and my grades were excellent. This year however, my teachers are amazing. They are so supportive and always wish me luck. They are very lax about getting test done ahead of time, ect. but I always insist so. There is no reason why the teachers should be put out by my hobby.

As one of my oh-so-kind teachers last year /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif pointed out, BY LAW the teachers are not required to give you the chance to make up your work no matter how much it counts for on your grade, ect.

It pretty much all boils down to how supportive your teachers and parents are and how responsible you are.

/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

----------------------------
~*~Chelsea~*~
*Boomerang*Irish Echo*Rhythm of the Rain*Irresistible*Capitol Scene* Marlon IV*
-Warmblood Clique(Founder)-Junior Clique-Pony Jumper Clique (Founder)-BBers at Night Clique-Pony Trainer Clique-

eqnjumperrider
Dec. 12, 2002, 08:54 PM
well put Chels /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

barnbabe718
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:10 PM
Hahaha. Reading over this thread amuses me.

Anyway, I'm fifteen; and I miss a great deal of school because of horse shows, whether it's taking the afternoon of for a lesson or missing two weeks to go to Florida. But my teachers never get mad, because I'm mature and responsible about it. And it helps that I do have a 4.1 GPA and participate in class when I'm actually in attendance.

First of all, it's important to phrase your plans for showing in a manner that will be acceptable to the administration. I keep a journal which I pass in to my Headmaster at all away shows, explaining to him everything that I have learned as well as the value of the experience. The faculty at my school is extremely understanding and supportive of my interests, and my teachers have even asked me to bring in videos of myself riding and pictures of my horse.

I get all of my work before I go away and make sure that I keep up with all of my reading. The day that I return, I have friends fax me lecture notes, and I make sure that all of my homework is done. The only thing that I have trouble making up on my own is math, and I have a tutor and can see my teacher during his office hours if necessary. Yes, I get tired. Yes, I get stressed. But I get it all done, even if it means sitting at the equitation finals with my history textbook and packets of calculus derivatives.

whalo
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:35 PM
i do all the things that you guys do too. i get all my work ahead of time, and make plans with my teachers for after school makeup tests labs tutoring ect. but some of them still make comments like "i dont have time for you to make up a test especially when you missed to go to a HORSE SHOW!!!" that bugs me cause if i missed for a school sport, field trip, ect. it wouldnt be a problem. oh well

BenRidin
Dec. 12, 2002, 09:41 PM
and I know that I probably shouldn't have even posted this then but I just wanted to say for everyone that pokes at anyone else's grammar they really don't have much place to talk. Of course people get a little lazy when they are typing on the internet, maybe they are typing a little faster than they can handle because they are chatting with friends on AIM at the same time or something..Anyway everyone makes mistakes when they type...it's very easy for your finger to hit the wrong key. Not everyone is a whiz with the keyboard don't ya know /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

And I can kind of see where whalo is coming from. Yes school is important but it sucks that you have to juggle school and trying to qualify for all the medal finals at the same time. Yes life goes on after you lose your junior title, however medal, maclay, juniors hunters ect. do not so try to understand why only having a year or 2 left in the juniors is very frustrating.

Ok I just had to say that, I don't like seeing other people get bashed when they reach out for help.. /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

~BenRidin

Fiction
Dec. 12, 2002, 10:05 PM
Whalo- I don't know anything about you, but if the public schools are being a pain, try private schools. My ex bf was a HUGE tennis player, and missed tons and tons of school last year- more than the top A circuit kids at my school. He switched to my school last year from a public school, because he heard it'd be better about missing days. They let him go to tournaments, and make up his work, but in the end he missed so much, he is being homeschooled this year.
I don't miss very much school, my parents are super strict on that, and my trainer is too. But we have/had some big name riders(Greg Best went to my school), who miss alot of days for anything ranging from FL to Devon, Indoors, Medal/Maclay Finals... Everyone (from what I've heard) gets their work ahead of time and takes it with them.
If its an option for your family and the area you live in, you might want to consider a different school, since it sounds like yours isn't very helpfull.

-----
This is not a true story
-----

eqnjumperrider
Dec. 12, 2002, 10:09 PM
wahlo- Instead of whining about what they say, be glad that they let you leave....

horseless
Dec. 13, 2002, 05:37 AM
I attempted to stay out of this but one thing that nagged at me was how Walo appears to think that homeschooling would indeed be eaiser on her schedual then regular school( public).Depending on your states laws this may or may not be true. I beleave Ma( this is where you said you were from correct) does quarterly evaluations. Though i wouldnt swear by it im in ohio. I homeschool both of my children and they spend an average of 4 hrs a day doing their work and i spend an average of 10 hrs a week grading,and doing their assignment sheet for the next week out. In ohio my kids are required to have a minimum of 900 hrs education time in the required fields pre year. this does not however include pe which has its own requirement. Again depending on the state your in and what their laws are will determine what subjects have to be covered and how your parent(s) have to "prove" you learned something. In ohio if the local school board determines that you ( the student) has made no progress the parent(s) are put on "probation" for rmedation whic means in a nut shell you have to report every so often to the school board with your child work. If no "progress" is made within that time they can force you to put the child back into public school. That being said you have to realize that its not just you that isinvolved in homschooling your parent(s) also have to be committed, and depending on which curricilum your parents pick out it could run anywhere from nothing(using the lib) to thousands of dollars per year .and If Ma is like Ohio you must submit in advance what curric your going to be using and they either approve or disapprove it... if they do not allow then the $$ is already spent and more has to be spent. (I have not had the "pleasure" of the school board dissapproving the curric i use but i have heard of it happeneing).
Homeschooling takes dedication on both the part of the parent and the student.. its not necessarly the easy way out.

Molly99
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:21 AM
BenRidin,

I cannot speak for the others, but the grammar issues bother me in these situations the most.

If you are posting a generic post, I really don't care, but if you are posting asking for advice or to vent, then I would expect anyone to use correct grammar and not short cuts. Minor mistakes are one thing, but repeated shortcuts that not everyone above the age of 15 will understand is annoying to the people that are trying to take the post seriously.

How would you expect people to take you seriously otherwise is beyond me.

My point: if you want people to treat you and your comments seriously you need to phrase them as such. Save the quick typing for the misc. posts.

vent over, thanks for listening

whalo
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:23 AM
i never said that homeschooling is easier, i always knew it would take more disipline, and work. however why i would want to home school is because if i did when i went to shows i would just be able to take my work with me without causing any stress to me or teachers. and i also wouldnt have to deal with other students who wish they had gotten out calling me skipper and such.

Molly99
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
but some of them still make comments like "i dont have time for you to make up a test especially when you missed to go to a HORSE SHOW!!!" that bugs me cause if i missed for a school sport, field trip, ect. it wouldnt be a problem. oh well<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, but a school sport or field trip is APPROVED by the school.

Like it or not, you cannot expect all teachers or school officials to like you missing school for an UNAPPROVED excuse.

That is simply the way it is.

Accept it, deal with, learn to live with it. That will be the story for the rest of your life. Do not think that employers will let you leave just because you have a horse show.

Bentley
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:26 AM
In all honesty, I didn't even try to read Whalo's last reply in this thread.

She/He may be as smart as they say they are, but I am not going to take the time to try to figure out the spelling mistakes, run on sentences and other problems in the post to make that conclusion.

First impressions do count for a lot, even on the internet!

That said, BenRidin, you were very eloquent in explaining your position /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

Whalo, my only advice is, Buck Up Buttercup - you don't have it too bad at all.

Jumphigh83
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:27 AM
Who said that riding and academic excellence are mutually exclusive? Billy is a Johns Hopkins Gifted and Talented high honor student who also happens to be a decent rider. When we go to shows we TRY to prepeare the schools and keep in contact via telephone, internet, fax etc..His school used to be helpful (up to about 6th grade) and then the teachers flatly refused to send work or prepare it in advance (even though they have to file lesson plans for the YEAR) It has to do with their contract. When they say they can't I correct them and say they WON'T ...big difference! It is no picnic to balance school and riding, it isn't a matter of "just dropping out" to "play horse"..why can't we have both? I wonder how Olympic athletes do it? Or gifted children who play instruments? All the nastiness on this board is directly proportional to the envy toward the kids who have this opportunity. I fail to see why the schools can't cooperate with the parents..life lessons are sometimes as valuable as school lessons. It concerns me that the school (read the STATE) has this much control over our kids. It SHOULD concern everyone out there. After all, they are OUR children NOT the States. I don't need them to tell me what is good for my child and I am sure most of you out there (with children) feel the same way. It doesn't "take a village" to raise a child, it takes a father and a mother and a family.

Betsy
Three Winds Farm NY

Lead, follow, or get out of the way...

Oakleigh
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:46 AM
I'm not in school. I "did" my 12 years plus 11 years of college already. BUT, if I had a child who was on the circuit, I would work directly with the school counselor and a tutoring service that is available at WEF. If the school knows you are "in class" a portion of every day, they should be much more lenient about the time you are away.

Here is info on a Lab school in Wellington. I don't know them personally, but it is very common during season to enroll your child here.

Dillon Country Day & Lab School
PEP Program at the
Palm Bch Polo Stadium
13420-A South Shore Blvd.
Wellington, FL 33414
561-798-4748 * Fax: 561-798-4731

Good luck. A few weeks on the circuit is an educational experience!

~~~~&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;****~~*~~****&lt;&lt;&lt;&lt;~~~~
Breeder of Holsteiner and Oldenburg prospects.
Oakleigh Sporthorses (http://hometown.aol.com/psulli1002/page1.html)

Policy of Truth
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:55 AM
"teachers dont want to put ne extra work into getting me my work before i leave or when i get back"

Ummm....you think teachers should HAVE to put in more work than they already do for the less-than-stellar pay they receive? Why should they? What about the other students? Do you really believe what you are saying?

You sound to me as if you are self-centered and your grammar makes me wonder if you are in fact making the grades you claim to be making.

Policy of Truth
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:01 AM
"All the nastiness on this board is directly proportional to the envy toward the kids who have this opportunity. I fail to see why the schools can't cooperate with the parents..life lessons are sometimes as valuable as school lessons"

Betsy, I am not jealous, nor do I think people who disagreee with you are jealous because they disagree...the two are mutually exclusive. Maybe you were playing with the horsies durring your logics class??

Again, you sound self-centered. Are teachers your servants? Where is their chance to enjoy life? Basically, you and others are making yourselvelves appear that you care only about what you want and not what is reasonable for one teacher to do for 1 out of 90 plus students. How selfish is THAT!?

Jumphigh83
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:04 AM
Pacific..they ALREADY HAVE the work "ready" My mother taught school for over 40 YEARS and they KNOW what they are going to do months in advance. Our district teachers make ALOT of money..50 or 60 thousand for 180 days of work and the average class size is FIFTEEN yes 15 NOT 50..They are not overworked. I would LOVE to make the money they make for the amount of time they log in...don't get me wrong I think good teachers are the cornerstone of our society but they are not brain surgeons or nuclear physicists... if they worked a "full" year their salaries would be nearly double what they are and that's pretty good money. After all if the teachers don't exemplify a "work ethic" why would we assume that their students would ?? The union has out lived it's useful life and now it is simply an overly powerfull lobby and an excuse to not have to consider individual potential and/or ambition. Slipping into the asbestoes as we speak.

Betsy
Three Winds Farm NY

Lead, follow, or get out of the way...

Molly99
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:06 AM
I have to disagree a little with the post concerning filing lesson plans for the year.

When I was teaching, we also were required to file a yearly lesson plan at the beginning of the year, however it did not have to be a detailed day by day plan. It was more of an overview of what we expected to teach on a monthly basis. Again, it was not the detailed plans that were done for a weekly plan.

Some schools require teachers to file on Friday afternoon a detailed plan for the next week, others do not.

Sorry, but I would question a teacher that on Sept 1 could tell you exactly what they would be doing on Nov 1. Teaching is not that exact. You have to go with the flow of the class, how they are learning and many times sections will be put off in some subjects until later on. It all depends on the class.

I do not know of any teacher that would refuse to give out work to a child that was missing for a specific reason. I do however see how they would be inconvienced to do that every week for the same child for the same reason, especially an unexcused reason.



If you want that individual attention, send your child to a private school that will do that for you. The majority of younger olympic participants do just that. They have tutors, get home-schooled, etc. They do what it takes because they are at that level.

Flame if you will, but I do not think any high school student is really at the level to in the equestrian sport to claim the are "in training for the olympics." Yes, they may get there someday, but the age of the riders in our sport are not high school students like ice skating, gymnastics, etc.

Coca-Cola
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:29 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
i have fine grammer, i typed that very fast cause i am in the middle of writting an essay. and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, this eloquent post has certainly convinced me that you are an intelligent human being deserving of special consideration. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Yes, indeed.

Quite frankly, I find it hilarious that whalo comes to this BB, posts a topic that looks like it was written by a third grader, and expects to be taken seriously when she bemoans the fact that her teachers are not sympathetic that she wants to miss school. She follows this post up with claims that she is smarter than everyone else, tells people to "bug off" and then insists that she does deal with her teachers in a mature and respectful manner. *snort* I say, "practice what you preach", which I've yet to see whalo do.

IMNSHO, she has not demonstrated that she is deserving of any special treatment, here or at school. Welcome to Reality 101 in The School of Hard Knocks.

~~Respect is EARNED, not bestowed.~~

[This message was edited by lady cottington on Dec. 13, 2002 at 11:25 AM.]

lmlacross
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:42 AM
that I am staunchly opposed to home schooling in the VAST majority of situations. The reasons for this are too involved to get into here (hinges on a lack of socialization and kids missing out on the value of learning how to adapt and succeed in the framework of an institution not run by Mom or Dad-- think "the workplace"). So, I'm not really going to get into that end of it.

I did, however, want to make one point to Whalo. You had mentioned (sorry, I'm paraphrasing here) that some of your classroom teachers were better than others at preparing and returning the assignments they prepare for you during you admittedly frequent horse show absences.

You need to realize that this is a HUGE pain in the ass (for lack of a better word) for your teachers, too. Preparing a special packet of worksheets, quizzes, etc. for a student who must be at home due to illness (mono, etc.) is different than repeatedly being forced to prepare, handout, track down and correct work from a student who is habitually absent due to her passion for horse shows (a passion which, by the way, I understand).

For teachers, this means quite a bit of extra work-- no longer can they simply plan and prepare lessons for their entire class, but they must prepare individualized lessons for you on YOUR own specialized calendar (revolving around horse shows).

Most schools have strict attendance and tardy policies (in my public high school in suburban Boston, it was no more than 10 absences a year, or you will lose credit for the course, excused, or unexcused). These policies help ensure that students get the most out of their classroom experience-- position them to succeed academically. However, on the other side of the coin, they also protect teachers from having to carry the extra burden created by students who are habitually absent.

Public school teachers, for the most part, are dedicated professionals who enjoy their work (and do it, quite often, for relatively little pay). I could see, Whalo, why some of your teachers work harder than others in catering to the demands of your show schedule. I'm not condoning a lack of attention on their part, but I did want you to know where they might be coming from. They probably see the value in your sitting in their class regularly--seeing you struggle academically (which they can most certainly attribute to your horse show absences) is probably enough to make the mwant to throw up their hands.

Good luck.

LML

*MidWest/Chicago Clique*
*Cripple Clique*

caffeinated
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jumphigh83:
All the nastiness on this board is directly proportional to the envy toward the kids who have this opportunity. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm really curious as to how you came to this opinion. I don't see envy anywhere in this thread (after all, many of us WERE able to get out of school for horse shows, we just had to MAKE it happen). Personally I think the "nastiness" happened because it seems children think they deserve to do whatever they want, whenever they want, and can't handle that the real world doesn't work that way. And of course the thread wouldn't have gotten as nasty as it has if the original poster had explained themselves clearly. Because of the lack of skill in expressing herself, most people here realize she probably needs education more than she needs horse showing.

I didn't get off of school very often for horse shows, but there were girls who did the A circuit who did. And people who took part in other "non-school-approved" activities that got out of school as well. BUT they had to work to make that happen. They had to make concessions. ANd many had to just deal with the fact that they lost grades and then did extra work for extra credit to bring themselves back up. Not a single one expected their teachers to treat them in a special manner or go far out of their way so they could traipse to a horse show. And THAT was the reason it was allowed. It seems our poster expects a lot to be given without understanding how the real world works.

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

halfhalt
Dec. 13, 2002, 09:50 AM
this sure reads like a troll..#

creseida
Dec. 13, 2002, 09:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by halfhalt:
this sure reads like a troll..#<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Where is Belen with her cute picture when we need her? /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Tha Ridge
Dec. 13, 2002, 10:10 AM
My mom's a teacher and teachers DO NOT know what they're going to be doing months ahead and like Whalo said, many times they will change assignments. It's not uncommon. My mom works oh, 160 or so days per year. Hardly overworked! She teaches three classes a day and has one week vacations in October, November, 2 weeks in December and 2 weeks in March. She teaches at a public, urban high school which is one of the largest high schools in Texas too. I think teachers being underpaid and overworked is a cliché.

- L.

"That's unbelieveable, like when the cow jumped over the moon...Now, I never put nothin' before you...That's like eatin cereal, pickin a fork over a spoon..." - Field Mob

lmlacross
Dec. 13, 2002, 10:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>My mom works oh, 160 or so days per year. Hardly overworked! She teaches three classes a day and has one week vacations in October, November, 2 weeks in December and 2 weeks in March. She teaches at a public, urban high school which is one of the largest high schools in Texas too. I think teachers being underpaid and overworked is a cliché.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

And I think your assuming that all teachers are in the same situation as your mother is too much of a generalization. If your mom only teaches three classes, then she's not a fulltime faculty member. Plus, most public high schools dont have all the vacations you listed.

Not all districts in all cities and states are the same. Pay scales vary widely. Be careful, before you rush to judgement about how truly "cliche" this is. Maybe, your mother's situation isn't quite representative of what most teachers deal with.

LML

*MidWest/Chicago Clique*
*Cripple Clique*

BybeeGirl
Dec. 13, 2002, 10:30 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jumphigh83:
Pacific..they ALREADY HAVE the work "ready" My mother taught school for over 40 YEARS and they KNOW what they are going to do months in advance. Our district teachers make ALOT of money..50 or 60 thousand for 180 days of work and the average class size is FIFTEEN yes 15 NOT 50..They are not overworked. I would LOVE to make the money they make for the amount of time they log in...don't get me wrong I think good teachers are the cornerstone of our society but they are not brain surgeons or nuclear physicists... if they worked a "full" year their salaries would be nearly double what they are and that's pretty good money. After all if the teachers don't exemplify a "work ethic" why would we assume that their students would ?? The union has out lived it's useful life and now it is simply an overly powerfull lobby and an excuse to not have to consider individual potential and/or ambition. Slipping into the asbestoes as we speak.

Betsy
Three Winds Farm NY

Lead, follow, or get out of the way...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Um, just to preface, I'm eating lunch as I post...
Please come teach my Novels classes that AVERAGE 28 students each. Or how about grade, and give thoughtful insight into the 139 essays I just collected. Oh, I forgot that I need to compile sample work for a parent conference this afternoon. I'm sure I can get that finished in my 45 minute "planning" period. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Back to topic. If parents want to pull kids for shows, that's fine by me. I don't have a problem getting together work at all. But I still have standards students must follow. If a student is going to miss the work, he has specified time to make it up. If I don't get it by the deadline, it's a 0. I don't track down work. If the student isn't responsible enough to see that it is turned in on time, that is not my problem.
I honestly think the attitude whalo is referring to is simply pressure that teachers are feeling. They are the ones held accountable when the students don't pass state assessments, not the parents.

BybeeGirl
Dec. 13, 2002, 10:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tha Ridge:
My mom's a teacher and teachers DO NOT know what they're going to be doing months ahead and like Whalo said, many times they will change assignments. It's not uncommon. My mom works oh, 160 or so days per year. Hardly overworked! She teaches three classes a day and has one week vacations in October, November, 2 weeks in December and 2 weeks in March. She teaches at a public, urban high school which is one of the largest high schools in Texas too. I think teachers being underpaid and overworked is a cliché.

- L.

"That's unbelieveable, like when the cow jumped over the moon...Now, I never put nothin' before you...That's like eatin cereal, pickin a fork over a spoon..." - Field Mob<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

WOW! I need to move to Texas! I mean 160 days of work. My contract is for 205 days...And 3 classes a day.
But this isn't a thread on overworked teachers, now is it????

Policy of Truth
Dec. 13, 2002, 10:58 AM
"and dude are you a horse person, hey at least im still in school. its not like i pay attention to my grammer on a message board i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!!"

REALLY???!! So, you know this because you know who you are addressing your retort to? And how, pray, do you gather this information so quickly (not to mention, show off your "skills" so eloquently)?

Believe me, I have not been insulted by your attempt to insult me or others who happen to disagree with you. I'm still trying to reconcile your grammar with your self-reported grades. What school system do you attend?

And BTW, having a differing opinion does not make a person less intelligent than you. Insulting a person's intelligence because they have a differing opinion than you makes you appear UNintelligent.

We are aware you are unhappy with your teachers and their innability to cater only to you. My suggestion is to be either home schooled or to pay for a tutor. Other people do it. What's the hinderance?

Policy of Truth
Dec. 13, 2002, 11:07 AM
"Our district teachers make ALOT of money..50 or 60 thousand for 180 days of work and the average class size is FIFTEEN yes 15 NOT 50".

So, teachers are finally getting the pay they deserve and you want them to do more? I don't get it. They fight for decent pay, get it, and then are told they have to do more for it? I know we disagree on this point, but that really bothers me.

Yes, horseshows are important, however they are not THE priority. If they are (unless it is a professional) then there is something clearly wrong.

Moesha
Dec. 13, 2002, 11:12 AM
Ok I have no idea what is going on here, but this seems interesting.

Riding and showing is important many junior riders I know are excellent students who plan on going to University....I am sure not every junior is like that..people are all unique and individual.

In my opinion, schools should really work with students who are dedicated and so involved with riding...they are excelling in a sport that requires mental and physical fitness and demands so much of them and really tests and builds their character, isn't that what schools are basically trying to promote and create....better people. I can understand the strains it may have on school systems especially depending on the grade, or age or other numerous factors. But if the parents and the student work with the system then I see no reason for the school to not cooperate.

If it really is an issue then a private school is definitely an option, not that the private schools would be more understanding, my prep school was not... I had to play tennis, lacross and soccer and participate in one play a trimester even though I wanted to ride instead for my after school sports/activity/ requirement....but they were leinent about missing some days here and there for showing...I didn't do Florida or anything just the Junior Hunters in my area MD, PA, and VA.

Basically if it is an issue you have to change something.....to make it work.

tyedyecommando
Dec. 13, 2002, 11:14 AM
quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by Tha Ridge:
My mom's a teacher and teachers DO NOT know what they're going to be doing months ahead and like Whalo said, many times they will change assignments. It's not uncommon. My mom works oh, 160 or so days per year. Hardly overworked! She teaches three classes a day and has one week vacations in October, November, 2 weeks in December and 2 weeks in March. She teaches at a public, urban high school which is one of the largest high schools in Texas too. I think teachers being underpaid and overworked is a cliché.

- L.

So your mom feels underworked and over paid, or is that your opinion. Print this thread off for her and get her answer. I doubt she feels the same way you do. Plus, with that teaching schedule and extremely high pay, perhaps I should change my major.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
I hope life isn't a big joke, because I don't get it.
Jack Handy

JAGold
Dec. 13, 2002, 11:28 AM
Those of you debating salaries may want to see this web page, (http://www.aft.org/research/salary/home.htm) which has current information about teacher salaries in various states. New York, where Jumphigh 83 is apparently from, pays the nation's 4th highest salaries, with an average (including extra duty pay) of about $51,000 a year. Teachers in NY received no pay increase last year.

Accomodating students' sports activities is not part of a teacher's job description. By definition, it is something that s/he is not paid to do. That said, I attended public schools from kindergarden through high school graduation. My teachers were extrordinarily accomodating of my desire -- not need -- to miss class time for horse shows. I was expected to turn in the work before a planned absence, in accordance with district policies, or to make arrangements to ensure that it was received by my teachers the same day that it was turned in by the rest of the class. My work was graded and returned to me at the same time the rest of the class received their scores, or when I returned to school. It was my responsibility to make these arrangements and to follow up on any work that I might have missed. Missing school was a privilage that I earned with good grades and responsible and respectful handling of the situation.

As an aside, I found that the same held true in college, when I continued to miss some class time for horse shows. Professors had no obligation to allow me to turn in work late or to make special arrangements for me, but so long as I spoke with them at the beginning of a course, were generally willing to let me turn in work early and even allowed me to take exams from hotels! (My school had an honor code that allowed students to take exams in the libraries, outside, or in cafes if so desired; the policy extended to hotels for traveling athletes by the graciousness of our professors.)
--Jess

crave2event
Dec. 13, 2002, 12:57 PM
I'll stand by my earlier comment. When I miss school and it is a so called, unexcusable absence (i.e. not a school sport, sickness, medical appointment, driver's testing) but rather riding, or competing in my other sport, broomball, the teachers are much much happier to get the extra work for me then getting it for a student who merely didn't go to class. Also, I don't know about you, but we have a thing down here called asking a friend, for your missed assignments, and notes. Tests and quizzes are made up at lunch hours, or during a class in a library. They don't have to make up a new one, unless it has already been handed back.

My mom is a teacher, and I take personal affront to some of the comments being made. Who says they are over paid? My mom teaches 2 grade 9 science classes, a pal calm class and and a reasource class. She has a 40 minute prep where she is normally still working with resource students. She is hard at work when she gets home. She is also only a subsititute, who has been on for a year and a half.

And 15 students in a class room? Wow, I would love to live there. My smallest class is 20, my largest? 38 students. In a room made for 25. Half of those students are grade 10, and the other half, grade 11. Now you tell me that teacher doesn't deserve every penny she gets!!!

I've veered off topic. Maybe Whalo hasn't presented her views the best way. But, my teachers are more then happy to give me extra work, as I think they should, as I'm staying away from drugs/alchol and dedicating myself to something worth it.


But then again, maybe its just further proof that maritimers rock.

Andrea

our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall

CourtneyLiz
Dec. 13, 2002, 02:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jumphigh83:
Pacific..they ALREADY HAVE the work "ready" My mother taught school for over 40 YEARS and they KNOW what they are going to do months in advance. Our district teachers make ALOT of money..50 or 60 thousand for 180 days of work and the average class size is FIFTEEN yes 15 NOT 50..They are not overworked. I would LOVE to make the money they make for the amount of time they log in...don't get me wrong I think good teachers are the cornerstone of our society but they are not brain surgeons or nuclear physicists... if they worked a "full" year their salaries would be nearly double what they are and that's pretty good money. After all if the teachers don't exemplify a "work ethic" why would we assume that their students would ?? The union has out lived it's useful life and now it is simply an overly powerfull lobby and an excuse to not have to consider individual potential and/or ambition. Slipping into the asbestoes as we speak.

Betsy
Three Winds Farm NY

Lead, follow, or get out of the way...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Betsy-
I'm sorry you have had such difficulties with your school system and your son. However, I'm rather offended by some of the things you've said here.

First, my mom is a teacher, making 50,000 dollars a year. This is a good salary. However, she has multiple masters degrees and close to 30 years of experience. For the majority of that time, she was making nowhere near this amount. Furthermore, she is an excellent teacher.

Second, I resent the implication that teachers are not as smart or deserving of pay as brain surgeons and nuclear physicists. I'm an intelligent individual. I routinely scored in the 99th and 98th percentiles on standardized tests. I have no doubt that I could be a nuclear physicist if I were interested in such things. I'm not.

After I graduate in may, I'm going to spend two to three years teaching. I love teaching, I love children, and I feel that there is no better way to spend my time straight out of college. I don't need to make 60 grand right after graduation. After my time teaching, I will attend grad school for neuropsychology.


Your implications that teachers do not work as much as other professions is ridiculous. Sure, teachers get off at 3 or 4 pm, but they go in early and they work evenings and weekends. My mom always has things to do at home, as do all the other teachers I know. They are some of the most industrious and dedicated people I know. Sure, your son attends school for 180 days, but teachers must work before and after that time. They must attend workshops and classes over the summer. If you'd love to make that amount of money for the time they work, then I'd suggest you try it.

Courtney

Kestrel
Dec. 13, 2002, 02:46 PM
My daughter's school treats horse shows as excused abscences, but she has to meet the school half way. She picks up the abscence form 2 weeks before hand, has all the teachers sign it as well as her advisor and I have to sign it as well. It list assignments or states that she will get them from another student, which she does by phone or email the day of the class. She talks to another student ahead of time to get copies of class notes, and makes sure to take notes for others when they are away or ill. Doing all of this has made her more independant and better organized about traveling and made her aware of the trade offs in horse showing/missing classes. One foreign language teacher told her that she couldn't get an A if she wasn't there to participate in the spoken part of class, so she had to make a choice and live with the consequences. Just like the real world.
On our part, we try to show during vacations whenever possible, and we fly in and out for shows, missing Friday and for some shows Thursday as well. It also helps to touch base with teachers by email so that they know that you are thinking about the class. One reason this works for her is that she goes to a private school with classes no larger than 18, and where teacher are there because they love teaching and kids. These are the kind of teachers who come to their student's swim meets, soccer games and plays. She has been lucky to have all the support from her school that she does.

Moesha
Dec. 13, 2002, 02:57 PM
Teachers are like Nurses in that they give so much to our society and receive nowhere near the amount of credit they deserve. Look at the shortages that both professions face. It sounds like the situations vary depending on many factors like all aspects of society something like this is not black & white it has too many variables.

Tha Ridge
Dec. 13, 2002, 05:37 PM
To whoever said my mom wasn't a full-time faculty member, she's as much of a faculty member as all of the other teachers. That comment sort of offended me as she works hard at her job and is a teacher (2 classes of World Geography, 1 of World History). ALL of the teachers teach only 3 classes a day. The school is ran on block scheduling and classes are switch every 18 weeks.

My mom doesn't think she's underpaid or overworked. God, with a total of 4 months vacation when you add it all up, I don't know how you could be overworked. LOL...if she were "overworked", I don't think she'd be relaxing at home by 3 p.m. everyday or going on a 2-week cruise in March.

- L.

"That's unbelieveable, like when the cow jumped over the moon...Now, I never put nothin' before you...That's like eatin cereal, pickin a fork over a spoon..." - Field Mob

Charisma
Dec. 13, 2002, 05:57 PM
I have to say that I am not suprised by the ignorance displayed by the many teenagers who have written on this post. It saddens me.
First of all, you are legally required to go to school, when you graduate, you may then decide what to do with your time.

Horse shows and "the lifestyle" are a luxury which your parents are paying for, and I would love to be there when you are out in the real world working for yourself and supporting yourself, and realize how good you had it. You may never get there if you don't participate in school.

I am very offened by the many off colored and false statements made regarding teachers, their pay, and work ethic. I am a teacher and I can assure you that even though our contract is for 210 days, we have many extra hours logged in after, before and during the school day and year. There are many classes and inservices we are required to take on Saturdays, after school and during the summer. I don't know one teacher who does not take his/her work home with them every day. Teachers work hard in difficult settings, with difficult students, parents and administration. I believe we have some on this board.

If you are to make comments, be sure that you are accurate and intelligent in your representation of yourself. You are after all our "future".

I thank those who defended teachers and those who are out there working to support themselves and their horsey habit.


"If you can read this, thank a teacher."

[This message was edited by Charisma on Dec. 13, 2002 at 08:12 PM.]

Hopeful Hunter
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:14 PM
You know, in coming back and reading all of this, I suspect that what most of us are reacting to - beyond Whalo's apparent inability to find either the shift key or a dictionary - is the sheer sense of ENTITLEMENT that is coming through in some posts. Not all of them - indeed, there have been many posts, including some by younger members, which have been thoughtful and responsible. But many of the posts just seem to ooze a sense of "I want to do this, so everyone should work around what I want."

Kids -- do you even REALIZE how lucky you are to RIDE a horse, any horse, let alone show at a level that requires absences????????? Do you know how many thousands of kids there are out there who would not just go to school but go all weekend just to earn one day of pony rides? Do you have any clue how different your life is from that of most of the people on the planet?

If you can afford a horse and the training to show enough to warrant missing school, you are probably in a family whose income far outstrips that of any of your teachers. Do you think it's really fair to treat them as though they OWE it to you to accomodate your expensive amusements? Because face facts, kids, that's what horses are unless you are a pro - an expensive amusement.

Even if you are in a family that's scrimping to send you to shows, you are still spending a boatload of money on a hobby. And expecting that hobby to be given priority by your teachers is arrogance in the highest degree.

As to teachers being underworked and overpaid -- I beg to ask what planet that comes from? The teachers I know earn every penny of their money, and DON'T earn nearly what they should - even at double their salary. For those who haven't tried it (and I did for one year at the college level) teaching is long, hard WORK. Preparing classes, fine-tuning your lecture to reach your students based on what they bring each semester, reading and grading tests -- it all takes a lot of time. Add to that tutoring those who ask after class, talking with parents, professional development, playing "what does the system want THIS year" and you've got the job from hell.

To add to that burden an arrogant child who feels your developing an individual lesson plan is her right - not because of LEARNING NEEDS but to make her hobby convenient - and I think you might understand why the teachers are less than gracious.

Now, Whalo, IF they are indeed speaking ill of you in your absence, use some of that social skill you claim to be developing while showing and deal with it. Politely and calmly ask about what you've heard, state how it makes you feel and that you'd prefer if they have such issues that they be brought up PRIVATELY with you, your parents or the headmaster. If that doesn't work, go up the food chain.

We've heard from your peers that it IS possible to show and work with the school. Not easy, but then why should it be? Consider it a life lesson -- oh, and please, find a shift key? Us old folks have a hard time reading all lower case or all caps.

luckyduck
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:16 PM
I have to say that with my 11 year old daughter...her teachers have been EXTREMLY supportive.

As long as her grades stay up and she gives them a heads up...they accommidate her in every way they can.

Her grades slipped one time this season...and the teachers said, "No way!" to skipping school...but they were the first to have her start satying after school to get extra help...it took almost 5 weeks, nut she is back showing and doing her school work inbetween classes...

Maybe the difference is that this is a charter school...but I have been VERY grateful!

Charisma
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:23 PM
A M E N

Thank you hopeful hunter!!

Lily
Dec. 13, 2002, 06:58 PM
People are constantly posting on the BB that non-horse people don't see riding as a real sport. I know that was the case when I was in high school- fellow students didn't understand why I was able to skip gym class and leave early for independent study each day, and some teachers didn't think I should be able to miss class regularly for shows.

Want to know how I did it? Lots of hard work- and a little luck. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I kept my grades up- all A's (okay, there was that B in physics)- participated in extracurriculars whenever possible, and proved to my parents and teachers that I could handle riding and school.

My principal saw me on television, and then made the "no gym class offer." My history and econ teachers came to a horse show to see what riding and showing was like. My English teacher wanted to see the proofs from each show.

So, my suggestion is this: work with your teachers. Don't tell them they "have to" prepare your work ahead of time, give you excused absences for shows, or do anything else they're not required to do. Have a meeting with your teachers, parents and a school administrator to discuss how you can all work together to help you be the best rider and student you can be. Get your trainer to write a letter detailing your training program, show schedule, etc.

Give your teachers and administrators the respect they deserve- and realize that if you want them to go the extra mile in granting you extra absences, extensions on papers or projects, and other special favors, you have to do the same. Show up on time and prepared for the classes you do attend, have your show schedule prepared weeks (or months, if possible) in advance, and realize what an extraordinary team you've got supporting you. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

PonyJumperGRL
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:02 PM
One of my teachers has NO idea what we're going to do until the day we do it. Nothing is planned, literally. I asked him what we were reading next and he said he wasn't sure what he wanted us to read.

I also have to say that the teachers I've had since I've started high school are a collection of some of the most amazing people I've ever met. Both of my English Teachers from this year and last year are two of the most brilliant people I've ever met. My AP Chemistry teacher loves what he does. He gets so excited sometimes he starts to yell.

I agree, teachers, like nurses, don't get credit for the truly truly truly life changing work.

I also find it apalling for ANYONE to think that a teacher needs to accomodate THEM. No. That's not the way it works. If you want someone to accomodate you, go to a private school or hire a private tutor where you can directly influence how much they get paid.

PonyJumperGRL
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:06 PM
Hopeful Hunter &gt;&gt; I loved your post...

On Thanksgiving I posted "what we have to be thankful for."

I can summarize it in one line: if you have money in the bank, in your pocket, and in a little dish somewhere, you're richer that 92% of this world's population.

Cruising
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:28 PM
Something my dad says:

Belen, think of good grades like a good job, with good wages. If you aren't making good grades, then aren't making good money. Then you can't pay for your horses. So, that C of yours is worth about $50, while an A would be $300. And since you have that C, you can't afford to ride!

It's a good way to persuede me to try and get good grades! Because, that's kinda how it will be like once I get out into the REAL world!

* B E L E N *
The road goes on forever and the party never ends!
Ho Ho Ho! Only 13 Days Until *CHRISTMAS*!
---&gt; *My Spiffy-rific Page (http://www.geocities.com/heightshunterxoxo/Main1.html)* &lt;--- (New Pics Dec. 8!)

Box-of-Rox
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:41 PM
whalo--

Today, I got deferred from my first choice college. Woe is me, but that's not the point. The point is that even though my envelope wasn't nice and thick with paper, it was nice and thick with a solid life lesson: SCHOOL MATTERS. Duh. But school matters in a different way than I thought it did. School, even if your goal isn't college or something academic, is a universal projection. Excelling in school means that you have discipline, that you rise to challenges, and that you recognize an obligation. Now, everyone that rides, or has ever met someone who took horses very seriously, knows that excelling at riding means that you have discipline, that you rise to challenges, and that you recognize an obligation. But it is not a universal projection. It is very limited.


A kid that goes to my school has GREAT grades, but almost nothing else, and he got in to the same school that I didn't get into. When you look at his transcripts, you say, "hey, he's taking four AP courses. It says a lot about someone that can sit down and do eight hours of homework a night and do it all to such a high standard that he gets A's." When you look at his courseload, you say "hey, he's not great at science-it's his lowest SATII--but he took all the basic sciences and AP bio; he's tested himself." When you see his attendance record, it speaks for itself: he NEVER misses school. It is his complete priority. That speaks VERY, VERY well for the boy.

Then there's me. I have discipline: four other kids got deferred or rejected from this school, and they went out for a we're-stupid-pity-party at Serendipity's, a NYC dessert restaurant. I didn't, because my trainer is very critical of my body and would kill me if I had chocolate cake. Instead, I went to the gym and ran three miles and did 5 sets of 20 'supermans' with extra weight because I have three horses and running from ring to ring jumping from horse to horse in the Florida heat takes a lot of endurance, and one of them it 18hh and is really a man's horse, and i'm not strong enough to keep him on his haunches. I also challenge myself: I have one horse who everyone is always telling me to sell because he, basically, has no heart. Well, I love him and I think he's a winner, so dammit I'm going to push myself to be more accurate and more agressive so that he doesn't need a heart. I drive 200 miles to go ride my horses on the weekends; I go to florida when all my other friends are going out. I am obligated to the horses, so I make sacrafices. But you know what? no one in the "Real World" understands that.

One of the best things that happens to riders is they get thrown back on their asses occasionally (like me not getting into school and you getting this thread). It lets us know that no matter how important riding is, it's not life. I don't know if you go to WEF or not, but, and I can't speak for other winter circuits, if an atomic bomb went off somewhere in the world, no one would know about it. If the horse that's leading in points for the AO hunters gets sold, people can't shut up about it. Priorities, priorities. What your school is TEACHING YOU, besides "life's a bitch, then you die," which is a vitally important life lesson, and "the world does not revolve around you," another good one, is that horses are not everything. If you want to ride through your whole life, you're going to have to reconcile the horse world and the real world for eternity. You cannot just run away and homeschool.

BoR--resident Stupid Child

Willem FAN CLUB!

[This message was edited by Box-of-Rox on Dec. 13, 2002 at 09:49 PM.]

nhwr
Dec. 13, 2002, 07:50 PM
I didn't read this whole thread because on the first page whalo demonstrates pretty succinctly where her head is at, lol. I am a mother that home schools her child. I can tell you it is no cake walk. And I would cut him no slack to go to a show. School is a priority at our house.

Education will do more for you (and the rest of world) than riding ever will. The fact that some think that teachers are stupid because they don't share your priorities simply do not have your heads on straight. The fact that this is even a question belies a lack of understanding of the nature of the world. If your abilities are so advanced, whalo, take the GED and get on with life. If not, quit whining.

In other words, "Quick, move out and support yourself while you still have all the answers."

Molly99
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:14 PM
Rox

That was a great post and it shows that you have learned one of life's hardest lessons very early.

Accept what you are given, change what you can, but work no matter what.

On a lighter note, does anyone else want to go back to grade school where the rules were simple and we knew all the answers. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"To teach is to touch the life of a child forever."

JumpTheMoon
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by WC Princess:
Rox

That was a great post and it shows that you have learned one of life's hardest lessons very early.

Accept what you are given, change what you can, but work no matter what.

On a lighter note, does anyone else want to go back to grade school where the rules were simple and we knew all the answers. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"To teach is to touch the life of a child forever."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

And sucking up to the teacher and being their "recess helper" could get you the A you really didn't deserve. THOSE were the days!!

I agree - B-o-R you're my hero, but you already know that. You work harder than I ever could, love your horses more than anything and spend way too many nights doing nothing but homework. You work your tail end off and anyone who knows you should recognize this and commend you for your hard work and dedication. You're a much better person than I could ever be!! Not to be too sappy or anything /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif - but I know how upset you are, and I also know that no matter what life throws at you, you'll succeed.

ride2hounds
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:28 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> by Emily A: Ride2hounds, m'dear, not Princeton, Yale! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, I would hate to set a bad example to whalo by lying about which university I received my degree from, so it will have to stay Princeton. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>oh and i am not this mean and abnoxious in person <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
As one poster put it, practice what you preach. (I'm assuming you mean Obnoxious)

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show.....i guess my school is just stupid....and in one class i am failing...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm sorry, but who did you say is stupid or ignorant here??

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!!..... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Of course you could; and you've demonstrated that ability so well, too.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Whalo, if you would really like to be taken seriously by this (or ANY) group of people, you should take the time to compose a proper question, not a note in gibberish. It shows respect for those whose opinions you seek, in the same way that braiding and proper turn out shows respect for the judge and your fellow competitors.

Think about how a judge would feel if you showed up in his ring, in muddy half-chaps or with an unbraided or unbathed horse, and you wanted him to judge you. His first impression would be, "This person has made no effort to show herself or her horse at their best, why should I waste my time and effort even judging them?" Your fellow competitors would certainly mock you as well.

On that same line, the fact that you couldn't be bothered to compose your request in a comprehensible manner shows a clear disrespect on your part towards the rest of us on the BB. Not only that, but proper spelling and grammar allows your point to come across clearly and concisely, without the need for an interpreter. Furthermore, by composing your question using proper grammar, spelling and syntax, it supports your claim that you are a good student, and that missing some time in school is not going to be detrimental to your education. If I read a sloppy post by someone who cannot even spell the word "any", or place apostrophes where appropriate, my first impression is this person is an uneducated moron, whether or not this is actually the case.

In life, first impressions are everything, just like in the show ring. You show up looking your best when you enter the ring, the judge will look upon you favorably, and continue to look for things to bolster that first impression. You show up looking like a slob, and you will be dismissed out of hand, no matter how fabulous a rider you are or how athletic your horse may be.

"You will never get a second chance to make a first impression" is so very true, and believe me, you've made quite a strong first impression with many posters here, and not necessarily in a positive light.

~*~Tally Hoooooooo!~*~

Tha Ridge
Dec. 13, 2002, 08:29 PM
Lily, you are very right. I once had an English teacher who was difficult to deal with because of showing. After showing her proofs and videos, we later developed a really awesome student-teacher relationship and she even came to a few of my shows. She's still one of my best adult friends!

As much as I don't like school, I do agree, it is a priority for me and should be for anyone whether you decide to go pro or not.

- L.

"That's unbelieveable, like when the cow jumped over the moon...Now, I never put nothin' before you...That's like eatin cereal, pickin a fork over a spoon..." - Field Mob

marianne
Dec. 13, 2002, 09:31 PM
Just have kids of your own! I truly believe that I should have two diploma for getting 2 kids through first grade. Man, all the stuff you have to train for: How to get the kids to school on time, have lunch/milk money, make lunches the night before, have homework ready and re-learn to read as my kids learn to read via phonics and math lessons. My kids had homework every night even if it was just read a book. I now have a great appreciation of my mother tongue English and how hard it is to learn.

Every fall we took a week to 10 days vacation. I told the teachers as soon as school started, we did homework on planes, wrote journals etc as we traveled to Canada and Europe.

creseida
Dec. 13, 2002, 11:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ride2hounds:
Whalo, if you would really like to be taken seriously by this (or ANY) group of people, you should take the time to compose a proper question, not a note in gibberish. It shows respect for those whose opinions you seek, in the same way that braiding and proper turn out shows respect for the judge and your fellow competitors.

Think about how a judge would feel if you showed up in his ring, in muddy half-chaps or with an unbraided or unbathed horse, and you wanted him to judge you. His first impression would be, "This person has made no effort to show herself or her horse at their best, why should I waste my time and effort even judging them?" Your fellow competitors would certainly mock you as well.

On that same line, the fact that you couldn't be bothered to compose your request in a comprehensible manner shows a clear disrespect on your part towards the rest of us on the BB. Not only that, but proper spelling and grammar allows your point to come across clearly and concisely, without the need for an interpreter. Furthermore, by composing your question using proper grammar, spelling and syntax, it supports your claim that you are a good student, and that missing some time in school is not going to be detrimental to your education. If I read a sloppy post by someone who cannot even spell the word "any", or place apostrophes where appropriate, my first impression is this person is an uneducated moron, whether or not this is actually the case.

In life, first impressions are everything, just like in the show ring. You show up looking your best when you enter the ring, the judge will look upon you favorably, and continue to look for things to bolster that first impression. You show up looking like a slob, and you will be dismissed out of hand, no matter how fabulous a rider you are or how athletic your horse may be.
~*~Tally Hoooooooo!~*~<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Whalo, this is excellent advice. Take it to heart, and it will serve you well for the rest of your life. If you want to be respect, you must treat others with respect. Telling them to "bug off" is no way to earn respect. If you want to be taken seriously, you must present yourself in a serious and workmanlike manner. <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show. horses are stupid they do all the work. it is great to have a horse as a hobby but it cant interfere with school. you cant get ne where with horses like you can in basic athelics sports.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> sounds like a childish temper tantrum, not a serious question from a young adult.

Take the advice you've received in the spirit in which it was intended; to help you survive your trials and tribulations as a teenager entering the real world. Or you can tell us all to "bug off", continue to function under the delusion that you are better than everyone else, and continue to wallow in self-pity because "no 1 takes u seriously". The choice is yours. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

[This message was edited by creseida on Dec. 14, 2002 at 01:20 AM.]

SuperPony
Dec. 14, 2002, 12:18 AM
How is it possible to get above a 4.0 GPA? I am a junior in high school and have a 4.0 GPA. I am taking 3 AP classes and 4th year language. I am also just about to get my first B ever (in AP Calculus...yuck). We get a 4 for an A, a 3 for a B, a 2 for a C, and a 1 for a D. And no credit, of course, if you fail. Are most high schools like this? I would LOVE to get above a 4.0 just so that my horrible calc grade doesn't kill my GPA.

And, more importantly, if the grade scale is different for other schools, what do colleges do with the grades?

-Caroline
"If I go crazy then will you still call me SUPERPONY!"

whalo
Dec. 14, 2002, 12:27 AM
Well I was thinking,
you all out there with the great education and good grammer, shouldn't you be out saving the world or somthing? I mean isn't degrading and calling a teenager stupid a bit below you level of intelligence?

...... Just a thought .......... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Blue Devil
Dec. 14, 2002, 12:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Box-of-Rox:
whalo--

Today, I got deferred from my first choice college. Woe is me, but that's not the point. The point is that even though my envelope wasn't nice and thick with paper, it was nice and thick with a solid life lesson

[This message was edited by Box-of-Rox on Dec. 13, 2002 at 09:49 PM.]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good advice, Jane. I am sorry Yale didn't admit you early, but don't think you won't get in in the long run. I was derred EA from that big place that starts with an H (;)) and actually, I am more happy where I am now (and so glad I turned down those other Ivies to end up here too /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif).

Email me at Ela9@duke.edu if you ever want to chat about that whole "Applying to college" thing. Oh yeah, I'd love to sell you to Duke too if you're still applying places /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Best of luck!
-Emily

P.S. We're not #4 for nothing /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Oh, and it's good to see you posting again...

My karma ran over your dogma.

BenRidin
Dec. 14, 2002, 12:55 AM
Please don't get snippy with everyone, making comments like that isn't going to make a situation any better. Realize that they are all doing this for your own well being, other wise they would have totally ignored your post and shrugged you off. If you make comments like that now, how can you expect anyone to take you seriously in the future when you have other questions? You cannot expect to post something on here and have everyone on your side, feeling the same way/sharing the same opinions as you.
Appreciate that everyone is taking their time to write advice to you and trying to get you focused. (yea as much as we all hate to admit it, while horse showing can be an important part of your life helping your future, an education is even bigger) They have been in your shoes and they know so I would listen to what they say if I were you because they are trying to help you make the best of your future.
Nope, I'm not an adult who is looking down their nose at a teenager. I am a 15 year old who is also struggling to get out of school and go away to horse shows such as WEF this winter, just trying to give you some advice and keep some peace on this board /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~BenRidin

linquest
Dec. 14, 2002, 02:48 AM
Jumphigh83- As someone who has provided research/bargaining assistance to a teachers union at another Upstate NY district, I have to question deeper into some of the facts you state:

50 or 60 thousand for 180 days of work and the average class size is FIFTEEN yes 15 NOT 50.
if they worked a "full" year their salaries would be nearly double what they are

Where is $50-$60K on the salary scale? Certainly not at the beginning. If it's 15+ years of service, then I hardly think those are high figures you're quoting.
Are you saying that the average class size of 15 is nation-wide or just in your district?
180 days...are those just days of instruction or did you include the numerous days of prep, counseling, grading, and inservicing (as another poster previously pointed out).
A full year is 180 days x 2? Incorrect...a full work year is NOT 360(/5) days. Most employees work under 265 days a year (5 days/week), so the assumption of a double salary is grossly overestimated. Further, if you include all of the non-instructional days of work, the gap would be even narrower.

Also, as far as 'having their work "ready" ', a teacher's plans made in advance of the school year are not necessarily the same as what will actually take place in the classroom. A good teacher will modify their lesson plans according to many factors including how their students are progressing, which may result in extensive revision time.

In any case, I'll say "ditto" to Lmlacross's response, especially with cautioning against using one school district to present overgeneralizations on teachers in general.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>by Emily A: Ride2hounds, m'dear, not Princeton, Yale!<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hey folks...we all know that Princeton and Yale BOTH highly inflate their grades. If she were to graduate with a Cornell degree, THEN I'd be impressed /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

whalo
Dec. 14, 2002, 07:26 AM
beenriding,
my comment was not directed to those who were giving me advice, I do appreciate those who did whether i agree with them or not. My comment was directed to those who continually post quotes of my bad grammer, and saying I am a moron and such due to a little bit of my grammer they saw on a message board. Thank you for your advice though. Oh and I want to add that one of the main reasons my school doesn't want to let me out for shows is because they are paid on an attendence basis. This I think is wrong.

whalo
Dec. 14, 2002, 07:27 AM
beenriding,
my comment was not directed to those who were giving me advice, I do appreciate those who did whether i agree with them or not. My comment was directed to those who continually post quotes of my bad grammer, and saying I am a moron and such due to a little bit of my grammer they saw on a message board. Thank you for your advice though. Oh and I want to add that one of the main reasons my school doesn't want to let me out for shows is because they are paid on an attendence basis. This I think is wrong. One more thing when I am talking about absences I am speaking of missing like 8-9 days a semester and nothing more.

Paloma
Dec. 14, 2002, 08:50 AM
Whalo, the only one I see slinging insults is you.
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>...ignorant teachers...my school is just stupid...students are jealouse [sic]...the teachers are really disorganised...they all ask snydely [sic]...i could probably out read, think, and write you any day so bug off!!! ...shouldn't you be out saving the world or somthing[sic]... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you don't feel these comments are insulting or demeaning, then you have a far more serious issue than the "stupid school" not letting you go play horsie. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>i am not this mean and abnoxious [sic]in person...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> I find this very hard to believe, for some bizarre reason. You seem to have had lots of practice, and you certainly have done nothing to prove otherwise on this BB. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> by Creseida: Take the advice you've received in the spirit in which it was intended; to help you survive your trials and tribulations as a teenager entering the real world. Or you can tell us all to "bug off", continue to function under the delusion that you are better than everyone else, and continue to wallow in self-pity because "no 1 takes u seriously". The choice is yours <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Creseida, you have your answer. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif After reading all of whalo's posts in this topic, I would have been very surprised if she had a sudden epiphany, if you know what I mean. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

&gt;&gt; If Noah had been Truly Wise,
He would have swatted Those Two Flies... /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif &lt;&lt;

tats
Dec. 14, 2002, 08:55 AM
Ok, I posted a response of what I have done, a few pages back, but... to add a few things. I have found, from talking to people and reading these posts, that it all has to do with how you present it. You can't give them one bit of lee-way (spell?). you just have to say, this is what I am doing, and that's that.
Also, I have sacrificed taking honors classes and AP's in order to ride, and go away to do it. I know this is a different situation, but I dont regret any of it. Please e-mail me so that I can go into details. Now that I am applying to colleges, I realized that what I have done won't neccessarily get me in to Harvard or Princeton, but I don't want to go there. My top choice is Mt. Holyoke, and it the women's equivalent of Ivy League. I don't want to raddle on, but whalo, and everyone else, if you need/want more info, and details, e-mail me.
tats9@hotmail.com

Tattie

~Maybe
~Max V.
Also in regards to Kelsey D.'s post a bit back, I tutor with Sparky and Alexa, and they work very hard, and Spark applied early to Georgetown. Another example, is Alexis Healey, she went to a small catholic school, was away a lot, and now goes to Georgetown. Just to add. Thanks

SpringBreak
Dec. 14, 2002, 09:22 AM
thosee were great ride2hounds /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

Anne
Dec. 14, 2002, 09:25 AM
Yay for Box-of-Rox! I hope you are back for good? /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

*****************************
Custom Needlepoint Belts (http://www.freewebs.com/belts)

SpringBreak
Dec. 14, 2002, 09:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
Well I was thinking,
you all out there with the great education and good grammer, shouldn't you be out saving the world or somthing? I mean isn't degrading and calling a teenager stupid a bit below you level of intelligence?

...... Just a thought .......... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

*Spring Break*
*Simon*
*Homie S*

nhwr
Dec. 14, 2002, 09:48 AM
ADA funds are paid for attendance and excused absences. This is why attendence records are kept. Public schools are required by law to provide their students with a minimum number of academic minutes of instruction per day. They can not accomplish this if you aren't there. If they are found in violation of these rules they can loose their accreditation.

Imagine you went to a training barn and told the trainer that you wanted to campaign your horse seriously. Then you only showed up sporadically, with a poor attitude and asked people to go out of their way for you. How seriously do you think you'd be taken?

Teachers will sometimes take a personal interest in their students. But it is not part of their job to do so.

Snowbird
Dec. 14, 2002, 10:29 AM
Training horses, understanding how to train horses is based on the education you have in so many periferial subjects. If you are uneducated you are also unable to become the best that you be.

It is really trite to compare apples and onions i.e. the fact that the schools are paid based on attendance. What that really means is that if you don't attend school you are cheating the other students of the financial benefits of you presence.

Do you have the right not to prepare yourself to be a good citizen, a knowedgable voter and a well balanced adult member of the community? I don't think so, I love horses and riding but it is a vocation that can be accomplished just as well later in life if that's really your calling.

I made my career change to horses at the age of 42, after having been educated and having been a stay at home Mom for 17 years. I am every day grateful for the education I received because every bit of it plays a part in everyday of my life.

How will you read and understand the components of products you may use on your horses if you can't read and understand the labels with a knowledge of chemistry? How will you understand and teach riders if you do not understand the basic elements of physics? How will you manage your farm without the knowledge of managing crops? How will you manage to know if you are buying and getting for your money a value on feed? How many baales to a ton? How much does a bale of hay or shavings weigh? If the Shavings are 3.3 cubic feet how much is that per dollor for the amount used in the stalls? Without math you will never know.

Coca-Cola
Dec. 14, 2002, 11:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whalo:
Well I was thinking,
you all out there with the great education and good grammer, shouldn't you be out saving the world or somthing? I mean isn't degrading and calling a teenager stupid a bit below you level of intelligence?

...... Just a thought .......... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Reading for comprehension is something you should have learned in school if you were there.

No one called you stupid or a moron. They said that their first impression of someone on this BB is based on what they read.

"Hello, I was wondering if the other juniors met with resistance from their teachers and schools when they take time off for schools?"

sounds much more mature and worthy of a serious and supportive response than:

"i was just wondering for those of you out there that have many absents due to shows,
what reaction do you get from you school...all i know is when i miss school i get a lot of flack from ignorant teachers and other students, such as you shouldnt miss for a show....you cant get ne where with horses like you can in basic athelics sports."

Based on what you have demonstrated here on the BB, I would say you need to spend more time in school and learning social skills than "skipping" and going to horse shows.

~SC~
Dec. 14, 2002, 11:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Box-of-Rox:
whalo--

Today, I got deferred from my first choice college. Woe is me, but that's not the point. The point is that even though my envelope wasn't nice and thick with paper, it was nice and thick with a solid life lesson: SCHOOL MATTERS. Duh.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Jane, I'm so sorry you got deferred! /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif Does that mean that they put you in the Regular Decision pool or are you totally out of the running? /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif Everything will work out for the best! Don't worry! My best friend got rejected from her first choice, W&L, and ended up going to Vandy with me. She now realizes that it was really not the school for her, and she is SO happy here! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif It might not be the same situation for you, as in Yale might really have been "the" school for you, but there are thousands of colleges, and I'm sure you'll get into another one that is considered *top tier*. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

E-mail me sometime: Sarah.e.sullivan@vanderbilt.edu. I haven't talked to you in forever!

~Sarah~

~*Southern Comfort*~

~Disgruntled College Students Clique~Georgia Clique~Junior Clique~ Buckle Bunnies /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

sarapony
Dec. 14, 2002, 11:53 AM
Read anything written by George Morris, Denny Emerson or Victor Hugo Vidal.

All three are/were excellent riders and writers who can not be accused of sacrificing their riding for school nor school for their riding. On further reading, you will also discover that they all have emphasized that the more education one has, the better horse person s/he is.

As for missing 8-9 days of school per semester, that is the equivalent of 10% of your educational experience. If you only gave 90% at a show, you wouldn't have much chance of success, why would anyone expect to succede at school with only 90% effort.

I was never as dedicated as Box of Rox nor as succesful has Jamie Taylor, but I have no one to blame but myself.

I was not going to post on this thread as all of the good advice has already been given, but I wasn't able to restrain myself /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

"No time to marry, no time to settle down. I'm a young woman and I ain't done runnin' around." - Bessie Smith

*Blue Ridge*
Dec. 14, 2002, 01:19 PM
When I was in grade 4 three, years ago I was doing my frist Competive show year on the 'A' Ciruit. I'd leave on Wednesday to show on lets say thrusday and Friday. My Teacher use to always get in truble ! Shed say things like "Ahh why are you always leaveing. " Shed come and confront me all the time. !!!!. /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif I use to get upset because I did not want her Yelling at me!!!!!!!!!! Ever since then I`ve just been training ponys and only showing 'B' rated shows so it did not interfear. But it looks like Im going to try and 'A' horse. So then .. I wonder what my grade 7 teacher will say to me?!!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

«|&lt;Ã¥â€*îê »

creseida
Dec. 14, 2002, 01:49 PM
it is called, How to Win Friends and Influence People. This book has been a consistent seller for 50 years.

Several chapters seem apropos to this discussion,

"If You Want to Gather Honey, Don't Kick the Beehive", "A Simple Way to Make a Good First Impression", and "Making People Glad to do What You Want".

Part III of the book is entitled, "How to Win People to Your Way of Thinking". Big Hint: You'll not find, tell them to "Bug Off!!!" in this section. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Since you seem to have such a hard time convincing your peers and your teachers that what you want to do is ok, you might want to read this book to learn some effective techniques in working with them to achieve your goals.

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

whalo
Dec. 14, 2002, 02:26 PM
It just occured to me that some of you may have been offended by me saying ignorant teachers. Just to clear some things up I didn't mean that my teachers are stupid or don't know any thing. What I meant by this comment was I have many teachers that are ignorant as far as what the horse show world is actually like. Infact many of my teachers are brilliant!! I simply meant that they think I am skipping school to go pet my horse. lol /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Fiction
Dec. 14, 2002, 04:51 PM
Doesn't anybody love me? /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

-----
This is not a true story
-----

whalo
Dec. 14, 2002, 08:07 PM
bump, just so some of the other posters including the teachers on this board can understand that I wansn't trying to belittle teachers!

Snowbird
Dec. 14, 2002, 08:34 PM
That's what really matters, to understand this world, it's people and creatures and the delicate balance that makes it all work. Education exposes you to the great thinkers, the great philosophers and the wonderful ideas that there aare and can change your world. If we don't understand history we will keep on making the same mistakes over and over until we do.

Policy of Truth
Dec. 14, 2002, 08:55 PM
Thank you for clarifying, Whalo. It is greatly appreciated. Though I am not a teacher, my mom is, and my dad is now retired from teaching.

They worked hard for every dime they earned. Please take to heart what many people have said about your argument. Even if you don't agree, maybe you'll be more understanding.

whalo
Dec. 15, 2002, 08:38 AM
bump

whalo
Dec. 15, 2002, 02:32 PM
bump

Box-of-Rox
Dec. 15, 2002, 02:42 PM
i don't mean to be mean-spirited, but you may want to let this one die a natural death.

BoR--resident Stupid Child

Willem FAN CLUB!

Lily
Dec. 15, 2002, 04:22 PM
I'm so glad to see you back here- and really hope you decide to stay! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I'm really sorry about your deferral, but you've definitely got the right attitude about it. I am sure you will get into an amazing school soon. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

LJD
Dec. 15, 2002, 06:30 PM
So I showed her this thread and we talked about it. The bottom line, as everyone else has pointed out, education is the most important thing in your life. Even if you are the next Leslie Howard, you have to have something to fall back on. Emily Williams and Liza Towell, two of the most amazing younger pro riders out there, realized this. I'm not sure if Emily ever got her degree, but I remember reading her saying that she wanted to go to college. Just in case she ever got injured badly enough where she could no longer ride, she could fall back on her education.

Teachers are not out to get you. Teachers do not randomly pick on a student and set out to make your life hell. It may seem like that, but most likely you have done something that has upset/angered them. My mom feels that perhaps a meeting with your guidance counselor, teachers and parents are in order to work out the kinks. They have your best interest in mind, but maybe they don't realize that their lack of support is causing you so much distraught. It is the teacher's job to help the student. I, nor my mom understand why you are having trouble getting work ahead of time if you are giving ample heads up you will be out (i.e. two weeks).

You never mentioned what grade you are in. I can understand a teacher being very upset over missing a lot of school if you are a junior in high school. That's your most important year, but if you are in middle school I don't see why there is so much hassle.

Looking into a private school or home school with a tutor on the road is something you may consider looking into if things don't start working out soon.

Best of luck with your dilemna! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BoR - Good to see you're back for some posts! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

- Lindsay -

caffeinated
Dec. 16, 2002, 06:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SuperPony:
How is it possible to get above a 4.0 GPA? I am a junior in high school and have a 4.0 GPA. I am taking 3 AP classes and 4th year language. I am also just about to get my first B ever (in AP Calculus...yuck). We get a 4 for an A, a 3 for a B, a 2 for a C, and a 1 for a D. And no credit, of course, if you fail. Are most high schools like this? I would LOVE to get above a 4.0 just so that my horrible calc grade doesn't kill my GPA.

And, more importantly, if the grade scale is different for other schools, what do colleges do with the grades?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Different schools do have different grade scales. My high school graded on a seven point scale. An "a" in a phase 7 (advanced, honors, and AP) was worth "7", a "b" in phase 7 was worth 6. An A in phase 6 (average to upper average) was worth 6. An A in phase 5 (average to lower average) was worth 5, and an A in Phase 4 (remedial) was worth 4. The only way to get a "1" was to get a D in a remedial class, and the only way to get a "7" was an A in a P7 class.

They basically sent these to colleges with our applications and records with an explanation of the grading system. They'd also do simple proportions to figure out "what it would be" on a 4 point scale. It wasn't a big deal (and college admissions offices deal with this a lot more than you'd think- they actually prefer weighted grade scales like this because they are more descriptive).

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

JAGold
Dec. 16, 2002, 08:27 AM
B-o-R, I'm glad to see you back; I've missed your insightful posts. I'm really sorry to hear that you were defered. I'm applying to grad schools now and remembering how hard it is to wait and see. Good luck -- I'll send you an e-mail. --Jess

lmlacross
Dec. 16, 2002, 09:24 AM
Some schools weight AP and honor classes as such that an 'A' is MORE than a 4.0.

LML
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SuperPony:
How is it possible to get above a 4.0 GPA? I am a junior in high school and have a 4.0 GPA. I am taking 3 AP classes and 4th year language. I am also just about to get my first B ever (in AP Calculus...yuck). We get a 4 for an A, a 3 for a B, a 2 for a C, and a 1 for a D. And no credit, of course, if you fail. Are most high schools like this? I would LOVE to get above a 4.0 just so that my horrible calc grade doesn't kill my GPA.

And, more importantly, if the grade scale is different for other schools, what do colleges do with the grades?

-Caroline
"If I go crazy then will you still call me SUPERPONY!"<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

*MidWest/Chicago Clique*
*Cripple Clique*

Arcadien
Dec. 16, 2002, 09:48 AM
Just wanted to comment that I for one appreciate the fact that whalo seems to be attempting to improve the grammar & spelling in her latest posts on this thread - that shows a willingness to change when it's pointed out the value of doing so. That will go a long way to help her deal with this admittedly tough, unfair world.

One other comment, it's been proven time after time that most of people's reactions to us, are caused by our own actions. In other words, you can often change the way someone is treating you, by changing the way you are communicating to them. So if you don't like the reaction you're getting, try to do something different yourself!

Arcadien, riding instructor with an MBA in Finance and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, lol - education counts no matter what you do!

In The Gate
Dec. 16, 2002, 10:52 AM
My school and many others gave you a 5.0 for an A in an honors or AP class. A B was 4.0. Therefore, if you got A's in AP or honors classes, your GPA would be over 4.0.

Valerie
~VWiles02@yahoo.com~
UC Davis student

In The Gate
Dec. 16, 2002, 10:53 AM
My school and many others gave you a 5.0 for an A in an honors or AP class. A B was 4.0. Therefore, if you got A's in AP or honors classes, your GPA would be over 4.0.

Valerie
~VWiles02@yahoo.com~
UC Davis student

CourtneyLiz
Dec. 16, 2002, 11:20 AM
Colleges recalculate and weight your gpa according to their own methods because there are so many different ways of calculating gpas. This ensures that no one is put at a disadvantage because of the way their school chooses to do things.

Courtney

my journal (http://mythsmistold.diaryland.com)

[This message was edited by CourtneyLiz on Dec. 16, 2002 at 01:29 PM.]

huntersrule
Dec. 16, 2002, 12:19 PM
I don't think anyone here can ever express how important school is too much! I for one struggled through high school and then college. I managed to show competetively on the circuit. I rarely missed school if ever for horseshows. I spent 6 years in college though. I was quite the party girl my first two years and didnt take it seriously at all. Now I am halfway through my first year of graduate school. Everyone here is giving advice to any young person whom is reading this. Perhaps we tend to jump to our/anyone elses defense very quickly. Those of us who worked hard for their education take pride in it. I get upset when I hear of kids who miss so many days in school and then don't care. The point is you should care and those of us further along in life know the benifits of education. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

"I am not deaf! I'm ignoring you!"
"God took a hand of southerly wind, blew his breath upon it and created the horse"