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HPFarmette
May. 15, 2012, 10:32 AM
Friend's farm, recently bought, long neglected. Nice wood frame shed on it she would like to use. Large colony of honeybees inhabiting one wall (inside it). We don't want to kill them...honeybees are our friends! Anybody have experience getting them moved to a wooden hive of their own if we provided one? We'll probably have to call in a beekeeper...although I have a smoker...but don't think I'm that brave or skillful. Comments?

Ambitious Kate
May. 15, 2012, 10:56 AM
Yes, call a beekeeper - he/she will also tell you the best place to set it up, so wait for them before you do. It may be that setting it up in the right place and they will move themselves into it, but I don't know that at all. There may well also be beekeeper forums you can find, but call the local bee guy, youcould already be on the phone about it! But of course, you must post pictures here and tell us how it goes, bees and honey are very interesting to me - I have a bee hive in the back of my property - landlord lets a guy keep it there, it gets repaired and taken care of regularly, but I have never seen the guy who owns it!

Dapple Dawn Farm
May. 15, 2012, 11:07 AM
Once they are ensconced in somewhere and have honey deposits, they will be reluctant to leave their current situation. A beekeeper will have to oust them forcefully and whether or not they will move into a provided hive would depend if you can find the queen and box her in there. Good luck!

EqTrainer
May. 15, 2012, 11:25 AM
We had to do this a few weeks ago. Call a bee keeper.

Bacardi1
May. 15, 2012, 04:25 PM
Oh brother - how timely.

Have had Honeybees move into a tiny attic space this spring. Unfortunately, except for the tiny hole they entered (which I attribute to a woodpecker - damn the little bugger), there is NO ACCESS to the area. Old cedar siding would have to be pulled, or a large hole would have to be cut from the upstairs bedroom ceiling - NEITHER of which I'm happy with. So I'm letting them bee until any sh*t hits the fan.

And folks shouldn't be so blunt as to say local beekeepers will be happy as clams to claim your swarm. Not so. Beekeepers know how darn ornery, time-consuming, & expensive it can be to collect bee swarms from homes/sheds. Most prefer to buy their bees - extremely inexpensive versus trying to trap wild bees from someone's house.

RainyDayRide
May. 15, 2012, 04:48 PM
And folks shouldn't be so blunt as to say local beekeepers will be happy as clams to claim your swarm. Not so. Beekeepers know how darn ornery, time-consuming, & expensive it can be to collect bee swarms from homes/sheds. Most prefer to buy their bees - extremely inexpensive versus trying to trap wild bees from someone's house.

Not true around here. Feral bees tend to be hardier than purchased queens, so for that if no other reason, local bee keepers are delighted to come remove hives.

HPFarmette
May. 15, 2012, 04:53 PM
Did some research and there's actually a beekeeper's club in our county. So, I may find some help. I'm happy that there are feral bees. Her farm is close to mine and my first few years I never saw any bees at my farm but now I sometimes do. We shall see....thanks for input.

rosijet
May. 15, 2012, 05:35 PM
For the first time ever we had a huge hive at the donkey shelter. We called a local beekeeper and she was very happy to come out and collect the hive and bees.

She promised us a jar of honey. :)

Ambitious Kate
May. 15, 2012, 09:43 PM
I think with the past die-off, beekeepers are interested in finding local, feral bees who are thriving, if they are wanting to rebuild their stock. I say give it a go and call some. Good luck. I do wish I was a beekeeper. I think that would be neat.

I like the scene in the most recent of the Robin Hood movies, where Friar Tuck says, in response to the question "Do you keep bees??" He says "I keeps them and they keeps me."

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
May. 15, 2012, 09:48 PM
My father is a beekeeper, and there is a massive, massive boom in local beekeepers looking for bees in the Northeast. The cost of purchasing bees has been on the rise for several years, and many suppliers have been unreliable. Last year, 4 of my dad's hives arrived 27 days late from Georgia. He would have gladly relocated hives from farmers had they called him.

Please, please contact your local beekeepers' clubs! They will appreciate it very much!

Ambitious Kate
May. 15, 2012, 09:52 PM
I googled re-hiving honeybees. You will find alot of interesting information. HEre's one youtube vid about getting a new swarm into a new hive (not what you are doing) but it is still interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GbThrrnc1uI

I guess the key is to get the queen into the new hive, and the rest will follow.

I seem to remember something about when I was a child, someone said you had to wait until winter to get the queen while she was sleeping, and you took all the comb and the queen and put them in the new hive (because the comb has the honey and babies all fermenting together for spring or something). But that's only a memory. I don't know the truth about that.

So here is a beehive people forum.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?195043-rehiving-a-swarm-living-in-a-derelict-hive

Ambitious Kate
May. 15, 2012, 10:12 PM
I found a link which describes what to do with bees hiving in your home, and the options and how they are re-hived, in some cases.

Good luck!

http://www.sembabees.org/toplevelpages/bees_in_wall.html

HPFarmette
May. 16, 2012, 11:35 AM
Thank you people, good info as always....:cool:

ReSomething
May. 16, 2012, 12:44 PM
DH kept bees. At the time he did a pretty good business of taking apart people's houses and getting out the bees,removing all the honey, cleaning and painting the space, then rebuilding the wall or roof or whatever bee tight.
He got out just in time to miss the colony collapse problems.
If you don't seal up the access points and remove the hive contents they or another swarm are likely to come back because obviously this was a successful site for a colony. Lots of people will take out the bees but to do it properly you have to demo the site, clean it and rebuild it, otherwise you'll have ant problems etc.
There are many many Beekeeper's clubs and most of them keep a list of members that will collect swarms or remove hives in structures.

S1969
May. 16, 2012, 03:20 PM
Agreed with checking the local beekeepers community - in many instances there is a "swarm list" - list of beekeepers that will help collect/move a feral swarm. As interesting as it sounds - don't try it yourself! (For your sake AND the bees!)

Good luck! :)