PDA

View Full Version : Is a Stubben EZ control a locking snaffle?



CHT
May. 14, 2012, 11:04 PM
My lesson horse is going great in the EZ control, but in just reviewing the EC bit rules, I see locking snaffles are not allowed.

What do you think might be close to the EZ control in action but that would be allowed?

pattnic
May. 15, 2012, 09:49 AM
To answer the question in the title, yes.


What do you think might be close to the EZ control in action but that would be allowed?

I would try either a mullen mouth or a lozenge/bean mouthpiece, depending on *why* the EZ Control works for the horse.

cadance
May. 15, 2012, 09:56 AM
can someone explain how this bit is different from a regular double jointed snaffle? do the longer pieces have only a limited range of motion?

alibi_18
May. 15, 2012, 10:10 AM
@Cadance: The bit locks at the joints and becomes a 'straight' bar when the rider or the horse pull on the bit up to a certain point. With a normal contact, the bit should feel like a regular double jointed bit.

carolprudm
May. 15, 2012, 10:53 AM
If straight bar bits are legal why would a locking it not be?

flashwhitelock
May. 15, 2012, 11:07 AM
they should be legal but they aren't *sigh.*

alibi_18
May. 15, 2012, 01:50 PM
If straight bar bits are legal why would a locking it not be?

Bit's approval take some time and I believe that the manufacturer needs to step up with facts/Pro rides try outs/demands from multiple riders to whatever organisation they would want their bit to be approved by.

Those locking bits are fairly new on the market and they are probably waiting to have more data on the subject. It is easier to approve a bit than to remove it from the list if finally found being unproper for dressage (or any other discipline).

Remember when there was no double jointed bit, when the bit had to be made of only one type of metal/alloy; no copper inlays, no stainless steel rings/copper canon...
When the Micklem bridle and the KK B-Ring (really just a baucher with a different shape) were not approved.

It takes some time but if people can justify that it is for the best interrest of the horse, then usually they will eventually approve it.

CHT
May. 15, 2012, 05:52 PM
To answer the question in the title, yes.

I would try either a mullen mouth or a lozenge/bean mouthpiece, depending on *why* the EZ Control works for the horse.

He gets too behind in the lozenge...but maybe at a show he will be more forward anyway....or maybe the EZ has shown him it is ok to take contact in general?

The kid showing him has quiet hands, so maybe that but will work for shows.

I don't own a dressage legal mullen mouth and couldn't find one at the local tack store in his width. COuld try the happy mouth bubble one though.

Shiaway
May. 15, 2012, 07:49 PM
I ride a horse in one of these bits (not my horse not my choice of bit) and personally to me it doesn't feel like a normal double jointed snaffle in my hands. If you ride with no contact then yes, you wouldn't notice a difference, but even with a mild contact I can feel the difference when I'm trying to use the sides independently--it feels more like a bar bit then. The horse I ride it in IMO doesn't like it at all. Flings her head/flops her tongue if you use even a slightly more pressure than light contact.

I tried her in a double jointed bit once to humor myself and I could really tell the difference and I didn't have any head flinging. But that might be because I'm so used to riding in snaffles that I'm better at using the snaffle bit. So your experiences with a locking bit like this might be totally different. My point is only that IMO yes, you can definitely feel the difference between a regular snaffle and this bit. Well maybe I should qualify that by saying I can definitely feel a big difference when I'm using this bit vs. a snaffle.