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View Full Version : Horsemanship Quiz...anyone want to play?



SBT
Nov. 15, 2002, 08:20 PM
This is a spinoff of the "beating a dead horse" thread about riders not knowing squat about their horses. How good is OUR horsemanship on this board? I propose we find out.

Think of the most difficult questions you can, and post them here. We'll see who knows what...and the people who don't know will learn! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I'll start: What is another name for the coffin bone? (2 possible answers, one common and one anatomical.)

Who wants to play? /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

SBT
Nov. 15, 2002, 08:20 PM
This is a spinoff of the "beating a dead horse" thread about riders not knowing squat about their horses. How good is OUR horsemanship on this board? I propose we find out.

Think of the most difficult questions you can, and post them here. We'll see who knows what...and the people who don't know will learn! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I'll start: What is another name for the coffin bone? (2 possible answers, one common and one anatomical.)

Who wants to play? /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

fernie fox
Nov. 15, 2002, 08:28 PM
Or third phalanx

fernie fox
"I have lived my life-it is nearly done-.I have played the game all round;But I freely admit that the best of my fun I owe it to Horse and Hound".

second chance
Nov. 15, 2002, 08:36 PM
ok, what is the third layer of the hoof? Ie: you have the hoof wall, hoof horn and ______________ {( first word 9) (second word 7)


I'm going to be away for the weekend, so I'll post the answer if you give up. The answer to my question. (http://www.horseshoes.com/anatomy/freeman/gallery/hooflayers.htm)
still patiently waiting to be able to ride again.

[This message was edited by second chance on Nov. 15, 2002 at 10:52 PM.]

SBT
Nov. 15, 2002, 09:12 PM
Next question, keeping with the hoof trend: What is the difference between laminitis and founder?

second chance: I knew it was some kind of laminae! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

Coca-Cola
Nov. 15, 2002, 09:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
Next question, keeping with the hoof trend: What is the difference between laminitis and founder?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
According to the Merck Vet Manual, the terms are synonymous~they are the same thing. /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

My Question: What is Gonitis?

SBT
Nov. 15, 2002, 09:34 PM
...was that laminitis refers to inflammation of the laminae (mild to moderate), and that the term "founder" implies separation from the hoof wall/coffin bone rotation.

But I could be wrong! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif That's what is neat about this quiz: we not only get to show our stuff, we get to learn, too! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

Medievalist
Nov. 15, 2002, 09:34 PM
Laminitis is an inflammation of the sensitive lamanae of the hoof.

Founder is that plus rotation of the coffin bone.

My Life: "Qu'est ce que c'est ce bordel..."

Medievalist
Nov. 15, 2002, 10:38 PM
you beat me!

My Life: "Qu'est ce que c'est ce bordel..."

DreamBigEq37
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:09 AM
sensitive laminae!!

*~*~Lauryn*~*~*~
&lt;3 Justice Served &lt;3
&lt;3 Nip N Tuck &lt;3

Dunhorse
Nov. 16, 2002, 08:14 AM
Where can you find the lateral cartilage?

What is the function of the horse's gallbladder? (muuua ha ha ha ha)

Where can you find the sulci?

Too which human bone is the horse's cannon bone analogous?

Where can you find the zygomatic arch?

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

Dunhorse
Nov. 16, 2002, 08:17 AM
What type of placenta doe the horse have? Why is this type of placentation not conductive to successful twinning?

What is the common name which horsemen give to the second and fourth metacarpal bones?

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

Seven
Nov. 16, 2002, 03:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
Where can you find the lateral cartilage?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The nose, I think.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
What is the function of the horse's gallbladder? (muuua ha ha ha ha)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Nice try /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ...but horses don't have gall bladders. Since they evolved as constant eaters, they have no need for a storage organ for bile.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
Where can you find the sulci?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

In the brain.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
Too which human bone is the horse's cannon bone analogous?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Middle finger.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
Where can you find the zygomatic arch?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I believe it's the bone that rounds the eye orbit in humans and forms the cheek bone, so it should be part of the bony structure of the horse's face, below the eye.

****
New York Horse Rescue (http://www.nyhr.org)

Seven
Nov. 16, 2002, 03:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
What type of placenta doe the horse have? Why is this type of placentation not conductive to successful twinning?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I know very little about equine reproduction...other than that they do /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ....so I'll have to pass on this one. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:
What is the common name which horsemen give to the second and fourth metacarpal bones?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Splint bones.

****
New York Horse Rescue (http://www.nyhr.org)

hoopoe
Nov. 16, 2002, 04:50 PM
Sulci is usually the name used for the middle groove of the frog ( though the body has other sulci structures)

The placenta is indeciduate with diffuse attachment. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Twinning limits the areas of attachment resulting in inadequate circulation to the feti. Usually one wins over the other.

I was going to say the horses Gall Bladder functions the same way as the rats. /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

(Co)Lateral cartilage is at the back of the hoof under the bulbs.

If you put your ear to the horses belly, what should you hear? What is this sound called?

_\\]
-- * &gt; hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

[This message was edited by hoopoe on Nov. 16, 2002 at 08:34 PM.]

[This message was edited by hoopoe on Nov. 16, 2002 at 08:35 PM.]

caffeinated
Nov. 16, 2002, 05:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hoopoe:
If you put your ear to the horses belly, what should you hear? What is this sound called?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"glub.... gurgle.... whiiiiiine... plurp plurp.... "

I didn't know the sound has a name though. I always thought "ah, the sweet processes of digestion... Carry on, old man, no need for banamine tonight!"

/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

brilyntrip
Nov. 16, 2002, 05:35 PM
This is great....I am learning stuff!I love it very goo dinfo for all of us doncha think??/

creseida
Nov. 16, 2002, 05:58 PM
Gonitis is inflammation of the stifle joint. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

What is another term for Swamp Fever?

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Dunhorse
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:01 PM
And here I thought I was being sneaky with the gallbladder question. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

The lateral cartilage(s) are flat, roughly triangular slabs of cartilage within the horse's hoof. They are attached to the wings of the coffin bone and extend back through the heal area. If you palpate the back of your horse's foot, above the heel, you will be alble to feel them.

Q __ What is the name of the condition which results from the lateral cartilage ossifying (turning to bone)? This condition was common in draft horses back when they were heavily used for farm work.

When I asked about the location of the sulci, I was specifically aiming for the grooves in the middle of, and bordering the frog. The term is also correct for the "grooves" which are found in the brain.

Serendipity, the middle finger is close but not exactly correct. The middle finger itself is analogous to the long pastern, short pastern, and coffin bone (in respective order from the first knuckle to the tip of the finger.) What is the cannon bone itself analagous too?

In the horse, the zygomatic arch can be found behind the eye. It is the bone directly beneath the hollow to the rear of your horse's eye.

Hoopoe, /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif exacty correct on the placenta. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Ok. I will play more when I get back from my mini vacation. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

Dunhorse
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:07 PM
Another term for Swamp fever is Equine Infection Anemia. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif It is what is tested for in a Coggin's test. NOT Coggin's disease!

What is Gravel?

Where is the coronary band?

What are the different types of Spavin?

What is a throughpin? Where can you find it?

What is the medical term for the ear flap?

What nerve is severed out in a high nerving? What nerve is severed in a low nerving?

ok. enough for now. Must.........get........going..........

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

dogchushu
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hoopoe:
The placenta is indeciduate with diffuse attachment. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL, now that sure clears it up for me hoopoe! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Okay, for those of us who struggled with high school biology, what the heck is an "indeciduate with diffuse attachment?" /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

lonewolf
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:23 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What is the name of the condition which results from the lateral cartilage ossifying (turning to bone)? This condition was common in draft horses back when they were heavily used for farm work.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Sidebone

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Where is the coronary band?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Where the hoof meets the pastern

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> What is a throughpin? Where can you find it?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Uhhh, it's a soft sweeling (I forget of what) found in the 'dimple' of the hock

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>What are the different types of Spavin?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
I know of bone and bog.

It's been years since I looked at an anatomy book. Must read up.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
He who claims to have made a small fortune in the horse business probably started with a large one.

hunterpa
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:41 PM
oooh, this is good!

ok, a thoroughpin is a soft swelling of the tendon sheath of the deep flexor tendon on the hind leg.. it's about 5 or so inches above the hock. If you push it in on one side, it will pop out the other, it's fun to play with!

Knee spavins are on the knees and Bog Spavins are on the fronts of the hocks... they're both soft swellings (an increase in synovial fluid in the joint, due to increased stress on the joint).

~Bre~
**Proud Member of the Appy Clique**

hoopoe
Nov. 16, 2002, 06:47 PM
Deciduate means that part of the mares endometrium (uterine lining) is attached to and shed with the fetal membranes after birth. The attachment refers to how the tissue of the foals placentas ( chorion) attach's to that of the mare. Many small spread out "hands" of tissue grab the endometrium rather than a large enveloping attachment.

As my profile says, my mind is cluttered with minutiae.

I figure once upon a time I had to know this stuff, but never use it. Sheesh you guys.

I have however encountered the gall bladder question on three different certification exams over the last 4 years.

_\\]
-- * &gt; hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

GatoGordo
Nov. 16, 2002, 07:16 PM
What is Gravel?
Gravel is the presence of a hoof wall, or laminar, abscess.

What is the medical term for the ear flap?
pinna

What nerve is severed out in a high nerving? What nerve is severed in a low nerving?
High nerving -- can include the volar, palmar, or plantar nerves
Low nerving -- palmar digital nerve
/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

crave2event
Nov. 16, 2002, 07:24 PM
Ok I'll play because you answered all the questions I know /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

What is the medical term for tying up?

(Going to Pony club quizzes are good for you...now if only I would have sent the national quiz application in...I would have been there, I didn't think I was that smart, lol!, and speaking of quizzes, lets do this again in the spring, while I'm studying for it, and my pony club test!)

Andrea

our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising everytime we fall

GatoGordo
Nov. 16, 2002, 07:31 PM
If an injection into a muscle is intramuscular, what is the name for an injection into the joint?

What do you call the fluid inside the joint?

What is the active ingredient in Kopertox?

How are Banamine and Bute used differently from each other?

What are the active ingredients in Banamine and Bute?

What is the difference between an embolism and an aneurysm?

GatoGordo
Nov. 16, 2002, 07:33 PM
What is the medical term for tying up?
azoturia

Atypical
Nov. 16, 2002, 07:49 PM
An injection into the joint is called an intrarticular injection. The fluid inside the joint is synovial, I'm pretty sure.


Bute is an anti-inflammatory and pain killer. Ingredient is phenylbutazone. Banamine is, uh....wow drawing a total balnk.

Man reading this, I really need to go back and read through some vet journals. I used to know a lot of this stuff from Pony Club, and I just haven't ahd to use it recently. Eep, now I feel bad.

SBT
Nov. 16, 2002, 09:53 PM
Flunuxin meglumine (sp?), an analgesic I believe...relieves pain, slows down the gut (that's why you DON'T give it to a horse if you think he may be impacted), and has a mild sedative effect.

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

SBT
Nov. 16, 2002, 10:05 PM
...some of these questions are WAY out of my league! It appears we've taken horsemanship to a whole new level here. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Hmmmm...(racking brain)...

Name 7 different kinds of nosebands!

What is the mechanical benefit of a bar shoe?

For how long does a horse usually sleep deeply?

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

findeight
Nov. 17, 2002, 07:41 AM
If memory serves the cannon bone roughly equates with the human forearm.

Bar shoes basically relieve pressure on the heels, used on navicular cases, but they are pretty popular for a variety of other "wear and tear" conditions.

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

Seven
Nov. 17, 2002, 08:26 AM
(I have to go b-day shopping for a party that I need to be at in about an hour /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif...naaa, I don't procrastinate... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif ....much /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)

I should have typed 'metacarpal' for cannon bone...the cannon bone is the same bone as in the center of the human hand and that the 3 middle finger is metacarpals are distal and analagous to the 3 phalanges (sp?). My bad. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I answered nose for lateral cartilege b/c the nostrils are made of cartilege....and they are lateral, right? And also because I was thinking of the muscle there which I think is called the 'lateral dialator' or something similar. So shouldn't I get like a bonus point for creative answer? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Anatomy was one of my favorite subjects.

Quick building off leg anatomy:

What is the horse's knee joint analogous to in human anatomy?

What is the horse's hock joint analogous to in human anatomy?

What is the horse's stifle joint analogous to in human anatomy?

What is the horse's gaskin analogous to in human anatomy?

Where is the horse's collar bone?

Do horse's have ankles?

forgive the typos.....gotta go shop....I *hate* shopping in stores unless they sell tack! /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

****
New York Horse Rescue (http://www.nyhr.org)

EventerAJ
Nov. 17, 2002, 09:23 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Serendipity:
(I have to go b-day shopping for a party that I need to be at in about an hour /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif...naaa, I don't procrastinate... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif ....much /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)

I should have typed 'metacarpal' for cannon bone...the cannon bone is the same bone as in the center of the human hand and that the 3 middle finger is metacarpals are distal and analagous to the 3 phalanges (sp?). My bad. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I answered nose for lateral cartilege b/c the nostrils _are_ made of cartilege....and they _are_ lateral, right? And also because I was thinking of the muscle there which I think is called the 'lateral dialator' or something similar. So shouldn't I get like a bonus point for creative answer? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Anatomy was one of my favorite subjects.

Quick building off leg anatomy:

What is the horse's knee joint analogous to in human anatomy?

-human wrist

What is the horse's hock joint analogous to in human anatomy?

-human ankle

What is the horse's stifle joint analogous to in human anatomy?

-human knee

What is the horse's gaskin analogous to in human anatomy?

-human calf

Where is the horse's collar bone?

-I think they have a "sling" of shoulder muscles instead

Do horse's have ankles?

-um, if you could consider the hock joint an ankle /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif But I call fetlocks "ankles" anyway /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

OK I know I'm not a hunter, or an eq rider, and in fact I'm a Pony Clubber. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I always enjoyed conformation and anatomy. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Fetlocks
Nov. 17, 2002, 10:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
Name 7 different kinds of nosebands!

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

hmmmm....I don't think I can get 7...........

cavasson
flash
figure 8/grackle
drop
kineton
crank
hackamore/bosal?

Are those the 7? I don't think the last one is technically a noseband but more of a type of bridle...could be wrong though.

EventerAJ
Nov. 17, 2002, 10:31 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Blossom:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
Name 7 different kinds of nosebands!

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

hmmmm....I don't think I can get 7...........

cavasson
flash
figure 8/grackle
drop
kineton
crank
hackamore/bosal?

Are those the 7? I don't think the last one is technically a noseband but more of a type of bridle...could be wrong though.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hmm, what about the "lever" noseband, as seen on some XC horses? It has a c-shaped metal piece above the bit; one strap across the nose, two straps underneath (one curb strap, like flash, one cavesson-type strap).

Oh, and you forgot the ever-popular "tack" noseband... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

~AJ~
"Got no excuses for the things that we've done; we were brave, we were crazy, we were mostly young." K.C.

*spring*
Nov. 17, 2002, 11:18 AM
Oh! Love horsemanship type tests! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Ok..

1. What is bishopping?

2. Where would you find the infundibulum?

3. What is the longitudinal depression on the labial surface of the upper corner incisor?

4. The heart pumps blood to the lungs from what part of the heart?

5. What is Osteochondritis?

- To Ride A Horse Is To Borrow Freedom -

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 11:20 AM
Plain caveson
Dropped noseband (as in the old style, with a single caveson adjusted below the bit)
Flash
Figure 8
Crank/Jawband
Abrasive (tack/chain)
Kineton (anti-pull)

Those were the ones I was thinking of. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Unless I'm mistaken, I thought the hock was analagous to the human knee, not the ankle. /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif


~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 11:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by *spring*:
Oh! Love horsemanship type tests! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

3. What is the longitudinal depression on the labial surface of the upper corner incisor?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Galvayne's Groove?

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

*spring*
Nov. 17, 2002, 11:56 AM
sbt78lw - yup, galvaynes groove!

- To Ride A Horse Is To Borrow Freedom -

PuffyDo
Nov. 17, 2002, 11:59 AM
is the process of filing a horse's teeth down to make him/her appear younger.

-How can a stallion be homozygous?
-Give three traits that would classify a horse as Overo.
Here's an easy one: What is the 7 1/2 minute period of play in a polo match called?

Sara

Real friends aren't the ones you call to get you out of jail. They are the ones sitting next to you in the cell.

hunterjumper19
Nov. 17, 2002, 12:25 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by EvntrByHeart:
is the process of filing a horse's teeth down to make him/her appear younger.

-How can a stallion be homozygous?

2 dominant genes- such as AA

-Give three traits that would classify a horse as Overo.

White face, White does not cross over back, dark legs( i think!!)

Here's an easy one: What is the 7 1/2 minute period of play in a polo match called?

haha, "Chukker"!!


AND THE BEST ONE EVER- "what do you call a gut sounds?" hehe, i love this word- Borborygmi :-D

Aimee

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 04:43 PM
...is a collection of symptoms brought on by the presence of a __________ ____________
(2 words: 1st word 9 letters, 2nd word 7 letters).

/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

Pistol 'n' Me
Nov. 17, 2002, 06:13 PM
This is just like Horse Bowl in 4H! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif ust to answer some that have yet to be answered...

What is bishopping?

--The process of altering a horse's teeth to make him appear younger. Can be accomplished via floating or using chemicals.

Where would you find the infundibulum?
--It's the part of the oviduct that partially surrounds the ovary and directs the egg into the oviduct. It spreads out into a structure that resembles a baseball mitt called the fimbriae.

What do you call the fluid inside the joint?
--Synovial Fluid

Now here's a few more to play with!

1. Horses may eat dirt as a sign of what mineral deficiency?

2. Where in the horse would you find the vitreous humor?

3. Name two cavities found in the horse's skull and give the purpose of each one.

4. What are the turbinates, and what are they associated with?

5. Before the existing birthdate of Jan. 1, what was the original birthdate for Thoroughbreds?

6. Give the entire zoological scheme of the horse (Kingdom-Species)

7. Which word is out of place: epididymis, urethra, oviduct, or seminal vesicle? Why?

8. When trotting, which breed of horse has a stride-suspension phase, the Hackney or the Standardbred?

9. What are the 4 positions of the 4 players on a polo team?

10. What is the teamsters turn for signaling a turn to the left?

That's all for now, I have a HUGE notebook chock full of questions (was on the state's hippo team last year and our horse bowl team this year). Enjoy, and *thanks* for giving me something to get away from studying!

creseida
Nov. 17, 2002, 06:28 PM
What necessary trace mineral can cause "alkalai poisoning" if an animal recieves too much?

Hint: This mineral is often supplemented in horses.

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Pistol 'n' Me
Nov. 17, 2002, 06:33 PM
creseida--selenium, right?

creseida
Nov. 17, 2002, 06:59 PM
Yep, selenium! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Next Question: What is Epistaxis? What potentially fatal condition can this be a symptom of?

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

GatoGordo
Nov. 17, 2002, 08:03 PM
2. Where in the horse would you find the vitreous humor?
The vitreous humor is the clear, gel-like mass that fills the space between the lens and the retina. You would find it in the horse's eyes.
6. Give the entire zoological scheme of the horse (Kingdom-Species)
kingdom Animalia
phylum Chordata (chordates -- contain notochord(dorsal stiffening rod))
subphylum Vertebrata (vertebrates)
class Mammalia (mammals)
order Perissodactyla (odd-toed ungulates -- also includes such animals as hippopotami and tapirs)
family Equidae (redundant, contains only one genus)
genus Equus (asses, zebras, horses)
species E. caballos
7. Which word is out of place: epididymis, urethra, oviduct, or seminal vesicle? Why?
"Oviduct" is out of place, as all of the others can be found in a male horse.

Creseida - epistaxis is hemorrhage associated with the nasal passages and related structures draining into the above (in other words, a nosebleed). It can be a sign of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage.

P.S. This topic might get more responses if it were moved to Horse Care.

creseida
Nov. 17, 2002, 08:36 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BostonGold:
_Creseida - epistaxis is hemorrhage associated with the nasal passages and related structures draining into the above (in other words, a nosebleed). It can be a sign of Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage.

.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Correct about the nosebleed; the "potentially fatal condition" that I was thinking of was a Gutteral Pouch Infection, which can cause a fatal rupture of the carrotid artery. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 08:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Oringinally posted by chimaera:

Cushings=Tumor on the pituitary gland.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're right, but what is it called?

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 09:03 PM
If the moderators want to move this to horse care, they can; however, the hunter/jumper forum is typically where lack of horsemanship (particularly among today's Medal/Maclay/Big Eq riders) is discussed at length. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif That's why I chose to put this here. I didn't anticipate there being so many in-depth medical and anatomical questions.

Folks, perhaps we can mix in some more of the questions that might be found in 4-H tests, Pony Club tests, and Medal/Maclay Q & A? /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif


...name 10 visible parts of an ordinary flat saddle (no knee rolls/blocks).

...name the six parts of a snaffle bridle (bit not included).

...give three other names for splint boots.

...explain the action of 5 different bits.

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

Dunhorse
Nov. 17, 2002, 10:03 PM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif It looks like this topic has really gotten fun while I have been away. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

More questions! I am going to stick with the anatomy and physiology type questions, as they tend to be my favorite area (along with genetics).

Q.- Where on the horse's body can you find the periople? What tissue layor produces this structure? What is the function of this structure?

Q.- What is Neonatal Isoerythrolysis? What is the root cause of this disease?

Q- What is an importent aspect of the newborn foal's immune system? How does a newborn foal gain the antibodies nessessary to fight of disease?

Q- What is the ciliary body? What is the function of this structure?

Q- Where can you find the sesmoid bones?

Q- Which joint is technically referred too as the distal interphalangial joint? What bones make up this joint?

Q- Where can you find the sesmoid bones?

Q- What is a hygroma?

Q- What bone attaches the horses scapula (shoulder blade) to the body? /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Q- Which is dominant, red or black pigment?

Q- Where can you find the horse's bars? (Two possible answers.)

Have fun!

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

SBT
Nov. 17, 2002, 10:19 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:

Q.- Where on the horse's body can you find the periople? What tissue layor produces this structure? What is the function of this structure?
A: The periople is at the top of the coronet band on the hoof. Its job is to generate new hoof growth.

Q- What is an importent aspect of the newborn foal's immune system? How does a newborn foal gain the antibodies nessessary to fight of disease?
A: To answer both questions: Colostrum, the mare's first milk, which contains antibodies to protect the foal.

Q- Where can you find the sesmoid bones?
A: At both sides of each ankle.

Q- Which is dominant, red or black pigment?
A: Red...I think?

Q- Where can you find the horse's bars? (Two possible answers.)
A: The toothless portion of the horse's mouth, or on the bottom of the hoof, on either side of the frog.


<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

Dunhorse
Nov. 17, 2002, 10:33 PM
sbt78lw,

This is fun, isn't it?

/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif The periople answer is not quite correct yet. The coronary band is responsible for generating the hoof wall. The periople has a seperate function. Keep trying! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

The second part of the immune system is correct, the foal receives antibodies from the colostrum. The aspect of the neonatal foal's immune system which makes colostrum nessessary is that transfer of antibodies across the placenta does not occur in the horse. The fetal blood of the foal does not come into direct contact with the maternal blood supply, so large molecules such as antibodies cannot cross over. The foal must drink the colostrum of the mare to obtain the nessessary antibodies.

Q- How long after birth is the foal's digestive tract capable of absorbing antibodies?

The sesmoid answer is correct. What is the function of these bones?

Black pigment is dominant over red pigment.

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

EventerAJ
Nov. 18, 2002, 07:39 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>

Q.- Where on the horse's body can you find the periople? What tissue layor produces this structure? What is the function of this structure?

A- the periople is the shiny outer layer on the hoof wall; I think it has to do with the moisture balance of the foot


Q- Which joint is technically referred too as the distal interphalangial joint? What bones make up this joint?

A- I'm guessing here...phalanges, that's the pastern bones, so it must be somewhere in that area


Q- What bone attaches the horses scapula (shoulder blade) to the body? /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

A- LOL, no bone! muscles and other soft tissues


<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

10 parts of saddle: seat, cantle, pommel, flap, stirrup bars, skirt, billets, twist, tree, panels

6 parts of bridle: cheekpiece, noseband, browband, crownpiece, throatlash, reins

Splint boots aka: brushing boots, galloping boots, closed-front boots (?)


Action of bits:

Loose ring single-jointed snaffe: pressure on bars, lips, tongue, can have "nutcracker action" to pinch bars and possibly hit roof of mouth. Loose ring allows mouthpiece to move independently of cheekpiece and reins

Mullen mouth pelham: pressure on bars, tongue, lips, poll, and chin (curb chain). Should be ridden with two reins- snaffle and curb. A leverage bit, meaning that 1-lb of pressure on curb rein can cause 2+ lbs of pressure on mouth and poll

Waterford: acts on bars, tongue and lips. Many-jointed mouthpiece "breaks" so that horse can't lean on it (as with a mullen mouth)

Curb: acts on bars, poll, tongue, and chin (curb chain). May have a "port" to offer tongue relief (permitting ease of swallowing). A leverage bit; not to be ridden with consistent contact (use in double bridle w/ bradoon, or in western with slack rein)

Full-cheek slow twist: same basic action as single-jointed snaffle; slow twist has edges for a harsher feel on bars, tongue and lips. Full-cheek prevents the bit from being pulled through the mouth; also helps with steering, encouraging the horse to turn head in the proper direction. When used with bit keepers, can have a very slight amount of poll pressure.

~AJ~

Pistol 'n' Me
Nov. 18, 2002, 07:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> The periople answer is not quite correct yet. The coronary band is responsible for generating the hoof wall. The periople has a seperate function. Keep trying! <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

A--The periople helps maintain the moisture balance of a horse's hoof.

Q.- What is Neonatal Isoerythrolysis? What is the root cause of this disease?

A--Neonatal Isoerythrolysis is the name of our trophy from QH Congress! But we tend to call it "Queenie" instead /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif (Our team won the Horse Bowl contest.) Aside from that, NI occurs in a foal when the mare and foal have incompatiable blood types (it has to do with the Rh factors I believe?). It causes the foal to became anemic, and can be treated with blood transfusions. Can be avoided by preventing the foal to receive the mare's colostrum.

Q- What is a hygroma?

A--A capped knee, basically a swelling that covers the front of the knee. Typically occurs due to trauma or blunt force.

Q- What bone attaches the horses scapula (shoulder blade) to the body?

A--Tricky! There is no bone, the front legs are attached to the rest of the skeleton via muscular attachments.

Q- Where can you find the horse's bars? (Two possible answers.)

A--Bars are the interdental space in the horse's mouth between the incisors and premolars. Bars are also found in the hoof, near the frog.

Q- How long after birth is the foal's digestive tract capable of absorbing antibodies?

A--Somewhere between 24-48 hours I think.


And Boston Gold, your answers were correct! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif This is just too much fun!

creseida
Nov. 18, 2002, 12:15 PM
Just to clarify a minor spelling issue...it isn't the coronary (of the heart) band, it is the coronet band. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

buryinghill1
Nov. 18, 2002, 12:35 PM
Name all the parts of a "full" or "double" bridle?

In which classes would you expect to find a horse shown in a "sewn-in" double bridle?

SBT
Nov. 18, 2002, 12:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EventerAJ:

10 parts of saddle: seat, cantle, pommel, flap, stirrup bars, skirt, billets, twist, tree, panels

Ah, but you can't SEE the tree or really the "twist." Think hard...

Splint boots aka: brushing boots, galloping boots, closed-front boots (?)

I wasn't thinking of "closed front boots," but rather TENDON BOOTS. This is how they are referred to in Standardbred racing.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


ydII: The bit must be sewn in for an Appointments or Corinthian Hunter class.

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

buryinghill1
Nov. 18, 2002, 12:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
ydII: The bit must be sewn in for an Appointments or Corinthian Hunter class.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
A+ /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
(don't the side-saddle ladies also have to show in sewn-in?)

Now what about the parts?

SBT
Nov. 18, 2002, 01:24 PM
...two headstalls (the main one for the curb, and the thinner one for the bradoon), browband, four cheekpieces, throatlatch, noseband (may NOT be dropped or have a flash attachment), curb bit with chain, bradoon, 2 (or more) sets of reins.

I think? /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

second chance
Nov. 18, 2002, 01:42 PM
what are normal amounts for the following in a horse of arab ancestry (arab, tb, standard bred)

Erythrocytes (RBC) (millions/cu.mm)

Range: ____ - ______
Average: ___.____

Cross bred horses:

Range: _____.__-____.______
Agerage: ____.___

Leukocytes (WBC) (thousands/cu.mm)

Range: _____ - ______
Average: _____._____

Cross bred horses:
Range: ____.____ - ____.____
Average: _____.____

Packed Cell volume: (volume per count)
Range: ______.______ - _____._____
Average: _____._____

crossbred horses:
Range: ______._____ - _____._____
Average: ______._____ - _____._____

Hemoglobin (gm/100 ml.)
Range:_____.____ - _____._____
Average: _____._____

Crossbred horses:
Range: _____._____ - _____._____
Average: _____._____ - _____._____

What are the resting pulse rates for the following:

Horses- ______ - ______ /min
Foals up to 2 wks. ____/min.
Foals up to 4 wks. _____/min.
colts/fillies (6-12 mo.) _____-_____/min.
2 yr. olds ____-_____/min.

what is the normal respiration rate for a horse/pony? ___ -___ respirations / min.

What is Karatoma?
What is Quittor ?

still patiently waiting to be able to ride again.

GatoGordo
Nov. 18, 2002, 02:55 PM
What are phenothiazines sometimes used for in horses?

sbt78lw - I see your point. Thanks for starting this -- it's been a really interesting thread so far! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

findeight
Nov. 18, 2002, 03:10 PM
I think some of this is straying outside what even an active owner needs to know into the closet vet areas.......
Nonetheless I have an answer to an earlier question and one of my own concerning bitting..and both are within what I think even a casual owner/rider ought to know

First the answer to suspension at the trot posed earlier-Hackney or Standardbred. Answer is Hackney. Bred originally for Sunday morning in the park brillance he shares this trait with the American Saddlebred. The Standardbred must trot or pace the mile in a set time-meet the standard hence the name Standardbred, time wasted in an elevated knee and hock is time wasted meeting the standard. Those looking for a long and low mover for Hunters would do well to look to the Standardbred while a high knee and hock might suit in the Jumpers.......good horses come in all kinds of packages so this type of knowledge is important, especially if you shop for horses on the cheap.

Now the question.
You have horse that cannot stand pressure on the tongue and is scared by multi piece bits. What's your choice?

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

Pistol 'n' Me
Nov. 18, 2002, 03:48 PM
findeight--Actually what I was getting at was the "stride suspension phase" in which there is a moment in the stride where all four hooves are off the ground (literally suspended). In that case, it would be the Standardbred. On the other hand, you are totally right about the Hackney having more vertical suspension.

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 03:51 PM
Stud, waist, panel lining

What is a TWIST on a saddle?

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:03 PM
1. Name a peice of tack that;

-puts pressure on the poll

-keeps the saddle from slipping forward

2. Name 6 types of girths

3. Name 10 colours of horses

4. At what age does the Galvayne's groove appear?

5. How many sacral bones does a horse have?

findeight
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:07 PM
So anybody want to hazard a guess at the tongue relief question?

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

hifi
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:18 PM
Galvanyne's groove appears at age 7.
as for 10 colors
grey
bay
chestnut
brown or seal brown
black
albino
buckskin
palomino
dune (buckskin)?
sorrel (chestnut)?
can't think of 6 girths other than
over girth
balding girth
chaffless

Poindexter, may he rest in peace.
Certified Thread Killer
www.melodicfarms.com (http://www.melodicfarms.com)
www.touchdownfarms.com (http://www.touchdownfarms.com)

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:18 PM
hackamore???

or straight bar rubber bit or happy mouth?

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:20 PM
hackamore???

or straight bar rubber bit or happy mouth?

hifi
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:21 PM
The part up by the pommel is the twist, the part that narrows , near your crotch.

Poindexter, may he rest in peace.
Certified Thread Killer
www.melodicfarms.com (http://www.melodicfarms.com)
www.touchdownfarms.com (http://www.touchdownfarms.com)

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:22 PM
i see, I think that's what the PC calls the waist.

findeight
Nov. 18, 2002, 04:54 PM
Tongue relief requires a port, meaning a big bend in the mouthpiece. Usually needs a curb strap to balance and a snaffle rein is added for a pelham. Sometimes a stand alone curb.

Actually a horse can have big old mouth with an arched soft palate. An old timey half breed or even a full spade does give a good balanced curb bit that removes all pressure from the tongue. You'd be surprised to see what the curb on the double bridles used on international Dressage horses looks like-looks like a half breed or spade.

It's all in the hands of the human on the other end of the reins.

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

second chance
Nov. 18, 2002, 05:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>what are normal amounts for the following in a horse of arab ancestry (arab, tb, standard bred)

Erythrocytes (RBC) (millions/cu.mm)

Range: =7.0 - 13.0
Average: 9.75

Cross bred horses:

Range: 5.5-9.5
Agerage:7.5

Leukocytes (WBC) (thousands/cu.mm)

Range: 7.0-14.0
Average: 10.00

Cross bred horses:
Range: 6.0-12.0
Average: 8.5

Packed Cell volume: (volume per count)
Range: 32.0-55.0
Average: 42.00

crossbred horses:
Range:24.0-44.0
Average:35.0

Hemoglobin (gm/100 ml.)
Range:10.0-18.0
Average: 13.40

Crossbred horses:
Range: 8.0-14.0
Average: 11.5 <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Karatoma is abnormal growth of horn on inner surface of hoof wall.

quittor is a chronic deep seated inflammation of the lateral cartilages characterized by necrosis(death) of the inflammed part of cartilege and drainage of pus through the coronary band.

Does anybody want to take a stab at the pulse rates?

still patiently waiting to be able to ride again.

Jennasis
Nov. 18, 2002, 07:55 PM
Albino is not a color of a horse. Horses do not possess the albino gene...if I'm not mistaken.

brilyntrip
Nov. 18, 2002, 08:11 PM
I may use that some time in the near future.Simple yet a valid question.Thanx!I am way confuused about the arab stuff.

SBT
Nov. 18, 2002, 08:40 PM
...to the Cushing's question: the tumor on the pituitary is called a pituitary adenoma.

...The ten VISIBLE parts of the saddle I was thinking of:

pommel
seat
cantle
skirt
stirrup bar
flap
SWEAT flap
billets
panels
gullet


GIRTHS:

balding
folded
chafeless (overlay, sheepskin lined, etc.)
mohair
trevira
elastic
synthetic
shaped (as in County Symmetry girths)
dressage (short girth for saddle with long billets)
cinch (for western saddles)
overgirth (not sure this applies b/c it doesn't really hold the saddle on, just reinforces the regular girth)
patent leather (for saddle seat, usually white)

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

MHM
Nov. 18, 2002, 08:43 PM
Here's one I almost used as a test this past weekend: What is the correct way to change your stirrup length when mounted?

SBT
Nov. 18, 2002, 09:02 PM
Your foot should remain IN the stirrup. You bridge your reins in one hand, turn your thigh out, and use your free hand to pull the buckle down SLIGHTLY, then to unbuckle and slide to the new hole. Then a quick pull back up and you're ready to go. No "dismantling" the leathers or using both hands with the rein looped over your arm (like most of us were originally taught to do)!

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

MHM
Nov. 18, 2002, 09:22 PM
Yes! GM got it right! LOL! It makes me SO crazy to see people doing that wrong- it's so unsafe!

Fetlocks
Nov. 18, 2002, 09:30 PM
(...since I agree with findeight...while these more technical questions are interesting, I don't think they're really necessary for the ordinary horse owner/show rider.)

Q - list three signs that you know your horse is due for a trim or reset of shoes?

Q - what are ermine spots?

Q - why is a crupper used?

Q - list 4 (or more) types of jumps you might *actually* see in a hunt field? /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 09:35 PM
Q - list three signs that you know your horse is due for a trim or reset of shoes?

he's tripping, his feet are long, his feet are chipped, borken and uneven, and it's been 6-8 weeks! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Q - what are ermine spots?

I forget!

Q - why is a crupper used?

I already asked this!

Q - list 4 (or more) types of jumps you might *actually* see in a hunt field? /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/QUOTE]

A coop
A sheep pen
A table top
A wall

Elmo
Nov. 18, 2002, 09:36 PM
What are Warbles?????

And what is Poll Evil?

caffeinated
Nov. 19, 2002, 04:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Elmo:
Q - what are ermine spots?

I forget!

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those cute little black spots next to the hoof on some horse's white feet. My old mare had those spots on her rear left foot, so cute /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

caffeinated
Nov. 19, 2002, 04:56 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jennasis:
Albino is not a color of a horse. Horses do not possess the albino gene...if I'm not mistaken.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's right, as far as I know. They can be double dilute (cremello type) which for a long time was thought to be albino because of the pale skin. But apparently there's no such thing as an albino horse, though there are white horses (which I remember being taught in summer camp as a kid was impossible... go figure)

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

Jennasis
Nov. 19, 2002, 08:50 AM
A crupper is a piece of leather attached to the underside of a saddle with another long piece of leather extending down the back of the horse ending with a leather loop that goes under the horses tail...it is used to keep the saddle from sliding forward. Most commonly seen on rotund ponies with no wither! We have two at my barn...and if you'll forgive the pun...it's a pain in the a$$!

buryinghill1
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sbt78lw:
...two headstalls (the main one for the curb, and the thinner one for the bradoon), browband, four cheekpieces, throatlatch, noseband (may NOT be dropped or have a flash attachment), curb bit with chain, bradoon, 2 (or more) sets of reins.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Close, sbt78lw!

Crownpiece (throatlatch is integral part)
2 Cheekpieces
Bradoon Strap
Browband
Noseband
Snaffle Rein and Curb Rein
Bradoon Bit and Curb Bit
Curb Chain and Lip Strap

that's all /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Jennasis
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:05 AM
What is a "Devil's Dent"? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Flashy Gray
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> What are Warbles????? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Easy answer: warbles are gross. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I believe, from the lengthy and infamous "Warbles" thread, that this is when a certain type of fly lay eggs on the horse, the larvae then bury themselves subcutaneously, and live there, creating nasty bumps. Which I believe only go away when the larvae emerge through the skin. Usually associated with poor/insufficient worming program?

Most often shows up on the withers and upper back, where the horse's tail can't necessarily reach to flick them off.

Flashy Gray
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:10 AM
The ugly spot on my right knee near my almost-destroyed PCL as a result of being lawn-darted into the ground after a jump and then stepped on by my green horse last year.

I mean, DUH!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

No, seriously I have no idea what this is ....

MHM
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:27 AM
Is that another term for a Prophet's Mark, which is a naturally-ocurring (as opposed to injury-related) dent in the horse's muscle, often on the neck?

I was told the Prophet's Mark is supposed to be lucky- it's "the mark of the prophet's thumb".

Maybe it's the Prophet's Mark on a good horse, and the Devil's Dent on a bad horse!

/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

buryinghill1
Nov. 19, 2002, 09:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Elmo:
And what is Poll Evil?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
MY head actually HURTS trying to answer some of these questions. My brain must be too cobwebby!
Poll Evil is (according to me simple, feeble brain) when a horse smashes it's head and the top gets infected and filled with pus and junk. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Memory correct?

Jennasis
Nov. 19, 2002, 10:21 AM
MHM...you are correct.

how about an easy one....What is colostrum?

findeight
Nov. 19, 2002, 10:27 AM
A substance in mom's milk the first few days after birth that provides immunity while baby's system cranks up to take over. Believe it is present in most if not all mammals.

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

Coca-Cola
Nov. 19, 2002, 10:28 AM
Collostrum

The first milk that a newborn takes from his mothers, and filed with antibodies to help them survive in the Brave New World! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jennasis
Nov. 19, 2002, 10:35 AM
What is a "parrot-mouth"?

Ewe-neck?

Pig-eyes?

caffeinated
Nov. 19, 2002, 10:38 AM
What is a "parrot-mouth"?

overbite /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif top part of jaw hangs way over the lower one, sort of like a parrot's beak /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Ewe-neck?

Neck that is curved the wrong way- heavy muscling underneath rather than on top, so the neck looks like a goat's neck. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pig-eyes?

Close-set small eyes.

**and people say gov't employees are useless... HA!**

Dunhorse
Nov. 19, 2002, 11:55 AM
Poll evil is a infection in the poll area which often drains down through the tissue layors. It is caused by the bacterium, Brucellosis abortis, which is a bacteria which causes abortion in cattle, undulent fever in humans, and also poll evil and fistulas (sp?) withers in horses.

Q- What is the name of the white, waxy patches some horses get inside of their ears?

Q- What is a curb? What conformation defect often leads to the development of a curb?

Q- What is the name of the conformational defect of having the cannon bones offset under the knees when viewed from the front?

Q- Do horse's have canine teeth? If so, in which sex are these teeth usually found?

Q- What is the name of the small, puffy, fluid filled blemishes which can sometimes be found on a horse's fetlock joints?

Q- What is the name of the hard, boney enlargements which can sometimes be found on a horses's fetlock joints?

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

Dunhorse
Nov. 19, 2002, 12:00 PM
10 horse colors.

Black
Chestnut
Bay
Brown
Grey
Roan (blue roan, bay roan, chestnut roan)
Dun (grullo, dun, red dun)
Dominant white
Taffy (silver dapple, bay taffy, chestnut taffy)
Champagne (classic, amber, gold)
Palomino, buckskin, smokey black, cremello, perlino, smokey creme.

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

EventerAJ
Nov. 19, 2002, 12:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunhorse:


Q- What is the name of the white, waxy patches some horses get inside of their ears?

-not sure, I'd like to know too!

Q- What is a curb? What conformation defect often leads to the development of a curb?
A- A curb is a thickening of the plantar ligament. Often caused by sickle hocks

Q- What is the name of the conformational defect of having the cannon bones offset under the knees when viewed from the front?
A- bench knees (can predispose a horse to splints)

Q- Do horse's have canine teeth? If so, in which sex are these teeth usually found?
A- found in males

Q- What is the name of the small, puffy, fluid filled blemishes which can sometimes be found on a horse's fetlock joints?
A- windpuffs

Q- What is the name of the hard, boney enlargements which can sometimes be found on a horses's fetlock joints?
A- osselets, right?


<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Now, MY questions. We've done a lot of conformation, how about nutrition? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

What are the 6 necessary nutrients? (hint, some are listed below!)

What vitamins are produced by the horse? (Fat-soluble or water-soluble?)

What are the fat-soluble vitamins?

Water makes up ___ % of a horse's body weight

T/F Protein is lost whenever a horse loses his hair

~AJ~
"Got no excuses for the things that we've done; we were brave, we were crazy, we were mostly young." K.C.

EventerAJ
Nov. 19, 2002, 12:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by maggymay:

Here's some:
-what is the name of the nerve that runs behind the girth area on your horse?
no idea

-where is a horse's "blind spot" and which are the areas it sees the best?

blind spot is directly between the eyes in front of the nose, and directly behind his butt. Sees best from beyond its focal point (where both eyes focus straight ahead)

-what is the hard thing sticking out of the back of your horse's fetlock called? What is it's origin and what is it made of?

called an "ergot", supposedly the remains of a finger, very similar to a chestnut; I'm guessing it's made of protein ?

-what was a "drench"? (history question)

A drench was a liquid medicine given to a sick horse (colic etc) using a bottle to pour it down a horse's throat

and for extra credit
-why does the hero(ine) ride a white horse?
not sure, I always thought it was because white has the connotation of pure/innocent/good, whereas black is perceived as evil/bad

Perhaps this came from Revelation 19:11 in the Bible: "And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righeousness he doth judge and make war."
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

~AJ~
"Got no excuses for the things that we've done; we were brave, we were crazy, we were mostly young." K.C.

Dunhorse
Nov. 19, 2002, 01:24 PM
The ear question is still up in the air. Keep trying!

A- The six nessessary nutrients are:
water
vitamins
minerals
fat (lipids)
carbohydrates (starchs, simple sugars)
protein (the body breaks these down to amino acids and then rebuilds these into more proteins)

A- The horse can produce some fat soluble vitamins. I can think of Vit D (synthesized by the horse when exposed to sunlight) and also Vit A, which can be produced when the horse eats Beta Carotine.

A- The fat soluble vitamins are A,K,D,E,.... (mental blank! ack!) Vitamin's C and the B complex vitamins are water soluble.

A- A horse's body is made up of about 70% water.

A- The nerve right behind the girth is the intercostal nerve, right?



T- Hair is made up of the protein, keratin

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

EventerAJ
Nov. 19, 2002, 01:34 PM
Right on the nutrients...Fat-soluble vitamins are A, D, E, and K like you said (All Dogs Eat Kibble!!)

Vitamins produced by the horse's gut are water-soluble vitamins; fat-soluble vitamins are obtained by forage (often green leafy foods) or sunlight (E).

I'm impressed! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~AJ~
"Got no excuses for the things that we've done; we were brave, we were crazy, we were mostly young." K.C.

Dunhorse
Nov. 19, 2002, 01:40 PM
Oh yeah! The B complex vitamins are produced by the intestinal bactria, correct? :P I am a bit rusty on the nutrient side of things.

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

hoopoe
Nov. 20, 2002, 08:37 AM
Auricular plaques

_\\]
-- * &gt; hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

findeight
Nov. 20, 2002, 09:28 AM
I asked my vet what the white waxy build up that sometimes occurs in the ears was called.

he said "Ear Crud".

Earlier poster wins /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

The Horse World. 2 people, 3 opinions. That's the way it is.

Dunhorse
Nov. 20, 2002, 01:17 PM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif The white waxy patches in some horses ears are called Aural Plaques.

God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.
~R. Graham

Peggy
Nov. 20, 2002, 06:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Q- What is the name of the conformational defect of having the cannon bones offset under the knees when viewed from the front?
Bench knee?

Q- Do horse's have canine teeth? If so, in which sex are these teeth usually found?
Yes - male (but my mare had them)

Q- What is the name of the small, puffy, fluid filled blemishes which can sometimes be found on a horse's fetlock joints?
Windpuffs

Q- What is the name of the hard, boney enlargements which can sometimes be found on a horses's fetlock joints?
Osselot (spelling doesn't look right)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

SBT
Nov. 21, 2002, 08:03 PM
...towards "riding horsemanship" and further away from "medical horsemanship..." which, IMO, would be a different thread entirely and would belong in the Horse Care Forum.

Let's see...

Name four "original masters" (as in pre-1900's or thereabout) of classical riding.

What kind of lunch and beverage are required to be in the sandwich case for an Appointments or Corinthian Hunter class?
Where are the spare gloves kept?

When observing a war statue of a horse and rider, what does it mean when only one of the horse's legs is raised?

What is the difference between an oxer, a square oxer, a triple bar, and a hogsback?

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

creseida
Nov. 21, 2002, 09:46 PM
Q: Name four "original masters" (as in pre-1900's or thereabout) of classical riding.
A: Xenophon, Caprilli, d'Aure, de Bourgogne (some are WAY pre-1900 /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif )

Q: What kind of lunch and beverage are required to be in the sandwich case for an Appointments or Corinthian Hunter class?
A: Drawing a blank.....I *used* to know this.

Q: Where are the spare gloves kept?
A: Tucked under the billets of the saddle

Q: When observing a war statue of a horse and rider, what does it mean when only one of the horse's legs is raised?
A: The rider died in battle

Q: What is the difference between an oxer, a square oxer, a triple bar, and a hogsback?
A: Oxer~spread jump, back pole higher than front
Square Oxer~ Front and back pole same height
Triple Bar~Spread jump comprised of 3 sets of standards and poles, the poles in ascending height
Hogsback~Triple Bar with centre pole higher than front and back poles

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Fetlocks
Nov. 21, 2002, 09:55 PM
Not too medical...and something average owners should know

Q: what's anhydrosis and why is it a problem?

Others...

Q: Who is permitted to wear black boots with brown tops?

Q: Who is permitted to show in a scarlet or pink coat?

Q: What's another name for braids? What's the term for a horse or pony's mane that has been removed by scissors or clippers?

creseida
Nov. 21, 2002, 10:08 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Blossom:
Not too medical...and something average owners should know

Q: what's anhydrosis and why is it a problem?

A: Anyhydrosis is an inability to sweat, thereby cooling the animal as it works. The horse is very prone to overheating and heat stroke, even in cool temps.


Q: Who is permitted to wear black boots with brown tops?
A: members of a hunt who have earned their "colours"

Q: Who is permitted to show in a scarlet or pink coat?

A: Members of the USET; those who have shown on an international level and have represented the country in such competitions.

Q: What's another name for braids?

A: Plaiting

Q: What's the term for a horse or pony's mane that has been removed by scissors or clippers?

A: Roaching

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Jennasis
Nov. 22, 2002, 10:03 AM
I believe the appointments class requires a CRUSTLESS peanut butter sandwich, cut in half and a flask of brandy.

StarBlazeSnip
Nov. 22, 2002, 10:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Blossom:
Not too medical...and something average owners should know

Q: What's another name for braids? What's the term for a horse or pony's mane that has been removed by scissors or clippers?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Aonther term for a mane that has been removed by scissors or clippers is hogged.

Now for my questions -

Q1 : What is the term for a tail that has it's hairs cut off square?

Q2 : What does the term twist mean when applied to a western saddle?

Q3 : What is the correct (safe) way to build a crossrail oxer?

"Your reins are all too long. Is this a Canadian thing? It must be a Canadian thing. I said shorten your reins." Tommy Serio at a clinic in Canada

Elmo
Nov. 22, 2002, 04:05 PM
Q1 : What is the term for a tail that has it's hairs cut off square?

Banged

hoopoe
Nov. 22, 2002, 05:05 PM
I always thought the sandwich was to be Ham but yes I remember the drink as brandy.

Perhaps the peanut butter for the vegis and those who keep kosher.

Q: What is another word for urination.

_\\]
-- * &gt; hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

SBT
Nov. 22, 2002, 05:46 PM
To my knowledge, it is supposed to be ham & cheese.

Good job on the jumps, the glove question, and the "original masters."

Two other masters that came to my mind were de la Gueriniere and Podjhaski (sp?)

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

mwalshe
Nov. 22, 2002, 06:00 PM
I'm 99% sure we used cucumber sandwiches for sidesaddle.

The real question is what's in there when you forget to take the sandwich out of the case between shows /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

PTDeaconHP
Nov. 22, 2002, 06:10 PM
Name all the vertibre of the horse

Name many stages of evolution of the horse


**Member of the Mighty thoroughbred clique**
***"There is no secret so close as that between a rider and his horse."***

creseida
Nov. 22, 2002, 10:55 PM
Q: Name all the vertibre of the horse
A: 7 cervical, 18 thoracic , 6 lumbar (5 for Arabians) 5 sacral, 15-22 coccygeal (tail bones)

Q: Name many stages of evolution of the horse
A: Eohippus, Orohippus, Mesohippus, Miohippus, Protohippus/Pliohippus/Parahippus, Equus Stenonis, Equus Caballus

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

sidesaddle
Nov. 23, 2002, 02:42 PM
oh, you guys crack me up! LOL !

here's a cut & paste with the answer. the complete press release is posted on the H/J forum Nov. 20th...

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Mason Phelps, Jr., Barbara Lundy or Beverly Lake Wilkes

at (561) 753-3389 or at NHSPressOffice@aol.com

Ladies’ Sidesaddle Competition To Be Featured At

The 119th National Horse Show

Wellington, Florida—November 20, 2002—The 119th National Horse Show, the nation’s most prestigious horse show, will be held at The Palm Beach Polo Equestrian Club in Wellington from November 26 through December 1, 2002.

Attached to the D-ring on the right side of the saddle is a silver sandwich case. There are 2 compartments in the case: one for a flask containing sherry or iced tea, the other for a sandwich on white bread, crusts removed, of turkey or chicken, with no lettuce or other dressing, quartered on the diagonal wrapped in wax paper.

SBT
Nov. 23, 2002, 03:57 PM
What about formal hunts? /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

sidesaddle
Nov. 23, 2002, 04:06 PM
i'll stay tuned to see what others say but the question was for appointment classes which i did answer. i've outfitted others for the corintian classes and they just borrowed all the same stuff ....

the formal hunts i've been on/to/in -- noone cared about your sandwich nor was it judged... pass the flask was about the only activity involving food & drink while mounted.

love the trivia contest!

SBT
Nov. 23, 2002, 04:19 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by sidesaddle:

the formal hunts i've been on/to/in -- noone cared about your sandwich nor was it judged... pass the flask was about the only activity involving food & drink while mounted.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Too funny!

~Sara /infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
*Charter member of the GHM Fan Club*
*Member of the Dirt Divers 78th Airborne Unit, ATH Squadron*

hoopoe
Nov. 23, 2002, 07:52 PM
Driving me nutz so I looked at the USAEq rules.

The Ladies Sidesaddle is very specific except as to what kind of sandwich. ( even answers the color of breeches question)

Corinthian class shows nothing as far as what the sandwich should be ( peace as we know it could turn on this Q and A) ! I think the USAE should drop everything and solve this puzzler! Perhaps it could be used as a tie breaker in the perpetual USAE vs USET fight. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

My reference is Mrs Dillon's "School for Young Riders"

Ham

ANYWAY!

Answer to the urination question is "stale"

_\\]
-- * &gt; hoopoe
The ancient Greeks did not write obituaries. They only wanted to know if you had a passion.

creseida
Nov. 23, 2002, 09:51 PM
Q: Why do you post on a particular diagonal?

Q: Why do you cue for canter by moving your outside leg behind the girth?

Q: When using a loose ring bit, what are two ways to avoid "pinching" the lips?

Q: What is "strapping"?

Q: What is a wisp and what material is it made of?

~&lt;&gt;~ Remember, the Ark was built by a rank amateur; the Titanic was built by a team of experts~&lt;&gt;~

Elmo
Nov. 24, 2002, 07:35 AM
Q: Why do you post on a particular diagonal?

To help the horse be more balenced

Q: Why do you cue for canter by moving your outside leg behind the girth?

To push that sides rear end under them to pick up the correct lead? that's a guess!

Q: When using a loose ring bit, what are two ways to avoid "pinching" the lips?

Bit guards for one

Q: What is "strapping"?

amessage technique, using a wisp

Q: What is a wisp and what material is it made of?

a wisp can be made of different things, like rope, hay, straw, soft dampened hay is the best. It's a message pad.