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Derby Lyn Farms
May. 9, 2012, 08:06 PM
Ok you guys are killing me here with all these aides. I'm trying to keep up and understand but I need it in a book. My dressage was awesome when I was younger, about 15 years ago. I studied Sally Swift on a daily basis. Is this a good book for me to pull back out now that I am getting back into dressage?

I see all the posts on instructors not giving riders the correct instruction on cues. I have to haul my horse about 1.5hrs away to a decent dressage instructor. My last instructor just had me going around the ring, same old stuff. Just saying keep your arms down. I can buy a parrot for cheaper then that instructor and teach it to say "Keep your arms down" and set it on the rail when I ride.

So Sally Swift? Or is she out dated? Is there a better book out there?

GallantGesture
May. 9, 2012, 11:26 PM
Jane Savoie's new book Dressage 101 is excellent. She does a great job breaking down different movements and has plenty of illustrations about how it should look and good descriptions of how to do things. It starts at the VERY beginning of training and progresses in a logical manner all the way up the levels.

Superminion
May. 10, 2012, 07:40 AM
Dressage with Kyra is another good one! My trainer has a copy that always gets stolen, but it's a great resource. We're big KK fans at our farm.

I read a great Cross-Training one when I was younger, but can't remember the title for the life of me. There were two or three books in the series, but had some great exercises and the writing was really easy to follow. Lots of pictures. I'll see if I can find it on Amazon and check back in. :)

carolprudm
May. 10, 2012, 07:59 AM
Dressage with Kyra is another good one! My trainer has a copy that always gets stolen, but it's a great resource. We're big KK fans at our farm.

I read a great Cross-Training one when I was younger, but can't remember the title for the life of me. There were two or three books in the series, but had some great exercises and the writing was really easy to follow. Lots of pictures. I'll see if I can find it on Amazon and check back in. :)

Jane Savoie had two books called Cross Training Your Horse. It has since been consolidated into one. Also check out her Youtue videos and find her on Faceook

Despite the horrible time I had in Mary Wanless clinics some of her books are really good, particularly the Ride with your Mind books though they don't really address the OP's question.

I also like Leslie Webb's book and DVD

Superminion
May. 10, 2012, 08:05 AM
Jane Savoie had two books called Cross Training Your Horse. It has since been consolidated into one. Also check out her Youtue videos and find her on Faceook

Despite the horrible time I had in Mary Wanless clinics some of her books are really good, particularly the Ride with your Mind books though they don't really address the OP's question.

I also like Leslie Webb's book and DVD

Thats it! Thanks Carol!

KBEquine
May. 10, 2012, 08:09 AM
Old-school dressage person here . . .

Among my favorite books, over the years:

Anything by Aloiss Podhajsky
Dressage Formula by Erik F herbermann
Dressage in Harmony, Walter Zettl
Anything by Charles de Kunffy
Dressage with Kyra
A Gymnastic Riding System using Mind, body & Spirit, Betsy Steiner

hundredacres
May. 10, 2012, 08:17 AM
My ALL Time favorite is Sylvia Loche's: Dressage in Lightness. I've referred to that one over and over and I re-read it every year or so because as my knowledge grows, I absorb more of it. The Jane Savoie's books - 101 and both of the Cross Training books are both well worn as well.

I've got the Zettl book (Dressage in Harmony) but have never found it easy for me to understand. We all learn differently - I love pictures and analogies ;).

sophie
May. 10, 2012, 08:31 AM
I have Dressage with Kyra, Ride with your Mind (Mary Wanless) , and My Horses, my Teachers (Alois P.) all of them very good reads, as well as 101 Dressage Exercises for practice, because I can't take regular lessons.

Jane Savoie's book looks interesting. Here's what they say about it:

Dressage 101 is a one-volume new edition of the bestsellers Cross-Train Your Horse and More Cross-Training

It’s a simple, riddle-free system of training that places a high priority on the horse’s physical and mental well-being. Beginning with the three golden rules of dressage training—clarity, consistency, and kindness— Jane Savoie walks you through her four stages of dressage education.

Stage One is an introductory course in the basics, and Stage Two covers the “nuts and bolts” of training, including transitions, school figures, and movements.

By the time you finish Stage Two, you’ll have a happy, responsive horse that understands going forward and being straight; accepts contact so you can communicate with him through the reins; moves in a regular rhythm and a steady tempo in all three gaits; and can do transitions, circles, and turns, back up, lengthen his stride, and go sideways.

In Stage Three, Jane translates the secrets surrounding the half-halt, enabling you to put your horse “on the bit,” and adding a whole new dimension to your training. You’ll even be ready for some “fancy stuff” in Stage Four. Don’t worry, everything in this book is well within the capacity of most horses—we’re simply talking about the work required in the United States Equestrian Federation's (USEF) dressage tests at Third Level. This includes collected, medium, and extended gaits; advanced lateral movements; and flying changes.

carolprudm
May. 10, 2012, 08:34 AM
Old-school dressage person here . . .

Among my favorite books, over the years:

Anything by Aloiss Podhajsky
Dressage Formula by Erik F herbermann
Dressage in Harmony, Walter Zettl
Anything by Charles de Kunffy
Dressage with Kyra
A Gymnastic Riding System using Mind, body & Spirit, Betsy Steiner
Yup, forgot that one

dressurrider
May. 10, 2012, 08:44 AM
Another fabulous book is Major Anders Lindgren's Teaching Exercises: A Manual for Instructors and Riders. It has simple aids explained and exercises to achieve correct connection.

Any of Carl Hester's books, so many books so little time!

Just came back from a Centered Riding Instructor Clinic, so yes you can utilize Sally Swift's concepts and exercises:)

Aven
May. 10, 2012, 09:12 AM
Old-school dressage person here . . .

Among my favorite books, over the years:

Anything by Aloiss Podhajsky
Dressage Formula by Erik F herbermann
Dressage in Harmony, Walter Zettl
Anything by Charles de Kunffy
Dressage with Kyra
A Gymnastic Riding System using Mind, body & Spirit, Betsy Steiner

I must be old school too! I quite like those ones.

merrygoround
May. 10, 2012, 09:58 AM
Sylvia Locke's "The Classical Seat"

Anything by Jane Savoie.

You can replace the parrot with mirrors.

beckzert
May. 10, 2012, 11:01 AM
Old-school dressage person here . . .

Among my favorite books, over the years:

Anything by Aloiss Podhajsky
Dressage Formula by Erik F herbermann
Dressage in Harmony, Walter Zettl
Anything by Charles de Kunffy
Dressage with Kyra
A Gymnastic Riding System using Mind, body & Spirit, Betsy Steiner

I love all these, too! I also just purchased Aurthur Kottas' book and it's excellent. I also just got a book called The Seven Deadly Sins of Dressage and it's pretty interesting as well.

Foxylady
May. 15, 2012, 07:35 PM
Terry Church has a great list of dressage books on her website, all classical and natural, www.naturalsporthorse.com, there are also some wonderful articles available for download, and a forum.

canyonoak
May. 15, 2012, 09:39 PM
"Real Life Dressage" by Carl Hester. Talks about real horses, real problems, real solutions.

"Dressage School" Isabell Werth/Britta Schoffmann-breaks down each movement into what is desirable, what can go wrong,how to make it better.
Both the above have good photos.

Biomechanics is a hot topic and there are countless books out there. I particularly like Susanne von Dietze and think her new book ("Rider and Horse, Back to Back") is easier to understand and follow than "Balance in Movement".

nhwr
May. 16, 2012, 12:20 AM
http://books.google.com/books/about/Elements_of_Dressage.html?id=BY44YVhzUMYC

Derby Lyn Farms
May. 16, 2012, 11:08 PM
Sylvia Locke's "The Classical Seat"

Anything by Jane Savoie.

You can replace the parrot with mirrors.

Thanks everyone! Gives me a reason to use those gift cards from Christmas finally.

The parrot is cheaper:winkgrin::winkgrin:

KBEquine
May. 17, 2012, 09:11 PM
The parrot is cheaper:winkgrin::winkgrin:

I'm pretty sure that means that you have never lived with a parrot . . .

KBEquine, who shares her house with in descending order of size):

1 Greenwing macaw, 1 Yellow Crown Amazon, 1 Congo African Grey, 1 Panama Amazon, 2 budgies, 2 Linnies, ALL messy, bite-y & expensive to feed & vet! Also, all loved!h

littlemanor
May. 18, 2012, 02:18 PM
My husband is writing a book that could be for you, a handbook for the training-level rider that attempts to explain the basic principles in a way that a beginner can understand, and also explains judging. Do you read e-books? Maybe we could send you the file as advance consumer testing, so to say . . . it will be out on Amazon soon. If you are interested, message/e-mail, and I'll try to figure out how to send the e-book file to you.

littlemanor
May. 18, 2012, 02:20 PM
I'll also put a vote in for Mary Wanless, though they can be a bit chewy . . . her last was much easier to understand, though.

Gimbalist
May. 18, 2012, 04:09 PM
Steinbrecht's Gymnasium of the Horse. Hands down the IT book on dressage. Podhajsky is next but not as in depth, but great listing of exercises. Steinbrecht is where you can learn the true why, when and how of training. Ex. when is your horse ready to introduce shoulder-in? What is the balance you are looking for and why?

I think Riding Logic by Museler has a great section about rider position and cues as well as traditional exercises and how to use them.

Got talked into a Carl Hester book and wonder why people would bother. It's a book only a fan would think brilliant. Same with Kyra though I think more of her as a trainer (not that Hester is bad, but she's better) and her book is ok.

carolprudm
May. 18, 2012, 04:13 PM
Steinbrecht's Gymnasium of the Horse. Hands down the IT book on dressage. Podhajsky is next but not as in depth, but great listing of exercises. Steinbrecht is where you can learn the true why, when and how of training. Ex. when is your horse ready to introduce shoulder-in? What is the balance you are looking for and why?

I think Riding Logic by Museler has a great section about rider position and cues as well as traditional exercises and how to use them.

Got talked into a Carl Hester book and wonder why people would bother. It's a book only a fan would think brilliant. Same with Kyra though I think more of her as a trainer (not that Hester is bad, but she's better) and her book is ok.

Available on Kindle for $16.49