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beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 01:51 PM
What did you learn in your last clinic or lesson?

I was supposed to be going to a clinic this weekend, but it was canceled. So please share the last thing you learned that was a real "light bulb" moment so that we can all benefit! (and maybe I'll feel better about not getting to clinic this weekend!) Please feel free to share tips on position, exercises, or mental tricks that really made something clearer in your mind.

Rhiannonjk
May. 8, 2012, 02:11 PM
Establish the connection, feel the connection, and keep that feeling through all three gaits.

amm2cd
May. 8, 2012, 02:31 PM
I learned that my pony is no longer a baby. Pushing her forward into the contact is no longer the goal.... Now I need to slow the tempo to encourage her to carry more behind.
Also, I need to expect a little more from her. No more 'helping' her through the transitions, time to let her do the work.

Also, no more worrying about how she'll do at a show since she handled the 3 hour drive, new facility and new arena like a champ!


Oh, and other dressage riders love a pony. Especially one that's talented.

beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 03:28 PM
I learned that my pony is no longer a baby. Pushing her forward into the contact is no longer the goal.... Now I need to slow the tempo to encourage her to carry more behind.
Also, I need to expect a little more from her. No more 'helping' her through the transitions, time to let her do the work.

Also, no more worrying about how she'll do at a show since she handled the 3 hour drive, new facility and new arena like a champ!


Oh, and other dressage riders love a pony. Especially one that's talented.

If it's any encouragement, I was at this stage not long ago with my mare, and she's adapted to the new rules quite well! (after a brief adjustment period) She's gotten much stronger and more balanced and much better off the aids.

I LOVE ponies. What's not to love? They're cute, they fit into any size trailer, you can always find clothes that fit them, and people love to ooo and ahhh over them:)

NOMIOMI1
May. 8, 2012, 03:32 PM
Tempo control without losing impulsion. (this is a forever type of work i am learning)

Big lightbulb moment was continuing to try and get a longer connection while also attempting the tempo control and same balanced horse with more out in front of me.

Inside rein - the softer it is the more shoulder your horse will use so letting them move that shoulder ad much as possible without blocking it with my hand while I try to collect.

Canter depart with just a whisper of aid from the walk ( has taken me about 4 months to get that and now from collected trot i just think it lol).

Forward halts with leg quicker when I feel her body change to not forward (think hiorsey posture) lol

Last lesson in january sadly...

beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 03:48 PM
Last lesson in january sadly...

Tell me about it! My last lesson was in October! But that's why it's nice to be able to help each other out:)

NOMIOMI1
May. 8, 2012, 03:51 PM
Ive known people who were "island" riders who made it big. No trainer but books and friends here and there... Its not easy but can be done! Lol

amm2cd
May. 8, 2012, 04:01 PM
If it's any encouragement, I was at this stage not long ago with my mare, and she's adapted to the new rules quite well! (after a brief adjustment period) She's gotten much stronger and more balanced and much better off the aids.

I LOVE ponies. What's not to love? They're cute, they fit into any size trailer, you can always find clothes that fit them, and people love to ooo and ahhh over them:)

The size is handy.
I had monthly lessons with a clinition until last fall. Then I moved to the middle of nowhere, so this was my first lesson in ... oh, eight months or so.

Turns out there's a huge difference in what to expect in an early 4 year old and a coming five year old!

meupatdoes
May. 8, 2012, 04:09 PM
I acutally just did a clinic with Eddo Hoekstra and he had me work on the following

To improve the halfpass:
Haunches in on longside,
then bring shoulders in front of haunches,
then bring shoulders back out,
then look at point on shortside slightly (slightly!) to the inside and ride toward it without changing anything. This creates a shallow halfpass with forward as the main perogative.


To make more expressive lead changes:
Ride a circle,
bring haunches in,
then the shoulders,
then transition to two steps of a higher gait, remaining on the smaller circle,
then immediately down to walk again,
repeat bringing haunches in, then shoulders in, then transitions as the circles get smaller.

First we did walk to trot, then walk to canter.

Once we did a few nice walk to canters on a small circle, continue on diagonal and ask promptly for change. If the canter stays good ask for another. If you run out of diagonal on the true lead, continue in canter. If you run out of diagonal in counter canter, walk and pat.


*eta, Eddo asks for stuff super fast, so each "line" of text is one or two strides from the horse. If you take longer than that, Eddo is like six moves ahead of you already. He had us hoppin' to! :lol::lol:

beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 04:27 PM
To make more expressive lead changes:
Ride a circle,
bring haunches in,
then the shoulders,
then transition to two steps of a higher gait, remaining on the smaller circle,
then immediately down to walk again,
repeat bringing haunches in, then shoulders in, then transitions as the circles get smaller.

First we did walk to trot, then walk to canter.

Once we did a few nice walk to canters on a small circle, continue on diagonal and ask promptly for change. If the canter stays good ask for another. If you run out of diagonal on the true lead, continue in canter. If you run out of diagonal in counter canter, walk and pat.


*eta, Eddo asks for stuff super fast, so each "line" of text is one or two strides from the horse. If you take longer than that, Eddo is like six moves ahead of you already. He had us hoppin' to! :lol::lol:

I imagine just doing the first part would be great for improving balance and carrying at all gaits, as well as canter. What an interesting exercise! I will defintely have to try that one later, even though my horse isn't quite ready for changes yet.

Gloria
May. 8, 2012, 04:37 PM
Ahhh meupatdoes, I'm sooooo darn envious of you. The last time Eddo came anywhere close was a whooping eight hours away and I could not make it.... And it does not seem like I will be able to ride with him this year... sigh...

I miss him... For the longest time, my pony refused to take left lead canter (looong ago), and in one session with Eddo he got us canter, left lead, all right :lol:

beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 04:39 PM
Ahhh meupatdoes, I'm sooooo darn envious of you. The last time Eddo came anywhere close was a whooping eight hours away and I could not make it.... And it does not seem like I will be able to ride with him this year... sigh...

I miss him... For the longest time, my pony refused to take left lead canter (looong ago), and in one session with Eddo he got us canter, left lead, all right :lol:

What did he have you do?

leilatigress
May. 8, 2012, 04:51 PM
Lesson#1: That the more I demand contact the faster he goes and less steering I have. Thankfully DD wasn't in the ring for this demonstration as I would have likely just mowed her right down. But by sitting back, keeping my elbows, keeping my leg off we get instant submission and a glorious walk that doesn't have me fighting him.
Lesson#2: (Same gelding 45 minutes later) If the gelding is so inclined he can and will lock his neck and plow forward at the pace of a snail while no amount of kicking, pulling, or pleading can get him to stop or turn. I felt like a little kid on a damn thewell at this point
Clinic: Pony can indeed do lateral work with the proper aids and a stern reminder from the crop.

Gloria
May. 8, 2012, 05:32 PM
Beckzert, I'm sure he asks different exercises for different horses but for us, it was to get the hind legs responsive first.

So to begin with, a lot of change of direction, change of gaits (between gaits and within gaits), leg yields of different direction, shoulder-ins of different lines, circles of different sizes, counter bend, all at walk and then trot. Mind you, we were barely training level at the time so none of these exercises were show quality. They were simply tools to get us moving.

He asks for stuff really fast and so we were busy keeping up with his demands - no time to overthink anything (my biggest personal fault). Both my pony and I became supple without knowing that was part of his plan.

So when both of us were supple and pony's hind legs responsive, he all the sudden asked us to do a big trot circle to left (20 meter), followed by a small circle to right (~10 meter), and then at the conclusion of the small circle, changed to left bend, and push my left hip forward at the moment when pony changed bend (there is a shift of weight), and then voila, a left lead canter!!! No fuss no mess.

Today I believe he was teaching both of us the timing and feel of initiating left lead canter (I did not realize that was his goal and plan - I just followed his instruction without question). And once we both felt it, it was only a matter of time before we both grasped the concept. If we lost that left lead canter, all we needed to do was to go back to that big circle/small circle/back to big circle to get it back. Now all I need to do is to half halt, drop my weight into the inside, and press my inside leg to start a canter. My aids have become more refined over the years as both my pony and I advance but he broke down that big obstacle that at times seem impassable and started me down the right path.

netg
May. 8, 2012, 05:47 PM
If I don't lean my left leg on my horse it actually takes no conscious use of my legs to do anything my horse is trained to do - switch between working or collected gaits, canter, simple changes, etc. Also, he does things he isn't yet trained to do if I sit properly and get my legs off him like walk and canter pirouettes. And all lateral work is easy.

I have consecutive rides coming up with the same biomechanics clinician so we will hopefully work on what we did last ride again and I will hopefully get it enough to do a better job practicing on my own. My horse has been helping me by being my "eyes on the ground" and telling me what I'm doing lately. :lol:

Clarification: That may have made it sound like I'm riding w/ my hands. Nope, riding w/ my body in a way that I do use my legs, just not always consciously other than when asking for forward, because he is sensitive enough off my seat to now do upward transitions off my seat, too, and getting hips/shoulders in the right direction gets the lateral work without having to consciously use hands or legs.

Petstorejunkie
May. 8, 2012, 07:48 PM
I learned some more fine tuning longitudinally using my back.

4wdNstraight
May. 9, 2012, 08:45 AM
I rode in the Lilo Fore clinic series in my area and she was awesome! We did canter half pass to quarter line, then straighten, then renver, and then turn that into a piroette. Works like a charm. Also work from Shoulder in to Med trot focusing on the transitions in and out and working on the quality of the Medium trot. Also how to get the collected trot more expressive and off the ground-forward and back and then introduced some half steps. She was very tough but spot on and helped my work on my seat that wants to come out behind me instead of staying underneath. Also keeping my snaffle rein short enough so I don't have to come back with my hands to maintain contact while keeping my curb rein loose. If anyone wants to ride with her when she comes to your region for the USDF do it! Definately audit it is well worth it.

quietann
May. 9, 2012, 09:05 AM
My last lesson was prep for a show, with the jumpers trainer. We primarily focused on having a better sense of when the mare might break from the canter, as well as practicing centerlines with a scary judge's area. (He put his coat over a couple of jump standards at C, and that worked.)

Show the next day: mare did not break from the canter, but she was very amped so that is not surprising. (She did, however, stop cantering when I asked her to). C, however, was still scary. (https://picasaweb.google.com/103634878102801472104/THEFarm06MAY2012#5739859046338952610) At X, mare tried to back up, got a little light in front, but did proceed forward, although not straight toward the very very scary judge's trailer. And was "peeking" at it for the rest of the test.

meupatdoes
May. 9, 2012, 10:05 AM
He asks for stuff really fast and so we were busy keeping up

I know right?!
Glad I'm not the only one to think this!

I love Eddo.

Another of his favorite exercises is to ride a 20m "octagon".
Two steps shoulder in, turn, three steps half pass, turn, three steps shoulder in, turn, two steps half pass, turn.
And from seat and leg, not the reins.
That one'll keep you hoppin' at the walk, and then he says calmly, "This exercise can be performed at all three gaits."
:lol::lol: