PDA

View Full Version : Trying to decide on a breed



luvmydutch
May. 7, 2012, 07:28 PM
If you had $10k to spend on a young prospect (unstarted)...what would you buy and why? I'm leaning toward a friesian because of their puppy dog temperament, good feet and low feed bill...but i love warmbloods. Maybe a lipizzaner or an andalusian but i really cant decide.

carolprudm
May. 7, 2012, 07:39 PM
Have you considered Irish? Yes they do dressage, no they are not all Gypsy Vanners

BMargieRad
May. 7, 2012, 08:05 PM
Morgan! Great minds, sound bodies, and they love a challenge!

shall
May. 7, 2012, 08:11 PM
Oldenburg or RPSI from Green Stone Farm in VA! Lots of lovely dressage prospects for reasonable prices.

Sabovee
May. 7, 2012, 08:11 PM
How about a Cheval Canadien?
SOLID horses, great feet, very healthy, hearty. GREAT minds, very versatile. Super easy keepers.

You can find an unstarted or started youngster well within your budget.

I picked up a greenie 4yo last year for less than half your budget who is picking up super scores at licensed shows this year. He's calm and easy at the shows. All of mine have super minds.

GoGrnRideIrish
May. 7, 2012, 08:13 PM
I second Irish :)

Burbank
May. 7, 2012, 08:20 PM
half arab or arab, love their people and have lots of try

ohrebecca
May. 7, 2012, 08:21 PM
I would buy a horse and not a breed. (i.e. I don't care about breed)

merrygoround
May. 7, 2012, 08:27 PM
How about going to look at horses. Horses with good conformation, great way of going, temperament to suit your expectations. When you find one, try it and find it suitable, then figure out what breed it is.

And there, voila`, is your breed of choice. So simple!!!!!

luvmydutch
May. 7, 2012, 08:32 PM
merrygoround...you're so right...i like the way you think :) I have to narrow it down a smidgen though for shopping purposes. If anyone sees anything nice on the east coast feel free to send it my way :)

MorganJumper848
May. 7, 2012, 08:32 PM
Morgan! Great minds, sound bodies, and they love a challenge!

I second morgans!

Twisted River
May. 7, 2012, 08:35 PM
You've got to post more specifics of what you want/need/goals for this young prospect if you want people to post anything beyond what they personally love/own. And how young are you willing to go? If you want a GP prospect for $10,000 you may be looking at weanlings.

In my experience Friesians are great for the reasons you listed. But aren't usually forward, self-propelled types. At least 9 out of 10 Friesian I see under saddle need spurs and a whip. Lots of people love a ride like that. If your preference is a forward, sensitive ride, this may not be the best direction to go.

luvmydutch
May. 7, 2012, 08:39 PM
I agree that friesians can be lazy...but any horse can be sensitized to the aids of trained properly. Heck, Jane savoie rides one and he's lovely! I'm looking for a nice, solid, sturdy horse who can do a little bit of everything (and be pretty good at it). Looking for 2010 models and older...prefer unstarted but lightly started isn't a big deal. A big, sturdy warmblood would be my top pick as i love them, but with one super high maintenance warmblood already to take care of, i'd like something that's a little bit more ... rugged.

horsefaerie
May. 7, 2012, 08:52 PM
What do you want to do?

If you want to make it to second level in one piece, have a horse who willingly expresses affection, can usually go barefoot go for the half arab with show miles. THere are plenty of them out there.

If you want the WOW factor go for the Friesian with the faults mentioned.

Need a larger solid athletic historical critter? Go for the Andy or the Lusitano.

Want to fit in with the conservative whip and spur group? Buy a WB.

Old School? Buy a TB, great minds lots of colors.

Dabble in Western dressage and still do well in open? Buy a QH.

THink you might want to Fox hunt or event some day? Go Irish.

I could go on and on. THey all have their good points and bad.

luvmydutch
May. 7, 2012, 08:54 PM
mmm i do love a big, bulky irish :)

MyssMyst
May. 7, 2012, 08:57 PM
half arab or arab, love their people and have lots of try

Seconding this! My National Show Horse (arab x saddlebred) is incredibly talented and athletic combo'd with huge amounts of try. He is as sweet as they come (seriously, my five year old can handle him with no issues). I swore I'd never have arab anything, but I wouldn't trade this horse for the world.

Justmyluck
May. 7, 2012, 09:06 PM
I would buy a horse and not a breed. (i.e. I don't care about breed)


This but don't rule out ponies!

JLR1
May. 7, 2012, 09:13 PM
Completely concur with Arab or half Arab. Huge hearts, tons of athletic ability and well...beautiful to look at:).

GraceLikeRain
May. 7, 2012, 09:18 PM
What are you looking for?

Size requirement
Build preference (well sprung ribs and a big body, or lean and on the narrow side)?
Temperament (1-10 on hotness)
Any other interests (trail riding, jumping, H/J, etc.)
What are your goals

If you are looking for a eventual 2nd level horse that is bright, sensitive, and forward who can also trail ride then an arabian sport horse might be the perfect match. If you want an upper level prospect that is dressage only, then maybe a purpose bred thoroughbred or warmblood might be a nice choice.

So many variables to take into account. Without additional information we can only give you are personal preferences.

If I remember correcting you have a 4 year old mare who started under saddle fairly recently. What aspects of her do you like/dislike?

Burbank
May. 7, 2012, 09:35 PM
luv where are you at? my guy is not a "dressage" horse but if you want to meet the great personality of a half arab you can come meet him

Twisted River
May. 7, 2012, 09:38 PM
any horse can be sensitized to the aids of trained properly.

I almost want to ask how many different horses have you ridden? But I'm not actually asking that! Just pointing out that there is a huge difference between riding a well trained naturally lazy horse versus riding a well trained sensitive hot horse. Regardless of how well the "lazy" horse responds to your driving aids, you are still driving almost 100% of the ride. And no matter how well the "hot" horse responds to your half-halt, you will still be half-halting almost every darn stride :) And of course there are lots of lovely horses that fall somewhere in between.

When deciding on a breed I think you are better off taking into consideration the population ridden by amateurs or lesser-known trainers. The horses ridden by Jane Savoie and other internationally known and respected riders are usually the top 1% of the horse world in terms of talent trainability and are often worth 6 to 7 figures.

mbm
May. 7, 2012, 09:51 PM
I would say to make a list of what you want then see what breed fits...i am a firm believer in any sound decently confored horse can be trained up the levels ...the key is the right fit , a good brain and excellent training.

Heck i bought a connemara pony that is almost too trainable... And he fits me very well!

Twisted River
May. 7, 2012, 09:53 PM
What would be really nice to find is a young horse (maybe 2?) at a breeding farm with at least a couple of older half-siblings that are staying sound under saddle and are loved for their laid back temperament and easy trainability. This would maybe give you a better prognosis for future soundness and temperament.

I agree that an Irish cross may be a lovely match. I would Google Irish sport horse and Irish draft breeders.

fairtheewell
May. 7, 2012, 09:56 PM
Half arab mare 7 and not started..in OK

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38-FzUIj1Bc

horsefaerie
May. 7, 2012, 10:25 PM
I wish they made them in bay or black.

goodhors
May. 7, 2012, 10:35 PM
I am going to chip in about the larger horses. You want a 2yr old, 2010, and they NEED a long time to mature. Doesn't matter the breed, height and big bones take at LEAST 6 yrs to get solid. I don't care WHO is doing things with them younger, horses need YEARS to grow up for the work Dressage will be asking of them. Bigger the horse, the longer it takes. Those BIG horses of 17H or more, probably will go 8 years to maturity!!

Are you willing to give that pricy young horse the time he needs to grow up? Otherwise you will be "dealing with body issues" as time goes on. Your young horse will be just like all the other horses' whose folks who started them too young. Then continue to work and drill them too hard, to reach the training levels they want, right now!

The breeds you are naming are all Heritage Breeds, Andalusion, Lippizans, Fresian, Irish, well known for being slow maturing mentally and physically, taking a long time growing up. But if you wait to bring them on slowly to develop them, animals do come along well, LAST SOUND for long times. All the reasons they were so valued in the past, lasting as pure Breeds into modern times.

We have Cleveland Bay Partbreds, and they can do all the various disciplines just fine. Ours dance well in the Dressage field for Driving, sensitive to leg and rein under saddle. But it takes TIME to get them to that excellent stage of communication, so they can be physically ready to do the hard work of CDE Marathon. Mentally understanding my requests, to like working with you for the Dressage, Cones, or any of the Western things I ask of them. Kind of cool seeing a 17H horse do a nice, controlled roll back! Not speedy spins, but balanced, controlled, ready to be sent off in the direction you ask.

As others have said, you need to sit down and make a list of "wants" for this future horse. How skilled are YOU as a rider? I hear MANY folks wanting a horse to ride "beyond Training" while they shop. However those riders seldom have the SKILLS to ride those kind of edgy horses and get the good scores. Breeders want to create athletic animals, then can't sell them because they are "too much horse" for the market. Many of the riding folks are aging, so things on the equine change, shorter height for easier saddling and mounting. Perhaps less "edge" and an accepting dispostion are now important. Gaits are clean, good, but lacking the "brilliance" of the hotter bloodlines. Can you tell flashy from EXCELLENT in a colt's movement? Any chance of you burning out on Dressage, so horse would need to be able to do other stuff?

Selling any of our horses is scary. I put down what the horse can do in an advertisement, list the size TRULY, state what kind of rider is needed. I almost NEVER get a shopper capable of riding that horse, to come look. Riders have a DREAM, and when I ask questions, horse CAN do that dream! However when the rider climbs on, horse SCARES them silly!! He is SO BIG, he is TOO FORWARD, he goes TOO FAST (walking)!! And this is all out of their mouth before we get close to cantering! They are usually done trying him pretty quick or I tell them to come into the center and have them get off. Hands are heavy, though horse is VERY responsive to reins. I hate a heavy headed horse, so none of mine are. I don't want him untrained by being poorly ridden, so rider needs to fix hands or get off! It does seem to take quite a while to sell one of our horses, so I am glad that doesn't happen often! Folks who have purchased from us, have ALL been ecstatic with their "bargin buy". We may get yearly cards with photos, list of successes they have enjoyed. Horse lasts them for years in various activities, so they don't need more than one!

I don't want to squash your dreams, it is GOOD to have goals. But investing the money and time needed to reach those goals is going to be costly to you. Are you willing to work YOURSELF to be able to ride this horse well, enjoy the "making of him" over the stages he needs for developing? You may have to greatly improve your riding skills to get up to his level! Bringing on young horses means a lot of hours in the saddle, and I would suggest that you take him out trail riding, go to places that are not in the confines of a ring. He will be a better minded animal for being shown that other things exist in the world than ring fences or walls. You and horse develop a better relationship, that will carry over as you build your "dream dressage" horse to win with. This is one of the best parts of owning your horse, making a good partnership in all your riding activities, with time spent enjoying him.

netg
May. 7, 2012, 10:50 PM
merrygoround...you're so right...i like the way you think :) I have to narrow it down a smidgen though for shopping purposes. If anyone sees anything nice on the east coast feel free to send it my way :)

I agree with merrygoround about not picking a breed.


If I were on the east coast looking for a young, unstarted but talented and well-bred horse, I would be looking at Virginia Tech in addition to the various different TB retraining programs in the area. That would keep it under budget, but make finding a talented and lovely horse very possible.

columbus
May. 7, 2012, 10:54 PM
I am biased as I breed Irish Draughts but I operate out of a Friesian barn in Minnesota. The Irish Draughts have become the prefered lesson horse...when the kids got to show this year they picked the Irish Draught over the Friesians. They are easier...more forward...softer gaits...don't under estimate how much bounce is in a forward Friesians movement. People in general who have switched out of Friesians do it because of challenges for older backs and just not liking to drive all the time. The Irish are healthier...fewer skin problems, less colic, cheap to keep, the Irish live in pasture or paddock in company and come happily into work(they want to have a job).
Considering they are still very few in number they are doing very well at shows. They can have natural talent for upper level dressage. However they are very smart and you need to be in charge or they will be. They like to skip fundamentals because fundamentals are boring. They do have a sense of humor. PatO

Eireamon
May. 7, 2012, 10:58 PM
i have been there done that in the pursuit of a laid back, good tempered dressage mount. i bred Irish Sport Horses for 15 years as a jumper rider And when i switched to dressage following a back injury I stayed with the ones I bred. I sold my last one 2 years ago as I just found them too big, too lazy off the leg and not good enough in the paces. I did also own a couple of warmbloods and loved the movement but found that with my back injury their temperaments and ability to spook at great speed did not suit me so they went too.
i loved the Irish temperament but not the lack of natural impulsion and fluidity of paces. i found the same with the Connemara/TB x.

As a child I had the most fabulous Welsh pony and thought Oh if I could have a bigger version of that. And now I have and absolutely rave about the cross. The Welsh Sec D x with TB is the ultimate ladies horse. Beautiful paces, pony temperament and the most trainable brain I have come across in my 40 plus years of riding. My boy is mistaken for a warmblood and in competitions gives even fancy imports a run for their money. He is already showing natural inclination to piaffe and passage and will easily go GP but is the easiest horse in the world to own.

Needless to say i now breed the cross from my beautiful Sec D stallion and selected larger TB mares. The youngstock on the ground so far are all staggering and much admired.

sid
May. 8, 2012, 12:42 AM
It sounds like you are looking for more of a "type", than a specific breed.

If want a horse that may not be a struggle to get ahead of your leg, but not "hot" -- and sensible enough for a leisurely trail ride -- I'd look for a warmblood cross. I'd also look at bloodlines close in (how much tb or anglo/arab that are used in breeding wb's).

Personally, my choice would be the offpsring an older type stallion crossed to a sensible TB mare.

Plus...one tends to get "hybrid vigor" genetically.

Just my 2 cents (and breeding experience).;) Good luck!

Mad Mare
May. 8, 2012, 06:14 AM
If know of a few fellow Lipizzan owners/breeders with US horses for sale on the East Coast around your price range.

Need to know what size you are looking for, however.

Eileen

silvia
May. 8, 2012, 06:41 AM
If you prefer the light, zingy type then a Saddlebred could be an option; we breed them here for dressage because I prefer them to the WBs in terms of being (to me) much easier to work on. I find although they too have trials and tribulations (eg needing to get them to loosen the back and lower the head), I am happy to work with that and have a horse that I can work in dressage doing lateral work etc without needing a whip or spurs. They tend to be happy to keep going in your gait without having to push them along and pretty smart and sensible learners. I also find their trots a lot easier to sit to, they have lots of gears! They can be a bit flat when you start, but once you get them a bit more muscled up all kinds of interesting things start to happen to their movement :D

For your budget you could have plenty of options too. Here is my future dressage filly (not for sale)

http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/529937_211700615615060_192242304227558_358336_1716 859489_n.jpg

kookicat
May. 8, 2012, 07:19 AM
I would buy a horse and not a breed. (i.e. I don't care about breed)

I agree with this!

You have a price and age range in mind. Shop within it without restricting yourself to set breeds. I bet you find a great horse.

sophie
May. 8, 2012, 07:25 AM
Interesting thread, I love reading all the answers / opinions!

I tend to go by the horse, not the breed.

That said, I have a soft spot for off-track Tbs, just because you can find true gems among them, and because *I* feel good getting them a second chance. The ones I've had, including my current mare, were very affectionate, very versatile (dressage, jumping, trails), sensitive and naturally fit and forward (not to mention beautiful!). If you go that route, I recommend working with a trainer / instructor who knows how to work with these horses.

Before getting into Ottbs tho, I was looking at getting another Morgan. I had a little Morgan who was a gem. VERY versatile, from eventing to trail riding to chasing cows, and trained to drive before she was trained to the saddle. Very nice, forward, sensitive ride, but not complicated and loved people. I had so much fun with her. Low maintenance, and soooo cute.
She was small, but some of the modern "sporthorse" Morgan are in the 16h range and if you like the look of baroque breeds, you might like them. At the time, if I'd had the money, I would have bought another Morgan and would still own one.

carolprudm
May. 8, 2012, 08:32 AM
mmm i do love a big, bulky irish :)

For some reason I can't link to her page but check out Tully Mac's Trendsetter
http://www.belltowerstud.com/
on the sales list. She is a out of Sophie's dam. Yes, that is an awful pic of Sophie. I also have another Beeza yearling by a half brother of Gil's sire. They look strikingly similar

luvmydutch
May. 8, 2012, 09:11 AM
Love everyone's input so far! I think i'm going to stick to either friesian, warmblood, andalusian, lusitano or lipizzaner. This horse is going to be my dream horse so i really don't want something not purpose bred. Must be 2006-2010 model...if warmblood i'd like something substantial and flashy...the baroque breeds i'd be happy with smaller but phenomenal movement.

I've started many young horses and brought them along myself, it's my favorite :).

Daatje
May. 8, 2012, 09:28 AM
My Friesian was the most difficult horse I've ever trained. They can be very pig headed and stubborn! But are also kind, sweet and gentle. Very tolerant of everything in their environment.

Skin problems are a PITA. They are genetically predisposed and no matter how well you manage them, skin problems will be an issue.

Hooves are awesome. Knock on wood, digestive issues have been non-exsistent.

When she's calm, very comfortable gaits. When she's excited, fasten your seatbelt and hope you rememberd the sporty-haft. :P

If I were to do it over again, I would not have purchased a Friesian. I like a hotter, more reactive horse that's lighter on their feet and faster with better stamina.

My next horse will be an OTTB.

Best of luck in your search!

NoDQhere
May. 8, 2012, 09:35 AM
I also have to say, buy the right horse for you, not a breed you think might be the right horse!

ASBnTX
May. 8, 2012, 09:36 AM
Here's my Friesian mare practicing the 1st level test. She's very forward (I ride her without whip or spurs 99% of the time) but also has a GREAT brain! You can fire her up, then give her a long rein and she's totally chilled. :) She's schooling 2nd level, starting changes, and has been introduced to p/p, all going SO well for her age. Easy, easy, easy to train and tries her heart out. And yes, great feet. The only negative is she doesn't have the endurance that some other breeds have, so building her strength takes a little longer. We also have to be careful with the heat in the summer time.

http://youtu.be/JpHajKaMPjs

Megaladon
May. 8, 2012, 09:39 AM
Cartujano Andalusians tend to be smaller with very nice, flashy movement. Plus they have great temperaments. They are however gettting harder to find with the Andalusian trend of breeding for height/color (they seem to be more popular in Europe).

Friesians are a great breed, and not all of them are the push forward type. One stallion in particular I know is VERY forward and throws that to his foals. Some can be difficult to sit, others are very smooth and push button type. Look for the German registered ones, FPZV-USA, for sport bred types.

For warmbloods, have you thought of Knabstrupper? :)

SmartAlex
May. 8, 2012, 09:48 AM
Seconding this! My National Show Horse (arab x saddlebred) is incredibly talented and athletic combo'd with huge amounts of try. He is as sweet as they come (seriously, my five year old can handle him with no issues). I swore I'd never have arab anything, but I wouldn't trade this horse for the world.

:D:D It's the Saddlebred in him! :D:D

OP, how about a Fresian cross? Like a half Fresian Georgian Grande?

luvmydutch
May. 8, 2012, 09:49 AM
I already have a friesian cross...and love her for all her frieisan qualities. I would really prefer a full friesian though :)

scubed
May. 8, 2012, 09:53 AM
buy the horse that works for you. Some I've bought or known and have done well (mostly in eventing, but that were more than capable at the dressage too):

Warmbloods crossed with TB, QH, appy or paint (WB sides have included Hanoverian, Holsteiner, and Trakehner)
OTTBs
Paint (registered paint, but 1/2 or more TB)
Morgan
Appendix QH
Irish Sport Horse
Horses of unknown origin (I have one now that was advertised as an "irish TB" We think he is a TB/pony cross. Got a 29.5 and 30.5 (70.5 and 69.5 in dressage scores) at his first two events)

Buy the horse. Go for the one with good conformation, good gaits that you find comfortable to ride, a good brain, and a personality that makes you smile every day.

SmartAlex
May. 8, 2012, 09:53 AM
I already have a friesian cross...and love her for all her frieisan qualities. I would really prefer a full friesian though :)

Well there ya go ;)

fairtheewell
May. 8, 2012, 11:36 AM
ASB...nice job!

Luvmydutch....you answered your own question :)

DiamondJ
May. 8, 2012, 12:55 PM
I have to chime in for th IRISH!
Lots of differences to choose from within that title though so talk to the breeders - there are some nice ones out there right now in the 5k to 10k range that will be really nice.

Here are some quick subtitles to the "Irish" title that you may see when reading ads

ID - all Irish Draught

RID, Registered Irish Draught, same as above but has passed inspection, hence the "R"

IDSH, Irish Draught SPORT Horse, carries a higher percentage of ID, but also carries WB or TB, or possibley other - a great way to get Irish Temperment and some other traits you want.

RIDSH, IDSH that has passed inspection

Irish Sport Horse, not the same as IDSH - there is an even wider variety, including the "Cavalier" Lines that are based in HOL breeding.

You can check teh breeder sites and there are a few on warmbloods for sale, and equine.com as well!
Have fun shopping!!!

Twisted River
May. 8, 2012, 12:57 PM
Luvmydutch, I'm not sure where on the East Coast you're at, but here's a few possibilities for you... (one is $12,000. I'm assuming you could pull together another grand and get them to come down to 11)

'09 Andalusian $12,000: http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1762088

'10 Andalusian/Percheron $6,000: http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1774927

'09 Irish Draught with Ammie owned parents $6,000: http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1782035
http://www.eponairishfarm.com/Clare.html

'09 Friesian, reserve champion at ISF inspection $11,000: http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1714012
Couldn't find her on their site, but they definitely own some lovely horses http://www.celticcrossfarm.com/horses.html

'08 Friesian, great price if he's nice $7,900: http://www.dreamhorse.com/show_horse.php?form_horse_id=1761858

Melyni
May. 8, 2012, 03:27 PM
Love everyone's input so far! I think i'm going to stick to either friesian, warmblood, andalusian, lusitano or lipizzaner. This horse is going to be my dream horse so i really don't want something not purpose bred. Must be 2006-2010 model...if warmblood i'd like something substantial and flashy...the baroque breeds i'd be happy with smaller but phenomenal movement.

I've started many young horses and brought them along myself, it's my favorite :).

Some are baroque, not all are loud colored. and all of them have great temperaments, and they are usually very forward willing rides.
MW

beckzert
May. 8, 2012, 03:43 PM
I looked at a horse for a client recently that was an Andalusian/TB. Beautiful horse! She wasn't right for the person who was looking at her, but she was fantastic! She was out of your age range (10), but she was an amazing mover, not spooky but not lazy, and was a great jumper as well. Also trail, trailer, and kid safe. And beautiful! I honestly didn't know what to expect, but clearly she got the best of each of her parents. I think if you keep an open mind and don't focus so much on one breed or another, you will find your dream horse:-)

NOMIOMI1
May. 8, 2012, 03:47 PM
If i had cash

Dutch
Hano

Or a cross of either.

Would love to have a tb crossed dutch and I do have a mare so lol

Win1
May. 8, 2012, 04:14 PM
Something to consider that I didn't see mentioned would be a Fjord. I recently discovered the breed and purchased a 5 year old a few months ago. He's getting awesome dressage scores, a decent jumper and has a priceless temperament.

horsefaerie
May. 8, 2012, 08:40 PM
Silvia, I want your horse!

PURTY!

silvia
May. 8, 2012, 11:46 PM
Silvia, I want your horse!

PURTY!

You'll have to pry her from my cold dead fingers :lol:

Alianna
May. 9, 2012, 09:30 AM
Yes, where are you located? I have a 2006 Hanoverian fitting your description that I'd let go for a smidge more...pm me if interested. I am in Pennsylvania.

Mad Mare
May. 9, 2012, 12:19 PM
Never mind. I could have sworn her profile said CA, but I must have her mixed with someone else.

Eileen

Shagyas Rock
May. 9, 2012, 02:18 PM
Try a Shagya!! Go to www.shagya.net - this breed can range in height to 16.1, have great minds, good bone, and they are bred for the FEI sports. They are particularly good at dressage and eventing. You have the brains, beauty, endurance, and human-loving disposition of the Arabian with a quieter temperament, bigger frame and more bone. It's like having an Arabian in a warmblood suit.

You can get a terrific dressage prospect for your budget and they have the talent to go to Grand Prix. In Europe they compete very well against warmbloods and usually end up in the top ten at 100 day tests.

silvia
May. 9, 2012, 09:52 PM
Some are baroque, not all are loud colored. and all of them have great temperaments, and they are usually very forward willing rides.
MW

I remember thinking Knabstruppers where just heavier horses with spots bred for colour - until I saw a video of one moving! :eek: Really impressive, light moving horses with fab gaits!