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Bethe Mounce
May. 3, 2012, 05:47 PM
I scribe often here in Northern California. We are so fortunate to have a lovely well organized venue.....we have all the same volunteers in place at every show so it runs like a well oiled machine. That being said.......for those of you who compete, when you go past the judge's stand, please pass by so I can see your number. Please know the test you are supposed to ride, make sure your test caller knows it too. Please take off your galloping boots/bell boots before you start around the perimeter. Please know your ride time and be prompt. You have 45 seconds to come down Center Line! It is up to the rider to watch the clock, not the ring steward for you. When you check in, re-confirm your ride time via the posted day sheets. I, on my part, will be sure you can read the scores and comments because I will aways write legibly. If you cannot read my writing, get with the TD and he/she will arrange a chat with the judge. Every judge I have scribed for, and there are many of them, wants to see success for every rider who comes down Center Line. So many ride the test with you. :-) Good Luck to everyone this year. May you halt at X and finish at X on every test and may all 4 of your horses' legs stay on the ground!!! :-)

beckzert
May. 3, 2012, 06:21 PM
Thank you!

I once told a little girl who rode my pony in a show that she needed to ride past the judge's stand so the scribe could make sure they had the right horse with the right test. Now every show, she goes straight up to the stand, gives the scribe her number, then thanks them for donating their time before warming up around the ring. It's the sweetest thing ever! Some experienced adults could learn a lot from her.

mjhco
May. 3, 2012, 06:23 PM
Yes!

PLEASE let us see your number. I perceive some are trying to HIDE it. I know a lot of the exhibitors and their horses. But not everyone. It is a good thing to have YOUR scores written on YOUR test.

belgianWBLuver
May. 3, 2012, 06:28 PM
Every judge I have scribed for, and there are many of them, wants to see success for every rider who comes down Center Line. So many ride the test with you. :-) Good Luck to everyone this year. May you halt at X and finish at X on every test and may all 4 of your horses' legs stay on the ground!!! :-)

Thank you so much for your words and especially your tips...
I have printed this little box and stuck it to my trailer door - its a great reminder for all of us how valuable to us you guys are!
Merci 1000 fois!!!

Ldbgcoleman
May. 3, 2012, 06:39 PM
So I will add all of the judges I have scribed with so far (4) have wanted the horse and rider to do well. Also, so many pairs are relaxed and looking good riding around the arena and the minute the step past A they become tense.

ozjb
May. 3, 2012, 06:59 PM
Great message! I live in Australia and also pencil at times. I am learning to enjoy it.

We have these little dinky bridle numbers that are sooo hard to see. Riders here don't actually have to speak to the judge, but can just ride by. Supposedly we are to be able to see the bridle number, even if it's just the one on the opposite side of the horse.

We used to have a horse who hated those number things so we started using the bigger numbers on the saddle pad. Now, after penciling, we put them on both sides on every horse! LOL Much easier to see.

I used to think the judges were just cranky old ladies who wanted to make life difficult. Now, I sit in the car and hear them practically begging riders to go into the corners, use the whole arena and ride round circles! :-)

flyracing
May. 3, 2012, 07:00 PM
I always say my number when passing the scribe(s). I may or may not halt depending on if the scribe is giving me eye contact. I don't always have my number on the outside when I'm going around the first time. I will always have my number on the the opposite side of which way I turn when coming down centerline (old habit, well ground in ;)). I've have always been thanked for saying my number, but I've always assumed everybody said their number if it was clearly displayed at least.

The other things, well mistakes happen. I don't think anyone intentionally starts to ride the wrong test or readers intentionally read the wrong test. I've confirmed with the scribe/judge about what test I'm riding before, not because I didn't know, but because they appeared to be scrambling :). But yes, I do it in a more questioning tone so I don't come off as rude or impatient. I've also had judges quickly confirm the test or my name if I stop and give my number. I smile, thank them and I'm usually told to have a nice ride or something like that.

I do think many people fear those in the judges box, but I find when the show is not running late the judges seem to enjoy some simple exchanges of words (thank you's, have a nice day, ect.) plus there is nothing better than having the judge smile right before your ride :)!

I've come a cross a handful of unpleasant judges as well, but that's just part of showing.

My advise is to be as prepared as possible and be a pleasant person to be around. All will be well, if we all just take a deep breath sometimes.

goodpony
May. 3, 2012, 07:18 PM
Thanks for the tips---I have a question, how do suggest handling this situation? Im extremely hard of hearing and sometimes (more often than not these days) cannot hear the bell/whistle/buzzer--should I let you know, the ring steward know or someone else?

KMErickson
May. 3, 2012, 07:30 PM
Every judge I have scribed for, and there are many of them, wants to see success for every rider who comes down Center Line. So many ride the test with you. :-) Good Luck to everyone this year. May you halt at X and finish at X on every test and may all 4 of your horses' legs stay on the ground!!! :-)

I agree with this too. I started scribing at USEA events last summer and honestly went into it with a somewhat checkered view of judges/judging. Every judge I worked with was a real pleasure and honestly seemed to be trying to reward horses and riders as much as possible. I know there are some exceptions and bad eggs out there, but overall I super impressed and had a wonderful time every time I volunteered.

SillyHorse
May. 3, 2012, 07:40 PM
Thanks for the tips---I have a question, how do suggest handling this situation? Im extremely hard of hearing and sometimes (more often than not these days) cannot hear the bell/whistle/buzzer--should I let you know, the ring steward know or someone else?
If I were in your position, I would try to have a friend (or just recruit someone) there to give me a hand signal when the bell/whistle/buzzer sounds. I'm not sure what the scribe or judge could do for you.

xQHDQ
May. 3, 2012, 07:52 PM
Yes!

PLEASE let us see your number. I perceive some are trying to HIDE it. I know a lot of the exhibitors and their horses. But not everyone.

I had a famous rider assume I knew who she was by sight. I knew her name but I can't even recognize my friends if they're not dressed the same! And, just because the day sheet says that so-and-so is the next rider doesn't mean that the person around the parameter is who the day sheet says she should be. Please give me your number, so I can confirm everything is correct.

mjhco
May. 3, 2012, 08:11 PM
I have been scribing when someone told the judge she couldn't hear well. So the judge said she would ring the bell when the rider was near 'C'. And to acknowledge with a nod or wave that she heard it.

Else, get someone to listen for you and give you a signal.

goodpony
May. 3, 2012, 09:25 PM
If I were in your position, I would try to have a friend (or just recruit someone) there to give me a hand signal when the bell/whistle/buzzer sounds. I'm not sure what the scribe or judge could do for you.

Ummmm...This...


So the judge said she would ring the bell when the rider was near 'C'. And to acknowledge with a nod or wave that she heard it.

Im just not sure who to make the request too? My husband usually tries to signal me---but its very difficult to keep your eyes on someone clear across the arena when you are navigating in a small space as often happens.

Beentheredonethat
May. 4, 2012, 01:01 AM
goodpony--I would just mention it to the judge as you ride by--Can you signal me when you ring? I'm hard of hearing. I can't see how anyone would have a problem with it. There's nothing wrong with mentioning it to the judge.

ACP
May. 4, 2012, 09:02 AM
It is SO important to let the scribe know who you are. Stop, or at least transition to the walk. "Good morning/afternoon, entry number 123, doing test so-and-so. Thank you for scribing." Takes maybe 10 seconds, helps you relax, tells the horse the people are not fire breathing dragons, makes sure you are scored on your score sheet. Just a good idea all around.

cnm161
May. 4, 2012, 10:20 AM
It is SO important to let the scribe know who you are. Stop, or at least transition to the walk. "Good morning/afternoon, entry number 123, doing test so-and-so. Thank you for scribing." Takes maybe 10 seconds, helps you relax, tells the horse the people are not fire breathing dragons, makes sure you are scored on your score sheet. Just a good idea all around.

Agreed. Also, smile. I've been doing this for years and I think they appreciate it.

horsefaerie
May. 4, 2012, 10:36 AM
What we did in the dark ages was place our number so at the first turn it was visible to the scribe. If your first turn was left you put you number on the right side of the bridle and vice versa.

THat way if everyone is busy or distracted the scribe has a fighting chance to have your number at the beginning of your test.

SGray
May. 4, 2012, 10:55 AM
when scribing I always confirm riders identity with them

[local gmo pres. was truly miffed that I asked her to confirm name :winkgrin: ]

MysticOakRanch
May. 4, 2012, 12:25 PM
GoodPony - I judge schooling shows, and get that request quite often - I don't think it is too much to mention as you first pass the stand, that you are hard of hearing - that way the judge can blow/ring right as you pass them. Be prepared, it may be right at that first pass. Also OK to have a friend/spouse signal to you as you pass them - you just can't have any assistance once you enter the court.

I always try to let the scribe know at my first pass, #XYZ. And as a often-scribe, I appreciate it when riders do the same.

As for ride times - IF the show is behind, the ring stewards need to let riders know. A good ring steward will make contact with each horse and rider at least once - to let them know who they follow and if the show is behind. A good competitor already knows who they follow and what their ride times are - and will probably make first contact to find out IF the show is on time.

roo 2
May. 4, 2012, 02:50 PM
I have been scribing when someone told the judge she couldn't hear well. So the judge said she would ring the bell when the rider was near 'C'. And to acknowledge with a nod or wave that she heard it.

Else, get someone to listen for you and give you a signal.

My hearing is bad, so not only do I stop to give the scribe and judge a moment to note my number, I also mention this to the judge. Every judge has been very accomodating to me so that I don't miss the bell - it's much appreciated:)

jcotton
May. 4, 2012, 07:50 PM
I'l add to this.
If you go off course and you have a reader. You should go to "C", have the judge give you instructions on where to restart. Not go to your reader.
Also do not leave the arena because you went off course--had that happen this past weekend. You need to ask permission from the judge to be excused before your final halt. Exception is when the horse jumps out of the arena or escapes at "A", judges discretion if you may conytinue.

After your final halt at "X", do not make an immediate "U-turn" to leave the arena. It looks tacky. Come to "C" or at least "G".

If the show is running on a tight schedule, walk out of the arena, after exiiting at "A", trot out. And the next can be going around the arena just after you do your final salute. Be Aware of the time changes, if there are any.

runNjump86
May. 4, 2012, 09:49 PM
I'l add to this.


After your final halt at "X", do not make an immediate "U-turn" to leave the arena. It looks tacky. Come to "C" or at least "G".

.

^^This!! :yes: When I started eventing last year, the first thing my trainer taught me was after my final halt/salute to walk to C, smile, say thank you, then turn and make my way out. Her opinion was it's just rude. :lol: I agree. I've scribed several times, and it drives me nuts when someone just leaves the arena without walking towards the judge to say thank you. For example, my horse's first test this year was miserable. I still managed to (almost) walk him to C, smile, and tell the judge "eh, first show...nerves!" and we both chuckled. The schooling show I first scribed for the judge gave pointers to every rider who came forward. I loved that!

I love scribing. I think it gives me kind of an inside look at how the judges think and score, and if I'm riding later in the day I try to remember the things they mark the lowest, such as not-round circles, so that my circles are extra round. :D

Also! If you are instructing kids, PLEASE make sure they know to wait for the bell. Last time I scribed we had a little girl on her pony start early, and the judge was still scoring the previous sheet. It was a schooling show and she could tell the girl was nervous so she didn't ring the bell to stop her, but she did mark it on her test. And if the judge OR scribe ask you a question, like your name and test, don't glare at us like we should know...we're obviously asking for a reason because the papers got out of order or we're missing your sheet and need to make one for you. Don't get mad, we're only human!

Bethe Mounce
May. 5, 2012, 01:32 PM
our horses may perceive the judge's box as being "the monster," but i assure you, judge's are quite accomodating to just about every situation. many of them have walked in your shoes. :-) if you are a bit hard of hearing and concerned about not hearing the start buzzer, bell, whistle, please mention that to the TD and show secretary and show manager. Let me suggest you let me see your number rather than telling me. riders don't always remember their own number. :-) riders are a bit dr. jeykl and mr. hyde from the collecting ring to the dressage court. :-) sometimes at X all goes out the window. :-) we understand too well. :-) i have to check two places to be sure the right horse is in the arena, if i have to write the collectives, all i need is a glance to see your number, otherwise if you tell me, i won't hear you because i am focused on what judge wants me to write. just be aware, some judges write their own collectives and some do not. :-) truly, they are very human. :-) they do laugh and smile. :-) and they really really really want to give you that "10," as often as they can.

Adelatus
May. 5, 2012, 10:04 PM
The differences (and similarities) between countries is interesting. I remember being very clearly told as a junior rider NOT to ride all the way up to C and 'go large' back to exit at A as it takes too much time, and that I should make an immediate U turn and ride directly for the exit. It is considered correct and not at all rude here. We do not normally engage in any conversation with the judge at the end of the test. If you've had a particularly bad ride, the judge may get out of the car and approach the rider for a chat

We also have our numbers on both sides of the horse (compulsary). For the national association, we are meant to just ride past the judge and not speak to them unless they actually speak to us. For the state association, we still speak to the judge.

I find it necessary to speak to the judges because I ride two grey horses in the same classes and there is regular confusion as to which horse I'm riding and I find it best to confirm. :winkgrin:

Bethe Mounce
May. 6, 2012, 01:13 AM
i like that idea of numbers being on both sides of the bridle or even both sides of the saddle pad if horse is fussy about his bridle. then again, that may cost management too much. numbers are not cheap. :-)

Adelatus
May. 6, 2012, 02:01 AM
i like that idea of numbers being on both sides of the bridle or even both sides of the saddle pad if horse is fussy about his bridle. then again, that may cost management too much. numbers are not cheap. :-)

Numbers are not supplied by the event mangement. Riders supply their own numbers. For the national association, each horse is given a permanent bridle number which is used at every event you attend. Many people have them embroidered permanently onto the saddlecloths, which is what I do.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150800562058319&set=a.10150800560213319.469414.784618318&type=3&theater

Not sure if the link works, but this is my pony with his permanent number. The P in front designates he's a Pony.

Bethe Mounce
May. 6, 2012, 11:16 AM
a permanent show number...fab idea!!!!!!!! show management supplies the numbers at our shows. i wonder if usdf and usef would let all of us do the same thing. each horse has an identification number but no permanent show number. :-)

yaya
May. 6, 2012, 12:21 PM
After your final halt at "X", do not make an immediate "U-turn" to leave the arena. It looks tacky. Come to "C" or at least "G".



I've actually had judges request the opposite. I've had to make an announcement to tell competitors not to walk up to the judge at the end because it wastes time and makes the show run long. They preferred a wave or a thank you from the halt, then just turn and leave.

Gestalt
May. 6, 2012, 06:12 PM
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150800562058319&set=a.10150800560213319.469414.784618318&type=3&theater

Not sure if the link works, but this is my pony with his permanent number. The P in front designates he's a Pony.

What an adoble pony! In my dreams I own a white pony with a long mane. :winkgrin:

I prefer the rider to turn fairly soon after X, walking all the way up to C and then walking out (and they usually walk slowly) takes up too much time. As a scribe I'd rather you only talk to me in the beginning because at the end I'm busy writing. If the judge calls you over, sure come over, otherwise I think it's best if you quietly and with a marching step, leave the arena.