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Shenandoah
May. 1, 2012, 07:45 PM
For those of you who have your own place, what do you have for footing? If money were no object, what type of footing would you have? What are the pros and cons and would you replace your footing with the same kind? If not, what do you like if money were no object? I am in the process of replacing mine on a budget and just looking for recommendations/information. Thanks!

Shenandoah
May. 4, 2012, 10:20 AM
Bump

horsetales
May. 4, 2012, 10:51 AM
I love riding with rubber. When I boarded at a dressage barn, she had rubber (black tire rubber) and loved it. Now they have rubber made from gound shoe rubber and it is so nice without the downside of the black rubber
http://www.stableandarena.com/airfoot_lightfoot_eurofelt_etc.html

dudleyc
May. 4, 2012, 11:31 AM
http://www.travelrightsurfaces.com/products/travelright.php

This footing is amazing it really is dust free and practically maintenance free

ise@ssl
May. 4, 2012, 12:40 PM
I find it VERY frustrating when companies don't put prices for their footing. Makes me wonder if the price depends on the buyer.

Cat Tap
May. 4, 2012, 07:36 PM
I have crumb rubber in my indoor and sand in the outdoor. The horses definitely go better in the indoor. If feels like your riding a horse wearing running shoes. I don't know if I have the wrong sand in the outdoor though it was installed by professionals but it seems to be more work to get the horses going forward.

The footing in the outdoor may be a bit too deep right now but I don't want to pay to have it hauled away only to need more in a year or two.

carolprudm
May. 4, 2012, 08:11 PM
I find it VERY frustrating when companies don't put prices for their footing. Makes me wonder if the price depends on the buyer.

The cost often includes shipping and that varies with distance from the plant.
I love my GGT footing, cost about $4000 shipped to VA. It's over 150 tons of VDOT-A sand trucked about 30 miles and I forget how much bluestone over my own compacted clay. With grading it cost $27K for a large dressage arena

This shows some of the grading
https://picasaweb.google.com/carolp3231/20111018#

dudleyc
May. 4, 2012, 08:30 PM
Re, the travel right footing I believe is VERY expensive - my barn owner throws out $100,000.

It is remarkable in that there is zero dust and essentially no maintenance. There are 2-3 horses in the ring all day and the ring NEVER needs to be dragged. Maybe once a month we rake the track. The footing is 4 years old.

dressagediosa
May. 4, 2012, 10:10 PM
http://attwoodequestriansurfaces.com/ We have the Pinnacle footing, and it is MARVELOUS. Dust-free, virtually no maintenance. We drag it twice a week with about 15-20 horses on it a day, 6 days a week.

NotGrandPrixYet
May. 5, 2012, 12:07 AM
Pinnacle and Travel Right are worth their weight in gold, honestly. I have rubber/sand/felt in both my indoor and outdoor. It is still a little dusty. If I were building one from scratch, it would be one of these two, as I have seen them both in other people's arenas and was highly impressed!

dudleyc
May. 5, 2012, 07:16 AM
Our ring hasn't been dragged in the 16 months that I have been there - it just does not need it.

Halfling
May. 5, 2012, 09:11 AM
So what exactly is GGT? More expensive options are out for me due to $$. Right now I'm getting a sand/sawdust (like a finer mulch, not exactly dust). I'm tapped out right now, but would like to add rubber or something else in the future (GGT?). I'm also unable to water my ring, so those high maintanence footings that need to have moisture are out. Those pricy footings will never be an option for me. Plus, it is hard to justify (even if I had the money) to spend that much for my own private use. Now if I win the Powerball it'll be a different story. :)

ise@ssl
May. 5, 2012, 11:51 AM
I certainly understand there are differences with respect to shipping costs. What I was referring to are the actual costs per square foot or meter on the various types of footing.

esdressage
May. 5, 2012, 12:03 PM
What about hog fuel / wood chips? The only issue would be if you get a lot of rain, because it can get slippery if it's wet out, but other than that it makes for good, inexpensive footing.

carolprudm
May. 5, 2012, 12:55 PM
So what exactly is GGT? More expensive options are out for me due to $$. Right now I'm getting a sand/sawdust (like a finer mulch, not exactly dust). I'm tapped out right now, but would like to add rubber or something else in the future (GGT?). I'm also unable to water my ring, so those high maintanence footings that need to have moisture are out. Those pricy footings will never be an option for me. Plus, it is hard to justify (even if I had the money) to spend that much for my own private use. Now if I win the Powerball it'll be a different story. :)

GGT looks like shredded Sham Wow. Mine is even the nice gold color that goes with my golden sand. It is better damp but did not get dusty when we had no rain....our April showers never showed up.

As I posted earlier mine was about $4K for my 20 x 60 m dressage arena, about 10% was shipping. I got mine through COTH poster AdAblur02.

carolprudm
May. 5, 2012, 12:55 PM
I certainly understand there are differences with respect to shipping costs. What I was referring to are the actual costs per square foot or meter on the various types of footing.

http://www.dressagearena.net/pages/ggtarenafooting.html

Dressage_Julie
May. 8, 2012, 12:24 PM
I would do Airfoot or GGT. Others have mentioned GGT- Airfoot is ground up Nike's. The bad things about the shredded rubbers is the amount of metal mixed (run through a magnet, but doesn't catch all metal pieces) in and then the breakdown being hazardous to breathing. I have found the cost isn't too bad... For airfoot in my 60x150 indoor I got a quote of about $4,000, for GGT I got a quote of about $2,500. My big problem is I need to redo my base and the quotes for that are coming back at 30k!

luckydog
Oct. 21, 2013, 04:19 PM
bump

GreyGelding
Oct. 21, 2013, 06:47 PM
I teach in a high volume setting and our indoor footing is a mixture of angular sand and black rubber mulch. In our scenario, this footing isn't ideal as the sand breaks down and doesn't hold the rubber in place well, allowing "bald spots" and deep rubber arenas (usually in the corners... especially if a quickie drag is done). When the ratio of sand/rubber is perfect and the moisture is good (helps decrease dust but also holds the rubber in place) the footing is nice and springy. But it requires monitoring.

Also, we have put "Retired" our older rubber footing to the outdoor, which was certainly an improvement, but the challenge there is when it rains, the rubber bits float to one end.

Arena footing is challenging, especially with a budget. I have enjoyed riding on GGT footing in an indoor. I think the GP ring at Saugerties NY has a GGT-like or other fiber based footing (outdoor) and that held up well with rain!

hoopoe
Oct. 21, 2013, 09:27 PM
I use to be a fan of Hog fuel but I have big reservations now.

A good hog fuel ring is not slippery in the rain. Problem is, many providers are bringing shredded up wood pallets and scrap and calling it hog fuel. True hog fuel is the outer barks and shreddings from lumber production

The problem with the hog fuel is that it has a very uneven particle size and thus very uneven rebound. I am convinced over time it is not doing your horse any favors.

It is hard to drag and usually needs hand raking. The base needs to be impeccable and drain well if outdoors. The last barn I was at had a wonderful outdoor. the base was put down by a road construction crew with proper crown and leveling. The footing held up very well.

Hilary
Oct. 22, 2013, 07:53 PM
I have plain bank sand - because it's just me, and money was a factor. Unlimited budget? I'd go with one of those polymerized sand footings like they used at the Kentucky Horse Park (for the WEG).

If money truly were no object I'd also build an indoor....

ken
Oct. 22, 2013, 10:11 PM
Second vote for Attwood Equestrian Surfaces - they did the indoor @ Morven Park (Va) & it is BEAUTIFUL! I know nothing about cost or maintenance, but it made my 15 yr old feel like a 6 yr old. Top of the line!!!!!

myleetlepony
Oct. 24, 2013, 08:47 PM
If you are on a budget, I would recommend what my current barn uses. I've ridden in plain sand, wood chips and rubber, and by far this is my current favorite:

Plain torpedo sand mixed with the wet only shavings from stalls. You can kick start it with new dry shavings, but to save on costs and labor, the BO just separates the wet shavings from the manure when cleaning stalls, and dumps and rakes it into the sand. Even in the dry cold, it only needs light watering once a week and it is CUSHY. And I have to say, during the cold months, the indoor arena feels a few degrees warmer than the rest of the barn from the shavings breaking down. I'm certainly in love with it and my mare certainly likes it, too.