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riverpup
Jul. 15, 2002, 03:53 AM
My husband made this claim last night. I don't believe it. He insists that this is true. I mean in general, not a really fit bear racing a an old or sick horse.

So I turn to you the horse experts. I just want to know for myself because once my husband's mind is made up he pretty much sticks with it.

Thanks very much! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

riverpup
Jul. 15, 2002, 03:53 AM
My husband made this claim last night. I don't believe it. He insists that this is true. I mean in general, not a really fit bear racing a an old or sick horse.

So I turn to you the horse experts. I just want to know for myself because once my husband's mind is made up he pretty much sticks with it.

Thanks very much! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cgn38
Jul. 15, 2002, 04:01 AM
I believe that it would depend on how far they were running, and of course the size of the bear and horse. I have heard that bears can sprint at 40mph, which is roughly how fast the grade 1 horses run. I am not a bear expert, so hopefully someone else will reply. Nor am I a horse expert...

slc2
Jul. 15, 2002, 04:14 AM
when we were riding in the wind river range in wyoming, i asked the leader.

and he said yes. i said that i thought bears were huge slow lumbering creatures. and i doubted it when he said they could run as fast as a horse.

he said actually with predators, how fast they can go or for how long has very little to do with it. it is not so much the speed of the predator, as how good the predator is at putting himself in a position where he can get the horse.

which, in the bear's case, he said, was very, very good. bears are extremely intelligent and they set themselves up very well.

breezymeadow
Jul. 15, 2002, 04:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I mean in general, not a really fit bear racing a an old or sick horse.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't know why reading this sentence made me almost snort my coffee this morning - I must be easy to amuse.

What about if the bear had one hand tied behind his back & gave the horse a head start? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

My body is a temple - unfortunately, it's a "fixer- upper".

Anne FS
Jul. 15, 2002, 06:17 AM
breezymeadow, riverpup must know us well. I can well imagine rp getting lots of posts back about, well, if the bear was a Rambo-bear and the horse was ancient and decrepit with stringhalt, sure, and then the thread would be off and running (like the bear) (or like the horse)and that would be that.

Anne FS
Jul. 15, 2002, 06:19 AM
From www.bear.org (http://www.bear.org) (who knew?):

"Running Speed: Bears can run uphill and downhill and on flat ground. Lean bears can run faster than 30 miles per hour. Fat bears in their winter coats overheat and tire quickly when running."

LaurieB
Jul. 15, 2002, 06:30 AM
This thread illustrates everything I love about this bulletin board. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

A topic I never even knew I cared about, discussed by people with interesting opinions, new information/trivia to store in the brain, and a few good laughs along the way. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Rosey
Jul. 15, 2002, 07:47 AM
I think it depends on the bear....Grizzly bears can sprint upto 60MPH!

"The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing."
-Socrates

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 15, 2002, 07:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>When moving at an all-out run, the black bear has been clocked at 30 mph. This is an animal that can outrun a horse over short distances and can weigh up to 500 pounds. The black bear is also a very good climber and swimmer <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Brown bears are extremely strong and have good endurance; they can kill a cow with one blow, outrun a horse, outswim an Olympian, and drag a dead elk uphill.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>If you surprise a grizzly on a trail and the bear does not immediately either charge or flee, start speaking to the bear in a firm but calm voice, while slowly backing off. Avoid eye contact with the grizzly. Do not scream or yell at the bear. If the bear is approaching, and it�s still a considerable distance from you, climb a tree if you can do so quickly and quietly. But remember, a bear can outrun a horse <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>In spite of their weight and short legs, a bear can outrun a horse for about 300 to 400 yards. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

Courtknee202
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:03 AM
Bears are quick! I've watched about a million documentaries on Discovery and PBS, I fully believe a bear could outrun a horse.

achcosuva
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:18 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Everythingbutwings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Brown bears are extremely strong and have good endurance; they can kill a cow with one blow, outrun a horse, outswim an Olympian, and drag a dead elk uphill. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
AND drag a dead elk uphill?? Oh my! LMAO!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

-Anne, the owner of a PrettyFilly and a WildArabianStallion-
"Change is inevitable...except from a vending machine."

Inverness
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:31 AM
yea, yea, sure. but how do brown bears do in dressage?! hummph. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif


"The man is only half himself, the other half is his expression."

-- Emerson "The Poet" (1844)

hobson
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:36 AM
I remember going on a hike in grizzly country in the foothills of the Montana Rockies, and reading the bear warning signs. It advised that if I was approached by a bear, I should quickly climb up a stout tree, as high as possible, to at least 12 feet. I glanced around the windblown, hostile landscape, and noted that ALL of the trees were hunched over, with few actually exceeding 8 feet. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Inverness
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:39 AM
Actually, Moose pose a much greater threat. Out in Montana I was surprised to learn that Moose attacks on humans consistently outnumber all other animal attacks combined.


"The man is only half himself, the other half is his expression."

-- Emerson "The Poet" (1844)

buryinghill1
Jul. 15, 2002, 08:44 AM
12,000 Feet... south of Leadville, CO...
I met a bear on the curve of a trail. We were 20 feet away. Probably a 2 year old. My horse "Coffee" stood like a statue (for about a minute). We could smell him (p.u.!). My heart still pounds when I think of that bear. He turned and ran away. So did Coffee. And it was all I could do to stop him. He went through the trees at a full gallop. Ouch.
Knowledgeable neighbors told me later (over a stiff drink) the bear would have had no trouble grabbing a horse. But most had only seen a bear run towards a human (or horse) if a cub was around.
After that I put a cowbell on Coffee and each pack horse.

hobson
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Inverness:
Actually, Moose pose a much greater threat. Out in Montana I was surprised to learn that Moose attacks on humans consistently outnumber all other animal attacks combined.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

So, could a MOOSE outrun a horse? Assuming fit Moose and motivated horse?

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:11 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>) A tireless
runner, the moose, Alces alces, can outrun a horse, but its main defenses are its front
hooves, with which it can deliver powerful kicks, and the male?s enormous antlers. A
blow from a bull moose?s rack can kill a wolf and will drive off a grizzly bear, and sparring
between two bulls can be fatal. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Moose Pics (http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Gorge/9233/page5.html) This site says Bison (when angry) can outrun a horse.

Power Animals (http://www.rainbowcrystal.com/power/powerdef.html)

Thousands of Animal Facts (http://www.skygaze.com/content/facts/animals.shtml)

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

hobson
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:14 AM
who would win?

My money's on the moose.

bigbay
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Everythingbutwings:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>When moving at an all-out run, the black bear has been clocked at 30 mph. This is an animal that can outrun a horse over short distances and can weigh up to 500 pounds. The black bear is also a very good climber and swimmer <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>In spite of their weight and short legs, a bear can outrun a horse for about 300 to 400 yards. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Okay, wait. If a horse's top speed (granted a fit racehorse) is 45 miles per hour and a bear's is 30, and a horse is obviously better suited to keep this up over a distance, through trees, etc, where do they get it that the bear can outrun the horse??
/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

"This is not a vacation, it's a quest: a quest for fun."

hobson
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:22 AM
Maybe they're assuming that the horse is carrying a 200-pound tourist, and the bear is real hungry?

DMK
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Inverness:
yea, yea, sure. but how do brown bears do in dressage?! hummph. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


And what about the jumping phase? Or the rest of cross country? I mean so far it only looks like the bear has the edge in roads and tracks. What will happen to the poor bear if those get eliminated????

Enquiring minds need to know!

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former."

Albert Einstein (1878-1955)

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:26 AM
Breaks down coming out of the starting gate /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

achcosuva
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hobson:
Maybe they're assuming that the horse is carrying a 200-pound tourist, and the bear is real hungry?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Besides, how many top racehorses are out in the wilderness meeting really fit black bears? All these horses they talk about are probably broken-down rent-a-trail-horse grade horses with a "rider" who has only ever done pony rides. Statistics always forget that some people CAN ride nowadays. It's not an old west phenomena. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

-Anne, the owner of a PrettyFilly and a WildArabianStallion-
"Change is inevitable...except from a vending machine."

Glimmerglass
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bigbay:
If a horse's top speed (granted a fit racehorse) is 45 miles per hour and a bear's is 30, and a horse is obviously better suited to keep this up over a distance, through trees, etc, where do they get it that the bear can outrun the horse?? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I presume the context of a "race" is such that if a bear has a horse in its sights then the bear can successfully overtake/or catch and conquer the horse.

Bears are very fast in their immediate sprint capabilities, not unlike a cheetah. That's why they tell you to NEVER ever run from a bear - or go up a tree. Stand your ground. If you flee you will die!

Last summer while in Lenox, MA I had a brown bear run across the road I was driving on and it was by no means a lazy slug.

OnyxThePony
Jul. 15, 2002, 09:44 AM
I don't think riding abiility much comes into it /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
If that bear wants you, he'll get'cha!!
When I was young,t hey used to say to climb a tall tree, to a slim limb, where the bear's weight would make it impossible for him to folow you. Since moving near to and riding around in the Canadian Rockies, I've learned that bears have since learned to bend trees/limbs and bounce ont hem to shake out their prey!
Isn't that a nice thought. It's also why hubby and I haven't gone for a big long mountain hike since last time we came face-to-face with a cute little black bear, and why I trained my rottie pup to recall to hack out with in the mountains!!
When your dog is trained to bark or raise an alarm at potential trouble (eg. bear, cougar), "recall" just means that it WILL come back when you call. This is the only way to not lose dogs to mountain wiildlife, and after a few close encounters, I've found it's essential when hacking out. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

dran kittenhard to type with kitten pullingo n hoodie strings
/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Big Things Ahead!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Anne FS
Jul. 15, 2002, 11:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by bigbay:
Okay, wait. If a horse's top speed (granted a fit racehorse) is 45 miles per hour and a bear's is 30, and a horse is obviously better suited to keep this up over a distance, through trees, etc, where do they get it that the bear can outrun the horse??
/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Because Seattle Slew, Affirmed & Alydar can hit 45 mph; our horses CAN'T, even though it feels like it to us.

However, a "motivated" horse might get close to that speed for 300 yards if it's running in terror from a bear. An angry bear would probably be a good motivator. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I've (thank God)never come across one but I've heard foxhunters tell of it and some say the horses cannot STAND bear smell and they will freak out & bolt at the smell and/or if they see one. Someone once said the smell is similar to pigs and their horse reacted the same and DID NOT LIKE pigs.

EvntRydr
Jul. 15, 2002, 11:40 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hobson:
Maybe they're assuming that the horse is carrying a 200-pound tourist, and the bear is real hungry?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I SWEAR TO GOD if I'd had soda in my mouth I would be cleaning it off the screen! Good one Hobson!

- someone help me, I've fallen and I can't get up! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

A Wyld Eyed Devil who believes, wishes do come true and amazing things can happen!

Everythingbutwings
Jul. 15, 2002, 12:15 PM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Save the Peeps!

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

hobson
Jul. 15, 2002, 12:17 PM
Good point, ETBW--would a bear go after peeps, or a horse? And if the bear chose the peeps, who'd be faster?

LaurieB
Jul. 15, 2002, 02:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hobson:
Maybe they're assuming that the horse is carrying a 200-pound tourist, and the bear is real hungry?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, but what would the moose be carrying? /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Halfpasser11
Jul. 15, 2002, 07:03 PM
I'm assuming that a bear can outrun a horse on a flat track if it came to that. But, can a bear be as nimble and turn on a time like a horse?

For any of you that have seen Lord of the Rings, when "the white horse" is running from all the black ones some to mind. Sorry, I can't think of any of the names. But those flying changes!

Anyways, I would think that a horse would win, but then again, I've never meet a bear.

I think, therefore I am single

riverpup
Jul. 15, 2002, 07:14 PM
Thanks so much everyone for the lively discourse! I have learned a lot and hope that I never am put in a situation that tests your answers. My husband will be smug. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Inverness
Jul. 16, 2002, 09:26 AM
But, but, what about camels?! No one has mentioned camels!

Lane 1: broken down pack horse w/200 lb. tourist
Lane 2: peep
Lane 3: horse (Alydar lines)
Lane 4: bear (grizzly)
Lane 5: bear (black w/cub)
Lane 6: moose (Canadian)
Lane 7: camel
Lane 8: hobson

On your mark . . . set . . .:eek:


"The man is only half himself, the other half is his expression."

-- Emerson "The Poet" (1844)

hobson
Jul. 16, 2002, 09:53 AM
And hobson gets immediately DQ-ed for outrageous interference when she cuts off the horse, 2 bears, moose and camel and heads straight for the peep in Lane 2.

But what about the angry bison?

/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Inverness
Jul. 16, 2002, 09:59 AM
Officials are reportedly considering banning hobson from racing for life. "Eating one's competitors is a very serious infraction," noted one race official.

hobson barely qualified for the final, beating out an angry (but lame) bison in the preliminaries.

Film at eleven . . .


"The man is only half himself, the other half is his expression."

-- Emerson "The Poet" (1844)

can't re-
Jul. 16, 2002, 10:30 AM
They can smell a PB that is in a tent, under a sleeping camper, in a sleeping bag..... /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif
And believe me when the bear comes asking for the power bar, he doesn't say please! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Sleepy
Jul. 16, 2002, 10:34 AM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

vineyridge
Jul. 16, 2002, 10:58 AM
Somewhat off topic, but similar--

I was looking through my Merck Vet Manual, and in the back they list normal ranges of things like heart rate, respiration, urine quantity, etc.

The horse is the most efficient domestic animal, with a heart rate nearly the same as an elephant. It has more efficient kidneys, and its respiration rate is the lowest of the animals listed.

So you see, the bear is a sprinter, but the horse is a stayer. If it avoids the first rush, it's home free.

Unfortunately the book didn't list mooses, bison or hobson. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

appyhunter
Jul. 16, 2002, 11:01 AM
BigBay- bear wins hands down in a sprint. A reasonably healthy and fast horse can run away from a bear over a distance, but in a nose to nose OH SH**! situation, you better hope the bear goes the other way. Black bear generally will, if a cub is not involved.

For those of you taking those tree climbing recommendations seriously, I personally am sitting here going /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif I had to hit the brakes coming out of Aspen a couple of nights ago, as a black bear was headed past the Hickory House restaurant ( this was a real bear, not the bronze on the roof, for those of you who have skied here) and toward the road at a good clip. That sucker did not cross the road in front of me as I was expecting, but he did gallop on up an old pine tree right next to the van. No slowing, just change of directions to a vertical. Took a GOOD look at that tree yesterday in the AM light, and from the claw marks, that bear is up that tree a LOT! I would also take the twelve foot recommendation with a BIG grain of salt,since that bear was that high in an eyeblink.

Moose are a bit testier and more likely to charge than a black bear. People who live where both are common walk real careful in moose territory... and are more likely to warn the tourista about the moose than the bear /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif And buffalo 'ranchers' regularly loose horses to p***** off buffalo. We are talking race and ranch bred QH's here, and the buffs are faster. AND they have more endurance than the QH sprinter. Irritated buff is a bad proposition to be around.

Do you all have ANY idea what kind of razzing you are in for when you call in late to work because there is a bear in the yard? /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif EVERYONE wants to know if you appreciated their hard work and sweat in dressing up like a bear! /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Horses don't all spook off into a runaway at sight of a bear. Most do, especially if unused to other large animals. (My horses are cattle/ deer/ elk/ coyote proof) But an ol lead mare is likely to keep a close eye on that bear, and follow it at a bit of distance.

Lovely, I not only have horses that track mule deer and hunters on nearby slopes, I have to have one that tracks bear! I am off opening gates AWAY from the bear, and my horses are following it! Mare is a smart cookie, she was staying outside easy sprint and catch distance for a bear.

achcosuva
Jul. 16, 2002, 11:09 AM
I'm beginning to be very thankful that in my part of Virginia the most dangerous predators are the New Yorker drivers on their way to Florida! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif These moose (moose, mooses, meese?), angry bison, bears, racing peeps, etc. sound quite scary! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

-Anne, the owner of a PrettyFilly and a WildArabianStallion-
"Change is inevitable...except from a vending machine."

appyhunter
Jul. 16, 2002, 11:14 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Halfpasser11:
I'm assuming that a bear can outrun a horse on a flat track if it came to that. But, can a bear be as nimble and turn on a time like a horse?

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Faster actually. Puts a good cutting horse to shame.

Not sure a bear is built well to do dressage, but I would NOT count them down and out on the cross country.

As to moose or bear being faster, the bear better be because moose take to heart the adage that the best defense is a good offense.

Can you all tell I have bears in the neighborhood? Do you know we park near the parks on breaks and see if the tourists and their dogs realize they are walking within a few feet of the bear in the bush? NOBODY will bet the tourista will see the bear anymore. They never do unless the bear moves! Be more fun if this were a sporting proposition...

Inverness
Jul. 16, 2002, 11:19 AM
I hear you Appyhunter. We still have a good number of black bears in the Blue Ridge and while I often smell 'em, I rarely see 'em.


"The man is only half himself, the other half is his expression."

-- Emerson "The Poet" (1844)

MoReDQthanU
Jul. 16, 2002, 11:26 AM
what if the bear only has 3 legs? Or the horse has rockets? Or the bear is blind, hits a tree and gets kinda dazed? Who would win then?? /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

TERRI!!!!
Guess what guys!?!? Schools out! Guess what guys, IM SO HAPPY!!!!!:)

hobson
Jul. 16, 2002, 12:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by vineyridge:

Unfortunately the book didn't list mooses, bison or hobson. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, I'm a lot like the bear: pretty quick in a sprint (especially when they prey involves spaghetti or brownies), but when I'm all fat and in my winter coat, I'm toast. No staying power at all.

Sandy M
Jul. 16, 2002, 01:07 PM
The final obstacle in a trail trial I competed in last year (placed 4th in my division) was an "abandoned" campsite. A tent, chairs, benches, a backpack tossed on the ground, a rock encircled campfire, a large igloo cooler, and............ a REAL stuffed bear, rearing up on its hind legs with paws spread.

To get the desired "0" score (low score wins), the horses were supposed to walk quietly by. Well, yes, the horses knew it was not a "live" bear. Mine walked quietly by (though he did give that bear a loooooong look) and got his "0" score. Once I was past the "penalty zone" I looked back at the judge and said, "Frankly, if I were on a horse and saw an angry bear, I would hope the horse would get the hell out of town as fast as possible, not walk quietly past it."

stegall
Jul. 16, 2002, 05:15 PM
Hang on-all the northerners are hogging the geography of this question.
Now for the southern aspect-what about gators? /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif
I have heard that gators can be pretty darn fast on a straightaway, and I know when I was living in FL, that I heard of the occassional breeding farm losing a foal to a gator when they wandered too close to the canal.

And don't think my horse hasn't gotten the bear question answered: if confronted by a bear-dump your rider as a sacrifice and gallop away to your barn while bear dines on human /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Any WHY do these questions remind me of my algebra teacher?

If a bear going 30 miles an hour confronts a horse going 20 miles an hour, who gets away first-notwithstanding the moose who shoots between them at the halfway point doing 40 miles an hour and being very mad....................
AND NONE OF THEM ARE ON THE TRAIN /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

appyhunter
Jul. 16, 2002, 07:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by stegall:
If a bear going 30 miles an hour confronts a horse going 20 miles an hour, who gets away first-notwithstanding the moose who shoots between them at the halfway point doing 40 miles an hour and being very mad....................
AND NONE OF THEM ARE ON THE TRAIN /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Stegall, this is because bear, horse and moose are ALL faster than Amtrak.

Did you know that mad moose sink small boats?

/infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Skeetericwood
Jul. 16, 2002, 07:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Anne FS:


"Running Speed: Bears can run uphill and downhill and on flat ground. Lean bears can run faster than 30 miles per hour. Fat bears in their winter coats overheat and tire quickly when running."<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well then I'd make sure not to race a bear i the summer but in the winter when they are fat! Lol. Good lesson to remember, never ever race a bear on a horse. HaHa!

subk
Jul. 16, 2002, 08:26 PM
MY husband says if it's a grizzle your toast. However, only if you're not running downhill. Apparently, bears have a balance issue downhill.

SO, if you and Trigger meet Smokey in the woods you should head downhill if given the option!

Also here in Tennessee some guy got a citation this weekend by attacking and throwing a (obviously small) black bear to the ground. The tourist was not happy that said bear was in the processes of procuring a veal venison snack. The bear ran off and didn't get the snack, the fawn had to be put down because of it's injuries and the tourist I hope was shown the stateline--what does he think bears eat anyway?

brilyntrip
Jul. 16, 2002, 08:38 PM
when I read your race card!! WAHAHA!!! I am glad that there are none of the aforementioned on Long Island !!Having lived on the Eastern shore of MD for several years if in fact the PIG SMELL is like the BEAR SMELL well I can understand why manyhorses d not like Eau du bear puuuuuu!