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MaybeMorgan
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:32 PM
If I never see "horrific" again it will be too soon.

Anyone with a dog breed that gives it a cutsie shortened form or acronym that takes me 5 minutes to figure out what the heck it is.

Adamantane
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:33 PM
Obey.

BuddyRoo
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:36 PM
wait, what?

If I never hear that again, I'll be pleased.

Mickey the Marcher
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:37 PM
"Flatting"
Anyone who uses that should flogged severely.

TheHorseProblem
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:39 PM
"I get it."

To me, this translates into "you are too dumb to see how smart I am so STFU."

"Fundamentally" when uttered by any politician.

"That said,..." Don't you mean "however"? I thought so.

HighFlyinBey++
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:40 PM
Wow

Sadly

In this economy

There are more. Give me time...

Long Spot
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:44 PM
My go-to hated word. Moist. GAH!!!!!

dressagetraks
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:44 PM
"My bad."

Comes Around
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:47 PM
Because of overuse: icon and iconic, "out of the box" and "to the next level"

lcw579
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:50 PM
Repurpose. :dead:

BEARCAT
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:56 PM
Kardashian

saaskya
Apr. 7, 2012, 10:56 PM
epic.

fail.

epic fail.

KBC
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:00 PM
preggo

Equine Studies
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:04 PM
Kardashian

Good one.

Long Spot
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:05 PM
Wait, What?

Kim Kardashian is preggo? But her marriage was an epic. fail. Epic Fail. She sure took divorce to a new level. I wonder if she'll repurpose her wedding dress. I hear the armpits were a bit moist, so maybe not.

Wow, sadly, in this economy, the guy she dumped can't afford to pay her alimony. I know, I know, I get it. She should probably pay HIM. I hope he obeys his lawyers strong suggestion and requests it.

Fundamentally, the whole thing was just wrong from start to finish. Just horrific.

:D:D:D

Sorry, Mickey, couldn't figure out a way to work "flatting" into the story.

sprite
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:07 PM
moving forward/going forward

BEARCAT
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:07 PM
"We're pregnant"

Unless there has been some staggering scientific breakthrough, you, the woman are pregnant. You can both be "expecting a child, " but your mate is certainly not pregnant.

shea'smom
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:11 PM
"That's so gay"
Lessoned, flatted.
Re-homed when you really want to sell it.
OTTB. They are THOROUGHBREDS. Period.

seabreeze
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:11 PM
Just sayin'.

Aghasted.

twotrudoc
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:14 PM
I just ate three artichokes, seabreeze. Prepare to be aghasted!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:lol: :lol::lol::lol:

I detest the words/phrase "baby momma" and "baby daddy".

UGH.

MaybeMorgan
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:14 PM
Wait, What?

Kim Kardashian is preggo? But her marriage was an epic. fail. Epic Fail. She sure took divorce to a new level. I wonder if she'll repurpose her wedding dress. I hear the armpits were a bit moist, so maybe not.

Wow, sadly, in this economy, the guy she dumped can't afford to pay her alimony. I know, I know, I get it. She should probably pay HIM. I hope he obeys his lawyers strong suggestion and requests it.

Fundamentally, the whole thing was just wrong from start to finish. Just horrific.

:D:D:D

Sorry, Mickey, couldn't figure out a way to work "flatting" into the story.

lol

Ghazzu
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:17 PM
Hunker down.

Joyrider
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:22 PM
"Throw the baby out with the bathwater". I had a professor who said this daily. I had never heard this phrase before and ...never want to hear it again, thank you.

mswillie
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:25 PM
Prolly. Really you're not cute when you use it. You just seem ill educated and childish.

janedoe726
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:26 PM
Throwing someone under the bus

OTV
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:29 PM
"Meh." It's bad enough in text, but in person?

"I seen." Learn how to speak properly. My estimation of your IQ just dropped 50 pts.

"It is what it is." I HATE when people think they're saying so uber profound when they spew this phrase out. Most of the time they just come off sounding like morons and I have to walk away. You don't sound profound; you sound like a fool.

"Irregardless." That's not a word!!

Abbreviated words. Really, you can't take the time to say a two syllable word and have to break it down into one? I had one moron post something on my FB with the phrase, "You went to the mountains? I'm tots jelly!" and I deleted her from my friends list.

"Cool beans."

"I could care less." No, you mean you could NOT care less. Saying you COULD care less totally defeats the purpose of why you're saying it in the first place!!

"Literally." Stop trying to make your sentence more dramatic by misusing the word literally. There was an announcer on tv that yelled, "That goalie is LITERALLY on fire!" Funny, he looked fine to me. There were no flames shooting off him. Worse is the emphasis placed on the word to create a more dramatic effect. I'm going to start using "figuratively" in place of a misused "literally" and see what people's reactions are. "I'm FIGURATIVELY going to rip your head off..."

"Anyways." No, it's anyway. Not anyways. Unless, of course, you're a 1950s tough guy. "Youse guys ain't going to believe this..."

That's all for now.

HighFlyinBey++
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:32 PM
Wait, What?

Kim Kardashian is preggo? But her marriage was an epic. fail. Epic Fail. She sure took divorce to a new level. I wonder if she'll repurpose her wedding dress. I hear the armpits were a bit moist, so maybe not.

Wow, sadly, in this economy, the guy she dumped can't afford to pay her alimony. I know, I know, I get it. She should probably pay HIM. I hope he obeys his lawyers strong suggestion and requests it.

Fundamentally, the whole thing was just wrong from start to finish. Just horrific.

:D:D:D

Sorry, Mickey, couldn't figure out a way to work "flatting" into the story.

I'm cutting you off :lol:

KBC
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:32 PM
OTTB. They are THOROUGHBREDS. Period.

YES,

LongSpot, brilliant

BasqueMom
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:37 PM
Whatever

HighFlyinBey++
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:38 PM
Or as the kids in my barn's neighborhood say, "Whatevs"

Trakehner
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:40 PM
Bling
Kardashian/ParisHilton and any other skank known for being known.
Beckham
Trayvon or Hoodie
Baby bump

Windsor1
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:41 PM
"It is what it is." I HATE when people think they're saying so uber profound when they spew this phrase out. Most of the time they just come off sounding like morons and I have to walk away. You don't sound profound; you sound like a fool.

I say that, but not in an effort to be or sound profound. :) I know a lot of people find it irritating, but I'm not really sure why. I guess to me it's easier than saying "Those are the facts and there's no changing them" or whatever a less offensive alternative to "It is what it is" might be.

I know it's used here pretty often, but "scritches" grates on my nerves, as does "guesstimate."

NJRider
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:44 PM
"Put on your big girl panties"
"at the end of the day, bla bla bla"
and I second anything Kardashian!

OTV
Apr. 7, 2012, 11:48 PM
I say that, but not in an effort to be or sound profound. :) I know a lot of people find it irritating, but I'm not really sure why. I guess to me it's easier than saying "Those are the facts and there's no changing them" or whatever a less offensive alternative to "It is what it is" might be.

I know it's used here pretty often, but "scritches" grates on my nerves, as does "guesstimate."

Oh, there's definitely a place for that phrase but I'm talking about when it's used about something stupid. Like yesterday, when a gal and I were talking about roasting chickpeas (yes, these are the amazing convos I have) and I mentioned sometimes the skins split when they're roasting but it still tastes fine. The gal spits out, "well, it is what it is" while nodding and I was thinking, "wtf?" Just seemed so out of context. I probably hear it more in situations like that then when it's actually used properly.

SendenHorse
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:03 AM
"I haz a cheeseburger" (tying to be cute by putting captions on strange dog and cat photos on FB) Haz is NOT a word!

"Preggers"

baby bump

skydy
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:04 AM
I'm afraid I am guilty of writing "wow" ,though I don't say it...

"rescued" (If you enter a burning building to save an animal then yes, you have rescued it, otherwise no..)

"re-home"

Long Spot
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:08 AM
and I mentioned sometimes the skins split when they're roasting but it still tastes fine. The gal spits out, "well, it is what it is" while nodding and I was thinking, "wtf?" Just seemed so out of context. I probably hear it more in situations like that then when it's actually used properly.

I immediately thought of "when in Rome" from Anchorman.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNV-ozPXn60

Windsor1
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:14 AM
Oh, there's definitely a place for that phrase but I'm talking about when it's used about something stupid. Like yesterday, when a gal and I were talking about roasting chickpeas (yes, these are the amazing convos I have) and I mentioned sometimes the skins split when they're roasting but it still tastes fine. The gal spits out, "well, it is what it is" while nodding and I was thinking, "wtf?" Just seemed so out of context. I probably hear it more in situations like that then when it's actually used properly.

I hear ya. You're definitely not alone in being annoyed by it! :)

dodedo
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:27 AM
I hate it when I hear someone say "shut up" to someone else!!
So very disrespectful! Besides the fact that my ex's parents constantly bickered and said shut up to each other....
I have other nasty things my ex used to call me but since I got rid of him, I do not hear those vile words anymore! :-)

Griffyn
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:30 AM
"kid" or "kiddo" for a child
"doggie, horsie"
"veggie" used to set my hair on fire, but Im just worn out from expunging it from the vocabularies of those around me.
"preggers" is vile, "baby bump"
Im with whoever noted "scritches" and also "hony, honie"? the word that means large pony or small horse.

I know the people with Icelandics and the like hate it when their horses are referred to as ponies. I have a horse thats (barely) 14.2 I refer to her as pony all the time and it drives some people crazy though I also call my 15.2 pony at times as well. Doesnt bother me to misuse the word pony at all but drives others berserkers.

Beentheredonethat
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:31 AM
lol, ESPECIALLY when spoken. Argh. Makes me think you're 12, and not too bright. How hard is it to write ha! or ha ha!

Blugal
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:35 AM
Who peed in your cheerios/cornflakes?

At the end of the day

Mara
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:48 AM
Another hater of "veggie". Even chefs and degreed nutritionists use that diminutive now, and it gets on my last nerve. I do still correct people, though I know it's an exercise in futility.

For example: "Would you like some stir-fried veggies?"

Me: "No thanks, but if you have any stir-fried vegetables I'd love some of those."

Also can't stand "prolly", and "l'il". Someone I'm quite fond only ever uses those in place of the "real" word, and I just grit my teeth.

EqTrainer
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:49 AM
"We're pregnant"

Yeah. What about later? "we're nursing"? Nope, didnt think so ;)

WNT
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:51 AM
But Jack loves his "scritches"! They are stronger than tickles but not as strong as full-on scratches. Ergo, scritches. Makes perfect sense to me!

"Frenemy" is a dumb word, as is "totes" anything. Texting, Twitter and Facebook will undo any good done in English classes.

DeucesWild11
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:55 AM
I CANNOT listen to the word "panty". I also hate the word "hubby".

Linny
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:09 AM
I have a friend who refers to to her husband has her "hunay" which is meant to meen her "honey" but it just sounds wierd.

Baby bump, baby daddy/mama, and all those dopey business terms like "think outside the box" (they never really want to you too) or "moving forward" (uh, unless you have cracked the time-space continuum, you can only move forward) all have to go.

I also cannot stand the misuse of "literally" but since "aghasted" is a beloved CoTHsm, I can accept it.

CVPeg
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:09 AM
"You guys..."

SO and I used to keep track of how often wait staff would say this during a meal.

"So, how are you guys doing tonight? What would you guys like to drink?"

Only one of us is a guy. Just say "you"....

vacation1
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:58 AM
baby bump

sammy (Rachael Ray, I f**** hate you)

LOL and OMG when spoken (oh, young people, please stop this now)

Pull up your big girl panties (you must choose between being coy and being crass; both at the same time is muddled and irritating)

kiddos (I die a little inside every time I read this)

smirk (easily the most overused word online, it's just awful. First, "said" cannot be bettered. Read Strunk and get back to me. Second, it's just an ugly, ugly word. Smirk is the smirk of words. Argh)
rescue - used as a breed.

mistakes were made - horrible, classic cop-out phrase to avoid accepting any blame for what was usually a deliberate wrong act.

case closed - a control freak phrase used almost exclusively by the poor-in-argument to attempt to escape having to actually defend their own comments


Local irritation: I hate, hate, hate people using "Jersey" to refer to NJ. It might be less annoying if it wasn't always a sneer. For the record, PENNSYLVANIA has 4 syllables and is a far, far more pathetic state and PHILADELPHIA IS PART OF IT!!!!! Okay, I'm good now.

BLBGP
Apr. 8, 2012, 02:07 AM
"Kill" and "no kill" shelters. It's divisive, misleading, and the term does nothing to help animals.

Alagirl
Apr. 8, 2012, 02:11 AM
Yeah. What about later? "we're nursing"? Nope, didnt think so ;)
hey, we might be....:D

Mara
Apr. 8, 2012, 02:22 AM
"Reaching out". Ugh. Sure, I'll call the consultant in North Carolina, but my arms aren't long enough to "reach out" and tap her on the shoulder all the way from Georgia.

RoseBud143
Apr. 8, 2012, 02:25 AM
.

Tapperjockey
Apr. 8, 2012, 03:12 AM
b

sammy (Rachael Ray, I f**** hate you)



It bugs me that every time she says EVOO, she then says "and for all you fans that don't know what that is, it's Extra Virgin Olive Oil". Why not just say "Extra Virgin Olive Oil", instead of EVOO and then explaining what that is? (I want to smack her every single time).

BasqueMom
Apr. 8, 2012, 03:23 AM
Well, that's that! My 86-year mother has started using that term...makes me
crazy, ok, crazier.

rmh_rider
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:47 AM
Words or phrases I detest. I am sure there are more.


"Like"

"Like you know"

"Like you know what I am talking about?"

"Like, just saying".

"Just saying."

The over use of LOL, or lol.

"Up to speed."

Hyphenated races.

Hyphenated names. Any name with a hyphen in it.

"Stupidly"

Tot mom. Who should be IN JAIL.

xeroxchick
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:01 AM
"Impacted."
"Impact" is not a verb. "Had an impact."

equidae
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:01 AM
Uber. Terrible, hideous, word.

bumknees
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:03 AM
Anything that Is a PC term. Hate them.

the whole baby mamma/dady

the well like ya know.. mmm no I do not know

repurpose. no it is reused.

relcaimed. no it is reused or recycled take your pick.

I find that offensive. Yeah well grow up and realise that the world is offensive.

EqTrainer
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:06 AM
hey, we might be....:D

Whaaat?!

b
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:15 AM
It annoys me when I go though a check out and as I leave the cashier says, "Have a good one." Have a good what? Have a good life? Have a good sneeze? Have a good meal with the food you've bought? Why can they just say, "Have a good day?" It's the same number of words! Maybe I should just reply, "Have a good two."

lovey1121
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:17 AM
These words or phrases give me chills of the hoohoo-cleansing kind:

Newbie. Newb.

Whatevs.

Nurture. I hear this in any sentence and I immediately go somewhere else in my mind.

Repurposed. Purpose-bred.

saaskya
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:17 AM
oh yeah, i forgot 'totes'. does anyone else hear this? my old roommate would say this ALL the time.

'totes forgot to make coffee.'
'totes love the new flowers'
and then she and her friends would really get into rhyming and being more ridiculous with it and i would hear 'totes m'goats' or 'totes m'goattles' or things even longer.

not like totally is any better a word to overuse but its at least an ACTUAL WORD.

havent heard it in VA or MD so maybe its regional ..

CDE Driver
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:18 AM
People really say "LOL" and "OMG"?? Please tell it is only vapid teenagers that do this!

ANY time a verb is used as a noun! That just makes me twitch.

Hony... please go back to third grade if you use this word. It is either a pony or a horse.

It just makes me confused when you call your 17H Warmblood your pony.

Incentiveize. How do you even spell that?

I guess the whole thing of changing words so you can leave out other words... see above.

Kids. Those are baby goats, if that is what you are talking about then great.

Fur babies = Creepy.

When Fathers say they are babysitting their children. No, you are parenting.

HighFlyinBey++
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:21 AM
It annoys me when I go though a check out and as I leave the cashier says, "Have a good one." Have a good what? Have a good life? Have a good sneeze? Have a good meal with the food you've bought? Why can they just say, "Have a good day?" It's the same number of words! Maybe I should just reply, "Have a good two."

LOL!! My ex would always yell, "HEY" to me instead of using my name (or even a pet name). I finally started answering back, "Straw?" instead of "yes?" It took him a while to realize how often he said it.

lovey1121
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:24 AM
:eek::eek: TOTES!!!!

"Totes whatevs!" -- The ultimate in pompousness and douchebaggery.;)

redhorse5
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:29 AM
American dressage instructors that say "Yah" instead of yes, good, correct.

ManyDogs
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:36 AM
Awesome.
Unless Eric Cartman says it.

dalpal
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:41 AM
epic.

fail.

epic fail.

Yes!! I hate the over usage of Epic

And I also cringe at
YUMMY and SCRUMPTIOUS to described something like leather or tack/hell, even people. I pretty much just hate both words in general...but please stop using them to describe something that isn't food!!!

Baby Bump

Preggo

dalpal
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:44 AM
"kid" or "kiddo" for a child
"doggie, horsie"
"veggie" used to set my hair on fire, but Im just worn out from expunging it from the vocabularies of those around me.
"preggers" is vile, "baby bump"
Im with whoever noted "scritches" and also "hony, honie"? the word that means large pony or small horse.

I know the people with Icelandics and the like hate it when their horses are referred to as ponies. I have a horse thats (barely) 14.2 I refer to her as pony all the time and it drives some people crazy though I also call my 15.2 pony at times as well. Doesnt bother me to misuse the word pony at all but drives others berserkers.

Yes, yes...Veggie I too hate that one.

Christa P
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:45 AM
"Deja vu all over again".

Christa

lovey1121
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:47 AM
American dressage instructors that say "Yah" instead of yes, good, correct.

:lol: "Yah! Gut, y'all!"

dalpal
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:50 AM
OH WAIT..forgot one. Considering we have been invaded by these people at the barn and they make me want to pull my ever loving hair out....

PARELLI!!!! And all the catch words/phrases that go along with it..."My horse is a Claustrophobic Introvert. That's why he will rear if you put your leg on him."

No your horse rears because he is a spoiled brat and you've let him get away with everything because you are scared of him.

HalfArabian
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:53 AM
Corporate speak or corporate speak of any kind!:D

anotheralteranotheralter
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:53 AM
When people spit out word association type words or catchy phrases.

You ask someone where Rachel is (you mean a real Rachel, like your mailman or neighbor or something) and they say "Rachel Ray"?

And, agreed, Rachel's lingo does not work for me, either.

Phrases: I just saw a commercial for a knife sharpener called "edge of glory"?
Yes, a knife sharpener does make an edge, but wtf on the "edge of glory" thing?

Duh.

CVPeg
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:57 AM
"Went missing".

That began when the Chamberlain baby in Australia disappeared and was feared eaten by dingoes.

It is an Australian phrase, but from that point on, the Western press has used it constantly. We used to say "disappeared", "kidnapped", "ran away", "is missing"!

glfprncs
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:07 AM
My principal, who truly is the best principal I've ever worked for, makes up his own versions of words and uses them ALL THE TIME. As an English teacher, whenever I hear him use them in a public forum (i.e. Morning announcements to the entire school), my stomach does flip flops and I feel physically ill.

His favorite...."incentatives"

We're required to offer the students "incentatives" for doing what they're supposed to do in school. However, since there's no such thing as an incentative, I'm clearly not under any obligation to provide my 8th grade students with a movie, or party, or some other reason for them not to be learning in my 60 minute class period.

One of my English department coworkers actually keeps a book of his made up words. I wish one of us was brave enough to broach the subject with him.

HighFlyinBey++
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:32 AM
"Deja vu all over again".

Christa

You don't like Yogiisms?

MsM
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:57 AM
I can't say that I have many words that I NEVER want to hear again in any circumstances.

Most of my teeth clenching comes from overused and misused words as many have noted. Another issue is using slang and textspeak in more formal situations Literally misused probably irks me the most. The trendy and buzz words I have heard come and go. I just sigh and wait for the next annoyance. Its all groovy.

BTW, I believe "You Guys" is the Connecticut (or maybe NorthEast) equivilent of "y'all". I tend to use it with my middle school students who object to being called "children" and seem to dislike "people" as well.

Ghazzu
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:07 PM
"Growing" the economy, business, etc.

petesperson
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:17 PM
Local irritation: I hate, hate, hate people using "Jersey" to refer to NJ. It might be less annoying if it wasn't always a sneer. For the record, PENNSYLVANIA has 4 syllables and is a far, far more pathetic state and PHILADELPHIA IS PART OF IT!!!!! Okay, I'm good now.

This! Also, as someone who used to live in Philadelphia, I hate it when people say Philly. There's North Philly, West Philly, and South Philly, but there's no plain Philly, just Philadelphia. (Or Fluffya, phonetically.)

Another thing that drives me crazy (and as far as I know I'm alone with this) is the use of "Best" all by itself as a closing. Best what? Best regards, best wishes, best of luck... all fine. But just best? What does that mean?!?

TheHorseProblem
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:27 PM
Tweeted

To Facebook something

Monetize

Mara
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:29 PM
It annoys me when I go though a check out and as I leave the cashier says, "Have a good one." Have a good what? Have a good life? Have a good sneeze? Have a good meal with the food you've bought? Why can they just say, "Have a good day?" It's the same number of words! Maybe I should just reply, "Have a good two."

Reminds me of George Carlin's rant on "Have a nice day!" -

"Let someone wish me a crappy day. Maybe, just maybe, I've had 527 nice days in a row, and by God, I'm ready for a crappy day!":lol:

TheHorseProblem
Apr. 8, 2012, 12:38 PM
Forgot one:

"no worries"

I was just ASKING. I was not WORRYING.

LLDM
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:03 PM
'Vast majority' - UGH!

...used by people to support whatever argument or point they're trying to make. A) Do you really think you speak for the vast majority? B) Do you even believe you know what the vast majority thinks? C) Does the vast majority actually agree on anything?

It's a cop out, an empty rhetorical phase used by every. single. politician. It makes my brain hurt.

SCFarm

dudleyc
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:11 PM
Baby Daddy

(I'm an OB/GYN and here this all the time....The baby daddy might come to the delivery)

Curiously
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:23 PM
Worst all-time phrase that should die forever:

*just threw up in my mouth a little*

:mad::mad:

You seriously need to say that? Why? It really does not carry the emphasis some people seem to think the phrase has. :mad: My immediate, involuntary thought when I hear that is, *you're disgusting*.

:rolleyes::dead:

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:30 PM
Kardashian/ParisHilton and any other skank known for being known.


:yes::yes::yes:

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:36 PM
"Reaching out". Ugh. Sure, I'll call the consultant in North Carolina, but my arms aren't long enough to "reach out" and tap her on the shoulder all the way from Georgia.

Thank you for saving me the trouble, Mara. There is a universe of business cliches. Some serve a useful shorthand purpose, but this disgusting example does not and has proliferated the past three years or so. Blecch.

JAM
Apr. 8, 2012, 01:42 PM
This.

Famously.

CVPeg
Apr. 8, 2012, 06:35 PM
BTW, I believe "You Guys" is the Connecticut (or maybe NorthEast) equivilent of "y'all". I tend to use it with my middle school students who object to being called "children" and seem to dislike "people" as well.

Use it myself when just having a good time with friends, or youngsters. But we often dined out, and especially on evenings when at a nice, romantic place, to hear "So how are you guys doing?" more or less broke the romantic ambience. ;)

JustTheTicket
Apr. 8, 2012, 07:24 PM
"We're pregnant"

Unless there has been some staggering scientific breakthrough, you, the woman are pregnant. You can both be "expecting a child, " but your mate is certainly not pregnant.

OH.MY.GOD. This one makes me insane. I'm glad I'm not the only one.

dressagetraks
Apr. 8, 2012, 07:30 PM
The "we're pregnant" one, which also annoys me, reminded me of a quip from a medical report about a week ago. The doc dictated, "The patient missed his last appointment. He apologizes today and says that his son gave birth to his grandchild that day, and he was too excited to remember."

I actually forwarded that to my stepmother, who also works in the medical field and mourns English, and I commented, "I hope he called the Guinness Book of World Records." She replied, "That would really be something to get excited about."

skydy
Apr. 8, 2012, 07:41 PM
"Growing" the economy, business, etc.

Oh , that one really is annoying!

The phrase "completely destroyed" irks me and is often used by the news media. :no::no:

Guin
Apr. 8, 2012, 07:52 PM
oh yeah, i forgot 'totes'. does anyone else hear this?
havent heard it in VA or MD so maybe its regional ..

Alas, it is NOT. I have a coworker (who is irritating in lots of other ways) who says this CONSTANTLY, primarily while screeching on the phone (we're in a cube farm.) I want to poke her eyes out with a stick.

Also: Baby mama/daddy. Preggers, preggo - GET A GRIP, PEOPLE; the word is PREGNANT. Hideous work phrases: "at the end of the day", "it is what it is." Also: "have a conversation." Apparently no one where I work just talks to someone.

ILuvmyButtercups
Apr. 8, 2012, 07:56 PM
BASICALLY !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Owwwwwwwwwwww, I hate, I hate, I hate this word used as the first utterance whenever someone is asked a question. Disaster strikes, you ask "What happened?" They sigh and say... "basically..." uargghhh!!!!!!!

I stopped watching those idiotic court shows on TV while making dinner, just for this reason. Allllllllllll the characters start their story with this noise. At least Judge Judy dresses them down for it - she hates it as much as I do. Yay Judy! :D

DarkStarrx
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:19 PM
" We're expecting" because I always giggle and wonder if they are expecting something other than a baby. Also yolo....seriously let this die!

Rambler
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:19 PM
When people say "did him" instead of "rode him". Such as, "my trainer did him in the pre-greens", instead of "my trainer rode him in the pre-greens". I don't know why that bugs me, but it really does!

Alagirl
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:25 PM
When people say "did him" instead of "rode him". Such as, "my trainer did him in the pre-greens", instead of "my trainer rode him in the pre-greens". I don't know why that bugs me, but it really does!


well, 'doing' somebody is naughty. :yes:

Bogey2
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:36 PM
baby daddy
yeah no
really?
read much for comprehension?
Tea Baggers
Tea Partiers

KBC
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:38 PM
well, 'doing' somebody is naughty. :yes:


:yes::yes: as in "she did him behind the bike sheds" very high school:lol:

ddashaq
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:41 PM
Uber.

"That's sick" as said by my 18 year old brother anytime he wants to express a positive feeling about something. I cannot WAIT until he outgrows that one.

Literally as in "I literally nearly died of embarrassment". Really? I think not.

Alagirl
Apr. 8, 2012, 08:59 PM
baby daddy
yeah no
really?
read much for comprehension?
Tea Baggers
Tea Partiers

Like really REALLY really?

DottieHQ
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:05 PM
Wait, What?

Kim Kardashian is preggo? But her marriage was an epic. fail. Epic Fail. She sure took divorce to a new level. I wonder if she'll repurpose her wedding dress. I hear the armpits were a bit moist, so maybe not.

Wow, sadly, in this economy, the guy she dumped can't afford to pay her alimony. I know, I know, I get it. She should probably pay HIM. I hope he obeys his lawyers strong suggestion and requests it.

Fundamentally, the whole thing was just wrong from start to finish. Just horrific.

:D:D:D

Sorry, Mickey, couldn't figure out a way to work "flatting" into the story.

Instead of wearing sky-high pumps to get the mail, Kim kardashian went flatting instead.:D

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:18 PM
well, 'doing' somebody is naughty. :yes:


Yes, precisely:

Perhaps because when someone "does/did [someone] colloquially means something vastly different, and is pretty coarse in its own right. Naughty doesn't quite capture it.

GreyStreet
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:18 PM
"This."

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:20 PM
Never heard this 'totes' business. Would someone please explain what it is supposed to mean?

dressagetraks
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:23 PM
I'm also confused on totes. Being a native of Georgia, I heard this often in the sense of "picks up and carries," but it never bothered me. There's another meaning?

Hpilot
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:23 PM
Baby Bump.

Here the grocery clerks say Have a Goot one. :eek:

When you see someone you know and they say What's up? I mean how in the heck am I supposed to answer that?

Alagirl
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:24 PM
When you see someone you know and they say What's up? I mean how in the heck am I supposed to answer that?

"I am"

most of the time that's about the most important thing of the day: I am no longer in bed....

Tapperjockey
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:39 PM
OH.MY.GOD. This one makes me insane. I'm glad I'm not the only one.

me too!!! And it drives my mother absolutely nuts. If a guy says it she reads them a 10 minute riot act. Gals the riot act extends to about 20 minutes.

MunchingonHay
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:39 PM
This! Also, as someone who used to live in Philadelphia, I hate it when people say Philly. There's North Philly, West Philly, and South Philly, but there's no plain Philly, just Philadelphia. (Or Fluffya, phonetically.)

Another thing that drives me crazy (and as far as I know I'm alone with this) is the use of "Best" all by itself as a closing. Best what? Best regards, best wishes, best of luck... all fine. But just best? What does that mean?!?


Really? I am from Philly,:lol: and I call it that all the time.

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:42 PM
I don't have a problem with adding "How're you doing?" or "What's up?" to the list.

They are not necessarily warm and fuzzy, but they are questions on one's status, and definitely colloquial but maybe less superficial than the nominally more straightforward but accepted: "How are you?" or "How're you doing?"

The challenge is whether you want to answer superficially or actually provide whoever it is a fairly robust answer to their question.

That's typically what I do when I'm not in a hurry.

Next time, they either don't ask or are less glib.

Great litmus test to see who is sincere and who's a fake. Wouldn't ever want the opportunity readily to discern that to disappear!

MunchingonHay
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:44 PM
Never heard this 'totes' business. Would someone please explain what it is supposed to mean?


:lol::lol: So I am not the only one reading it as in Totes, like the umbrella/ rain gear company. I think people are meaning to say toots, as in "Hey Toots!!"

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:50 PM
:lol::lol: So I am not the only one reading it as in Totes, like the umbrella/ rain gear company. I think people are meaning to say toots, as in "Hey Toots!!"

Tell me it isn't so!

PC is revolting, but I thought that "Toots" crap went away in the 1940's, along with "Doll".

Even surviving Neanderthal men found that offensive by the 1950's. Something left over from a hard-boiled '30's detective novel.

tpup
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:50 PM
Hate, hate when I hear corporate-speak....specifically saying "Reach out"...a.e. "Could you 'reach out' to Julie about that file?" How about "can you call or email Julie?"????? Reach out?? I picture E.T. pointing his finger across miles of space to someone sitting in their office. Just say what you mean to say!!

Let's connect - are we Lego's??

VEGGIE - drives me CRAZY. It's not a veggie, it's a vegetable!!

Moist - right up there with veggie.

At the end of the day.

Kiddie. a.e...Kiddie pool, kiddie playground.

TheHorseProblem
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:51 PM
"This."

^^^^
this?

GreyStreet
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:24 PM
Yep - I totally get why people do it...but every time I see someone quote another post and say "this," it's like nails on a chalkboard. It was okay the first 500 times, but...

Long Spot
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:28 PM
Yep - I totally get why people do it...but every time I see someone quote another post and say "this," it's like nails on a chalkboard. It was okay the first 500 times, but...

Especially to repeat offenders. There are a few posters who's count is mainly comprised of "This^^^"

Adamantane
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:33 PM
Especially to repeat offenders. There are a few posters who's count is mainly comprised of "This^^^"

Probably that is because there is no "like" button. Indicating agreement is all someone might wish to say and there's no other way to do it.

mvp
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:35 PM
I don't have a problem with adding "How're you doing?" or "What's up?" to the list.
The challenge is whether you want to answer superficially or actually provide whoever it is a fairly robust answer to their question.

I have a nice litmus test. It's Californian.

When they ask, I say

"Sh!tty, thanks!"

with a nice smile and a perky voice.

The happy voice is what they expected. The words are not. They have to pick one.

JustTheTicket
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:39 PM
me too!!! And it drives my mother absolutely nuts. If a guy says it she reads them a 10 minute riot act. Gals the riot act extends to about 20 minutes.

lol. I think your mom and I could bond over this.

JustTheTicket
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:42 PM
:lol::lol: So I am not the only one reading it as in Totes, like the umbrella/ rain gear company. I think people are meaning to say toots, as in "Hey Toots!!"

They mean totes as in "totally".Example: "I'm totes going to that party tonight!" I know a few younger hipster types that do that. Unnecessarily shortening words. They'll also do things like "Adorbs" for adorable. Incredibly obnoxious.

Mara
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:43 PM
I hate being referred to as a "gal".

For some odd reason "chick" doesn't bug me. Perhaps because I once had a cute tee-shirt with a cartoon fuzzy baby chicken on it wearing shades. It was captioned "Cool Chick".:lol:

Rambler
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:44 PM
my near to retirement age co-worker calls me "doll" all the time so it didn't go out in the 50's I guess. He also asks me if I want to get a bucket of chicken, a bottle of wine and go see "closed for the season" at the drive in. He obviously did not get the PC memo.

Frank B
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:47 PM
http://www.jewishworldreview.com/strips/mallard/2000/MFT20120406.jpg

"Issue", when used in place of "problem" It implies the inability to face up to reality.
"whatever"
"disengenuous" Political correctness be damned. Just go ahead and call 'em a liar!

Curiously
Apr. 8, 2012, 10:52 PM
Probably that is because there is no "like" button. Indicating agreement is all someone might wish to say and there's no other way to do it.

SURE there is!!!!

Pick one... or create your own. :rolleyes::yes:

*I agree.*

*Good point.*

*Well said.*

*I'll second that.*

Et cetera.

...OR, even *like* sounds far less like a toddler screaming *dis, dis!* :dead:

blondebates
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:01 PM
It drives me crazy when horse people are talking about a foal and say he/she is out of (insert stallions name here) no that is incorrect that foal is not our of any stallion... It is out of a mare.

Also YOLO... dumbest combination of letters making young people feel they need to go out and do dumb things

FalseImpression
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:11 PM
at this point in time.. Hate it!
Like... like...
At the top of the hour..
Growing my business...lessoning... and many others

MunchingonHay
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:16 PM
They mean totes as in "totally".Example: "I'm totes going to that party tonight!" I know a few younger hipster types that do that. Unnecessarily shortening words. They'll also do things like "Adorbs" for adorable. Incredibly obnoxious.


I am so uncool ! :lol::lol:

Dr. Doolittle
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:23 PM
AMAZING!

Applied to *everything*. Really, people, there ARE other adjectives! Use your imagination and utilize your full vocabulary (if you have one.) Ugh, the gratuitous overuse of this word makes me :rolleyes: and grit my teeth with annoyance...

Also, "drug" is not the past tense of "drag." DRAGGED is the past tense of drag. Drug is a NOUN, not a verb! ARGH! (My English Major is showing, but really, people who seem relatively intelligent make this mistake. Often. And on this BB!)

cyriz's mom
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:00 AM
entitled

Don't like the word or the attitude it that surrounds it.

CDE Driver
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:11 AM
"That's the way I roll". My husband says that just to bug me... and it does!

Um, what is YOLO?

Thanks for explaining "totes". I too am so uncool!

Fred
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:15 AM
Kardashian

:D

'awesome'

Fred
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:30 AM
"no problem"

Said in a singsong voice in response to you saying 'thank you'.
Whatever happened to 'You are welcome'?

Blugal
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:58 AM
Um, what is YOLO?


You Only Live Once

Courtesy of www.urbandictionary.com

petesperson
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:31 AM
my near to retirement age co-worker calls me "doll" all the time so it didn't go out in the 50's I guess. He also asks me if I want to get a bucket of chicken, a bottle of wine and go see "closed for the season" at the drive in. He obviously did not get the PC memo.

Ha ha!

petesperson
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:33 AM
Really? I am from Philly,:lol: and I call it that all the time.


I'm starting to think it's a generational thing... I haven't lived in Philadelphia in 20 years.

CDE Driver
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:41 AM
"Vacay"... you can't just say vacation?

alexandra
Apr. 9, 2012, 10:17 AM
"Throw the baby out with the bathwater". I had a professor who said this daily. I had never heard this phrase before and ...never want to hear it again, thank you.

Was he of german heritage ??? There is a german saying and if you directly translate you get that !

jumpnow
Apr. 9, 2012, 10:34 AM
Ressies as in reservations.:)

Renn/aissance
Apr. 9, 2012, 10:46 AM
LIKE! :D:D:D:D

^^^^THIS!!!!! :D:D:D:yes::yes::yes::D:D:D

shakeytails
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:15 AM
My biggest hate is the word disrespect. As in "He disrespected me". It's even worse when it's "dissed". Perhaps someone was disrespectful of you, but to say someone respected you just sounds ignorant, IMO.

I also cringe when I hear baby momma/baby daddy.
And "You don't know me" also gets on my last nerve.

vtdobes
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:17 AM
"viral"....as in "the photo/video has gone viral". :(

wendy
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:03 PM
I used to cringe when I heard "baby momma/ baby daddy" until I met someone who attempted to explain his very complicated "family" and really, he DID need words like that- he had a "baby momma", a girlfriend, a wife, an ex-wife, and some of these assorted women had one or more "baby daddies" who were not the same person(s) as their boyfriends/ husbands/ ex's.

Alagirl
Apr. 9, 2012, 12:07 PM
I used to cringe when I heard "baby momma/ baby daddy" until I met someone who attempted to explain his very complicated "family" and really, he DID need words like that- he had a "baby momma", a girlfriend, a wife, an ex-wife, and some of these assorted women had one or more "baby daddies" who were not the same person(s) as their boyfriends/ husbands/ ex's.


all the more reason why the word is so cringe worthy. :yes:

Angelico
Apr. 9, 2012, 01:42 PM
Legit...

Mtn trails
Apr. 9, 2012, 02:14 PM
baby bump
Preggers - or any derviative thereof
Prolly
We're pregnant - hate this one
In this economy
Enclosed please find - talk about outdated! How about Enclosed is?

Swishy-Tails
Apr. 9, 2012, 02:27 PM
Lol, as a linguist, I find this thread incredibly hilarious -- in a nerdy way, of course!

Language shift, language diffusion, etc. is what we are experiencing here :D

Studies actually show that women are more open to change, diversity and more susceptible to use new colloquial speech.

Carry on.

Mara
Apr. 9, 2012, 02:39 PM
baby bump
Preggers - or any derviative thereof
Prolly
We're pregnant - hate this one
In this economy
Enclosed please find - talk about outdated! How about Enclosed is?

Thank you! I've been tempted sometimes to respond with, "Since it's not a hefty check made out to me, I'd prefer not to find (whatever the enclosure is). Thanks for the kind request, though."

moonriverfarm
Apr. 9, 2012, 02:44 PM
"amazing!", the way the movie stars use it so loosely to describe everything from their SOs or the linguini they ate last night.

Mara
Apr. 9, 2012, 02:59 PM
"amazing!", the way the movie stars use it so loosely to describe everything from their SOs or the linguini they ate last night.

Gordon Ramsay is the WORST offender, on every one of his shows. Everything is "the most amazing. . ." Unless of course it's utter shite.

starborne
Apr. 9, 2012, 04:22 PM
An old one that still makes me cringe is 'orientate'. And, I hate it when people I've never seen before call me hon.

TheHorseProblem
Apr. 9, 2012, 04:37 PM
Don't have time to scroll through, so here goes:

vajayjay

Miss T
Apr. 9, 2012, 04:48 PM
One I see here on COTH often - Love me some..... Where did that originate?
And, although I know some people consider it correct, "exact same". Ugh.

Angelico
Apr. 9, 2012, 05:24 PM
Oh, and when I see people asking about their horse's confirmation, when they really mean confOrmation.

Mara
Apr. 9, 2012, 05:41 PM
Oh, and when I see people asking about their horse's confirmation, when they really mean confOrmation.

What if he's joining the Catholic Church? :lol:

Renn/aissance
Apr. 9, 2012, 05:46 PM
Thank you! I've been tempted sometimes to respond with, "Since it's not a hefty check made out to me, I'd prefer not to find (whatever the enclosure is). Thanks for the kind request, though."

Is this really considered outdated? I was taught that was a concise way of saying "please take the time to review the document enclosed."

Mtn trails
Apr. 9, 2012, 05:56 PM
Yes it is outdated. It is now preferred to use plain English that one would use everyday instead of "business jargon."

original copy - is it a copy or an original?

kookicat
Apr. 9, 2012, 08:26 PM
It drives me crazy when horse people are talking about a foal and say he/she is out of (insert stallions name here) no that is incorrect that foal is not our of any stallion... It is out of a mare.

Also YOLO... dumbest combination of letters making young people feel they need to go out and do dumb things

What does YOLO mean?

canadianbacon
Apr. 9, 2012, 08:31 PM
Trending...


As in 'top stories trending now on CNN'... It makes my skin crawl and makes me think my news is being decided by the twitter universe demographic.

HorseLuvr
Apr. 9, 2012, 08:32 PM
I also hate the word....."stunning". SO overused! "Oh, so and so, you look SO stunning in that dress!" GAG!

Gray Horse H/J
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:00 PM
I cannot stand "preggo" and "preggers". :dead:

And I HATE "lol" and "bff". And "chica" when you are not speaking in Spanish. The worst is when someone I know writes them on Facebook and combines them all together. "LOL. Aw thanks chica, you're my BFF!" She's 31. 31.

Strangely though, "OMG" doesn't bother me.

"It is what it is." I had an old boss who said this all the time. Every day, multiple times per day.

My current boss says "seriously" way too often. When she thinks she's being hip she says, "Seriously dude." Bleh.

I hate when people say something is gay. "That's so gay." STOP USING THE WORD THAT WAY, for the love of God!

Baby daddy and baby momma are pretty awful. Ew.

CDE Driver
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:04 PM
What does YOLO mean?

You Only Live Once... someone was kind enough earlier in the thread to clue me in! ;)

Gray Horse H/J
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:10 PM
OH! I thought of another one. I actually wanted to start a thread on this - maybe I still will.

Calling horses "it." And I don't mean a horse you don't know. If you're driving by a pasture and look at a pretty horse and call the horse "it", whatever. Lately I've been hearing people call horses "it" a lot.

Someone asked one of the young instructors at my barn if she was riding her horse that day, and she said "I already rode it." I find that so odd. Or a girl had her friends horse on crossties grooming and another girl walked by and said, "Oh are you riding it today?" Referring to horses that you know, and that have been at the barn a long time, as "it" irks me so badly.

Anyone else notice this?

Alagirl
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:13 PM
OH! I thought of another one. I actually wanted to start a thread on this - maybe I still will.

Calling horses "it." And I don't mean a horse you don't know. If you're driving by a pasture and look at a pretty horse and call the horse "it", whatever. Lately I've been hearing people call horses "it" a lot.

Someone asked one of the young instructors at my barn if she was riding her horse that day, and she said "I already rode it." I find that so odd. Or a girl had her friends horse on crossties grooming and another girl walked by and said, "Oh are you riding it today?" Referring to horses that you know, and that have been at the barn a long time, as "it" irks me so badly.

Anyone else notice this?

grammatically correct.

To me it's more irksome to have inanimate objects referred to as 'she'

alterhorse
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:27 PM
This thread reminds me of the Monty Python "Tinny word" sketch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZFj72MV0f0

Cielo Azure
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:30 PM
Yesterday, I read in a post on COTH:

That someone "should have been swallowed..." EEEWWWWW

I hope not to read that little phrase over and over again.

pony4me
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:31 PM
Just a comment on the phrase "we're pregnant" or "they got pregnant"....I am guilty of using those phrases because I have a son, and always wanted him to get the message that a pregnancy is THEIR responsibility. Not just hers.

It seems to have worked. No grandkids so far.

Alagirl
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:34 PM
Yesterday, I read in a post on COTH:

That someone "should have been swallowed..." EEEWWWWW

I hope not to read that little phrase over and over again.


well, as gross as it is (there is a version that does not involve ingestion, but is equally graphic) it illustrates the problem well. :lol:

Guin
Apr. 9, 2012, 09:58 PM
I have tried and tried to restrain myself, but I can't anymore. Someone posted a thread on COTH that is titled "Bettering the Hack." This horrendous grammatical butchery almost made my head explode. Why not say "Floundering the Race Car" or "Ringing the Dishwasher"? It would make as much sense!

"Help me improve my hack." "How can I make my hack better?" Any dozens of other combinations that make sense, PLEASE.

*zips flame suit and ducks*

Wilko1917
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:11 PM
I detest the word "like" which seems to be inserted every third word in every sentence uttered just now.

Also HATE the phrase "in terms of" usually uttered by a politician attempting to sidetrack any subject you care to name.

OK rant over.

redhorse5
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:17 PM
bottom line

Gray Horse H/J
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:27 PM
grammatically correct.

To me it's more irksome to have inanimate objects referred to as 'she'

It may be grammatically correct, I just think it's so weird! My animals are family to me, I would no sooner call my horse or my cat "it" than I would a baby. :) Most people who have animals refer to them as "he" or "she", so I always think "it" sounds weird.

I agree with you on calling inanimate objects "she" - like cars. That annoys me, too!

Kryswyn
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:28 PM
"Irregardless." That's not a word!! It is in Brooklyn! :D

Ridonkulous. Should only be used by Allie Conrad. As far as I'm concerned, she invented it :) Her friends here and on Facebook can use it. It should NEVER be used in a TV commercial.

Linny
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:55 PM
Grammatically speaking "it" is appropriate for an animal but when discussing an animal of known sex with the owner of said animal, it sounds odd. I expect the non-horsey person to ask "Will it bite?" but I don't expect the owner to reply, "No, it doesn't bite."

Linny
Apr. 9, 2012, 11:59 PM
Forgot one: "I'm all about" meaning you are into or enthusiatic about something.

saaskya
Apr. 10, 2012, 12:09 AM
Grammatically speaking "it" is appropriate for an animal but when discussing an animal of known sex with the owner of said animal, it sounds odd. I expect the non-horsey person to ask "Will it bite?" but I don't expect the owner to reply, "No, it doesn't bite."

i encounter this frequently, but moreso by the namelessness of it than disregarding just the gender. boss will say, 'well whats wrong with the black horse?' you mean fred? he has a name, hes the only black horse and hes been here for 7 years. or, 'what are you doing with the bay horse today?' well, there are 9 bay horses. you know all of their names. which one are you referring to? or, 'i want to sit on the grey horse today.' miller? or ekara? both grey, you know both their names, and both hugely different creatures.

karlymacrae
Apr. 10, 2012, 12:18 AM
"moist"

"just saying"

"y'all"

"whatever"

"crunchies" (referring to dog/cat food)

dghunter
Apr. 10, 2012, 12:24 AM
No offense but... I hate that. All it does is make the other person feel defensive.

Panties. No idea on that one, just hate it.

Many of my students hate the word moist. I can't say I use it very much or hear it very much so it doesn't bother me.

Basically. My students use this all the time in writing. Basically, WWII was between the Allied Powers and the Axis Powers. Argh! There is no basically! It simply was! I tell them including the word basically makes their writing sound weak, like they don't believe what they are writing.

Long Spot
Apr. 10, 2012, 12:34 AM
Slacks.

:no:

Tex Mex
Apr. 10, 2012, 01:45 AM
I'm not Christian, so it confuses and annoys me to see "He is Risen" all over Facebook on Easter. shouldn't it say he HAS risen?

Grataan
Apr. 10, 2012, 02:22 AM
My go-to hated word. Moist. GAH!!!!!

Lotion

/shivers eeek. I can't even stand to TYPE the word lol

Frizzle
Apr. 10, 2012, 03:20 AM
It is what it is

Verbage

Signage

Surreal (especially when said by a celebrity, usually at an awards show)

I'm sure there are more, and of course I will think of them as soon as OT Day closes! :yes:

Grataan
Apr. 10, 2012, 04:22 AM
Slacks.

:no:
I know. What does that even MEAN? lol

equidae
Apr. 10, 2012, 06:45 AM
I know. What does that even MEAN? lol

Pants. It's old-fashioned for business pants, or non-jeans pants.

My mother uses slacks and the ever-worse "dungarees". Dungarees are any kind of pant that you wouldn't wear to work. (In her vocabulary at least).

In reality, it is this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungaree_%28fabric%29

Slacks are this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slacks
:lol:

bumknees
Apr. 10, 2012, 06:54 AM
I hate pleaded. As in The acused pleaded not guilty yesterday. The word is Pled as far as I am aware the word still is in the dictionary. Why the heck doesnt anyone use the correct word any more? Is it so difficult to use it?

And yeah the whole ''issue'' thing for the word problem I hate it. And i do corect someone who asked do we have an issue? I say no we have a problem use the correct word please.

Denzel
May. 11, 2012, 04:14 PM
I don't mind most of the examples in this thread, I mostly get irritated when people don't seem to know the difference between homonyms. AFFECT and EFFECT are NOT the same word!!! I had a university PROFESSOR that would always use AFFECT in place of effect in all of her lectures. Drove me INSANE, I would have to scratch it out and fix it in my lecture notes.

The other big one is "supposably" *head desk* it's supposEDLY!!! Argh!

Add me to the list of people who hate "seen" too. No you did not "seen so-and-so" today, you SAW them.

The most frightening part is that it's not just teenagers using them, it's highly educated adults! If you want to say "totes" or "vacay" or "adorbs" with your friends and such, go for it, but do NOT use it in a professional setting, ick!

Alagirl
May. 11, 2012, 04:31 PM
'astronomical'

it's DH's latest catch phrase.

pegasus209
May. 11, 2012, 06:02 PM
'Preggers', 'This' and the grammar ones kill me.
Ya'll (<--okay-sorry--native texan :lol:) might get a kick out of this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mj6QqCH7g0Q

got to say I love 'Aghasted' though! ;D

pegasus209
May. 11, 2012, 06:05 PM
OH! I thought of another one. I actually wanted to start a thread on this - maybe I still will.

Calling horses "it." And I don't mean a horse you don't know. If you're driving by a pasture and look at a pretty horse and call the horse "it", whatever. Lately I've been hearing people call horses "it" a lot.

Someone asked one of the young instructors at my barn if she was riding her horse that day, and she said "I already rode it." I find that so odd. Or a girl had her friends horse on crossties grooming and another girl walked by and said, "Oh are you riding it today?" Referring to horses that you know, and that have been at the barn a long time, as "it" irks me so badly.

Anyone else notice this?

This has ALWAYS driven me nuts!! I just cannot call them 'its'! 'He', 'she' or <name>, and it is 'basically'(:lol:) a thing!! Ahhhhhh!!!

TheHorseProblem
May. 11, 2012, 06:06 PM
Ya'll (<--okay-sorry--native texan :lol:)

My nephew used to live in Austin, ans when we were visiting him I came up with my own Texanism: w'all (we all)

It's the answer to y'all (you all.)

Texan to her friends: Y'all coming to the show?
Texan friends: Yes, w'all are!

pegasus209
May. 11, 2012, 06:08 PM
LongSpot :lol::lol::lol: I love you!

pegasus209
May. 11, 2012, 06:09 PM
My nephew used to live in Austin, ans when we were visiting him I came up with my own Texanism: w'all (we all)

It's the answer to y'all (you all.)

Texan to her friends: Y'all coming to the show?
Texan friends: Yes, w'all are!

:lol::lol::D

Mara
May. 11, 2012, 06:17 PM
I don't even get this one - apparently it's an internet "meme" (another word I wish would disappear):

"derp".

Alagirl
May. 11, 2012, 06:18 PM
I don't even get this one - apparently it's an internet "meme" (another word I wish would disappear):

"derp".


hate meme, don't mind derp. :lol:

BabyGreen
May. 11, 2012, 06:31 PM
Job Creator.

Flagstaff Foxhunter
May. 11, 2012, 06:46 PM
Ginormous (although "humongous" used to amuse me)
kiddos
pones
Calling living beings "it"
a hockey "goldie" ARGHHHHHH!

And I wholeheartedly second the votes for "growing the business", "at the end of the day" and "at this point in time."

Spooks
May. 11, 2012, 06:51 PM
"Impacted."
"Impact" is not a verb. "Had an impact."

Yes!!! I fought that one bitterly when it first appeared. I thought I was the only one.

I cringe every time I hear "take it to the next level". Actually I cringe before the words are even spoken, because you can tell when it's coming. :mad:

kookicat
May. 11, 2012, 06:52 PM
I'd like to get rid of the various and sundry misspellings of gorgeous I keep seeing on Facebook.

An example that just popped up on my page: gorjus :no::dead::no:

Windsor1
May. 11, 2012, 06:56 PM
"Training" as a synonym for "course" or "class" (singular), as in, "You need to complete/take two more trainingS to be qualified to do [whatever].

Cayusepapoose
May. 11, 2012, 07:21 PM
RIP. I "hear" a sheet of paper being torn in half or something fabric coming to a bad end. For what 'rip' means; maybe that's
actually appropriate. Still don't like it though.:no:

Alagirl
May. 11, 2012, 07:56 PM
RIP. I "hear" a sheet of paper being torn in half or something fabric coming to a bad end. For what 'rip' means; maybe that's
actually appropriate. Still don't like it though.:no:

LOL, yep.

Only time it was fun and not annoying, the tribute to Maude Flanders...the T-shirt girls giving her a T-shirt gun salute: Let her RIP.....:lol::lol::lol::lol:

GrayTbred
May. 11, 2012, 09:27 PM
Situation.

This word has no meaning. You can remove it from any phrase and not change a thing.

You're not in a "traffic situation." You're in traffic.
You don't have a "bad home situation." You're in a bad home.

Guin
May. 11, 2012, 09:44 PM
Situation.

This word has no meaning. You can remove it from any phrase and not change a thing. You're not in a "traffic situation." You're in traffic.
You don't have a "bad home situation." You're in a bad home.

Also - Weather "Event." Hello? It is just the WEATHER. Snow, rain, typhoons, it is NOT an "event." :rolleyes:

Alagirl
May. 11, 2012, 09:47 PM
Also - Weather "Event." Hello? It is just the WEATHER. Snow, rain, typhoons, it is NOT an "event." :rolleyes:

LOL.
Tornado outbreak


It's not the effing measles!

farmgirl598
May. 11, 2012, 10:48 PM
I hate the trendy things. Such as responding to every statement with "I know, right?"
Or what i've noticed lately....responding to a questions with "I AM", instead of a simple "Yes" to questions. Example: "Are you seeing that new guy from New York?"....."I AM".....why not just say "Yes, he and I are seeing each other". I am also VERY tired of the word "AWESOME"....

Toadie's mom
May. 11, 2012, 10:51 PM
110% (in effort) isn't that impossible:confused:

Some old favorites, or least favorites (as the title implies):

baby daddy, baby bump

heart horse

you go girl ...gag (not gag, I like gag)

There are many others, just wait 'til I have another glass of vino...tee hee

prudence
May. 11, 2012, 10:59 PM
Practicality.
Collective sigh of relief

katiehorse
May. 11, 2012, 11:13 PM
"Paint it out." Used repeatedly on HGTV. Grrr...can't whateve it is just be "painted?"

Alagirl
May. 11, 2012, 11:16 PM
"Paint it out." Used repeatedly on HGTV. Grrr...can't whateve it is just be "painted?"
man, i have not watched that channel in a long time...

But I don't really need the cookie cutter deko sceem they have been pushing fr 4 years now....

katiehorse
May. 11, 2012, 11:57 PM
Alagirl, or the heavy metal music they play every time the heavy construction equipment comes on the scene. C'mon, it's morning and I'm still working on my first cup of coffee!

I just read the whole thread, now you've all got me going:

In business correspondence, "Please don't hesitiate to call." Why are you stating a positive by using a negative?

"So, I said, I said. . ." Said repeatedly by a co-worker. I don't think she even realizes she says it.

Someone's saying "irregardless" automatically makes me shave points off their IQ.
Improper use of they're/there/their.
Starting a sentence with a conjunction.
Using "I" after a preposition instead of "me."

I will confess I never have completely gotten the hang of lay/laid/lain so I'm sure I've made someone's ears bleed over that one! :lol:

TheHorseProblem
May. 12, 2012, 12:27 AM
This has "prolly":lol: been said, but...

I am so followed by something like not liking this.

I am so wearing that dress tonight.

Just wear the dress!!!!!!

Alagirl
May. 12, 2012, 12:29 AM
This has "prolly":lol: been said, but...

I am so followed by something like not liking this.

I am so wearing that dress tonight.

Just wear the dress!!!!!!


I'm liek so not liking this!


:p

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

katiehorse
May. 12, 2012, 01:10 AM
Ooo, I thought of another one: Constantly saying, "ya know" at the end of every single sentence.

bt
May. 12, 2012, 01:19 AM
Im going to apologize in advance for all the nausea this will cause but I saw my cousin's boyfriend comment "sweetie the feeling is SMOOCHUAL" on FB, dude NO ONE should use SMOOCHUAL instead of MUTUAL, especially not a 40something year old male.

Windsor1
May. 12, 2012, 01:33 AM
Starting a sentence with a conjunction.

This is actually kosher per Chicago:

http://www.legalwritingpro.com/articles/F49-five-grammar-myths.php

I wish people would stop using the word "devastated" to describe how they feel when Macy's doesn't have the cocktail dress in their size or they open the refrigerator and find that they're out of half-and-half.

You are devastated when someone close to you dies or your fiancee leaves you waiting at the altar. Not when the ball game is rained out.

katiehorse
May. 14, 2012, 11:47 PM
Windsor, thank you, but every single one of my English professors discouraged it so it really brings out my inner red pen Lol!

Alagirl
May. 14, 2012, 11:49 PM
This is actually kosher per Chicago:

http://www.legalwritingpro.com/articles/F49-five-grammar-myths.php

I wish people would stop using the word "devastated" to describe how they feel when Macy's doesn't have the cocktail dress in their size or they open the refrigerator and find that they're out of half-and-half.

You are devastated when someone close to you dies or your fiancee leaves you waiting at the altar. Not when the ball game is rained out.


I am devastated to hear you think that way!



:lol::lol::lol::lol:

TheHorseProblem
May. 14, 2012, 11:52 PM
I am devastated to hear you think that way!



:lol::lol::lol::lol:


I am so never saying that!

Alagirl
May. 15, 2012, 12:18 AM
I am so never saying that!

seems like I am liek so totally busted. :cool:

alternate_universe
May. 15, 2012, 12:20 AM
Situation.

This word has no meaning. You can remove it from any phrase and not change a thing.

You're not in a "traffic situation." You're in traffic.
You don't have a "bad home situation." You're in a bad home.



See, I mildly disagree here, but I still see what you're saying. If you said someone "was in a bad home", that could be mistakan as "they live in a run down house in a bad neighborhood". Whereas when you add 'situation' the listener understands that you mean the interactions between people and environment within the home.

Otherwise, I agree, it's a silly add-on word.

Alagirl
May. 15, 2012, 12:21 AM
See, I mildly disagree here, but I still see what you're saying. If you said someone "was in a bad home", that could be mistakan as "they live in a run down house in a bad neighborhood". Whereas when you add 'situation' the listener understands that you mean the interactions between people and environment within the home.

Otherwise, I agree, it's a silly add-on word.

then again, one could be talking about a cast member of Joisey Shoar. ;)

Foxtrot's
May. 15, 2012, 01:09 AM
Oops - I use quite a few of these right here on COTH.

Foxtrot's
May. 15, 2012, 01:13 AM
What I cannot read is the paragraphs that go on for a whole page without capital letters or punctuation. My eyes hurt and I just skip over them.

Blugal
May. 15, 2012, 02:19 AM
Godspeed (seems very trendy on COTH right now. I wouldn't mind, if the people using it gave some indication that they had a clue what it meant and in what situations it should be used)

Git 'er done (trendy everywhere... oh how I hate this phrase)

My heart just breaks (over something trivial or that has nothing to do with you)

Fictionalistic
May. 15, 2012, 03:06 AM
"No offense, but..."

It gives the person a coward's way out if the following statement really is offensive. Pssh.

"Shy."

It's just a personal peeve. Hesitant, wary, distrusting, insecure... I prefer those words to just plain "shy."

rmh_rider
May. 27, 2012, 11:19 AM
Padding and soring in the TWH breed.

LauraKY
May. 27, 2012, 12:27 PM
Job creator.

Grataan
May. 27, 2012, 12:28 PM
historical. It's HISTORIC. GAAAAAH!

Ghazzu
May. 27, 2012, 12:35 PM
My heart just breaks (over something trivial or that has nothing to do with you)


Along that line, the word "tragedy" has been sorely debased.

Sing Mia Song
May. 27, 2012, 12:38 PM
I'm in media relations, and if I hearing one more time that "We need to lean into this message point," I may just go postal. Never mind the ridiculousness of the phrase "message point," how exactly does one "lean into" something intangible? Every time I hear it, I think of trying to walk in a wind tunnel.

GrayTbred
May. 27, 2012, 02:57 PM
I'm in media relations, and if I hearing one more time that "We need to lean into this message point," I may just go postal. Never mind the ridiculousness of the phrase "message point," how exactly does one "lean into" something intangible? Every time I hear it, I think of trying to walk in a wind tunnel.

If your job includes coaching people for interviews, could you please train them to stop saying "absolutely" for every answer, when a simple " yes" will do?

Thanks in advance, LOL.

pegasus209
May. 27, 2012, 03:29 PM
oooo I didn't know this was open! I think we could all use a distraction after the last couple of days..

"Paradigm Shift"- ok, this was a cool phrase several years ago but now everybody and their mother is having a 'PD' over something--
Puleeze! Gaaaaahhhh!!!

TikiSoo
May. 28, 2012, 09:10 AM
What about incomplete sentences as in "Let's do lunch"? My answer is always "do WHAT to lunch"?
Or "I have to do the faucet first"....do WHAT with the faucet?
or
"My bad"
"Your bad WHAT?" (your bad grammar actually)

I also detest the plethora of "baby talk" creeping into our language. "Hey blubba, less go dow at da crib" "yo dawg bi?" (does your dog bite?) Bafroom, birfday....:o
It goes hand in hand with stupid baby names grown adults call themselves like Snoopy, Pookie, Dushy and the like.

When someone tries to tell me it's "eubonics" I return with, "No that's just sloppy baby talk".

sisu27
May. 28, 2012, 10:54 AM
Has anyone said "amazeballs" yet? Or how about "cray"?

Can't describe in language appropriate for this forum how much I HATE those two.....

coco21
May. 28, 2012, 11:00 AM
"Meh." It's bad enough in text, but in person?

"I could care less." No, you mean you could NOT care less. Saying you COULD care less totally defeats the purpose of why you're saying it in the first place!!



This one is one of my pet peeves too. And it is used incorrectly more than correctly.

The one that makes my skin crawl is "yeah, right"!

Windsor1
May. 28, 2012, 11:07 AM
historical. It's HISTORIC. GAAAAAH!

Actually it depends. "Historic" and "historical" mean different things.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/historic_historical.htm

Grataan
May. 28, 2012, 11:37 AM
Actually it depends. "Historic" and "historical" mean different things.

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/historic_historical.htm

Oh no, not in this town, not the way people use it here.

They also say things like orientated and should of. NO. Oriented and SHOULD HAVE. AAAAAAAAKKKK.

SLR
May. 28, 2012, 12:03 PM
Awesome
and the phrases "gone missing"
"needs" anything, ie "painted, washed, cleaned, sold, gone" arrrggghhh! The latter maybe all regional.

suze
May. 28, 2012, 03:30 PM
Flatting.