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horsedoggirl
Apr. 7, 2012, 09:11 PM
I know, I know! Another working student thread. I've already gone through previous threads but most of the conversations go through pm's so I figured I'd try and see if I could get any new information. I'm graduating early so I can take a gap year and devote a year solely to horses before I go to college followed directly by law school. I've checked Yard and Groom pretty consistently with not much luck. I want to do the big eq and junior jumpers if I can but probably can't afford it so I'd just like to find a really good trainer that both myself and my horse can go to. I've sent a few emails with not much luck. Hoping to stay on the west coast because I'm 80% sure that that's where I'm going to go to school. However I don't want to shut any doors so potentially interested else where too. Anyone have any ideas of who to contact or know of any open positions? I have a resume, videos and letter of recommendations on hand.

horsedoggirl
Apr. 9, 2012, 06:33 PM
Anyone?

Hunter/JumperMom
Apr. 10, 2012, 07:10 AM
Not to burst your bubble but how early are you "graduating early". If you want to do the big eq and junior jumpers, you probably should be doing them now, as you age out, usually by finals during your first year in college.

There is a difference between a working student and someone wanting to compete and show. Are you looking to "do the circuit"? Or just show in some classes at those heights. Who are you currently training with and do they have any connections to send you with someone?

juststartingout
Apr. 10, 2012, 10:34 AM
A difficult but not impossible project. If you have already competed in the big eq and junior jumpers, it will be a plus. If you have a horse capable of doing the big eq and junior jumpers, it will be a plus. The fact that you can commit for an entire year will be another plus. If you already do horse care - grooming, bandaging, all the shoe prep, that too will be a plus.

Assuming you are not a well known junior rider, then what you are offering a trainer is a willingness to work - expect to work really HARD, long hours, unpredictable locations, and to be totally flexible. Expect to be on the road a lot. You will likely be a groom - up early, finishing late and your riding will definitely have to fit around and into those tasks.

The easiest way to find those jobs is a referral by your current trainer. BUT, if that is not possible you may just have to keep approaching people - letters, calls, emails etc until you find a person willing to take you on.

Expect that in exchange for work, you may get a stall for your horse, a place to live (at least when on the road) and lessons. Do not expect that you will be paid (given that you get the above at no cost). Expect to to pay your own entries and braiding at shows.

horsedoggirl
Apr. 10, 2012, 06:46 PM
Yes I am aware the tasks that working students find. My last position I worked 50+ hours a week this was following school and everything else I do too. I'm not afraid of work, that's how I was raised. I don't expect to be the best junior jumper or big eq rider there is. I'll consider myself lucky if I can compete in a single class. I'd be happy to give more details through pm. I've gone through my connections. Thanks for your replies.

Quartergirl
Apr. 10, 2012, 07:03 PM
What area of the country are you in?

lachevaline
Apr. 10, 2012, 07:53 PM
If there are barns you're interested in nearby, I'd drop in and speak to trainers/barn managers in person - this shows you've got initiative, and people are almost always more likely to remember someone they can put a face to (as opposed to a phone call or e-mail). Have a resume ready and leave it at the office if no one can meet with you, and don't forget to call and follow up with a thanks.

horsedoggirl
Apr. 14, 2012, 04:35 PM
Thank you for the responses. Unfortunately there is nothing local that will get me where I want to go.

horsedoggirl
Apr. 21, 2012, 09:11 PM
Going down in July in hopes of finding a barn. Any references of barns to look into would be great. Thanks again!

LovesHorses
Apr. 21, 2012, 10:54 PM
A difficult but not impossible project. If you have already competed in the big eq and junior jumpers, it will be a plus. If you have a horse capable of doing the big eq and junior jumpers, it will be a plus. The fact that you can commit for an entire year will be another plus. If you already do horse care - grooming, bandaging, all the shoe prep, that too will be a plus.

Assuming you are not a well known junior rider, then what you are offering a trainer is a willingness to work - expect to work really HARD, long hours, unpredictable locations, and to be totally flexible. Expect to be on the road a lot. You will likely be a groom - up early, finishing late and your riding will definitely have to fit around and into those tasks.

The easiest way to find those jobs is a referral by your current trainer. BUT, if that is not possible you may just have to keep approaching people - letters, calls, emails etc until you find a person willing to take you on.

Expect that in exchange for work, you may get a stall for your horse, a place to live (at least when on the road) and lessons. Do not expect that you will be paid (given that you get the above at no cost). Expect to to pay your own entries and braiding at shows.

This hit the nail on the head. I assume you already have a horse? We would love someone like you where I work, but I am afraid it would be more grooming at shows than anything else/staying home unless the entire barn goes to the show. A resume with references is best.

dropitlikeitshot
Apr. 22, 2012, 07:28 AM
To where are you headed? You're not giving us any information to go on regarding location. The Northwest includes 3 states, and possibly NorCal too. Do you have any idea of where you'd like to be? Do you need a place to live as well or are you going to get an apartment? Do you need money as well or will your parents help you out?

horsedoggirl
Apr. 22, 2012, 01:24 PM
Hoping to find a live in situation that allows me to bring my horse. It can be anywhere in the northwest. When I'm going down this summer I'm going to be in the Seattle area, Spokane area and then driving to the Portland area. But that doesn't mean I won't consider other areas.