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Kirsten
Oct. 15, 2002, 10:39 AM
Hey guys, I was reading through Nicolodian's great news thread (congrats!), and subsequently through the "engagement rings" OT thread that someone pointed out. There was a lot of useful info in there, and I was wondering whether anyone had more specific experience of how different metals and settings take the beating of wear around horses and the barn.

I'm not much of a jewelry person, but I do wear a stainless steel ring which seems to be doing OK, with the exception of a very few scratches.

I've been scratching my head over potential metals and settings for an engagement ring (not that there's a snowball's chance in... uh... heck... that Mr. Kirsten is likely to pop the question anytime soon, but I like to plan ahead). I've heard platinum is the hardest metal and doesn't bend out of shape (good for diamond settings), but I've seen a couple of people whose platinum rings are badly scratched. Anyone know if platinum generally scratches worse than white gold? I know that the lower carat white gold is hardest... but as far as looking good through the years, I have a 10-carat white gold school ring that has so many tiny scratches from day-to-day wear that it's nowhere near as shiny as it used to be. I've also heard that with white gold, you can just get it replated... and that you don't have that option with platinum.

Is it feasible to use platinum prongs to set the diamond, and use white gold for the rest of the ring? For those who have a "traditional" 4-prong or a Tiffany-style 6-prong setting, do you even find it catches on things at the barn or that you worry about bashing it around? Ever scratch your saddle or something by accident? Those who have lower settings, do you find it takes away from the sparkliness of the diamond? Are larger diamonds more likely to cause an issue (i.e. do they require a higher setting or generally get in the way)?

Sorry this is so long... as I said, I like to be prepared just in case. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif And since anything I wear is going to have to withstand riding, setting jumps, and cleaning tack among other things, I want to make sure it'll still look good for the rest of my life. Any real-life experience would be very much appreciated.

Kirsten
Oct. 15, 2002, 10:39 AM
Hey guys, I was reading through Nicolodian's great news thread (congrats!), and subsequently through the "engagement rings" OT thread that someone pointed out. There was a lot of useful info in there, and I was wondering whether anyone had more specific experience of how different metals and settings take the beating of wear around horses and the barn.

I'm not much of a jewelry person, but I do wear a stainless steel ring which seems to be doing OK, with the exception of a very few scratches.

I've been scratching my head over potential metals and settings for an engagement ring (not that there's a snowball's chance in... uh... heck... that Mr. Kirsten is likely to pop the question anytime soon, but I like to plan ahead). I've heard platinum is the hardest metal and doesn't bend out of shape (good for diamond settings), but I've seen a couple of people whose platinum rings are badly scratched. Anyone know if platinum generally scratches worse than white gold? I know that the lower carat white gold is hardest... but as far as looking good through the years, I have a 10-carat white gold school ring that has so many tiny scratches from day-to-day wear that it's nowhere near as shiny as it used to be. I've also heard that with white gold, you can just get it replated... and that you don't have that option with platinum.

Is it feasible to use platinum prongs to set the diamond, and use white gold for the rest of the ring? For those who have a "traditional" 4-prong or a Tiffany-style 6-prong setting, do you even find it catches on things at the barn or that you worry about bashing it around? Ever scratch your saddle or something by accident? Those who have lower settings, do you find it takes away from the sparkliness of the diamond? Are larger diamonds more likely to cause an issue (i.e. do they require a higher setting or generally get in the way)?

Sorry this is so long... as I said, I like to be prepared just in case. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif And since anything I wear is going to have to withstand riding, setting jumps, and cleaning tack among other things, I want to make sure it'll still look good for the rest of my life. Any real-life experience would be very much appreciated.

SteadyPace
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:28 AM
I have a platinum engagement ring and it seems to be holding up really well. If I'm doing something rather dirty or damaging I try to put on gloves, but most times my ring is nekkid. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I haven't noticed any horrible damage. It got a bit scratched but it adds character. I am going to take it in once a year to do a thourough cleaning and buffing though, to keep it healthy.

"Friends don't let friends reply to all"

peepie
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:39 AM
I have a platinum, six prong solitaire (round cut), 2.53 carats, and yes, the size of the stone does bother me when I ride (oh, such a complaint, ha ha) because it slips to the inside between my fingers sometimes (when I'm no bloated /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif) and it is a pain when wearing gloves...aside from these issues, I love it, but the platinum does looked scratched to me - or is it just in need of a cleaning? It shines up nicely (have done this twice in 5 years). Sorry can't offer more info. /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

My horse bucked off your honor student

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:50 AM
I have a platinum solitaire, 3 karats, that is set really, really high--when I first saw it, all I could think about was what to do about riding gloves! However, that has proven not to be much of a problem. Also, I thought I would catch it on everything (it is set WAY high) but for some reason it just really is not an issue (although I did catch it in a tangly mane once over a jump). One caveat: I must say that I find that my platinum ring is quite scratched up and I have only had it for a little over a year. It just looks nice and worn-in, though, not dingy or anything.

peepie
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:55 AM
How do you keep it from bugging you in gloves? I'm interested...I've even thought I'd cut a hole for the stone in the gloves, but then decided not to.

***My horse bucked off your honor student!***

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:57 AM
I think that what happens is, when I slip my gloves on, it immediately slides over toward my pinkie finger so that it is almost lying flat--does that make sense??!??! Plus, I wear laced gloves--can't do leather with these thing on! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Starmite
Oct. 15, 2002, 11:58 AM
Kinda OT, but my gold bracelet that I've had since I was 8 years old got lost at the barn yesterday! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_mad.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif I'm sooooo sad.
~MP

*Founding member of the 'Starmite Rocks My World' CLICK*

artienallie
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:04 PM
I have a 1.5 carat round solitare set in a six prong, very high 14K white gold "catherdal" setting. (that means the sides of the ring swoop up to the sides of the prongs and diamond)

I've had it two years - and it's not come off my hand yet, even with a year taking care of 11 horses. (OK, it does go in my pocket when I clean sheaths) It hardly has any wear at all. One or two very minor scratches. When I take the time to clean it, it looks brand new.

Mr. A&A specifically went in with the "I need the most durable setting you've got" line - and was told that 14K white gold is more sturdy than platinum. It's also WAY less expensive.

hitchinmygetalong
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:11 PM
If you wear gloves, and you smash the ring and the stone comes out of its setting, it is STILL IN THE GLOVE. Plus, have you ever caught a ring on something? Think of all the horrible "somethings" that are in a barn...

If the stone is big, try turning the ring so the stone is on the palm side of your hand.

Personally, I have NEVER had to worry about my diamond being "too big." /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif At just over one-third of a carat, I guess some would consider it more of a friendship ring. But since I married my bestest friend ever, guess it's appropriate!

Besides, it has the highest grade color you can find in a diamond, and I could blind you with it! (and it is "almost" flawless - like my marriage! /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif)

"I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning to sail my ship."
-Louisa May Alcott

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:13 PM
You know what, that is actually a huge misconception (I was guilty of thinking it, too): artienallie stated that white gold was way cheaper than platinum but that is actually not true. We priced my ring in both platinum and white gold (thinking white gold might scratch less) and teh difference was only in the hundreds of dollars. Not a big chunck of change when you are shelling out $10,000 or so for something you will keep for the rest of your life. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

EarthTo?
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:13 PM
. . . it's the risk that you will lose the stone. It is very easy to catch the setting on something around the barn or when riding and pop the stone out, and your chances of ever finding it again are about a million to one.

My wife NEVER wears any jewelry with a stone setting (e.g., her diamond engagement ring) to the barn or when riding.

Pocket Pony
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:18 PM
Titanium!

Mr. Batgirl and I are getting new wedding bands that are made out of titanium!!! Check out www.tirings.com (http://www.tirings.com)

I never wear my diamond ring to the barn, though. It gets dirty too easily, and I won't ride with rings on.

"Both rider and horse must enjoy the work. This is the essence of success" - Reiner Klimke

LaurieB
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:18 PM
I've known three people who have suffered badly broken (and one nearly detached) fingers when their engagement rings caught on something while they were riding or working with their horses. Consequently I never wear my engagement ring to the barn. My wedding ring is a lovely "eternity ring" with channel set diamonds going all the way around the band. Nothing sticks out, it never catches on anything and I never take it off. That might be another option to consider.

Nickelodian
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:19 PM
Regarding Platinum being scratched.....

This is how 4 different jewlers explained it to me....

Gold does not scratch (at least not much)...why? because any scratch that would be there isn't because the metal actually comes off. So gold will become thinner and thinner over time.

Platinum scratches but when it does the metal moves to each side of the scratch. None of the metal is actually lost. When the metal begins to look scratched, get it cleaned and all of the metal will flatten back out to a shine.

A jewler that I absolutely trust and knows my lifestyle would only let me get a platinum ring. He said gold would be a lopsided mess in 6 months. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I'm engaged!!! Go ahead ask me about it!!!

kt
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:21 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned this yet..... (oops Laurie B beat me to it)

I promise I am not trying to be rude, but do you know how dangerous it is to wear rings around horses? I have heard countless horror stories of people getting their fingers ripped clean off from incidents (even with quiet horses) that happen so quickly you wouldn't believe it. I love my wedding band, engagement ring, earrings, and bracelet but I don't do anything with the horses until I take them off. Things just happen too quickly. My husband is a police officer, and as much as I would like the world to know he is MARRIED ( /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ) while he is working, we would both much rather he have his ring finger at the end of his shift, so he doesn't wear his when he works. Freak accidents happen WAY too easy. Just my opinion though.


***
The hardest to learn was the least complicated.

murdoch
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:42 PM
OK getting really off topic here...
But does anyone not wear their wedding ring - I mean I hardly ever wear it - it's always in my purse. This started when I started riding more than one horse... I found that I couldn't ride in it (gave me nasty caluses on my finger) and since I tend to go to work straight from the barn (or vise versa) I would always forget to put it back on.... Now it's a habit.
To tell the truth I've never really liked the feel of anything on my hands or wrists - I hardly ever wear a watch and avoid gloves unless it's really cold.
My engagement ring hasn't seen the light of day in years and my wedding ring surfaces occasionally for family events - my mother is horrified /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

So am I the only married woman in the country that doesn't wear a wedding ring? Anyone have any barn friendly marriage symbol ideas - it's not like I have any regrets being married or anything - my SO is a wonderful husband! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Maybe I should just get my finger tattooed (ouch /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif)

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:43 PM
Oh, please. Life is short. It is not worth it to me to take off my beautiful and meaningful engagement ring (that I could possibly misplace) every time I get on a horse. Plus, I don't do strenuous barn work or longe young horses or anything, so I really would rather take the tiny, tiny chance (of what? I am not quite sure what can happen when you are merely jumping a 3'6" course) of something happening. I bet y'all are the ones who wear those protective vests, too . . .

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 12:44 PM
p.s. This was in response to kt, not Murdoch. I have lots of friends who take off their wedding ring simply b/c it "bugs" them (including my husband when he plays golf)!

Everythingbutwings
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:00 PM
Old fashioned, deep, well protected settings.

I must get Mr. Wings to read this topic and put his thoughts in for the old fashioned settings!

Since the title for the thread is "jewelry around horses" I must put in for DIAMOND Stud earrings. No dangling or drop styles, no hoops, etc. No bracelets that can catch in gate/stall latches of the caulks on horseshoes.

Mr. Wings (King of the Pawn Shops in a former employment) just started working for the Transportation Security Administration and, with conveyer belts all around him, is now wearinging ring strung on a neck chain WHILE he is at work /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Safety is important.

Auntie Pat would assure you that it is perfectly appropriate and comfortable to have multiple 1/2 carat channel set diamonds under a suitably and discretely gloved hand.

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

Kirsten
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:14 PM
I was actually considering the option of channel-set diamonds, rather than a solitaire... I know someone who has a ring like this, and it's quite pretty (from the quick glances I've had). Plus, it acts as both an engagement ring and wedding band... so you don't have to find room for two rings on your finger. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I wonder if it takes away from the "sparkle" to have them set this way?

kt
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:27 PM
Commodore...like I said, just my opinion. It doesn't take that long to take off my jewelry. I'd much rather do that than lose a finger, so don't come crying here if it happens to you /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

And no I don't wear a safety vest, but even if I did, so what big deal? (I assume you are joking here). I use common sense in the barn, I don't wear jewelry around the horses, and I wear a helmet, but I am not some safety freak. Also like I said, freak accidents happen at the most unlikely times and in the most unlikely ways. Life is short, but it's so easy to help prevent that type of accident.


***
The hardest to learn was the least complicated.

Pixie Dust
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:28 PM
OMG.....I am SO not in this league!! 10K on a ring?? Not in my lifetime. /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

SophieGirl23
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:40 PM
I will never wear my ring while I'm at the barn again. A little over a year ago I was cleaning the barn. We had to go up a fairly steep ramp to dump into the manure spreader. It was raining and I slipped. I smashed my finger when I fell and broke it. I was wearing my engagement ring and was not able to get it off. My finger swelled to several times it's normal size and I ended up having to get it cut off. That was not fun. Now, I wear it all day unless I'm at the barn. When I get there, I take it off put it in it's "special place" do what I need to do and then I put it back on. I haven't lost it, I haven't ruined it, and hopefully I won't have to get another one cut off.

Pixie Dust
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:44 PM
People with 3 carrat diamond rings should not be cleaning out stalls.....kind of like driving a Jaguar and living in a one bedroom bungalow. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin' it back- A Cowboy's Guide to Life

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:49 PM
Not to sound snotty, but that is what I'm saying (reread post)--I don't clean out stalls, I don't do any "heavy lifting," all I do is ride (and groom when I can, b/c I love the horseys) so I am not taht concerned about injuring myself with a small rock, even if it is 3 carats.

commodore
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:52 PM
By the way, it doesn't look that big--I definitely am not going for the dripping-in-jewelry look and I could never stand the tacky, fur-clad, diamond-covered horse show moms that I would see at Washington or teh National, who ONLY came to those shows and had never pet a horse in their lives. My ring is just simple and beautiful and not distasteful at all, IMO.

Pixie Dust
Oct. 15, 2002, 01:57 PM
Hehee, Commadore, that's what I was meant!!

katarine
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:00 PM
It only comes off when I scuba - otherwise I wear it.

It's white gold, so iodine will stain it -eek the first time I forgot that! But, I had it plated with something ( starts with an R- sorry!) and it's shiny and happy. There's simply no way for it to 'hang' on anything...which is why I chose it.

My husband is an electrical contractor, so he doesn't wear one. I need him alive more than I need the world to know he's married

Kestrel
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:02 PM
I have my Graduate Gemologist degree and have worked as a jewelry appraiser, designer and taught classes in gemstone identification and diamond grading. I've seen many rings that have been through all kinds of mishaps.
Gold, in either white or yellow is actually very soft. You could bend a ring with your fingers. Gold is made harder by the metal it is alloyed (mixed) with. 24 Karat gold is pure gold, going down to 18k, 14k (the most common in the U.S.) and 10k. It can be alloyed with several other metals. Since it is soft it does scratch easily. Gold rings will have to be "reshanked" over the years, replacing the thin area opposite the center stone.
Platinum is a very hard metal. I have only seen 1 squashed platinum ring, and it had been squished by a car transmission (it did save the finger). Platinum is more difficult to work, i.e. make into a ring or polish, so labor my be higher. It is one of the rarest of elements.
Titanium is also strong for its weight, but is more brittle. It is also difficult to work (ask your farrier about titanium horseshoes!)
Compared to the diamond, the metal in the mounting is usually a small proportion of the cost of the ring.
I wear my rings to ride, but always wear gloves since a ring can get caught and "deglove" a finger quite easily.
I encourage active women to choose a design that protects their diamond, like a bezel or channel setting or one with "shoulders" that come up to the level of the top of the stone. If the diamond takes a blow (think whack on a door jam or jump) between prongs, there is a chance that the stone may fracture or even break.
A 4 or 6 prong setting will not make a diamond sparkle more than a bezel setting. The flash of a diamond comes from the light that enters the top of the diamond, reflects off of the bottom facets of the stone and back out the top to your eye. If a diamond doesn't reflect white light to you or sparkle (the sparkle part comes out the little facets on the top of the stone, white light from the big table facet) it means that the stone is not cut to the best advantage. A "dead" stone tends to look like it has a black center. Estate jewelry often has stones like this, either round or "Mine cut" in shape.
At the barn there are some things you can do to protect your gemstones. Wear gloves for your saftey as well as your jewelry. Proper mounting is next, having the mountings (prongs or bezel) checked every year or two and protecting your stones from thermal shock. If its freezing cold, don't stick your hands in hot water - going from cold to hot too quickly can break the stone. This also applies to hot tub/snow bank transitions as well! Make sure that you don't get bleach on your jewelry since it will weaken the solder that holds heads on shanks and joined wedding sets together.
Stones like emerald and opal usually don't last long as "every day" rings since they are very prone to breakage. Diamond, sapphires and rubies are a much safer bet.
I'll try to find a picture of the light bouncing stuff and post it too, since my explaination is probably clear as mud.

asterix
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:03 PM
Since we are on the topic of jewelry and gruesome accidents (ok, I know that wasn't the original topic, but...), I have to put in a plea to leave all earrings at home, including studs...
Many years ago my trainer was walking down the aisle when a new arrival with (as we discovered) some bad stall habits whipped his head out and bit her diamond stud earring off...taking the ear lobe with it.
Luckily (I am NOT making this up) the student she was about to teach was an undertaker -- he packed the lobe on ice, took her to the ER, and got her patched up. But neither she nor I have ever worn earrings at the barn again. Sadly, I now own many "singleton" earrings, since I'm always taking them off and stashing them in the car or my briefcase, and then forgetting to retrieve then, but I'd rather have one earring than one ear...

Blinky
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:03 PM
I take off my engagement ring and only wear my wedding band while at the barn for several reasons. I'd freak if I lost the diamond (it is after all sentimental) and it snags on gloves and manes. I went with the nice solitare, 1.5k, surrounded by other diamonds and a very plain,thin wedding band. I keep the band on and have had no problem. But-I'm the type that shows up at the barn sans makeup, no jewlery and old clothes. Not the type that looks like they are going to Saks after they ride. I can't stay that clean!

Kestrel
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:10 PM
In that instance I think the trainer would have suffered an ear trimming even if she didn't have an earring on. Usually a stud earring will pull out, leaving a slit from the hole to the edge of the ear. /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

peepie
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:10 PM
Insurance is not very expensive...you can get a rider on your homeowner's or renter's insurance...it won't replace the sentimentality, but it will replace it monetarily so you can replace it if lost or trashed.
I agree about earrings! Necklaces, too. However, my ring is the ONLY jewelry I wear to barn...and by the way, people with big stones are not immune from cleaning stalls, etc....hey - the SO bought the ring, NOT ME$$$!!! /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif And he's no longer the SO, but I still have the ring - on right hand, of course! Hate to waste a good stone!

***My horse bucked off your honor student!***

Blinky
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:16 PM
Insurance-YES! A "rider" for jewelry isn't that expensive.

I personally find cleaning stalls to be very theraputic. Nothing like seeing immediate results /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

peepie
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:20 PM
"rider"...and I, too, find cleaning stalls therapeutic...I generally pick mine out b-4 I leave even though we do have someone whose job it is to do it...the "EQ HORSE LEASE PRICE" thread on H/J forum speaks to the issue of those who "ride" but don't do any of the "grungy" work - such as - gasp - grooming and tacking up your own horse...I never liked that side of the circuit - wasn't jealous, just thought they weren't TRUE riders, like me...HA HA HA - I get D-I-R-T-Y! /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

***My horse bucked off your honor student!***

Everythingbutwings
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:49 PM
My jewelry (bgoosewood, it came from his years in the pawn business, the evidence of many failed relationships /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ) is usually covered in horse spit, sweat and wormer.

Whenever he gifted me with the latest "OH S**T, it's her birthday!" present, my usual response was "How many board feet of fence, bales of hay, etc, can I get for this one?"

I lost a marquise saphire surrounded by tiny diamonds under a new round bale in the snow one winter. He located it the following spring with a metal detector.

Sticky-up settings will RUIN your lovely riding gloves.

Leave the good stuff at home or string it on a chain and tuck it under your shirt. How sentimental will it be when you have no finger to show it off on? (Or, if you are lucky like me, you just plain lose the jewelry somewhere in the field?)

Friendship is Love without his wings
-Lord Byron

poltroon
Oct. 15, 2002, 02:56 PM
Mr. Poltroon bought me a horse instead of a ring. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Kirsten
Oct. 15, 2002, 04:27 PM
Wow, Kestrel... thanks so much for sharing your expertise. I took a look at that site for titanium rings... the ones with the platinum inlay are really cool! /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif I wonder whether a regular jewelry shop could polish them up if they got scratched, or whether you'd need to send them to NASA or somewhere? /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Commodore, I have to admit that I couldn't quite picture in my mind what 3 carats would look like all in one place. Saw a picture on DeBeers. And girl, all I can say is Yeeeeeehaaaaw! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Good points made about safety in the barn. Personally, I'm such a dimwit I'd likely lose any jewelry I took off before riding. I've found more anklets (which aren't comfortable under paddock boots) in jeans pockets months later than I care to admit. I agree though that wearing gloves is a great idea, both for personal safety and the safeguarding of your sparkly stuff. At least that's what I would do, given some sparkly stuff to protect. /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Fred
Oct. 15, 2002, 04:35 PM
MY husband is the pawnshop king! He has a GPD on his dashboard set for pawnshops. /infopop/emoticons/icon_eek.gif We even got our wedding rings in a pawnshop. Mine is 18k, very old, rounded, like a curtain ring - and I never take it off, except the time I broke my fingers and the MD in the ER threatened to cut if off (actually - he said "your choice, take the ring off,, or we'll have to cut your finger off when it becomes gangrenous". Now, I'm stubborn, but not crazy!. My anniversary ring - trinity setting, 2 diamonds, centre sapphire, never goes to the barn.
I always wear plain gold hoops or diamond studs and a gold Cartier ( 3 intertwined bands of gold) bracelet on my right wrist...
and ridiculous accidents DO happen. I have worn that bracelet for about 15 or so years.
Last year, coming back from a show, I ran my hand down one of Fred's back legs to wrap him. He picked his leg up quickly, thinking that is what I wanted, and SOMEHOW my bracelet got hooked on his stud. He put his leg down, (until that moment I didn't realize what had happened) - and of course when he put his foot down, my shoulder yanked down with it, with my hand bent in a horrible position under his foot. Thank God it was this horse!! He picked his foot up the second he felt my hand under it and held it suspended until I could get the band out from the crevice between the stud and the shoe. It really hurt! The bracelet is horribly bent out of shape - but did I learn from this and stop wearing it? Noooo. /infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif I just try to remember to shove it up my arm when I am working around the horses.

dogchushu
Oct. 15, 2002, 04:35 PM
If you haven't read Merry's piece in Horse Illustrated on engagement rings, and Thanksgiving, and barn work, you should check it out. It's side splitting funny!

As an aside, I get stuck with everyone's engagement rings as they go in to ride at shows. One of these days, I'm going to walk off with one of those large rocks!

For me, I avoid wearing jewelry to the barn or to ride. I don't mind ruining all my clothes at the barn. But the few nice jewelry pieces I have are not going to get bent, broken, twisted, or scratched. I usually take off jewelry and put it in the toll change pocket in my car.

barbaraG
Oct. 15, 2002, 04:41 PM
Ok, Everyone here knows by now that I don't ride, I only volunteer.

But the Great Warrior Volunteer does not wear Any jewerly when she is working an event.

Not even my band! I've had That 27 years, not going to risk it Now! /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif Nothing except a watch, on my left wrist, which I need. And it's a Cheap watch at that.

One less thing to get lost, misplaced, crushed or smashed!

And from hard experience, I've learned to wear Nothing, absolutely Nothing around my neck!! The only time I did was in Winnipeg, for the Pam-American Games. You Had to wear your cards and ribbons all the time, or the Mounties would nab you.

Hope this helps,
BarbaraG
GWV

baileygreyhorse
Oct. 15, 2002, 05:24 PM
Nope, you're not the only woman not wearing her wedding band to the barn. Mine became too small when I lost some weight last year and I can't stand the feeling of it dangling on my finger. And on the subject of engagement rings... Mine *always* goes to the barn. It's my 2500 Dodge Ram truck. Yep, instead of getting a diamond, I got a truck for my engagement. Sounds kind of redneck, but it's a really nice truck /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

flypony74
Oct. 15, 2002, 05:40 PM
My engagement ring has an 18k band with four platinum prongs, and after two years mucking stalls, throwing hay, fixing fence, etc, my rock is still tight and beautiful. The band has some tiny surface scratches, but almost any metal will scratch when subjected to an active person, and the jeweler can "refurbish" it...somehow they polish it and remove the scratches. My rock is about 1/2 carat (I wanted QUALITY, not QUANTITY...and I have tiny hands too) and is a simple Cathedral setting. It is somewhat raised, which took some getting used to, but now I'm used to it (I previously didn;t wear ANY jewelry). I really like it a lot.

My jeweler has a warranty with regards to losing your stone. As long as I have my prongs checked every six months (I have a card that I take and they fill out), if my rock falls out, they will replace the diamond for free. It is also covered under our homeowners insurance.

The main thing, don't worry about getting something HUGE, because it will just get in your way, not to mention being expensive. Go for something of high quality, and go with a size and setting that compliments your features. My best advice, go try on some rings. You'll feel goofy at first (I did!), but you'll have a better idea of what you like.

"Dream as if you'll live forever, and live as if you'll die tomorrow." -- James Dean

1-800-Dial-A-Distance
Oct. 15, 2002, 08:51 PM
Okay, I only have experience with my high school ring which is silver with an onyx stone, but it has held up unbelievably well. I was just thinking about that today...
1-800

"The tongue weighs less than an ounce but few have the strength to hold it."

"Fool me once, shame, shame on you, fool me twi, you, you can't fool me again."
~ Sad day for us Republicans

Kestrel
Oct. 16, 2002, 12:34 AM
Any full service jeweler should be able to polish either platinum or titanium jewelry. Onyx is a pretty durable stone so it is well-suited to class rings, etc.
How fragile a stone really is depends on the type and number of inclusions (flaws) in the stone. Little included crystals don't effect durability as much as fractures or cleavages. If you're going to mount the stone in a prong head, go with the highest quality stone (clarity) you can, and pick one with crystals over cleavages.
Even though I've been in the trade, my engagement ring stone is quite small. I hang all the big stuff around my neck or on my ears, and save it for occasions when "Power Jewelry" seems to be in order. I'm too afraid I'll lose my tennis bracelet to wear it riding, and spent hours searching for someone's bracelet in the schooling area at Bend this summer. (Their footing is now much more valuable). /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Therese
Oct. 16, 2002, 01:38 AM
Though I have no degree in gems, dad is a Geologist (with a minor in gemology), and my brother's hobby is jewelry making, so I've got a bit of knowledge.

My engagement ring is .37c, and is top quality (dad pulled out the loupe to check…) It's mounted in 10k gold band, with partial cathedral sides. The 6 prong setting is platinum. I replaced the gold prongs last summer when I noticed them starting to bend and catch lint. (HINT: If your prongs catch threads, they are loose.) I prefer the 6 prongs over 4. On a 6, I can loose a prong and the stone is still secure. With 4 if a prong is lost, so is the stone, basic physics there.

After 11 years of near constant wear, the band is showing wear on the back, but the front design has held up rather well. Part of the reason I like 10k vs 14k or 18k is the durability. My wedding band is 14k yellow with two white "ropes" inset into it. The ropes are starting to wear smooth in some spots.

I've gone back and forth wearing/not wearing my rings while riding. I do keep a good pair of "wire" cutters in my tool box at the stable. I've cut 2 rings off with them (one mine, one someone else's). Rather a bauble than a finger!

I now always wear gloves when riding, but rarely for anything else.

If I had to do it over again, I would have asked for a bezel setting, but I doubt I would have gotten it. Jack was insistent on a traditional white solitaire. I wanted a blue or champagne color... /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Despite that, we're still together after nearly 10 years of marriage.

****************************
"I love deadlines." "I love the swooooshing sound they make as they fly by!" -Douglas Adams

SaddleFitterVA
Oct. 16, 2002, 05:39 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by murdoch:
OK getting really off topic here...
But does anyone not wear their wedding ring - I mean I hardly ever wear it - it's always in my purse. This started when I started riding more than one horse... I found that I couldn't ride in it (gave me nasty caluses on my finger) and since I tend to go to work straight from the barn (or vise versa) I would always forget to put it back on.... Now it's a habit.
To tell the truth I've never really liked the feel of anything on my hands or wrists - I hardly ever wear a watch and avoid gloves unless it's really cold.
My engagement ring hasn't seen the light of day in years and my wedding ring surfaces occasionally for family events - my mother is horrified /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

So am I the only married woman in the country that doesn't wear a wedding ring? Anyone have any barn friendly marriage symbol ideas - it's not like I have any regrets being married or anything - my SO is a wonderful husband! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Maybe I should just get my finger tattooed (ouch /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif)<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Murdoch,

No, no...I haven't seen my wedding ring in a few years....I know it is in a box somewhere /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif, but I'm not sure where.

It bothered me when I rode, I am not really into jewelry. Then the diamond (a mere 1/4 carat) became loose in the tiffany setting, and I put that away....in a braces rubber band bag...with the rubber bands still there /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif. After leaving my wedding ring on the kitchen counter for weeks and weeks at a time, my husband started to put it on a breadbag as a "tie"....I took the hint and put it away.

Mel

JB
Oct. 16, 2002, 05:41 AM
My engagement ring is yellow gold with a platinum setting, and I had them make the setting low so that it doesn't stick up as high as "normal". My wedding band was custom made in a similar fashion, so it too has a yellow gold band with a platinum setting. Both diamonds are princess cut, so you'd think the corners would catch on things all the time, but honestly I have more problems tucking in a shirt than riding. Because the setting is low, most gloves don't squish the ring (or get a hole poked through them). If you read one of the latest Horse Journals where they talk about different gloves, there's actually a new kind ('course I don't remember what that is) that has a "ring pocket" - a slightly enlarged ring finger part of the glove - bout time! But that said, I just leave my rings at home on the weekends- why bother. But during the week, since I head to the barns after work, I keep them on so as not to risk losing them. The worst part is them getting dirty, but I clean them once or twice a month. And a couple of times a year I get them buffed back to shiny new at the jewelers which is when I also have them check the settings.

commodore
Oct. 16, 2002, 06:00 AM
Okay, not to be a b#@*ch, but flypony, I gotta respond: I didn't "go for" quantity over quality either. First of all, I didn't ask for a 3 carat stone, to be honest I had thought it would get in the way at the barn, during yoga, and on long runs. Second of all, and most importantly, mine is THE HIGHEST GRADE, color-wise, that they sell on the open market. It is considered "colorless." Although not perfect on the clarity scale, it is way up there as well. So I just had to respond to your implication that I was walking around with this big giant grey thing with 33 inclusions!

Heather
Oct. 16, 2002, 06:26 AM
I wear my wedding ring when going out to a social occaision, or to run errands, but I don't wear it to walk around the house, work (in the house) and I've never worn it in to the barn except for a quick, throw-the-boys-some-hay type errand. I don't want it dirty, lost, scratched, broken, nor do I want to have my finger surgically re-attached which happened to a former barn mate of mine when she fell off and the reins became entangled in her ring (she was wearing gloves, so the finger was savable, though completely pulled off.)

It just wouldn't occur to me to wear it to the barn or around the house or anything--my horses don't care I'm married, LOL.

lilblackhorse
Oct. 16, 2002, 07:02 AM
I don't take them off, my knuckles are too big, and I would lose them if they were off my fingers.

My engagement ring was a lovely 1 carat diamond solitare.....the prongs are thinning, as it is old, and it sticks up too high for my comfort. It lives in the safe deposit box.

Then I had a wedding ring made...channel set, but I should have complained that he set the baguette wrong. I was supposed to be recessed as well. Who knew you could break diamonds? Well, I did-I chipped the sides of the baguette--it now lives in the bank too. I have now officially given up on a nice sparkly ring...

I can't have anything that sticks up at all (I'm with etbw on this)....Mine fill with horse feed, dirt, you name it. Plus the glove issue is a problem. I have now settled on a silver band I bought in 1980 in a surf shop in australia, and another cheap silver band I found at a ferry port in Vancouver BC......On my right hand I actually wear my anniversary band, which is a platinum band from Ireland...it has lovely celtic knotwork and claddagh designs.

I am just too abusive for nice jewelery-I wear the same pair of earrings that I have for the last 20 years (I changed them for the wedding day)...my watches are Timexes bought on sale and strewn throughout the house. I have three I think, so I can always find one. They have cloth bands and seem to be waterproof and shockproof.


I looked at lovely channel set claddagh rings at a shop in Portland this weekend, but sighed and knew I would wreck those too. /infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif I have good taste, but am just too hard on my hands)

The gene pool could use a little chlorine.

hobson
Oct. 16, 2002, 07:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
So am I the only married woman in the country that doesn't wear a wedding ring? Anyone have any barn friendly marriage symbol ideas - it's not like I have any regrets being married or anything - my SO is a wonderful husband! /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Don't worry, you're not alone! Mr Hobson and I don't even have rings-- engagement, wedding or otherwise. I don't like wearing rings very much or often, and he does even less. We also didn't like the popular symbolism of the rings. Our "barn-friendly" solution was to buy a 2-year-old not-yet-to-the-track thoroughbred instead. Our 16.1 hand hairy chestnut icon of love.

peepie
Oct. 16, 2002, 07:14 AM
Too funny - a giant grey thing with inclusions! LOL
I didn't have any input in the choice of stone (including it's size) but mine, too, is of highest quality...not that I'd know the difference by looking! My ex-SO wanted a big stone, I think, to stroke HIS ego...

***My horse bucked off your honor student!***

*jazmataz*
Oct. 16, 2002, 07:55 AM
My endurance riding friend rides hundred mile races regularly, and has quite the ring. Not that it has a huge 3 carat diamond or anything, it has 4 smaller diamonds but they are set quite high, sort of assymetrically. I think her ring is neat because each diamond is set at the top of a "tube" of gold and her husband had it designed this way so that the diamonds are protected and don't catch. She never takes it off and believe me she gets her hands dirty at the barn, self-boarding her horses.

TrakHack
Oct. 16, 2002, 08:22 AM
Does Mr. Commodore have a brother? /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Rhodium is what is used to plate white gold when it yellows. I'm thinking I need to get my white gold ring that I used to wear all the time plated, as it started to irritate my finger about a month ago. It looks like the ring burned my skin.

I wear a watch, a silver box-link bracelet, the aforementioned ring, and pearl studs to the barn. With the exception on the watch and the ring's irritation, the pieces only come off for cleaning.

commodore
Oct. 16, 2002, 08:30 AM
Sister--

Yes, he does, but he is a total jerk and you don't want him! LOL! He also spends half his time telling Mr. Commodore what a waste of time and money horses are. Yuck!

TrakHack
Oct. 16, 2002, 08:35 AM
Sounds like Mr. Commodore got all the good genes in that family!!!

Hexel
Oct. 16, 2002, 09:47 AM
Murdoch

I don't wear my wedding band or engagement ring nor does my husband. I 'm not comfortable with a ring on for any length of time. If the commitment is not in the heart thennnnnnnnn.

I heard someone had a ''digit'' kicked off at Harrisburg I wonder if they were wearing a ring?

pinkhorse
Oct. 16, 2002, 06:46 PM
My engagement ring is an (almost) antique (1908) platinum with lots of filigree and lots (like 30 or so) of small diamonds made by my husband's grandfather for his wife as a "dinner ring". The whole thing is pretty flat - nothing sticks up - and, I'll never admit it if you told Mr. Pinkhorse, but my second or third thought after I first saw it was, "the perfect riding ring!!". It fits nicely in a glove. One jeweler absolutely frieked when a diamond fell out of it and he replaced it when I told him that I wore it every day. "It's your ENGAGEMENT RING??? ... It's like driving an antique car across the country - you just wouldn't do it!" I say, forget it! It was $50 to replace the diamond. I love this ring and only take it off for Tae Kwon Do. (It may be flat but it's certainly not something you'ld want to punch someone with!) Besides, taking rings off is way too risky for me (I'd be afraid I'd lose it and that would be a BAD THING).

Anyway, it's in perfect shape (after replacing the one stone) - as in it doesn't bend. On my other ring finger I wear a white gold old ring ('20's) - same deal as in filigree and flat - but it's bent out of shape some. Neither are scratched. My wedding band (also platinum) is also pretty pristene. I get them cleaned up every so often - maybe twice a year. (I've had them almost 7.)

Neither are scratched.

There are 2 women at my barn who have had their stick-up-y diamonds reset so that they're flatter.

Re: losing stuff - someone's mother lost her huge diamond somewhere in the indoor arena at Stoneleigh Burnham a few years ago. I must admit to catty thoughts about rich people with their big diamonds hanging around barns.... I imagine someone who made a purchase from Stewarts Nursery (who used to pick up the manure from the barn) getting a nice surprize with their pretty new dogwood tree....

Also, I lost a bracelet when seeding the pasture that I'd been coveting for years and my sister bought me for x-mas last year. About 2 weeks later I was setting up a dressage arena in the indoor when I looked down and saw this thing that looked like a worm. But, no! It was my bracelet - come home to me! I immediately took it to get a new kind of clasp.

Silly Mommy
Oct. 16, 2002, 07:38 PM
sits in the box with my "REAL" engagement ring. They come out to play once a year or so.

Hubby bought me a "plain" wedding band for our first anniversary - it's soooo worn! /infopop/emoticons/icon_razz.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

BREATHE!!! Oxygen is a good thing!

gwen
Oct. 16, 2002, 09:28 PM
The hubby got my ring in platinum set low with baguettes on the side of my solitaire and i wear it every day and have NEVER had a problem with it. My band is a channel set band in platinum as well always wear that too!!!!! They do get in the way when I ride and I get blisters but I always forget to take them off. /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

He knew to set it low because I am a clutz!!

**BARB***

Kestrel
Oct. 16, 2002, 11:33 PM
Therese, there is a little trick you can do if you still want that colored diamond. You can tint your stone a light shade of pink, blue, lavendar or whatever. Take a WASHABLE ink pen and color the girdle (the skinny edge of the stone between the top and the bottom halves). If the girdle is wide enough to take enough ink, it will lightly tint the entire stone when you look at it from above. It will wash off when you wash your hands and isn't practical for long term color. You can also use ball point pen ink which will wear off after awhile.

Sister, if your white gold ring is causing skin problems, the alloy probably contains nickel which causes rashes for many people. Rhodium plating will take care of the problem. For a quick fix you can paint clear nail polish inside the ring. It won't last a long time but it will help until you get the plating done.

June
Oct. 17, 2002, 04:22 AM
this thread caught my eye /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I always wore the pearls my Mom and Dad created year by year with the aid of a Manhattan jeweler (Bathmans I think) they did so for all their daughters. A couple of years ago the strand broke in a indoor arena and I can't tell you how sick I felt, searching for them in the footing! At the end of the day, when I had them restrung we were missing less than a half inch. Funny thing is, the first time they were strung the "line"? lasted 30 years; the second time after the indoor debacle, the "line" lasted less than a year but mercifully broke while sleeping! Haven't had them restrung yet...

TrakHack
Oct. 17, 2002, 12:14 PM
/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

EqChick
Oct. 17, 2002, 02:25 PM
What's a bezel setting? Just curious - read your part about lower settings and am interested.

I can't believe RolexH hasn't commented - she has a beautiful ring. I just remember her saying before she got engaged, "I want one REALLY tall. What happens if it catches on things? I'll say, 'Oh, excuse me - I'm SO sorry my HUGE ring got caught on your sweater.'" /infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

LOL What a goofball. /infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Now that there'a a potentail Mr. Chick I completely understand. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

So tell me again how the 40 Hour Standard was created? I think my boss was busy...

LuckyMe
Oct. 17, 2002, 05:12 PM
Great thread... especially since my boyfriend proposed last night, and I now have a sparkly new ring on my finger!!!

It is a gorgeous 3/4 carat princess cut solitaire set in white gold. Of course my first thought was "how is this gonna hold up around the horses??" and I've decided that I just can't risk losing or damaging it-- it'll stay at home when I go to the barn.

I do lead a very active lifestyle tho... luckily the boyfriend (now husband to be!) let the jeweler know and while it's not necessarily a cathedral setting, it looks a whole lot sturdier than a lot of solitaire settings I've seen.

Kirsten
Oct. 18, 2002, 06:04 AM
Congratulations, LuckyMe!
That's wonderful news. /infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

CluesGirl
Oct. 18, 2002, 06:13 AM
...a completely recessed 5-carat (YES - 5 CARAT) solitaire. It is absolutely gorgeous. She ponies and exercised racehorses, plus grooms and mucks and ....you get the picture!

She has a thick white gold band (wide and tall off her finger) with a square cut perfect massive diamond set down into it. You never have to worry about prongs being bent, etc. but it is hard to clean between the diamond and the band.

Funny thing (well, funny now after 8 years) ... her husband was my boyfriend through high school. Damn, that would've looked nice on my finger.

If you're a cowboy and you're dragging a guy behind your horse, I bet it would really make you mad if you looked back and the guy was reading a magazine.
--Jack Handy, Deep Thoughts

Kestrel
Oct. 18, 2002, 12:32 PM
EqChick, think of a round stone with metal surrounding it all the way around. It protects the thin edge of the stone called the bezel, where the top and bottom halves of the stone meet.