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ToTheNines
Apr. 4, 2012, 01:56 PM
I set up a course yesterday with a bending line that I thought would ride an easy five. For a hunter course. I walked it with a little bend, and I thought it was about 70 feet. Wrong... my trainer rode it today and it was off. If you are measuring for a five with a nice bend in it, how would you measure with a tape?

Lord Helpus
Apr. 4, 2012, 02:07 PM
You walk it off the way it is intended to be ridden. If it can be ridden both straight and with a bend, walk off both tracks. Then you can tell someone how it will ride depending on which way they ride it. (i.e. "it's a quiet 6 if you bow out or a regular 5 if you ride the 2 jumps in a line".

Measuring tapes are all well and good, but if you are going to set courses, you really ought to develop your 3' step.

Put 2 rails on the ground and measure off the distance between them so you know what the tape tells you. Then walk back and forth between them until you can get the same measurement using even steps.

Personally, I measure by saying:
0-2-3-4, (for take off and landing)
1-2-3-4,
2-2-3-4,
3-2-3-4 etc.

That way when you get to "6-2-3-4" you will automatically know it is a 6 stride line without subtracting one stride.

Herbie19
Apr. 4, 2012, 02:35 PM
Another thing to consider is making it longer, like seven strides. Short bending lines are actually harder to ride--much less forgiving. It's kind of like jumping the dreaded two stride at 3' on schooling day when the lines are set for 3'6"--close your eyes and pray! The sixes and sevens are much easier to make because you have more strides to make up for the extra distance.

I agree with Lord Helpus--I would practice walking along a 12' pole and then walk the path you intend to ride, but set it on the 12' (at least) and add if you need to.

Ravencrest_Camp
Apr. 4, 2012, 04:33 PM
I set up a course yesterday with a bending line that I thought would ride an easy five. For a hunter course. I walked it with a little bend, and I thought it was about 70 feet. Wrong... my trainer rode it today and it was off. If you are measuring for a five with a nice bend in it, how would you measure with a tape?

Here is how I measure bending lines when I course design.

Place the end of your tape measure in the centre, at the base of the first jump. Have someone stand on it so it does not move.

Go STRAIGHT out the distance you want your line to be (ie 70' in your example). Now slowly start walking in the direction you want the bend to be. Your tape measure should trace out the path of the line to be taken. The end of your tape will be where the centre of your second jump should be located.

You want to ensure that the path is a gentle bend with the "turning" stride roughly in the middle. If the line has too sharp a bend or it is too early or too late in the line, start again.

The tape measure will provide you with a nice visual of how the line should ride. It may take you a few tries, to start over go back to a straight line.

Hope this makes sense.

RioTex
Apr. 4, 2012, 05:01 PM
When I measure a bending line, we put someone at the bend to pull the tape in the shape we want the line to ride. A standard or what not would serve the same purpose. If you are going to walk it (and can walk a distance better than I), walk it the way you want it to ride.

AmmyByNature
Apr. 4, 2012, 05:44 PM
Get a measuring wheel, rather than a tape.

fordtraktor
Apr. 4, 2012, 05:52 PM
You walk it off the way it is intended to be ridden. If it can be ridden both straight and with a bend, walk off both tracks. Then you can tell someone how it will ride depending on which way they ride it. (i.e. "it's a quiet 6 if you bow out or a regular 5 if you ride the 2 jumps in a line".

Measuring tapes are all well and good, but if you are going to set courses, you really ought to develop your 3' step.

Put 2 rails on the ground and measure off the distance between them so you know what the tape tells you. Then walk back and forth between them until you can get the same measurement using even steps.

Personally, I measure by saying:
0-2-3-4, (for take off and landing)
1-2-3-4,
2-2-3-4,
3-2-3-4 etc.

That way when you get to "6-2-3-4" you will automatically know it is a 6 stride line without subtracting one stride.

Exactly this. Walk where you want your track to go. Practice walking until a 3' step is second nature and you don't have to wonder if you are off.

That said, when something walks a half stride in the jumpers I always walk it twice, just to make sure my coffee got to the correct vein.

ToTheNines
Apr. 4, 2012, 06:04 PM
Thanks everyone. In all my years this is the first time I have set a bending line at home! I will make RioTex show me at her show... I think my problem when walking it was how much bend to put in it! Seems like there should be a rule of thumb that if it measures xx feet center to center in a straight line with a tape, it will then be y strides with a nice bend.

AmmyByNature
Apr. 4, 2012, 06:09 PM
When I was a kid I drew chalk marks on the barn aisle and practiced walking 3' steps the whole time I was at the barn...

Herbie19
Apr. 4, 2012, 07:01 PM
Get a measuring wheel, rather than a tape.

This is the best and easiest idea so far!

Canterbury
Apr. 4, 2012, 08:01 PM
It also depends on the size of ring that you have. A 70' line in my indoor rides different then a 70' line in my outdoor which will ride different then in my field.

asb_own_me
Apr. 5, 2012, 12:20 PM
You walk it off the way it is intended to be ridden. If it can be ridden both straight and with a bend, walk off both tracks. Then you can tell someone how it will ride depending on which way they ride it. (i.e. "it's a quiet 6 if you bow out or a regular 5 if you ride the 2 jumps in a line".

Measuring tapes are all well and good, but if you are going to set courses, you really ought to develop your 3' step.

Put 2 rails on the ground and measure off the distance between them so you know what the tape tells you. Then walk back and forth between them until you can get the same measurement using even steps.

Personally, I measure by saying:
0-2-3-4, (for take off and landing)
1-2-3-4,
2-2-3-4,
3-2-3-4 etc.

That way when you get to "6-2-3-4" you will automatically know it is a 6 stride line without subtracting one stride.

This is one of the most helpful posts I've ever come across on COTH. I wish there were a way for me to "flag" it or bookmark it for my own reference. I think I'll PM it to myself. Thanks, Lord Helpus!!!