PDA

View Full Version : Puppy regressing on housebreaking



Roxyllsk
Apr. 1, 2012, 09:54 AM
I have a 10 month old sheltie pup (male). He got fixed about 1 1/2 months ago. He's been pretty reliably housebroken for about 2 months now. The only accident he had was right after he got fixed - his tummy was upset I think for the meds and he couldn't wait, so that one didn't count in my book.

Last week I went away on vacation, and some friends of mine dog sit for me. My older dog is completely comfortable in their house - it is truely his 2nd home, and he has stayed with them many times when I've been away. The pup has been there quite a bit, almost every weekend, because I go over there all the time for dinner and take them with me. He is pretty comfy with them as well.

So - he was great about the housebreaking at first, but after Day 2 started pooping in the house. They'd take him out, then he'd come inside and go in the house right after. He never peed, just pooped.

Any suggestions / explainations ? He is a happy little guy, not a worry-er. I'm thinking that he was having so much fun outside playing that he forgot what he was out there for. I walk him on a leash because I live in a townhouse, but they have a farm so can let him off the leash supervised. They also tried taking him out only on the leash, but that didn't seem to help.

I am going away again next month for a few days for work and I want to try and get this 'fixed' before that.

Emryss
Apr. 1, 2012, 10:26 AM
My best explanation (without being there to watch) is to guess that dogs are pretty specific animals in that they can be housebroken HERE (your house) but not necessarily THERE (your friend's house.) Shelties, being pretty smart, can learn a bad habit as fast as they can a good one. Your dog had a moment of inattention and thought, "Oh, yeah, I had to potty." Mistake made, and he got careless because he could.

If I were you, I would have your friends "re-housebreak" your little pup while he is watched there. Bring a crate, and if he doesn't go while outside, he gets popped in the box, just as if he didn't know the rules. He'll catch on very quickly that the rules are the same in your friend's house as they are in your own. If he's anything like any other Sheltie I've known, he'll not make that mistake once reminded of the error of his ways.

GraceLikeRain
Apr. 1, 2012, 12:23 PM
I would enforce the idea that going outside means doing business before play. If he doesn't poop then he goes back in the crate. It might mean that he has a boring day or two but it is much better to address this now with consistent rules than try to fix it down the road.

BuddyRoo
Apr. 1, 2012, 02:01 PM
What's your normal routine?

For me, potty training involves a pretty strict routine and even after they're house trained, the routine is still necessary.

So for example, in our house, pup would be crated overnight. First thing in the morning, pup comes out of crate, on leash outside. No goofiness, business. Verbal reward for pee. Then pup gets fed. 15 min after feeding or so, pup is back outside (on a leash again) to the poop area of the yard where we walk til we poop, then more praise. Then back in the crate while we're at work. Repeat the process in the evening when we get home and right before bed.

But even with the kids, if they weren't really paying attention or holding to the schedule, we'd have accidents in the house. I had a LOT more accidents in the house with pup #2 and the 4 person family than with pup #1 when it was just me. (pup #1 only ever had one accident in the house and it was because I fell asleep on the couch!)

If I had to guess about your scenario, I'd guess that pup is so distracted with the joys of a big farm and all the stimulation that he's forgetting to do his business and/or he's a little off his schedule. By the time he's back inside he REALLY has to go and either doesn't know to give an "I gotta go!" signal or it's not something your friends are seeing being that they're used to other dogs and their signals.

Roxyllsk
Apr. 1, 2012, 06:02 PM
i wrote out his potty schedule for them - and the times he usually goes. I suspect that they weren't sticking with it, or weren't giving him enough time outside. He will pee immediately outside, but sometimes he needs a few minutes to poop.

I also think they weren't crating him too much. He IS crate trained, and he does spend some time in his crate but not as much as when I first got him, since he's 'proven' himself reliable about the potty training. He will also get into stuff he shouldn't and did chew up a few things at my friend's house (shoelaces and a pillow). My friend said they started crating him more as the week went on and he seemed more reliable about it.

He is a sweet, happy, sensitive little guy and I've only used positive reinforcement for housebreaking. He goes outside, he gets a snack. Pretty simple. It's worked for me.

naturalequus
Apr. 2, 2012, 10:20 AM
My best explanation (without being there to watch) is to guess that dogs are pretty specific animals in that they can be housebroken HERE (your house) but not necessarily THERE (your friend's house.) Shelties, being pretty smart, can learn a bad habit as fast as they can a good one. Your dog had a moment of inattention and thought, "Oh, yeah, I had to potty." Mistake made, and he got careless because he could.

If I were you, I would have your friends "re-housebreak" your little pup while he is watched there. Bring a crate, and if he doesn't go while outside, he gets popped in the box, just as if he didn't know the rules. He'll catch on very quickly that the rules are the same in your friend's house as they are in your own. If he's anything like any other Sheltie I've known, he'll not make that mistake once reminded of the error of his ways.

:yes: Dogs do not automatically generalize, their brains are wired different from ours.

They need to stick to the schedule and crating routine you do with him, plain and simple, until he learns the rules at your home also apply there. With experience where the rules are consistently the same in other places he can learn to generalize about potty training.