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View Full Version : Who feeds Diatomaceous earth?



Nootka
Mar. 27, 2012, 12:42 PM
I have just read that you can feed the food grade for a dewormer and for joint pain for your Dog? Does anyone?

CODEX Food Grade fresh water DIATOMACEOUS EARTH?

MaybeMorgan
Mar. 27, 2012, 03:40 PM
I'm all for natural remedies but feeding a somehat jagged-textured clay?

trilogy
Mar. 27, 2012, 03:48 PM
I had my horses on it and within 2 weeks 7 of 10 horses had major skin reaction. Don't know why but it has not happened since and I'm not willing to risk it again.

ladybugred
Mar. 27, 2012, 04:15 PM
It's not clay, DE is the fossilized bodies of diatoms, little freshwater critters. It's very high in silica, which is probably what caused the skin reaction. I have used it on fleas, worked tolerably well, but not great, we did have a heck of a problem tho.

Yoy should look around at prices, I found they really varied.

LBR

I can tell you that their water consumption will increase. I've taken it myself, its supposed to be good for your hair, it made me VERY thirsty!

Nes
Mar. 27, 2012, 05:22 PM
+1 ladybugred

Be careful about breathing it in while you work with it.

I found it works moderately well for fleas and use it more to control/prevent instead of treat.

Works great on chickens, don't use it often on my big animals.

Make sure you get food grade 100% DE or it can have some really nasty stuff in it.

ladybugred
Mar. 27, 2012, 06:36 PM
Yes, I forgot to mention that!!!!!! I had not been that careful about breathing it, and ended up with respritory infection type symptoms, shortness of breath,and lots off coughing.

Also it MUST be food grade, also known as "fossil shell flour", the other stuff is treated and poisonous.

LBR

MaybeMorgan
Mar. 27, 2012, 08:01 PM
it is classified as a clay, yes it's a fossil. Please see http://www.organic-creations.com/servlet/the-Clays-cln-Diatomaceous-Earth/Categories

draftdriver
Mar. 28, 2012, 11:06 AM
Diatomaceous earth for deworming? :rolleyes: Don't bother. Save your money, read the scientific literature, and get a product which is proven to work.

Nootka
Mar. 28, 2012, 04:29 PM
Yea I thought it sounded "interesting":lol:

HydroPHILE
Mar. 28, 2012, 04:36 PM
Yay - something I can talk about. We use food-grade diatomaceous earth here at my company. I can tell you...use food-grade for anything around the home/your animals. There are several grades out there including insecticidal and pool quality.

As far as feeding to remove worms - no idea. We use DE (food-grade) around our farm to cut down on insects and fleas around the dogs. It did not have a negative effect on our dogs' coats or skin, but I imagine perhaps a more sensitive animal may have issues?

As someone else said, diatomaceous earth is siliceous fossil meal: pulverised diatoms (remember those cool things you learned about in biology with the teeny tiny skeletons that looked like snowflakes under a microscope? Yeah...those.)

While DE isn't DANGEROUS, it is considered a respiratory irritant and can be a pain in the ass if inhaled. Talc powder and flour are also considered irritants though not nearly as harmful as DE. When using or handling DE, your best bet is to wear a mask and gloves (goggles if necessary,) and for topical application, we mix our DE with water so that the water harnesses the DE and prevents it from flying about as it does in powder form.

Be careful with external/around the home use as it kills bugs, but it kills bad and good bugs. It's non discriminating.

horsefaerie
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:28 AM
I have used it for decades for deworming, treating flea infestations etc.

Works great, is inexpensive and works on fleas, ants and garden pests and worms. As someone said above, food grade is necessary, it is an irritant like any other powdered substance.

Try it. Many dewormers have lost their efficacy due to overuse.

nightsong
Mar. 29, 2012, 07:12 AM
Its efficacy is due to its glass-like jagged edges, which cut and tear whatever it comes in contact with. Dangerous stuff.

trubandloki
Mar. 29, 2012, 08:44 AM
Its efficacy is due to its glass-like jagged edges, which cut and tear whatever it comes in contact with. Dangerous stuff.

I know people who use it as a deworming product for their horses. What you posted is my thoughts, and all I can think of when they talk about feeding it.

HydroPHILE
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:03 PM
That is absolutely correct. It has jagged edges that make tiny slits in insects' exoskeletons and basically dehydrates them. I would not feed it to an animal or a human, but obviously some do.

trubandloki
Mar. 29, 2012, 12:20 PM
Question on it; does it digest or does it sit in their system like sand does?

Grataan
Mar. 29, 2012, 02:52 PM
I have used it for decades for deworming, treating flea infestations etc.

Works great, is inexpensive and works on fleas, ants and garden pests and worms. As someone said above, food grade is necessary, it is an irritant like any other powdered substance.

Try it. Many dewormers have lost their efficacy due to overuse.


It does not "work on worms" :rolleyes:

Calhoun
Mar. 29, 2012, 03:26 PM
The last 2 years our barn has fed N.O.M.S. and uses predator fly control. These products used together has resulted in a huge reduction in flies (all types). When we go to shows, all of us and the horses complain about the flies. I am curious to see what happens this summer with the very mild winter we had this year.

horsefaerie
Mar. 30, 2012, 02:25 PM
Gosh Grataan, I guess I better tell my vets that their fecals are wrong!

All of these years! Who knew!!

trubandloki
Mar. 30, 2012, 03:16 PM
Gosh Grataan, I guess I better tell my vets that their fecals are wrong!

All of these years! Who knew!!

How does a low fecal prove anything other than your horse has a low worm load?

Some horses naturally are low shedders. Your horse(s) with good fecals could be in that group.

I have two horses who time and time again show as zero on their fecals, I have never used diatomaceous earth and they only get dewormer product 2x per year. (And for the record, they live with a high shedder.)


I am still waiting for one of the people who knows about this stuff to answer my question about it digesting. It just seems to me that it would be something that acts like ingested sand.

nasalberry
Mar. 31, 2012, 09:08 AM
In small pastures, I have walked around and sprinkled directly on the manure piles: The flies light on it, and - Bingo! Less fly population.
Have no idea how that would effect manure/compost piles.

trubandloki
Mar. 31, 2012, 12:08 PM
Gosh Grataan, I guess I better tell my vets that their fecals are wrong!

All of these years! Who knew!!

You might find This (http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=6950272) interesting.

BeeHoney
Mar. 31, 2012, 12:36 PM
It never ceases to amaze me how willing people are to spend money on weird substances to feed their animals that have no proven benefit.

ksojerio
Apr. 3, 2012, 04:12 PM
Gosh Grataan, I guess I better tell my vets that their fecals are wrong!

All of these years! Who knew!!

I've used it for years on my horses and my fecals all come back clean. My vet has no problem with me using it.

trubandloki
Apr. 3, 2012, 04:52 PM
I've used it for years on my horses and my fecals all come back clean. My vet has no problem with me using it.

I have never used it and all my fecals come back clean too.

:winkgrin:

SandraD
Apr. 5, 2012, 09:18 AM
I'm wanting to start using it in our turnout areas in conjunction with our predators. Especially around the round bale holders (where they poop & pee) to cut down on flies. I'm not interested in feeding it.

Has anyone used it as "fly bait" per se?

trubandloki
Apr. 5, 2012, 09:24 AM
It might be worth contacting your predator source and asking them if using it will affect your predator population.

HydroPHILE
Apr. 5, 2012, 03:17 PM
You can use DE to control your fly population. It tends to kill flies that land in the area (when treated regularly,) and flies won't generally lay eggs there either.

HOWEVER, remember that DE cuts down on good bugs, too. If you're using fly predators, I would NOT recommend it. DE will kill fly predators.

ETA: If you do use food-grade DE, don't pay top dollar through Amazon.com, etc. You can call up most chemical supply companies and ask them for "food-grade diatomaceous earth / filter powder." I think our company pays $0.50/lbs for ours.

wendybird
Apr. 8, 2012, 05:32 AM
If applied to ther soil, it will gradually disintegrate and it's constituent parts will be available for absorption by the vegetation. I can't think that it would offer anything beneficial to the horse's absorption; I guess it could 'scrape' the gut linings, but I would worry that the sharp edges might cause tiny lesions in the gut, thus enabling infections -

D-RING
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:16 AM
I take it myself. In a cleanse that I do annually. I had a problem with parasite.. Too much sushi possibly. It does make you thirsty! I will say it did clear up the parisites. Now I take it yearly( Paratrex)

draftdriver
Apr. 8, 2012, 11:34 AM
People, can't you read science? This from an article from thehorse.com http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites1004.pdf

“Alternative” Dewormers

Various compounds, including chewing
tobacco and garlic, have been purported to
have activity against intestinal parasites of
horses. In recent years, the most common
subject of such claims has been a naturally
occurring substance known as diatomaceous
earth (DE). Diatomaceous earth is a
whitish powder made up primarily of the
exoskeletons of fossilized algae (diatoms).
It’s almost pure silicon dioxide, the same
chemical formula as quartz, and its microscopic
sharp edges make it useful as a filtering
agent and an abrasive for industrial
uses.

Theoretically, the abrasive nature of DE
particles damages the integument (outer
skin layer) of nematodes as they pass
through a horse’s gastrointestinal tract.
Unfortunately, DE’s reputation does not
bear up under scrutiny. It has been the
subject of only limited formal evaluation
in sheep and horses (American Association
of Veterinary Parasitology Proceedings),
but those researchers failed to detect any
anthelmintic effect associated with feeding
DE, as measured by fecal egg count reduction
in treated horses compared to untreated
control animals.

One must also wonder about the effect of
such an abrasive silica product on the
horse’s intestinal tract!

For proponents of DE, please post links to scientific papers showing the efficacy of the material.

ljcfoh
Apr. 8, 2012, 09:05 PM
I'm wanting to start using it in our turnout areas in conjunction with our predators. Especially around the round bale holders (where they poop & pee) to cut down on flies. I'm not interested in feeding it.

Has anyone used it as "fly bait" per se?

I am pretty sure you are going to kill off your fly predators. If you still have fly problems you should increase the number of predators. For example I get a about twice as many as it might state I need for the number of animals here because I have shade and some woods area which can increase the fly population...

But I do know you'll have trouble if you use things to kill the flys cause you'll kill your good bugs too.